Alignment with National Content Curriculum Standards


Investigation 1-5
A Mysterious Ailment

Synopsis:  Students read a 1981 column about a mysterious ailment (AIDS, before it was called AIDS and before HIV was identified) and identify the descriptive epidemiological clues that led to the formulation of early causal hypotheses.  To further understand the value of descriptive epidemiology, students predict what the descriptive epidemiology of this mysterious ailment would be if it were caused by mosquito bites, sitting on toilet seats, donating blood, or shaking hands.  Students realize that descriptive epidemiology is sometimes useful in determining that certain causal hypotheses do not make sense.

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Science Health Mathematics Language Arts Social Studies Technology


SCIENCE
 
Unifying Concepts and Processes K-12

Conceptual and procedural schemes unify science disciplines and provide students with powerful ideas to help them understand the natural world. Because of the underlying principles embodied in this standard, the understandings and abilities described here are repeated in the other content standards.

 
As a result of activities in grades K - 12, all students should develop:
1: Science as Inquiry

Inquiry requires that students combine processes and scientific knowledge as they use scientific reasoning and critical thinking to develop their understanding of science. Engaging students in inquiry helps students develop an understanding of scientific concepts, an appreciation of "how we know" what we know in science, an understanding of the nature of science, the skills necessary to become independent inquirers about the natural world, and the dispositions to use the skills, abilities, and attitudes associated with science.

 
6: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives

An important purpose of science education is to give students a means to understand and act on personal and social issues. The science in personal and social perspectives standards help students develop decision-making skills.

 
7: History and Nature of Science

In learning science, students need to understand that science reflects its history and is an ongoing, changing enterprise. The standards for the history and nature of science recommend the use of history in school science programs to clarify different aspects of scientific inquiry, the human aspects of science, and the role that science has played in the development of various cultures.


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HEALTH
 
By the end of Grade 8, students will:
4: Influences on Health

Students will analyze the influence of culture, media, technology, and other factors on health.


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MATHEMATICS

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LANGUAGE ARTS
 
Grades K - 12
4: Communication Skills

Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

 
5: Communication Strategies

Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

 
6: Applying Knowledge

Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

 
7: Evaluating Data

Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

 
11: Participating in Society

Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

 
12: Applying Language Skills

Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


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SOCIAL STUDIES

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TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY

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