Geography Major, Environmental Studies Concentration (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2011 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2011 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree (for further information, see General Education Requirements).

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION

Complete 60 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. GEOGRAPHY MAJOR COURSES

    Complete the following 7 courses:

    MATH 109 Statistics 3
  2. CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 8 requirement(s):

    1. Complete 1 course from the following:

      PSYC 109 The Human Environment 3
    2. Complete .

    3. Complete 1 course from the following:

      ECON 300 World Resources and Industries 3
    4. Complete .

    5. Complete 1 course from the following:

    6. Complete 1 requirement from the following:

      1. Complete .

      2. Complete .

    7. Complete 1 requirement from the following:

      1. Complete the following 2 courses:

        BIOL 113 Principles of Biology II 4
        BIOL 213 Introduction to Ecology 4
      2. Complete the following 2 courses:

        CHEM 120 General Chemistry I 4
        CHEM 121 General Chemistry II 4
    8. Complete 1 requirement from the following:

      1. Complete the following 2 courses:

        LAWS 200 Introduction to Law 3
        LAWS 302 Legal Research 3
      2. Complete the following 2 courses:

        ECON 101 Principles of Economics: Macro 3
        ECON 102 Principles of Economics: Micro 3
  3. MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete 6 semester hours from the following:

    1.  

    2. One of the following may be used:

      HIST 312 Historical Geography of the United States 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL113: Principles of Biology II

Principles of Biology II will provide an introductory level study of biodiversity and the origins of life, phylogenetic relationships among organisms, genetics, developmental biology, reproduction, the biology of populations and communities, and ecosystem processes. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Interdisciplinary Core, Scientific Issues. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.) 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or a satisfactory score on the Math department's precalculus readiness test.

BIOL213: Introduction to Ecology

Semester-long field oriented course designed as an introduction to the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on identifying and characterizing the variety of habitats in New Jersey through field observations, group and individual projects and specimen collection. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.) 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 113 (or BIOL 120 or BIOL 132 if completed prior to Fall 2002).

CHEM120: General Chemistry I

Introductory lecture and laboratory course for science majors, prerequisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Introduction to atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory stresses techniques and data treatment and their use in examining chemical systems. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.) 4 sh.

Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry.

CHEM121: General Chemistry II

Introductory lecture and laboratory course for science majors, prerequisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Introduction to thermochemistry, kinetics; general acid base, precipitation, redox equilibria, electrochemistry and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory stresses techniques and data treatment and their use in examining chemical systems. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.) 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or better.

ECON101: Principles of Economics: Macro

A study of the American economy, analytically and institutionally; the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long term growth. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

ECON102: Principles of Economics: Micro

Organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. Resource allocation, price determination and behavior of the firm in the determination of quantity of output and the hiring of factors of production. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

ECON300: World Resources and Industries

Distribution, flow and consumption of mineral resources. Political, economic and social implications of the geography of resources. Basic studies in industrial location, agricultural land use, problems of economic development and population-resource ratios. Examines world trend in production controls and market allocations. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, EUGS300. Starting Summer 2012: Distribution, flow and consumption of mineral resources. Political, economic and social implications of the geography of resources. Basic studies in industrial location, agricultural land use, problems of economic development and population-resource ratios. Examines world trend in production controls and market allocations. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or EUGS 101 or EUGS 102. Major within School of Business.

HIST312: Historical Geography of the United States

The slow pace of settlement of the eastern seaboard and the development of distinctive culture hearths prior to 1800; the rapid settlement and diffusion of culture traits in the area beyond the Appalachians since 1809. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, EUGS 312. Starting Summer 2012: The slow pace of settlement of the eastern seaboard and the development of distinctive culture hearths prior to 1800; the rapid settlement and diffusion of culture traits in the area beyond the Appalachians since 1809. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

LAWS200: Introduction to Law

An introduction to the meaning and functions of law, the powers and the jurisdiction of the courts. An exploration of traditional and evolving areas of law. A survey of the different professions and career options within the legal field. An assessment of the roles and importance of law in the lives of students and the public. Students may take LAWS 200 or JURI 210 but not both courses. Students in the Jurisprudence major should take JURI 210. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LAWS302: Legal Research

Study of principles and methods of research as applied to law and government. Exploration of the sources of law including case law, legislative process and intent, statutory law and public administration. Contrastive applications of law library research and computer-assisted legal research. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

MATH109: Statistics

Introduction to the use of statistics in the real world. Topics include: analysis and presentation of data, variability and uncertainty in data, techniques of statistical inference and decision-making. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Mathematics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 051 or MATH 061 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT). Not for majors in Mathematics (MATH), Mathematics with Applied Math concentration (MAAM) or Mathematics-Teacher Education (MTED).

PSYC109: The Human Environment

An interdisciplinary course which explains the human impact, as social groups and individuals, on the natural environment. It explores the relationships and interconnectedness between natural processes and social, economic, cultural, technological, and political culture. Critical environmental issues are discussed. Crosslisted with Earth and Environmental Studies, ENVR 109. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Starting Summer 2012: An interdisciplinary course which explains the human impact, as social groups and individuals, on the natural environment. It explores the relationships and interconnectedness between natural processes and social, economic, cultural, technological, and political culture. Critical environmental issues are discussed. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.