Linguistics Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate (Combined B.A./M.A.T. with Teacher Certification in English as a Second Language (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities) - 2011 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2011 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

The Dual Degree Dual Certification program is a 5-year program that leads to teacher certification in English as a Second Language (grades P-12), teacher certification in Teacher of Students with Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one-year master’s portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education Program website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree (for further information, see General Education Requirements).


LINGUISTICS MAJOR

Complete 36 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete the following 7 courses:

      LNGN 210 Introduction to General Linguistics 3
      LNGN 220 Structure of American English 3
      LNGN 230 Language in Society 3
      LNGN 245 Language and Culture 3
      LNGN 300 Syntax 3
      LNGN 331 Phonetics 3
      LNGN 332 Phonology 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      LNGN 301 Semantics 3
      LNGN 302 Pragmatics 3
  2. MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES

    Complete 4 courses from the following:

    1. (LNGN 450, 478, and 479 may also be used with written department approval)

      LNGN 110 Language of Food 3
      LNGN 250 Language of Propaganda 3
      LNGN 260 Dialectology 3
      LNGN 280 Bilingualism 3
      LNGN 284 History of the English Language 3
      LNGN 325 Principles of Second Language Learning 3
      LNGN 384 The Grammars of English 3
      LNGN 420 Language and the Mind 3
      LNGN 480 Linguistics in Education and Society 3
      PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics 3
    2. From the following, the course not used in Major Requirements Group B, may be used as an elective:.

      LNGN 301 Semantics 3
      LNGN 302 Pragmatics 3

Course Descriptions:

LNGN110: Language of Food

This course explores the intersection of language and food (or speaking and eating) by investigating what we can learn about language by studying "the language of food." The course introduces fundamental aspects of language and linguistics through an exploration of topics related to food: food terms, food metaphors, the language and structure of menus and recipes, the language of wine, the language of food advertising and labeling, and language practices related to food and eating (e.g., saying grace, making toasts, sharing recipes, etc.). The course examines how people talk about food, how people use food to talk about themselves and about others, and how "food talk" conveys a range of social and cultural meanings. Cognitive aspects of the language of food and taste as well as cross-linguistic similarities and differences will be considered. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN210: Introduction to General Linguistics

The nature and structure of language; the basic techniques for analyzing linguistic structures; phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic structure of languages, language and dialects; language change; the comparative method in linguistics; human and animal communication; differences between first and second language learning. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN220: Structure of American English

The phonology, morphology, syntax of American English, geographical and social dialects; traditional, structural and transformational approaches to grammar. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN230: Language in Society

Correlations between language varieties, their functions in particular settings, and the characteristics of their speakers. Black English. The role of second languages within a society: Pidgin, Creole, Lingua Franca, Diglossia, etc. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN245: Language and Culture

A study of language in its cultural context. Relationship of linguistic to non-linguistic variables: ethnosemantics, linguistic relativity principle, componential analysis. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN250: Language of Propaganda

This course is a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the use of language to manipulate and influence opinions via advertising, innuendo, jargon, emotive language, etc. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN260: Dialectology

Principles of dialect study; application to American dialects. The origin and development of American dialects in historical, literary, regional, social and urban perspectives. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN280: Bilingualism

Compound and coordinate bilingualism; attitudes, motivation, etc.; functions of languages in multilingual settings; problems of newly-independent, multilingual nations in establishing national and standardized languages; analysis of bilingual speech; problems of educating minority groups in this country whose native language is not English. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN284: History of the English Language

English from its Indo-European origins up to and including the eighteenth-century grammarians. The Germanic strains; old, middle and modern English. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN300: Syntax

The study of sentence structure and the theories designed to describe it. Emphasis on structural grammar, the development of Generative Grammar and contemporary theoretical methods for describing sentence structure. Data will be taken from a number of different languages. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Linguistics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval.

LNGN301: Semantics

The systematic and objective study of meaning in language. Topics include: referential meaning, semantic fields, componential analysis, synonymy, polysemy, hyponymy, and sequential meaning. Data will be taken from a number of different languages. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300.

LNGN302: Pragmatics

The study of pragmatics, an area of linguistics that examines language as situated speech and studies how context affects the interpretation of meaning. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300.

LNGN325: Principles of Second Language Learning

Theories of second language acquisition; error analysis; individual learner differences; the roles of input, interaction, and formal instruction in language acquisition. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210.

LNGN331: Phonetics

A comprehensive introduction to phonetics, the study of the production of speech sounds and their acoustic characteristics. Students will learn to identify, classify, and transcribe sounds from a variety of languages. While intended primarily for Linguistics majors, this course will also be of interest to prospective language teachers and to majors in Speech, in Psychology, and in Communication Sciences and Disorders. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval (for Cognitive Science majors).

LNGN332: Phonology

Phonology studies how languages make use of a particular subset of all the possible speech sounds in a systematic way to produce meaningful units like words and sentences. The objectives of this course will be to give students experience in analyzing phonological data from a wide variety of languages and to survey current theories of phonology. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 331 or departmental approval.

LNGN384: The Grammars of English

A critical overview of traditional, structural, and transformational-generative approaches to the problems of analyzing the grammar of the English language; practical applications for teaching English and for understanding grammatical principles as a means of more effective writing and literary analysis. Cross listed with English, ENGM 384. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or LNGN 210.

LNGN420: Language and the Mind

An introduction to the major theoretical and methodological principles of Noam Chomsky's theory of Universal Grammar and what they tell us about structure of the human mind. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or PSYC 290.

LNGN480: Linguistics in Education and Society

The course is intended to acquaint students involved in language education of any sort with the applications and implications of linguistics for education and for understanding the functioning of language in society. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301.