Teaching English as a Second Language, Instructional Certification: Teacher Certification in English as a Second Language (Preschool-Grade 12) - Graduate - 2011 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2011 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Students with a baccalaureate degree who are interested in teaching may pursue the Post-baccalaureate program for initial teacher certification.

Additional undergraduate coursework in the certification content area may be required to meet State and University certification standards.

Upon successful completion of the program the student will be recommended to the State of New Jersey for initial teacher certification (Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced Standing, or CEAS). The CEAS authorizes the holder to teach in New Jersey public schools and expedites the ability to become certified in most other states. The CEAS never expires.

In New Jersey, candidates who have completed an initial teaching certification program must successfully complete one year of teaching in order to be eligible to receive a permanent Standard Certificate.


TEACHING ENGLISH SECOND LANGUAGE

Complete either the initial or the additional certification program.

  1. INITIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

    Complete 3 requirement(s):

    1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

      1. SPEECH

        Complete the following 1 course: (May be completed by examination)

        SPCM 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement 3
      2. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

        See the Center of Pedagogy.

      3. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

        Complete 1 course from:

        ELRS 580 Learning Theories 3
        PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology 3
    2. TEACHING FIELD REQUIREMENTS

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. REQUIRED COURSES

        1. Complete the following 7 requirement(s):

          1. Complete 1 course from the following list

            APLN 500 Language and Linguistics 3
            LNGN 210 Introduction to General Linguistics 3
          2. Complete 1 course from the following list

            APLN 524 Advanced Structure of American English 3
            LNGN 220 Structure of American English 3
          3. Complete 1 course from the following list

            APLN 502 Sociolinguistics 3
            LNGN 230 Language in Society 3
          4. Complete 1 course from the following list

            APLN 532 Language and Culture in Minority Education 3
            LNGN 245 Language and Culture 3
          5. Complete 1 course from the following list

            APLN 504 Syntax 3
            LNGN 300 Syntax 3
          6. Complete 2 courses from the following list

            APLN 506 Phonetics and Phonology 3
            LNGN 331 Phonetics 3
            LNGN 332 Phonology 3
          7. Complete 1 course from the following list

            APLN 505 Semantics and Pragmatics 3
            LNGN 301 Semantics 3
            LNGN 302 Pragmatics 3
        2. Complete 4 courses for 12 semester hours from the following list.

          APLN 510 Discourse Analysis 3
          APLN 520 Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition 3
          LNGN 260 Dialectology 3
          LNGN 280 Bilingualism 3
          LNGN 284 History of the English Language 3
          LNGN 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science 3
          LNGN 302 Pragmatics 3
          LNGN 304 Principles of Discourse Analysis 3
          LNGN 325 Principles of Second Language Learning 3
          LNGN 384 The Grammars of English 3
          LNGN 420 Language and the Mind 3
          LNGN 450 Selected Topics in Linguistics 3
          LNGN 478 Independent Study 3
          LNGN 479 Independent Study 3
          LNGN 480 Linguistics in Education and Society 3
          PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics 3
      2. TEACHING METHODS

        Complete 1 course from the following list

        APLN 525 Methodology of Teaching ESL 3
        LNGN 403 Methods and Material of TESL 3
    3. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      1. INTRODUCTORY SEQUENCE

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling 3
          EDFD 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling 3
        2. Complete for 1 semester hours.

          CURR 518 Technology Integration in the Classroom 1
      2. DIVERSITY AND INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE

        Complete 5 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 509 Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning 3
          EDFD 509 Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours from the following list

          CURR 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners 1
          EDFD 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners 1
        3. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours:

          CURR 517 Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools 1
        4. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours: .

          READ 501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School 3
        5. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning 3
          EDFD 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning 3
      3. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE I

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 527 Fieldwork 3
      4. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE II

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 6 semester hours from the following list. (CURR 514 is for in-service teachers).

          CURR 514 Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching 4-8
          CURR 529 Student Teaching 6
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II 3
  2. ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

    1. INITIAL INSTRUCTIONAL CERTIFICATION

      Students must provide a copy of their initial New Jersey K-5, K-8 or content area instructional certificate.

    2. ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATION TEACHING FIELD

      Complete the following 6 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 500 Language and Linguistics 3
        LNGN 210 Introduction to General Linguistics 3
      2. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 524 Advanced Structure of American English 3
        LNGN 220 Structure of American English 3
      3. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 532 Language and Culture in Minority Education 3
        APLN 534 Languages in Contact 3
        APLN 536 Languages of the USA 3
        LNGN 245 Language and Culture 3
      4. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 520 Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition 3
        LNGN 325 Principles of Second Language Learning 3
      5. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 525 Methodology of Teaching ESL 3
        LNGN 403 Methods and Material of TESL 3
      6. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 529 TESL Practicum 3
        LNGN 405 Field Experience in Teaching English as a Second Language 3

Course Descriptions:

APLN500: Language and Linguistics

An overview of the study of language and linguistics intended to provide students with a clear understanding of human language and with the conceptual foundations of linguistics. The course will expose students to several major areas within linguistics: language acquisition, phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. It will introduce the major tenets and principles of linguistics without surveying the areas treated in the other graduate courses in the department. It is a prerequisite for all other courses in the M.A. program. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

APLN502: Sociolinguistics

The study of language in its social context with a focus on language variation. Topics include language and social class, language and ethnicity, language and gender, and the study of standard versus nonstandard varieties of language. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN504: Syntax

An investigation of the findings of theoretical syntax and the valuable insights which these provide for syntactic analysis in language teaching, for language-learning texts, for translation, for work in artificial intelligence, etc. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN505: Semantics and Pragmatics

An exploration of the main tenets of contemporary semantics and pragmatics, the areas of linguistics that examine various aspects of meaning. The course investigates the boundaries between semantics and pragmatics by studying utterance meaning as well as lexical and sentence meaning. Students will learn about the applications of semantics and pragmatics to a variety of areas of applied linguistics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN506: Phonetics and Phonology

The study of the basic principles of phonetics and phonology, and the relevance of these principles to a variety of applications, including foreign-language teaching, speech pathology, and the analysis and synthesis of speech by computer. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN510: Discourse Analysis

An investigation of the techniques used in discourse analysis, the branch of linguistics which studies how to analyze naturally occurring connected speech. Discourse analysis is the study of the organization of language above the sentence level including the structure of conversations. It considers language in a social context, in particular the language used in verbal interactions. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN520: Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition

An in-depth analysis of the processes of child and adult second language acquisition (SLA) and how it differs from first language acquisition and the implications of these theories for the teaching and learning of second languages. The application of sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics to language teaching. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN524: Advanced Structure of American English

A detailed analysis of the phonological and grammatical structures of American English; advanced study of the social and stylistic varieties of American English; various theories of English grammar are studied. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN525: Methodology of Teaching ESL

The study of current issues in the teaching of English as a Second Language. Issues may include innovative teaching methodologies, the application of language learning theories to classroom teaching and the adaptation and development of instructional materials. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 520.

APLN529: TESL Practicum

To provide students who are seeking certification in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) as a second teaching field, with an opportunity to teach ESL in a formal classroom setting. Arrangements will be made on an individual basis for each student. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 525 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. Completion of other required courses for TESL certification.

APLN532: Language and Culture in Minority Education

An investigation of the intimate connection between language, culture, and ethnic pride and identity. Study of the communication problems faced by bilingual children due to differences in verbal and non-verbal patterns of communication; survey of various instructional methods and models employed in teaching children from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds; study of the correlation between language and various socio-cultural factors. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN534: Languages in Contact

A study of the effects of bilingualism and multilingualism on society and on the languages involved. By examining a variety of examples, students become familiar with the possible outcomes of language contact and with the factors that play a role in language-policy decisions in multilingual societies. Pidgins and creoles are also studied. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN536: Languages of the USA

A survey of the indigenous, colonial, and immigrant languages of the U.S. and how they are used in education and general communication. Also studied are factors affecting the maintenance or loss of languages and the shift from native languages to English with discussion of the mutual effects of language contact. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

CURR505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with EDFD 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR509: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 509. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR514: Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching

Open only to post-baccalaureate and graduate students; this course replaces supervised student teaching for those already employed in teaching situations without standard certification. Joint supervision by the school district and University personnel. Student must obtain permission of department chairperson and the school district. Certain qualifications required. () 4 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

CURR516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 516. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR517: Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools

This course presents the central issues in the inclusion of students with disabilities in United States middle and secondary schools. It focuses on best practices for providing access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. In addition, students explore the legal, professional, and contextual influences on the implementation of inclusion. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR518: Technology Integration in the Classroom

This one-credit course introduces pre-service teachers to the dimensions of educational technology for teaching and learning. Students also explore the history of educational technology with a focus on the pedagogical and practical implementation of educational technologies, youth technology culture, and emerging technologies. It enables the students to drawn upon field-based experiences in READ 501 to plan instructional technology environments that are student-centered, collaborative, and inquiry-based; that emphasize critical thinking; and that support specific curricular goals - as stated in institutional, state and national standards for technology in education. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR519: Assessment for Authentic Learning

This course provides prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for evaluating and understanding student growth and learning across diverse educational settings. Students consider assessment practices from the point of view of learners and how they experience learning opportunities. Teacher candidates also analyze assessment policies and practices, both local and national, in order to maximize both student and teacher performance. They draw on aspects of assessment policy and practice to evaluate their own understandings of assessment and its development. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 519. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. (6 hours lab.) 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with CURR 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD509: Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 509. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD519: Assessment for Authentic Learning

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ELRS580: Learning Theories

Study of the learning process and its measurement as it applies in the classroom and non-school settings. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN210: Introduction to General Linguistics

The nature and structure of language; the basic techniques for analyzing linguistic structures; phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic structure of languages, language and dialects; language change; the comparative method in linguistics; human and animal communication; differences between first and second language learning. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN220: Structure of American English

The phonology, morphology, syntax of American English, geographical and social dialects; traditional, structural and transformational approaches to grammar. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN230: Language in Society

Correlations between language varieties, their functions in particular settings, and the characteristics of their speakers. Black English. The role of second languages within a society: Pidgin, Creole, Lingua Franca, Diglossia, etc. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN245: Language and Culture

A study of language in its cultural context. Relationship of linguistic to non-linguistic variables: ethnosemantics, linguistic relativity principle, componential analysis. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN260: Dialectology

Principles of dialect study; application to American dialects. The origin and development of American dialects in historical, literary, regional, social and urban perspectives. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN280: Bilingualism

Compound and coordinate bilingualism; attitudes, motivation, etc.; functions of languages in multilingual settings; problems of newly-independent, multilingual nations in establishing national and standardized languages; analysis of bilingual speech; problems of educating minority groups in this country whose native language is not English. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN284: History of the English Language

English from its Indo-European origins up to and including the eighteenth-century grammarians. The Germanic strains; old, middle and modern English. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

LNGN288: Introduction to Cognitive Science

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Philosophy and Religion PHIL 288, and Psychology PSYC 288. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CMPT 183 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

LNGN300: Syntax

The study of sentence structure and the theories designed to describe it. Emphasis on structural grammar, the development of Generative Grammar and contemporary theoretical methods for describing sentence structure. Data will be taken from a number of different languages. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Linguistics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval.

LNGN301: Semantics

The systematic and objective study of meaning in language. Topics include: referential meaning, semantic fields, componential analysis, synonymy, polysemy, hyponymy, and sequential meaning. Data will be taken from a number of different languages. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300.

LNGN302: Pragmatics

The study of pragmatics, an area of linguistics that examines language as situated speech and studies how context affects the interpretation of meaning. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300.

LNGN304: Principles of Discourse Analysis

This course introduces students to discourse analysis, the subfield of linguistics that analyzes naturally occurring connected speech and written texts and describes the nature of socially-situated language. Central issues in the study of discourse will be examined, including the relationship between linguistic form and function, the relationship between text and context, and the question of "textuality," that is, how a randomly ordered set of sentences is distinguished from a coherent text. Various approaches to discourse will be discussed including speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, conversation analysis, and critical discourse analysis. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210.

LNGN325: Principles of Second Language Learning

Theories of second language acquisition; error analysis; individual learner differences; the roles of input, interaction, and formal instruction in language acquisition. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210.

LNGN331: Phonetics

A comprehensive introduction to phonetics, the study of the production of speech sounds and their acoustic characteristics. Students will learn to identify, classify, and transcribe sounds from a variety of languages. While intended primarily for Linguistics majors, this course will also be of interest to prospective language teachers and to majors in Speech, in Psychology, and in Communication Sciences and Disorders. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval (for Cognitive Science majors).

LNGN332: Phonology

Phonology studies how languages make use of a particular subset of all the possible speech sounds in a systematic way to produce meaningful units like words and sentences. The objectives of this course will be to give students experience in analyzing phonological data from a wide variety of languages and to survey current theories of phonology. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 331 or departmental approval.

LNGN384: The Grammars of English

A critical overview of traditional, structural, and transformational-generative approaches to the problems of analyzing the grammar of the English language; practical applications for teaching English and for understanding grammatical principles as a means of more effective writing and literary analysis. Cross listed with English, ENGM 384. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or LNGN 210.

LNGN403: Methods and Material of TESL

The theory and practice of ESL instruction covering the major methodologies, planning lessons, testing language skills, selecting and developing materials and related topics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 325.

LNGN405: Field Experience in Teaching English as a Second Language

Opportunity to teach English as a second language will be arranged for each student in the program. () 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 325.

LNGN420: Language and the Mind

An introduction to the major theoretical and methodological principles of Noam Chomsky's theory of Universal Grammar and what they tell us about structure of the human mind. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or PSYC 290.

LNGN450: Selected Topics in Linguistics

Study of special problems and topics in linguistics. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval.

LNGN478: Independent Study

This course is designed (1) to allow students to explore areas of linguistics that are not covered in the normal course offerings of the department; (2) to permit an in-depth analysis of a given subject beyond the scope of a regular semester course; or (3) to provide advanced students with the possibility of research in areas of linguistics that are of special interest to them. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. () 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

LNGN479: Independent Study

This course is designed (1) to allow students to explore areas of linguistics that are not covered in the normal course offerings of the department; (2) to permit an in-depth analysis of a given subject beyond the scope of a regular semester course; or (3) to provide advanced students with the possibility of research in areas of linguistics that are of special interest to them. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. () 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

LNGN480: Linguistics in Education and Society

The course is intended to acquaint students involved in language education of any sort with the applications and implications of linguistics for education and for understanding the functioning of language in society. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

READ501: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School

Studies the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties in the content subjects. For the subject area teacher and the beginning reading specialist. Secondary school reading needs and specific suggestions for guiding the slow, average, and gifted student in a classroom situation. Starting Summer 2012: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School introduces pre-service and in-service teachers to an array of cross-content literacy strategies for the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties. Students learn how to ground literacy strategies in purposeful and meaningful curricular and pedagogical projects. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPCM101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Additional Requirements for State Certification The following additional requirements must be met prior to student teaching. Upon admission to the program, the student's submitted transcripts are evaluated to determine if any of these requirements have been fulfilled by previous coursework. In such cases, the requirement(s) appears on the degree audit as being waived.

  • SPCM 101 - Fundamentals of Speech or Speech Challenge Exam or Documented & approved experience
  • Physiology & Hygiene - free test at county office of education or BIOL/HLTH course
  • Educational Psychology - ELRS 580 Learning: Process & Measurement or PSYC 560 Advanced Educational
  • Psychology or equivalent undergraduate course work

Note: Certification requirements are subject to change.