Spanish (M.A.) - Graduate - 2011 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2011 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

The MA program in Spanish offers students a wide array of courses in Spanish and Spanish American literature as well as in advanced studies of the Spanish language and literary theory. The program prepares students for careers in research and teaching and provides a cultural and linguistic base from which students can explore career options in interpreting, translating, diplomatic service, editorial work, social services, commerce and business. The Master of Arts degree also opens opportunities for students to pursue doctoral programs at major institutions.

ADMISSIONS

The Master of Arts program in Spanish is open to students who hold a bachelor's degree with an undergraduate major in Spanish or who have completed 24 semester hours of Spanish on the undergraduate level or the equivalent. Students must take the Graduate Record Examination aptitude test prior to acceptance into the program.

Students who hold a bachelor's degree or its equivalent may enroll in graduate courses without obligation to follow a master's degree program, if they have 24 semester hours or the equivalent in Spanish.


SPANISH

Complete 33 semester hours including the following 5 requirement(s):

  1. Required Core

    Complete the following 3 semester hours: .

    SPAN 504 Introduction to Literary Theory 3
  2. Peninsular Area

    Complete 4 courses from the following: .

    SPAN 516 Medieval Spanish Literature to the Fifteenth Century 3
    SPAN 522 Theatre of the Golden Age 3
    SPAN 523 Prose and Poetry of the Golden Age 3
    SPAN 524 Cervantes 3
    SPAN 525 Enlightenment and Romanticism 3
    SPAN 526 Spanish Novel of teh 19th Century 3
    SPAN 527 The Generation of 98 3
    SPAN 528 Spanish Fiction and Film 3
    SPAN 533 Contemporary Spanish Theater 3
    SPAN 534 Contemporary Spanish Novel 3
    SPAN 535 Contemporary Spanish Poetry 3
  3. Spanish American Area

    Complete 4 courses from the following: .

    SPAN 540 Colonial Spanish American Literature 3
    SPAN 541 Latin American Literature of the 19th Century 3
    SPAN 542 Contemporary Latin American Novel 3
    SPAN 543 Contemporary Latin American Theater 3
    SPAN 546 Modernismo in Latin America 3
    SPAN 548 Contemporary Spanish American Novel 3
    SPAN 549 Contemporary Spanish American Short Story 3
    SPAN 551 Contemporary Latin American Poetry 3
  4. Electives

    Complete 6 semester hours from the following: .

    SPAN 501 Advanced Studies in the Spanish Language 3
    SPAN 505 History of Spanish Language 3
    SPAN 516 Medieval Spanish Literature to the Fifteenth Century 3
    SPAN 522 Theatre of the Golden Age 3
    SPAN 523 Prose and Poetry of the Golden Age 3
    SPAN 524 Cervantes 3
    SPAN 525 Enlightenment and Romanticism 3
    SPAN 526 Spanish Novel of teh 19th Century 3
    SPAN 527 The Generation of 98 3
    SPAN 528 Spanish Fiction and Film 3
    SPAN 530 Spanish Cultural History 3
    SPAN 533 Contemporary Spanish Theater 3
    SPAN 534 Contemporary Spanish Novel 3
    SPAN 535 Contemporary Spanish Poetry 3
    SPAN 540 Colonial Spanish American Literature 3
    SPAN 541 Latin American Literature of the 19th Century 3
    SPAN 542 Contemporary Latin American Novel 3
    SPAN 543 Contemporary Latin American Theater 3
    SPAN 546 Modernismo in Latin America 3
    SPAN 548 Contemporary Spanish American Novel 3
    SPAN 549 Contemporary Spanish American Short Story 3
    SPAN 551 Contemporary Latin American Poetry 3
    SPAN 560 Topics in Spanish, Latin American and Caribbean Literature 3
    SPAN 562 Autobiographical Acts in Spain and in Latin America 3
  5. Culminating Experience

    Successfully complete both the Comprehensive Exam and Research Presentation.


Course Descriptions:

SPAN501: Advanced Studies in the Spanish Language

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore various linguistic-oriented topics and theories in order to expand their knowledge of the structure, usage and variation of the Spanish language both in the Spanish-speaking world and in the United States. The study of these topics will be done in connection with the analysis of various literary texts. Topics to be explored will change with each offering of this course. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN504: Introduction to Literary Theory

This course gives students a comprehensive view of different critical and theoretical approaches to literary studies, among them Russian Formalism, Structuralism, Feminist Theory, Postmodern and Postcolonial Studies, and gender and queer theory. Major articles of such theorists as Jacobson, Genette, Levi-Strauss, Barthes, Moi, Kristeva, Derrida, Foucault, Lyotard, Sidonie Smith, Benedict Anderson, Said, and Butler will be applied to specific literary texts from Latin America and Spain. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN505: History of Spanish Language

The aim of this course is to examine the evolution of the Spanish language from its origins to the present. It focuses on the phono-phonetic, morphological, syntactical, and semantic changes that characterized the evolution from Latin to modern Spanish from a political, sociological, and historical point of view. Topics include a structural and textual analysis of ancient documents and literary pieces. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN516: Medieval Spanish Literature to the Fifteenth Century

This course examines main philosphical concerns of the Middle Ages and the connections and dialogue that exist between works of this period and the contemporary world. Through close analyses of representative works, the course explores the roles played by identity, representation, and desire in the construction and reconstruction of the aesthetic of the self as well as the representation of the human in relation with the divine. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN522: Theatre of the Golden Age

Focusing on the Baroque chiaroscuro as a metaphor for the scission of the 17th century Spanish subjectivity, this course draws from Lacanian theory to articulate and analytical framework that allows a postmodern reading of comedias by both leading and peripheral playwrights. Recurring topoi, such as gender confusion, honor, uxoricide, rape, order and chaos, are contextualized and deconstructed in light of psychoanalysis and performativity. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN523: Prose and Poetry of the Golden Age

This course examines the works of major authors of the Spanish Golden-Age and concentrates on the subtextual dialogues established by these authors in reaction both against their time and space and themselves. Readings include canonical prose and poetry of the period as well as peripheral writings. Literary texts of the period are analyzed in the context of different currents in literary theory and genre studies. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN524: Cervantes

This course takes a closer look at the fragmented discourses intertwined in the texts of Cervantes. By drawing from different critiques and theories about Cervantes, among them those dealing with paradox, madness and sanity, nationhood and the satire of a monolithic Spanish identity, and the function of dialogue and intertextuality, this course delves into the many layers of Cervantes's writings. It also examines the narrative complexity of Cervantes's masterpiece and the ways in which Don Quijote anticipates many aspects of postmodern fiction. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN525: Enlightenment and Romanticism

This course exposes students to two of the literary manifestations of 18th and 19th century Spain. It explores the concept of the "Enlightenment" in the painting of Goya and the writings of Feijoo and Cadalso as well as the socioeconomic context of this period. It also examines European Romanticism in art and literature; selected Spanish Romantic poetry, drama, and essays, including the writings of Larra, Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Duque de Rivas, and Zorrilla are analyzed in light of literary theories of the 18th and 19th centuries. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN526: Spanish Novel of teh 19th Century

The focus of this course is the study of the so-called "novela realista" or the Spanish novel of the 19th century. It explores cultural, literary and socioeconomic influences on the novel as well as the theory and the practice of this genre in the 19th century. Texts of 19th century Spanish authors are accompanied by selected theoretical readings on the novel written by twentieth-century critics Miguel de Unamuno, Jose Ortega y Gasset, M. Bakhtin, Doritt Cohn, and Gerard Genette, among others. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN527: The Generation of 98

This course examines major works of the generation of writers whose intellectual development coincides with the defeat of Spain in the Spanish-American War of 1898. Attitudes toward national identity, literature, culture, politics, gender, and philosophy will be explored as well as the concept of literary generations and their inclusions and exclusions. Readings will include selections from canonical writers - Unamuno, A. Machado, Valle-Inclan, Azorin, and Baroja - as well as texts from women writers - Caterina Albert and Carmen Burgos, among others - historically excluded from this generation. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN528: Spanish Fiction and Film

This course analyzes works of Spanish literature from the late 19th century to the present and films that are either based on specific texts or reflect their major themes. It discusses film and fiction as distinct modes of artistic expression and the process by which complex narrative strategies are rendered into visual images and cinematographic techniques. A variety of film genres, novelistic techniques, idological concerns, and gender roles are studied in the works of writers like Galdos, Tusquets, Rodoreda, Riera, and Munoz Molina and film directors, Bunuel, Bollain, Almodovar, Betriu and Miro, among others. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN530: Spanish Cultural History

A study of the formation and the nature of Spanish civilization through an investigation of the political, social and cultural trends and influences on the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN533: Contemporary Spanish Theater

This course examines selected works of Spanish theater from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. It explores the relationship between ideology and dramatic technique during the Franco regime and the Post Civil War and Post Franco periods, and the Spanish theater's appropriation and adaptation of theories of Artaud, Brecht, and the theater of the absurd, among others. The theater as a vehicle for social and political critique, subversion of gender norms, exploration of the complexities of identity formation, and challenge to historical values will be explored through selections of Valle-Inclan, Lorca, Arrabal, Buero Vallejo, Diosdado, Pedrero, and Romero, among others. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN534: Contemporary Spanish Novel

This course examines the evolution of the Spanish novel from the 20th century to the present and the relationship between the evolution of narrative techniques and strategies and changes in Spanish social and political structure. Theories of the novel offered by diverse European and American critics will be combined with the study of various novel forms from social realist to psychological realist and the postmodern and their respective debt to Cervantes's masterpiece, Don Quijote. The role of the novel in circumventing censorship, challenging official norms and myths, and dismantling traditional literary and political authority will be examined in the works of Cela, Delibes, Martin Santos, Falcon, Martin Gaite, Diaz-Mas, and Juan Goytisolo, among others. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN535: Contemporary Spanish Poetry

This course examines Spanish poetry from the beginning of the 20th century (Juan Ramon Jimenez, A. Machado) to the poetic expressions that emerged after Spanish Civil War (Miguel Hernandez and Gloria Fuertes, among others). Different trends, topics, influences and movements will be examined, among them Symbolist and post Romantic poetry at the beginning of the 20th century; European Ultraism and Futurism; Surrealist poetry; painting and cinema in Spain; the notion of "Avant-Garde"; art as a game; humor and irony in poetry; homoerotic expressions of love in the poetry of Federico Garcia Lorca and Luis Cernuda; and social poetry and the poetics of protest. Students will be exposed to classical notions of Rhetoric as part of the process of analysis of poetry. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN540: Colonial Spanish American Literature

This course examines Colonial Latin American texts such as Hernan Cortes's Cartas de relacion, Cristobal Colon's Cartas del descubrimiento, Sor Juan Ines del la Cruz's writings, Dabeza de Vaca's Naufragio and Bartolome de las Casas's Brevisima relacion del la destruccion de las Indias, among others, in light of postmodern and post colonial interpretations. Semiotic and anthropological readings are also applied to the course selections. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN541: Latin American Literature of the 19th Century

This course provides an in-depth study of the aesthetics of Romanticism in Europe and its subsequent adaptation by Latin American writers. Special emphisis is given to Argentine Romantic writers of the period. Texts will be analyzed in the context of Romantic aesthetics and political, historical and social change in the Latin American continent. Realistic and Naturalist aesthetics will also be discussed as will such aspects of economic and social change as the growth of the city, the influx of immigrants, social exploitation, and racial strife. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN542: Contemporary Latin American Novel

This course is divided into three main components. The first one studies in depth the novels of the Mexican Revolution from Azuela to Carlos Fuentes. A sociological approach will be applied to the novels of this period and students will trace the changes that the novel of the Revolution reveals as it moves from one generation to another. The second component examines the novels of the land and of social reform from J.E. Rivera to the indigenous novel. Attention will be given to the Andean novel and the reappearance and adaptation of neo-realistic aesthetics. The third component deals with novels of the city, mainly in the southern tip of the continent. Argentine and Uruguayan novels will be studied carefully to reveal such aspects as the growth of the city, the relationship with European novels, the need for a new language, and the birth of the psychological novel. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN543: Contemporary Latin American Theater

Designed to offer a critical introduction to contemporary dramatic writings in Latin America. Students examine a corpus of works by playwrights from a variety of Latin American nations, movements, and decades, up to the present. Taking as point of departure The Tempest, William Shakespeare's drama of conquest and resistance, students will examine themes of social justice, identity, the power of language and the role of art in theater's trajectory over the course of the twentieth century and into the present century. Major playwrights such as Rodolfo Usigli, Griselda Gambaro, and Luis Rafael Sanchez are studied within the framework of contemporary theories of performance and reception in Latin America. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN546: Modernismo in Latin America

This course provides an in-depth study of the aesthetics of French Parnassian and Symbolist poetics and how these in turn lead directly to the Modernist aesthetics in Latin America. Special consideration is given to Decadentism and its rejection of the social and economic values represented by the European bourgeoisie. Works by Marti, Najera, Casals, Silva, Dario, and Lugones wil be approached stylistically and thematically for the purpose of identifying the radical changes in the literary text from the perspectives of language, versification, forms, themes, and the unique poetics of each member of this movement. Special attention will be given to the works of Ruben Dario in tracing the development of Modernist poetics from the pre-Modernist period through the post-Modernist period. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN548: Contemporary Spanish American Novel

A critical examination of representative examples of the Spanish American novel from the "boom" to the "post-boom". (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN549: Contemporary Spanish American Short Story

The contemporary short story from the end of the "Modernista" period to the present time. Critical evaluation and analysis of representative works. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN551: Contemporary Latin American Poetry

This course offers an overview of significant trends in Latin American poetry from the Avant-Garde to the Postmodern, with particular attention given to the most contemporary expressions of Latin American poetry. The course will focus on authors such as Borges, Lange, Ocampo, Huidobro, Neruda, Vallejo, Lezama Lima, Pizarnik, German Belli, Gonzalo Rojas and Zurita. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPAN560: Topics in Spanish, Latin American and Caribbean Literature

This course explores contemporary narrative fiction from the Spanish Antilles (Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic). It examines foundational themes of Caribbean letters such as the plantation structure, the maroons, the repercussions of the French Revolution and the Age of the Enlightenment in the works of Alejo Carpentier, Miguel Barnett, Reinaldo Arenas and others. The works of Emilio Diaz Varcarcel, Ana Lydia Vega and Julia Alvarez highlight the problematic relationship of island and diaspora in the context of neocolonialism and identity. May be repeated once for a total of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Majors only.

SPAN562: Autobiographical Acts in Spain and in Latin America

This course examines autobiographical texts from Spain and Latin America in light of general theories of the genre. Autobiography will be studied in the broadest sense and will encompass the study of testimony, letters, diaries, and autobiographical poetry. Readings will include texts written by Julia de Burgos, Garcia Marquez, Jorge Guillen, Lorca, Rigoberta Menchu, Renee Mendez-Capote, and Pedro Salinas, among others. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.