Italian, Instructional Certification: Teacher Certification in Italian (Preschool-Grade 12) - Graduate - 2011 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2011 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Students with a baccalaureate degree who are interested in teaching may pursue the Post-baccalaureate program for initial teacher certification.

Additional undergraduate coursework in the certification content area may be required to meet State and University certification standards.

Upon successful completion of the program the student will be recommended to the State of New Jersey for initial teacher certification (Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced Standing, or CEAS). The CEAS authorizes the holder to teach in New Jersey public schools and expedites the ability to become certified in most other states. The CEAS never expires.

In New Jersey, candidates who have completed an initial teaching certification program must successfully complete one year of teaching in order to be eligible to receive a permanent Standard Certificate.

ITALIAN

Complete 3 requirement(s):

  1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

    1. SPEECH

      Complete the following 1 course: (May be completed by examination)

      SPCM 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement 3
    2. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

      See the Center of Pedagogy.

    3. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

      Complete 1 course from:

      ELRS 580 Learning Theories 3
      PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology 3
  2. TEACHING FIELD REQUIREMENTS

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 6 courses for 18 semester hours:

        ITAL 242 Italian Grammar and Composition I 3
        ITAL 243 Italian Grammar and Composition II 3
        ITAL 309 Italian Conversation 3
        ITAL 340 An Introduction to Italian Literature I: Heroes, Humanists and Sages 3
        ITAL 341 An Introduction to Italian Literature II: The Modern, Post-modern and Beyond 3
      2. Complete 5 courses from the following list

        ITAL 321 Commercial Italian 3
        ITAL 350 Introduction to Translating 3
        ITAL 375 Italian Study Abroad 3
        ITAL 441 Italian Literature of the Renaissance I 3
        ITAL 442 Italian Literature of the Renaissance II 3
        ITAL 446 Italian Literature of the 19th Century I 3
        ITAL 447 Italian Literature of the 19th Century II: Experimentalism 3
        ITAL 451 Italian Literature of the 20th Century I: A Changing Italy 3
        ITAL 452 Italian Literature of the 20th Century II: A Changing Italy 3
        ITAL 461 Dante Seminar I: Inferno 3
        ITAL 462 Dante Seminar II: Purgatorio and Paradiso 3
        ITAL 469 Italian Literature of the 13th and 14th Centuries 3
        ITAL 470 Senior Seminar in Literary Research 3
        ITAL 477 Italian Literature of the 18th Century 3
        ITAL 480 Independent Study 3
    2. TEACHING METHODS

      Complete for 3 semester hours.

      ITAL 419 The Teaching of Italian in Elementary and Secondary Schools 3
  3. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

    1. INTRODUCTORY SEQUENCE

      Complete 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

        CURR 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling 3
        EDFD 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling 3
      2. Complete for 1 semester hours.

        CURR 518 Technology Integration in the Classroom 1
    2. DIVERSITY AND INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete 5 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

        CURR 509 Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning 3
        EDFD 509 Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching 3
      2. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours from the following list

        CURR 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners 1
        EDFD 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners 1
      3. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours:

        CURR 517 Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools 1
      4. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours: .

        READ 501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School 3
      5. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

        CURR 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning 3
        EDFD 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning 3
    3. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE I

      Complete 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

        CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I 3
      2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

        CURR 527 Fieldwork 3
    4. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE II

      Complete 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course for 6 semester hours from the following list. (CURR 514 is for in-service teachers).

        CURR 514 Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching 4-8
        CURR 529 Student Teaching 6
      2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

        CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II 3

Course Descriptions:

CURR505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with EDFD 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR509: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 509. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR514: Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching

Open only to post-baccalaureate and graduate students; this course replaces supervised student teaching for those already employed in teaching situations without standard certification. Joint supervision by the school district and University personnel. Student must obtain permission of department chairperson and the school district. Certain qualifications required. () 4 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

CURR516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 516. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR517: Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools

This course presents the central issues in the inclusion of students with disabilities in United States middle and secondary schools. It focuses on best practices for providing access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. In addition, students explore the legal, professional, and contextual influences on the implementation of inclusion. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR518: Technology Integration in the Classroom

This one-credit course introduces pre-service teachers to the dimensions of educational technology for teaching and learning. Students also explore the history of educational technology with a focus on the pedagogical and practical implementation of educational technologies, youth technology culture, and emerging technologies. It enables the students to drawn upon field-based experiences in READ 501 to plan instructional technology environments that are student-centered, collaborative, and inquiry-based; that emphasize critical thinking; and that support specific curricular goals - as stated in institutional, state and national standards for technology in education. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR519: Assessment for Authentic Learning

This course provides prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for evaluating and understanding student growth and learning across diverse educational settings. Students consider assessment practices from the point of view of learners and how they experience learning opportunities. Teacher candidates also analyze assessment policies and practices, both local and national, in order to maximize both student and teacher performance. They draw on aspects of assessment policy and practice to evaluate their own understandings of assessment and its development. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 519. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. (6 hours lab.) 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with CURR 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD509: Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 509. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. (1 hour lecture.) 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD519: Assessment for Authentic Learning

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ELRS580: Learning Theories

Study of the learning process and its measurement as it applies in the classroom and non-school settings. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

ITAL242: Italian Grammar and Composition I

A two-part course designed to improve the student's written Italian in a variety of contexts: short narratives, descriptions, formal and informal letters, argumentative essays, observation, and analysis. Attention is given to style, register, and vocabulary enrichment. This course begins with a thorough review and refinement of the student's knowledge of Italian grammar with systematic exercises and descriptive analyses of reading passages. The course is centered on discussion and written practice through the writing of multiple drafts and presentations and prepares students for the ACTFL Writing Test. Required for majors. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 104 or equivalent.

ITAL243: Italian Grammar and Composition II

This course is designed to strengthen the student's written Italian in a variety of contexts: short narratives, descriptions, argumentative essays, observation and literary analysis. Attention is given to style, register, and vocabulary enrichment. This course continues a review and refinement of the student's knowledge of Italian grammar with systematic exercises and detailed analyses of reading passages. The course emphasizes group discussion and written practice through the writing of multiple drafts, presentations, and creative writing assignments. It prepares students for the ACTFL Writing Test. Required for Majors. Taught in Italian. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 242.

ITAL309: Italian Conversation

Practice in spoken Italian with an emphasis on listening and speaking skills, pronunciation, and oral competence through assigned topics and a discussion of modern and contemporary Italian culture. Special attention is given to vocabulary enrichment. This course prepares students for the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview in Italian. Use of Language Lab, web-based and computer assisted resources required. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 242.

ITAL321: Commercial Italian

A combined conversation and writing course emphasizing business and professional contexts such as the job application, the resume, interviewing, office etiquette, and techniques of commercial correspondence. This course is designed to develop students' communicative skills and prepare them to work in the Italian business world. It provides an in-depth study of Italian geography and economics, including the free enterprise system, marketing and banking, and of aspects of Italian politics such as the party system, trade unions, and the Constitution. Use of Internet and computer-assisted resources required. Readings in Italian and English. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 104.

ITAL340: An Introduction to Italian Literature I: Heroes, Humanists and Sages

An overview of some of the more significant literary trends in Italy from the first texts in a nascent Italian language up to and including the 1700s. The focus will be on representative literary texts and the fundamentals of literary analysis, accompanied by the study of the historical events and power structures influencing literary production and language usage, the changing role of the writer/intellectual, questions of identity, trends in music, the figurative arts, architecture, and fashion, autobiography and personal correspondence. Required for majors. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 242.

ITAL341: An Introduction to Italian Literature II: The Modern, Post-modern and Beyond

An overview of some of the more significant literary trends in Italy from the Enlightenment to the Postmodern and contemporary periods. Students discuss the construction of Italy as a nation and its appointment with modernity, questions of identity, and trends in the figurative arts, architecture, and fashion. The course also serves as an introduction to the principles of literary analysis and criticism. Required for majors. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 242.

ITAL350: Introduction to Translating

The focus of this course is both practical and theoretical. Students practice translating the types of texts - technical, commercial, advertising, journalistic, medical, legal, etc. - that translators encounter on a regular basis and are introduced to the fundamental textual and linguistic principles underlying translation theory. This course examines the role of cultural context and emphasizes the use of computer-mediated resources in the act of translation. Students discuss and rewrite their translations in a workshop environment. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 242.

ITAL375: Italian Study Abroad

Study at an Italian university to gain firsthand knowledge of the historical, social, economic and cultural life of Italy. Credit by evaluation. () 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ITAL419: The Teaching of Italian in Elementary and Secondary Schools

Students will learn the theory and practice of the communicative approach to teaching Italian as a second language in accordance with the guidelines developed by the MSU Center of Pedagogy. The notion of content standards for teaching communication and culture in a foreign language will be studied through a thorough examination of the "New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for World Languages." Students will learn how to build a didactic unit and to prepare portfolios designed for various levels of instruction. Another important topic addressed in this course is the use of new technology in the classroom. Taught in English. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 242 and 243.

ITAL441: Italian Literature of the Renaissance I

An introduction to the development of humanism in Italy through a study of significant works of the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. Topics include Petrarch's lyrical language and its influence in the 15th century, the origins of Italian chivalric poetry and its evolution in the Quattrocento, the historical and cultural context of Italian courts and the signoria, the debate on the principle of imitation, the sacra rappresentazione, theatrical works, the anticlassicisti, pastoral drama, the debate on the dignity of man, and the political treatise. This course also teaches methods of interpreting literary form and meaning in the works studied. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340.

ITAL442: Italian Literature of the Renaissance II

Through an in-depth study of Ariosto's Orlando frioso, Machiavelli's Principe and La Mandragola, and Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata, this course analyzes the epic, political and theatrical masterpieces of Italy's Cinquecento. Other topics include the debate of the "questione della lingua", the short-story genre in the 16th century and its relationship to Boccaccio's Decameron, women writers, the poesia maccheronica, literary production and its relation to the visual arts, and the study of the development and conventions of the Commedia dell'Arte tradition. This course also teaches methods of interpreting literary form and meaning in the works studied. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340.

ITAL446: Italian Literature of the 19th Century I

This course will explore the thought of the three foremost authors and founders of modern Italian culture Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni and Giacomo Leopardi through analytical readings of their literary works. Narrative, philosophical and poetic texts such as Ultime lettere di Jacopo Ortis, I promessi sposi, Canti and Operette morali, will be examined against the background of European Romanticism and the dramatic changes in aesthetic and literary tastes occasioned by the revolutionary movements and conflicts of this period. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340 or 341.

ITAL447: Italian Literature of the 19th Century II: Experimentalism

Students examine the narrative and poetic works of 19th-century authors such as Carducci, Pascoli, Verga, Fogazzaro, and D'Annunzio and contrast late-Romanticism, Verismo, and Decadentism in Italy with their European counterparts. This course also provides an account of Italian unification, the Risorgimento, as told through its heroes, allegories, and myths. Students are introduced to protomodern but less studied literary currents like the "romanzo nero" (Gothic novel), viewed as an expression of industrialization and sociopolitical instability. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340 or 341.

ITAL451: Italian Literature of the 20th Century I: A Changing Italy

An examination of the major narrative, poetic, and philosophical works of authors of the first half of the 20th Century, such as Ungaretti, Quasimodo, Montale, Aleramo, Svevo, and Pirandello, positioned within the context of European Modernism and the historical avant-gardes. This course introduces students to Fascism and the Resistance with attention given to class struggle and the role of women. Other topics include a discussion of Italian society at the turn of the century, immigration and imperialism. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340 or 341.

ITAL452: Italian Literature of the 20th Century II: A Changing Italy

Advanced literary analysis of representative texts from different genres from the postwar period to the end of the 20th Century. Topics discussed include modern Italian literature's relationship to the vital shifts in postwar Italian society: the "economic miracle", the Cold War, external and internal emigration, student revolts, the class struggle, women's rights and Italian feminism, terrorism in Italy, regionalism, immigration, and multiculturalism, military and cultural imperialism, the role of technology in everyday life and Italy's changing role in the international arena. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340 or 341.

ITAL461: Dante Seminar I: Inferno

This course includes an introduction to Dante's life and works within their intellectual, historical and cultural context and offers close critical readings of the Inferno, particularly of major episodes, aimed at providing students with an understanding of the poet's narrative strategies, use of allegory, appropriation of classical and biblical sources, and handling of literary themes borrowed from tradition. Other readings may include Virgil's Aeneid, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Latini's Tesoretto, and Dante's Vita Nuova, De Vulgari Eloquentia and Monarchia. Web-based resources complement class readings. Taught in Italian. (3 hours seminar.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340.

ITAL462: Dante Seminar II: Purgatorio and Paradiso

A continuation of ITAL 461, this course focuses on selections from Purgatorio and Paradiso. It enables students to explore both the intertextual and intratextual strategies in the Commedia, that is, the narrative techniques Dante employs for incorporating into his text the works of classical and Christian authors as well as his own source material. By contrasting episodes paired by thematic or structural analogy, the student explores the nature of Dante's auto-exegesis in the Commedia and, more precisely, his use of the technique of the "parallel passage." Other readings may include Boethius, Roman de la Rose, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Dante's Convivio. Web-based resources complement class readings. Taught in Italian. (3 hours seminar.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340.

ITAL469: Italian Literature of the 13th and 14th Centuries

A comprehensive view of the Italian lyric tradition during the 13th and 14th centuries with emphasis on the Sicilian school, the Tuscan school and the Dolce Stil Novo. Other topics explore the birth and development of Italian religious poetry, sacred and profane didactic literature, the precepts of courtly love, the Breton and Carolingian cycles, Medieval chronicles and the relationship between the narrative form of the Christian exemplum, and the origin of the short-story genre. Other readings include Beowulf, Chanson de Rolande, Norse legend, and the troubadour poets. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340.

ITAL470: Senior Seminar in Literary Research

This course offers an introduction to the techniques of literary research based on selected topics from Italian literature and/or cinema. Taught in Italian. (3 hours seminar.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340 and 341; and Italian majors only.

ITAL477: Italian Literature of the 18th Century

The cosmopolitan character of the Enlightenment is essential to an examination of all national literatures. For this reason the course will present a variety of theatrical, operatic, theoretical and poetic texts which exemplify the connections of Italian culture to its European environment. Topics such as Alfieri's critique of ancient regimes, Goldoni's praise of the bourgeoisie, Parini's and Casti's social satires, Vico's foundation of modern anthropology, and Da Ponte's and Metastasio's contributions to the operatic theater will be the object of close analytical readings. Taught in Italian. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ITAL 340 or 341.

ITAL480: Independent Study

Directed independent study and research in Italian. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 hours of Italian electives. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. () 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

READ501: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School

Studies the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties in the content subjects. For the subject area teacher and the beginning reading specialist. Secondary school reading needs and specific suggestions for guiding the slow, average, and gifted student in a classroom situation. Starting Summer 2012: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School introduces pre-service and in-service teachers to an array of cross-content literacy strategies for the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties. Students learn how to ground literacy strategies in purposeful and meaningful curricular and pedagogical projects. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

SPCM101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Additional Requirements for State Certification The following additional requirements must be met prior to student teaching. Upon admission to the program, the student's submitted transcripts are evaluated to determine if any of these requirements have been fulfilled by previous coursework. In such cases, the requirement(s) appears on the degree audit as being waived.

  • SPCM 101 - Fundamentals of Speech or Speech Challenge Exam or Documented & approved experience
  • Physiology & Hygiene - free test at county office of education or BIOL/HLTH course
  • Educational Psychology - ELRS 580 Learning: Process & Measurement or PSYC 560 Advanced Educational
  • Psychology or equivalent undergraduate course work

Note: Certification requirements are subject to change.