Industrial Design Major (B.F.A.) - Undergraduate - 2011 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2011 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Program Overview

The Industrial Design Major focuses on the design and development of consumer products reflecting virtually all areas of human activity. It is an intensive program emphasizing critical thinking and problem-solving skills and a solid grounding in all aspects of the design process.

For further information: Art & Design webpage

Curriculum Requirements

All university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree (for further information, click here.)  In addition, students pursuing Industrial Design (B.F.A.) must complete the requirements below.


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAJOR

Complete 94 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. CORE REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 7 courses for 21 semester hours:

    ARFD 121 Foundations I: Concept, Process and Application 3
    ARFD 122 Foundations II: 2D Design 3
    ARFD 123 Foundations III: Visual Organization - 3D Design 3
    ARFD 124 Foundations IV: Figure Drawing 3
    ARFD 125 Foundations V: Color, Light and Time 3
  2. ART & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN HISTORY

    Complete the following for a total of 9 semester hours:

    1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

    2. Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours from the following list

  3. INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAJOR STUDIO

    Complete the following for a total of 52 semester hours:

    1. REQUIRED STUDIO COURSES

      Complete 15 courses for 45 semester hours:

      ARID 100 Visualization and Illustration Techniques for Industrial Designers 3
      ARID 101 Advanced Techniques in Design Delineation 3
      ARID 111 Model Making and Prototype 3
      ARID 120 Human Factors in Engineering 3
      ARID 201 Industrial Design and Problem Solving 3
      ARID 202 Industrial Design Studio, Beginning 3
      ARID 210 Materials Processing Studio I 3
      ARID 211 Materials Processing Studio II 3
      ARID 220 Introduction to Computer Aided Solid Modeling Representation 3
      ARID 221 Surface Modeling Techniques 3
      ARID 302 Industrial Design Studio, Intermediate 3
      ARID 303 Industrial Design Studio, Advanced 3
      ARID 360 Professional Practices in Industrial Design 3
      ARID 410 Project Design Development I 3
      ARID 411 Project Design Development II 3
    2. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

      Complete for 7 semester hours.

      COED 401 Cooperative Education Experience I 3-8
  4. COLLATERAL COURSES

    Complete 4 courses for 12 semester hours:

    ARGD 211 Fundamentals of Adobe Creative Suite - Mac 3
    ARMJ 200 Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning I 3
    MKTG 240 Introduction to Marketing 3
    MKTG 344 Advertising Theory and Techniques 3

Course Descriptions:

ARFD121: Foundations I: Concept, Process and Application

Students will be challenged and guided in the development of their critical and conceptualizing skills as they apply to art and design processes. Foundations I is a problem-solving course in which the student investigates the dynamic visual forces involved in composing in a variety of media. Students explore the interrelationships of composition, process, perception, and intent. Through the understanding of concepts, processes, and visual language, students broaden their skills in idea development, research strategies, and technical application. This course advocates and utilizes the model of a learning community to effectively introduce students to ideas, issues, and practices in contemporary art and design. Foundations I further connects creative research and practice to socio-political and cultural ideology, allowing students opportunities for integration of ideas outside the disciplines of art. This will be accomplished through lectures, exercises, student team assignments, discussion, and exploration in and outside of the classroom. This course is required during the first semester for all freshman and undergraduate transfer students majoring in BA Studio and BFA Studio. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio.) 3 sh.

ARFD122: Foundations II: 2D Design

Foundations II introduces students to the principles of 2-dimensional design in a variety of media. Major principles covered include composition, line, shape, volume, movement, value, rhythm, repetition, variation, scale, size, perspective, proportion, texture, balance, unity, harmony, and contrast. The course content consists of a variety of projects focusing on critical, theory-based problem solving, together with lectures and demonstrations. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio.) 3 sh.

ARFD123: Foundations III: Visual Organization - 3D Design

An introduction to the 3rd dimension of the world that we inhabit ("made" things, natural forms, and the occupation of space). Three-dimensional sensibility is progressively developed when basic components are manipulated by the effective use of direction, balance, axis, orientation, and relationship; in other words, organization (composition). Assignments in light, shape, shadow, depth, form, and movement are examined in a natural progression from 2D knowledge to 3D. Activities include lectures, conceptualization, observation, creation, discussion, and critical analysis for each project. The aesthetic consideration of materials and tools in this context add to the expressive output of three-dimensional study. The process may begin with concept, material or observation; it continues by way of lecture, demonstration, critical analysis and class discussion until each project is crafted to completion. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARFD124: Foundations IV: Figure Drawing

An introduction to drawing the human figure. Students in this course will spend the majority of their time drawing from live models in a studio setting. Most classes will follow the traditional figure drawing format of beginning with quick gesture drawings, with poses gradually increasing in length of time, and ending with a single sustained pose of an hour or more. The students will be introduced to a wide range of ideas, concepts, strategems, and materials related to the drawing of the human figure. Ideas and drawing approaches will be illustrated by looking at the visual examples of artworks by both past and present figurative artists. A brief historical overview of various visions of the human image will be presented, as will an introduction of human anatomy for artists. Concurrent with ideas about proportion, foreshortening, scale, and anatomical construct, ideas about line quality, chiaroscuro, and the figure in differing spatial constructs will be explored. Although weekly thematic ideas will be presented, most classes will include an interweaving and repetition of a wide range of concepts. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARFD125: Foundations V: Color, Light and Time

Color functions in many ways - as a visual phenomenon of light, as a perceptual occurrence, as a pigment with specific mixing properties, and as an element with powerful expressive and symbolic potential. It is important that artists and designers understand the principles and properties of color for use in their work in any medium. This course introduces students to the history, theory, and interdisciplinary use of color and color systems via lectures, demonstrations, and exercises. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARGD211: Fundamentals of Adobe Creative Suite - Mac

A project and exercise-based approach to learning the programs used by graphic designers on Macintosh computers, covering the fundamentals of the latest versions of the Adobe Creative Suite series: Adobe Illustrator CS, InDesign CS, and Adobe Photoshop CS. These programs are prerequisite for all those interested in working within the design and publishing industries. The use of scanners for importing both art and text will also be investigated. Instruction in the course is tutorial-based, with supplemental lectures and demonstrations. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio.) 3 sh.

ARID100: Visualization and Illustration Techniques for Industrial Designers

This studio course concentrates on fundamental conventional drafting and illustration skills that enable the communication of design ideas in technical terms for purposes of understanding industrial fabrication. Starting Summer 2012: Students gain an understanding of the relevance and role of effective sketching and drawing techniques, as essential communication tools for industrial designers. The course work addresses 20 geometry and fundamental 30, descriptive geometry. The course focuses on developing students ' free hand sketching , marker rendering and technical drafting abilities , necessary to accurately communicate design ideas in conceptual , aesthetic and technical terms. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

ARID101: Advanced Techniques in Design Delineation

This studio course concentrates on extending the student's technical appreciation, knowledge and skill level in the production of industrial product drawings. Starting Summer 2012: Building on skills gained in ARID 100 the course concentrates on digitally developed and enhanced presentation techniques using industry standard computer applications. The course material extends students ' technical knowledge and skill level in creating effective presentations employing digitally enhanced sketches and computer generated drawings in design concept and idea development. Logic of effective presentation techniques appropriate for industrial designers is part of the coursework. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 100.

ARID111: Model Making and Prototype

The design and construction of scale models as a visualization and prototyping tool for designers and artists. Starting Summer 2012: Students will learn the role of model making and prototyping in the design process. The focus of the course is the construction of scale models as a means of visualizing design ideas. Students will learn the importance of making various study and presentation models and use appropriate techniques and materials relevant in each stage of the design process. Course assignments challenge students to study and develop an understanding of aesthetic forms and require them to focus on detail and workmanship. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.) 3 sh.

ARID120: Human Factors in Engineering

The study of information and guidelines related to the design of systems, facilities, equipment and products for human use and consumption. Basic concepts and principals of ergonomics related to the field of industrial design are emphasized. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 100, ARID 111.

ARID201: Industrial Design and Problem Solving

Students are introduced to processes and techniques by which design problems are analyzed, researched, prototyped and solved. Problem solving models and their application provide the focus within the scope and framework of all coursework. Starting Summer 2012: Problem solving models and their application provide the focus of all coursework. The course builds on the knowledge gained in previous subjects and addresses, problem sets ranging from, technical constrains, aesthetic requirements, material limitations, or system related problems. In this course, fast paced, research intensive assignments challenge students to think intuitively, exercise critical approaches to problem identification, problem solving and visualization. Successfully completed projects in this course begin the development of a student's industrial design portfolio. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 101 and ARID 120.

ARID202: Industrial Design Studio, Beginning

A laboratory-based learning experience for industrial designers that focuses on the evolution of consumer products from initial specifications to pre-production prototypes. Starting Summer 2012: The course content introduces students to different philosophies of design and to the design development process. Students will analyze products to learn to differentiate between various design approaches. Students will work on multiple, beginning level, design assignments that cover research, critical thinking and developing coherent arguments in all stages of the design development process. Students are expected to demonstrate thorough knowledge in all previous subject areas to successfully complete this course. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 120 and ARID 201.

ARID210: Materials Processing Studio I

A comprehensive introduction to various methods for producing metallic, polymeric, cellulose-based and ceramic materials. Content is organized around the major families or processes; casting, molding, forming, separating, chip removal, conditioning, assembling and finishing. Starting Summer 2012: The primary objective of this course is to equip students with the theories of traditional manufacturing production technology. Various methods for producing mass manufactured consumer products are analyzed, together with examining material properties best suited for a particular design. Students will learn about the most common material families used in product design and the manufacturing processes applied to satisfy production feasibility and design outcome. Laboratory activities and assignments are in conjunction with ARID 220 Digital Modeling 1. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 111.

ARID211: Materials Processing Studio II

Study of hand and machine processing utilizing layout, handwork, machining, and precision control systems. Includes an introduction to CNC machining. Laboratory activities are applied to prototyping and manufacturing processes appropriate for industrial designers. Starting Summer 2012: This course is a continuation of ARID 211, and emphasizes the application of technical knowledge pertinent to product design. In addition to demonstrating thorough knowledge of traditional manufacturing technology, students will engage in researching emerging technologies and new materials. The course covers how design aesthetics, functionality, sustainability and other objectives influence production. Laboratory activities and assignments are in conjunction with ARID 221 Digital Modeling 2 and experimentation with 3D digital prototyping.materials. The course covers how design aesthetics, functionality, sustainability and other objectives influence production. Laboratory activities and assignments are in conjunction with ARID 221 Digital Modeling 2 and experimentation with 3D digital prototyping. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 210.

ARID220: Introduction to Computer Aided Solid Modeling Representation

Beginning course enabling students to build conceptual and performance skills required to create and visualize three dimensional objects on a computer. Starting Summer 2012: This course is about the fundamentals of digital parametric modeling. Content is organized around part modeling, assembly models and technical drawing generation. Students are taught to build conceptual and performance models required in the practice of visualizing and testing three dimensional objects on computer. The course emphasizes the purpose and importance of digital modeling in the design process. This subject requires students to apply their knowledge of geometry, problem solving and 3D visualization ability. Students are expected to explore the possibilities of digital modeling with curiosity and inventiveness, maximizing their confidence and skill level. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 100 and ARID 101.

ARID221: Surface Modeling Techniques

Application of computer graphics to visualize problems associated with product design relating to form, space, color and factors of human interaction. Starting Summer 2012: The second part of the Digital Modeling course sequence focuses on expanding students' knowledge gained in ARID 220 and builds on the material of previous course subjects. Content provides an in depth knowledge of Computer Aided Design as it applies to product development on the corporate level. Simulation and visualization of problems, related to form and technological issues are discussed. Students are expected to independently explore the wide range of possibilities and approaches to digital modeling. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 220.

ARID302: Industrial Design Studio, Intermediate

To provide industrial design students opportunities to build on skills and attitudes developed in ARID 202 by collectively developing industrial design projects in small group sizes and producing a presentation quality prototype. Starting Summer 2012: The course content concentrates on aesthetic and technical aspects of design, appropriate for the junior level. The focus is on learning design practices, addressing cultural and social concerns, material selection and manufacturing for developing feasible design solutions. The development of coherent design documentation along with presentation quality prototypes are stressed in the course content. Research, application of critical thinking, exploration of opportunities related to factors, product marketing and technology are required. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 202.

ARID303: Industrial Design Studio, Advanced

An advanced level industrial design laboratory course enabling the student to identify a significant design project requiring sophisticated materials processing techniques to develop a pre-production prototype consumer product. Starting Summer 2012: Students propose a research topic for a significant design project to develop a product that satisfies the criteria of aesthetic sophistication and allows a conscious approach to technical development. Through total immersion into their subject throughout the semester, students will address the cultural, social, technical and production issues around their design, establish branding opportunities and demonstrate product feasibility on multiple levels. Completion of design documentation and a portfolio of the project are required at the end of the semester. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 302.

ARID360: Professional Practices in Industrial Design

Examination of myriad of issues facing industrial designers. Highlighted are legal, political, contractual and professional ethics and an introduction to professional organizations and career development. Starting Summer 2012: This course explores contractual, legal, financial and ethical issues industrial designers face in their professional careers. Students will also focus on developing their resume and a junior level portfolio, consisting of successfully completed previous courses. The portfolio must contain evidence of research, preliminary concepts, technical development, and a final design argument. The course also introduces students to professional organizations and career development. Successful completion of this course will enable students to apply professional skills and conduct associated with the field of Industrial Design. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 201.

ARID410: Project Design Development I

Students will develop projects based on their own interests, and working in conjunction with both faculty and/or actual clients, manage their projects through a complete design and prototyping cycle. Starting Summer 2012: Students begin to research and explore design opportunities to develop multiple project concepts based on their own interests for the purpose of proposing a complex industrial design thesis project. Students are required to provide evidence of all the knowledge they have obtained in the major, and to present data resulting from independent studies, exploration and research. The project complexity is expected to be on the level of a senior thesis and its viability is evaluated by a faculty appointed panel. Students work in conjunction with faculty, external consultants, or an actual client. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 303.

ARID411: Project Design Development II

An opportunity for students to focus independently on specific themes or interests. This is the second part of a two-part course sequence (with ARID 410) in preparing students to experience methods of solving complex industrial design issues. Starting Summer 2012: This course is the second part of a two- part course sequence (with ARID 410). Students focus on the completion of their thesis projects. They work independently; receive regular feedback from faculty and their external consultant. The objective is to build students' confidence in developing and finalizing design details and perfecting their projects to achieve a rational design solution. Preparing design documentation, study and presentation models and illustrative presentation panels is compulsory. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 410.

ARMJ200: Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning I

Introduction to metal working and jewelry techniques traditionally used in the shaping of useful articles. (6 hours studio.) 3 sh.

COED401: Cooperative Education Experience I

Cooperative Education is an internship program that integrates academic study and classroom theory with on-the-job experiences. It involves an educational partnership among Montclair State, business and non-profit organizations for the profesional development of students. Academic faculty assess the learning and award credits and a supervisor/employer evaluates progress. Students may not exceed 16 credits through enrollment in multiple co-op courses. () 3 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Determined by individual academic departments.

MKTG240: Introduction to Marketing

This introductory course is designed to expose the student to the basic areas that comprise marketing as a discipline. Marketing is viewed as a process that must be integrated with all other business functions. The basic theories, concepts, language and tools of marketing are introduced, and illustrations of their applicability to the business as well as non-profit sectors of the national economy with increasing stress on the global realities which affect the marketing function are addressed. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

MKTG344: Advertising Theory and Techniques

A broad introduction to advertising, promotion and marketing communications: historical roots of advertising; advertising from the viewpoint of clients, ad agencies and media; and both the marketing aspects (strategy development; account management) and creative aspects (copywriting; art direction; production and editing) of advertising. Covers all forms of advertising: print, broadcast; out-of home; and the latest advertising media such as direct mail and response; cable TV; and internet/interactive. In addition to traditional lectures, guest lectures are provided by the advertising professionals. Students also have a practical opportunity to create ads and commercials. (3 hours lecture.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business, Graphic Design, Fashion Studies.