Environmental Management (Ph.D.) - Graduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

 

The Montclair State Ph.D. program in Environmental Management is intended for students who have recently graduated from academic institutions with an appropriate baccalaureate or master's degree as well as for select early to mid-career professionals who would like to deepen their research credentials and their understanding of environmental management, thereby improving their qualifications for professional advancement. The program will emphasize investigations of the mechanisms and interconnections found within and among components of environmental systems (atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere) and with associated human systems (political, legal, social, economic). The program offers extensive field and laboratory work allowing students exposure to cutting edge environmental research, environmental management issues, and access to state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation and computer-assisted technology. Graduates of the program will be fully prepared to enter post-doctoral research in the discipline, academic institutions, government agencies, profit or non-for-profit organizations, private sectors, etc. that deal with the environment, sustainability, and restoration issues.

The specific objectives of the Ph.D. program include:

  • Primary emphasis on research, grounded in unique transdisciplinary approaches to address environmental issues that impact sustainability and future management.
  • Preparation of scientists who are fully primed to continue with creative, cutting edge scientific discoveries that will lead to important answers and approaches within relevant issues geared towards sustainable management of the environment.
  • Preparation of environmental scholars who will recognize and analyze relationships among scientific, technological, societal and economic issues, and will use research in a data-driven decision and policy making process, firmly rooted in current scientific knowledge and methodology.
  • Development of research professionals who will emerge as leaders in environmental management within academia, industry and government institutions.

Consistent with other environmental Ph.D. programs around the country, the dissertation of an Environmental Management doctoral student entails extensive original research generating new ideas and new data. The dissertation consists of high quality collection and analysis of extensive original data and field work that are prepared for publication in appropriate national/international peer reviewed journals. In addition, all doctoral students are expected to present ongoing results at professional conferences and are guided to prepare and submit competitive research proposals to national, state, regional or private agencies and foundations for potential funding support of their work (e.g., NSF doctoral support programs, EPA Fellowships, Heinz Scholars for Environmental Research of dissertations, etc.). The Ph.D. program requires submission of at least one journal article for review and publication prior to a students’ dissertation defense. The precedence is well set by the 4 graduates of the program who share 12 peer-reviewed journal articles and many presentations between them. The existing students have more than 25 publications, including 6 journal articles to date. The doctoral students have received awards for their outstanding presentations at scientific conferences.

The PhD program takes advantage of the University's location, within the heavily impacted New York-New Jersey metropolitan region, effectively making the region a laboratory to study a broad spectrum of environmental problems. Focus is particularly on the collection of data, analysis, understanding, and consideration of solutions to environmental issues in urban areas, both locally and parallel issues around the globe. With increased and appropriate scrutiny from government and community groups, industry must increase its vigilance on environmental controls and enhance efforts to minimize environmental disruption. Thus, the need for sound, scientifically-rooted environmental scholars and managers continues to grow. While environmental “problems” may focus on a particular issue or region (e.g. New Jersey brownfields, contaminants in Passaic River sediments, etc.), the Ph.D. program prepares students with a transdisciplinary perspective and approach that is critical to proper understanding of geographically different yet coincident environmental issues. For example, the cause and impact of a point source pollutant in New Jersey and in Shanghai may be similar, but the approach to comprehensive recognition, understanding, and possible rectification of the problem could be widely different. Students are encouraged to compare regional environmental problems with other heavily urbanized sites in developed and developing world countries.

Research

Research in the PhD program can be broadly classified into the following clusters:

Cluster 1 - Environmental Quality and Remediation

Key Researchers: Drs. Sarkar, Deng, Feng, Kruge, Rakshit, Wu, Barrett (adjunct), Datta (adjunct). Key Questions: What are key pollutants affecting the New Jersey environment? How do environmental factors impact the fate and transport of these pollutants? What kinds of risks do these pollutants pose to human health and ecology? What sort of "green" remediation measures can be developed/adopted to lower or even eliminate such risks? Scope of Research: Characterization/quantification of various physico-chemical processes that determine the behavior of inorganic/organic contaminants in soils and sediments. Evaluation of data (field/greenhouse/experimental) to investigate plant/human bioavailability, aqueous and solid phase speciation, precipitation and adsorption mechanisms of chemicals (contaminants and nutrients) in soils resulting from domestic/industrial wastes. Evaluation of chemical, microbial and phytoremediation techniques to clean up environmental contaminants, e.g., heavy metals. Primary Tools: Spectroscopy, chromotography, spatial analysis, statistical analysis.

Cluster 2 - Environmental and Urban Ecology

Key Researchers: Drs. Prezant, Bologna, Egan, Hazard, Kight, Monsen, Vanderklein, Wu, Weinstein (adjunct). Key Questions: How do invasive species, issues of exploitation, current and through time, and environmental perturbations influence organismal behavior and ecosystem health? Scope of Research: Understanding interactions among hydrological, geological, biogeochemical and biological systems in urbanized, freshwater, estuarine, and coastal environments. Analyzing the relationships between habitat and the production of certain species, including finfish and shellfish, to identify critical habitats that link "bottom up" recruitment of juveniles to the adult stages. Primary Tools: Remote sensing; spectroscopy, chromotography, and biomolecular analysis.

Cluster 3 - Earth Systems and Climate Change

Key Researchers: Drs. Brachfeld, Passchier, Chopping, Galster, Pope, (New Earth Systems Science faculty starting Fall 2011). Key Questions: How can environmental changes induced by human activities be quantified and separated from those forced by naturally-occurring climate cycles? Scope of Research: Monitoring of Earth's surface processes from the ground, air, ocean, and space. Earth's climate systems include regularly-repeating cycles, positive and negative feedbacks, and abrupt events—processes that affect Earth's surface temperature, the chemistry of the atmosphere and ocean, soil moisture, and the size and stability and ice sheets; and in turn affect societal communities through sea level rise and fall, the frequency and intensity of storms, the type and extent of vegetation, changes in the geographic range of flora, fauna, and pathogens. Primary Tools: Sediment coring, remote sensing, materials analysis.

Cluster 4 - Environmental Modeling and Visualization

Key Researchers: Drs. Chopping, Yu, Feng, Ophori, Sarkar, Billings, Robilla,Vaidya,Verde, Barrett (adjunct), (New Earth Systems Science faculty starting Fall 2011). Key Questions: How can remote sensing be used to quantitatively describe changes in the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, or geosphere and predict future anthropogenic changes in the earth system? How accurately can one model reactive transport of contaminants in surface/subsurface environments at both spatial and temporal scales? Scope of Research: Application of remote sensing techniques to quantitatively model ecosystems' structure, function and health; hydrodynamic modeling of water flow; and sediment and contaminant transport in aquatic systems; and modeling of urban systems using GIS/spatial analysis (e.g., GIS-based design of urban streets to lessen stormwater runoff and flooding). Design of mobile sensing arrays/platforms in random "noisy" environments. Analysis of effects of sustainable environmental remediation technologies, e.g., natural drainage applications of bioremediation and management practices. Primary Tools: Remote sensing GIS, geochemical and hydrogeological modeling codes, statistics.

Cluster 5 - Geodynamics

Key Researchers: Drs. Brachfeld, Galster, Gorring, Ophori, Passchier, Pope, Vaidya, Yecko. Key Questions: How are deep earth processes manifested at the earth's surface? What role do natural surface and interior geologic processes play in the Earth's climatic system at both short and long timescales? How does the morphology and disturbance dynamics of continental shelf sediments affect benthic community structure? What models can be used to acquire fast and accurate multidimensional imaging and delineation of hydrocarbons in deep and ultra deep Gulf of Mexico strata? Scope of Research: Understanding of impacts of large-scale geological processes, interactions within and between layers, and large-scale cycling of material between the layered structures. Investigating the nature of weathering and soil-forming processes and their expressions sedimentary basins and hydrocarbon traps) at the Earth's surface. Primary Tools: Seismology, magnetism, petrology, GPS, InSAR, and geophysical data analysis.

Cluster 6 - Environmental Forensics

Key Researchers: Drs. Kruge, Galster, Sarkar, Feng, Brachfeld, Barrett (adjunct). Key Questions: Can environmental contaminants be traced back to their point of origin? Scope of Research: Identifying the source and age of pollutants and their transport mechanisms in air, water, soil, and biota—Especially considering that the New Jersey-New York area contains hundreds of Brownfield sites and Superfund sites, reclamation of these sites often involves public debate and law suits over the nature of contaminants on the site, identifying the party or parties responsible for those contaminants, and determining legal consequences and financial liability for the cleanup costs. Primary Tools: Mineralogy, microscopy, chromotography and spectroscopy.

Cluster 7 - Environmental Policy, Social, and Management Impacts

Key Researchers: Drs. Taylor, Vedwan, Batkay, Kay, Siegel, Wishnick, Mukherjee, Chatterjee, Zhang,Weinstein (adjunct), (New Environmental Economics faculty starting Fall 2011). Key Questions: How should public policy and urban development practices be influenced by research in sustainability science? What are technical, economic, social barriers to the development of sustainable energy practices (e.g., solar, geothermal, etc.)? Scope of Research: Constructing indicators and establishing models for monitoring urban systems. Finding opportunities for enhancing sustainability, equity, and vulnerability reduction in communities and institutions. Estimating ecological and human health risk for environmental decision-making.


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Complete the following 7 requirement(s):

  1. CORE COURSES

    Complete 4 courses for 12 semester hours:

    BIOL 570 Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 700 Earth Systems Science (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 760 Organizational Environmental Management (3 hours lecture) 3
    LAWS 590 Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. REQUIRED RESEARCH COURSES

    Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours:

    EAES 895 Research Project in Environmental Management I (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 896 Research Project in Environmental Management II (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s) for a minimum of 36 semester hours:

    1. COLLOQUIUM

      Complete for a minimum of 6 semester hours.

      EAES 792 Special Topics 1-4
    2. DISSERTATION

      Complete for a minimum of 30 semester hours.

      EAES 900 Dissertation Advisement 3-12
  4. ELECTIVES

    Complete a total of 18 semester hours from the following. Elective courses must be selected with committee approval.

    1. Complete 3 semester hours-18 semester hours from the following list.

      EAES 610 Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 611 Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 660 Seminar in Environmental Management (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 701 Modeling in Environmental Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 710 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 541 Applied Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 0 semester hours- 15 semester hours from the following list.

      BIOL 532 Advanced Entomology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 550 Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 553 Microbial Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 571 Physiological Plant Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 572 Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 573 Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 574 Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 580 Evolutionary Mechanisms (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 595 Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 534 Chromatographic Methods: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      CNFS 510 Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas 2
      EAES 505 Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 526 Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 532 Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 533 Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 535 Geophysics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 545 Paleoecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 550 Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 551 Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 562 Waste Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 563 Natural Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 565 Environmental Change and Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 566 Environmental Problem Solving (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 569 Air Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 680 Reading Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies (2 hours seminar) 2
      EAES 792 Special Topics 1-4
      ECON 501 Economic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 503 Economic Problems of the Third World (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 508 Economics of Public Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 544 Government and Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 502 Determinants of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 565 Foundations of Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 501 International Business: Concepts and Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 511 Global Business Endeavors (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 520 Managing The Global Workforce (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 510 Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHMS 565 Tidal Marsh Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      SOCI 581 Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture) 3
  5. QUALIFYING PORTFOLIO/EXAM/ASSESSMENT

    Successfuly complete the qualifying portfolio, examination or assessment requirement.

  6. ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY

    Following completion of pre-dissertation research courses and qualifying exam, you may be admitted to candidacy.

  7. DISSERTATION REQUIREMENT

    Complete a dissertation in accordance with Graduate School and doctoral program requirements.


Course Descriptions:

BIOL532: Advanced Entomology (3 hours lecture)

Examination of insects as model systems for biological inquiry. Topics include an integrative treatment of insect molecular biology, genetics, physiology, behavior, evolution and ecology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in M.S. Biology program or permission of instructor.

BIOL550: Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture)

Coverage of selected topics such as the microbial genetics, antibiotic action, bacteriophage, virus, cancer and microbial metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications of modern research in specific areas. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL553: Microbial Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Exploration of the essential role of microorganisms in the ecosystem. Lecture, field trips and laboratory will demonstrate the ubiquitous and highly adaptive evolution of microorganisms, their interrelationships and their profound influence on the biosphere. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL570: Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Basic ecological principles and concepts. Habitat approach to field exercises in fresh water and terrestrial ecology. Intra and interspecific relationships with all living members of the ecosystem, problems in plant and animal biology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and zoology.

BIOL571: Physiological Plant Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

The effects of soil, light, and water on plant growth, as well as, toxic effects of metals and salinity are measured using growth chamber and greenhouse facilities. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and one course in field biology.

BIOL572: Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Important biotic, chemical and physical parameters of New Jersey's estuaries. Evolution and successional trends of estuarine communities. Ecology of individual communities studied by field trips to Delaware Bay shore and to some Atlantic coast bays, marshes and offshore barrier islands. Also offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL573: Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Community structure, trophic dynamics, species diversity and distribution of bottom dwelling organisms in relationship to their environment; lectures, laboratory work and field investigations of the marine benthos. Also offered at NJ Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL574: Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture)

This seminar course explains the ecological consequences of animal behavior, viewed within the context of how behavior evolves and how populations adapt to their environments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Field biology and zoology.

BIOL580: Evolutionary Mechanisms (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students the opportunity to read primary resource material and interpret the findings of the data. This course will also teach students how to read, critique and present scientific data to a peer group. Students will analyze, discuss and present primary research articles with respect to scientific content, accuracy of the data and significance of the experiments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the biology master's program or permission of the instructor.

BIOL595: Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture)

This course addresses concerns about the loss of biological diversity and genetic resources through species extinctions. Students will learn about the importance of maintaining biological diversity, the problems involved in monitoring and protecting sensitive and crucial habitat, the impact of human societies on biodiversity, the alternatives to the destruction of habitat/species, the prospects of restoration, and the policies needed to prevent the loss of biological diversity. Students will also learn about population processes that are directly related to species survival. This course is cross listed with CNFS 595. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

CHEM534: Chromatographic Methods: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

A combined lecture/hands-on course in the theory and practice of chromatography; including GC, HPLC, GC-MS, GPC, and SFC, as well as computerized instrument control, data acquistion, and processing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 310 (Analytical Chemistry) and 311 (Instrumental Analysis) or equivalents.

CNFS510: Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas

Students will examine the impact of recreation on natural areas in four of New Jersey's major ecosystems: upland forest, pine lands, salt marsh and barrier beach. Investigation of recreation records and plans will allow for comparison and contrast of heavily used sites with those which have been relatively undisturbed. Students develop "recreation impact statements". CNFS 511 must be taken concurrently. 2 sh.

EAES505: Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of the relationships between man and the physical environment of atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Particular attention to problems of mineral resource and fossil-fuel depletion; pollution of air, water and soils and waste disposal and recycling, simple computer modeling of environmental situations. Previous course GEOS 525 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES526: Geochemistry (3 hours lecture)

Chemical laws and principles applied to the earth, chemical composition of the earth, distribution and relative abundance of the elements. Radioactive materials, atmospheric precipitation of geochemicals, the geochemistry of polluted water (including solid and liquid wastes) study of meteorites. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 575 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES532: Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduction to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling, using a variety of current software packages. Saturated and unsaturated media will be considered. Emphasis is on application of models to the solution of common problems encountered in hydrology industry and research. Previous course GEOS 552 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of EAES 331; and MATH 116 or MATH 122 or departmental approval.

EAES533: Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

The spatial patterns of the water resource both as surface water and ground-water. Processes affecting availability and techniques of estimation are stressed. Previous course GEOS 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES535: Geophysics (3 hours lecture)

Theory and application of conventional geophysical methods: seismology, magnetism, electricity and gravity. Laboratory includes the collection and interpretation of geophysical data. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 571 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program.

EAES545: Paleoecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Distribution and association of fossils as interpreted from the evidence presented in the geologic record. Detailed paleoecological field study made of selected faunal assemblages. Previous course GEOS 530 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES550: Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture)

Development and evolution of the ocean basins; marine sedimentation; shoreline development and classification; submarine topography; mineral resources of the sea. Laboratory analysis of marine sediments and fossil assemblages. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 560 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program or department approval.

EAES551: Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Coastlines and their evolution; processes and materials of the coastal zone; shore zone hydrodynamics and sedimentation: beach and barrier systems with special emphasis on the New Jersey shoreline. Offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 551. Previous course PHMS 581 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES or MS Biology graduate program and equivalent of EAES 200 or departmental approval.

EAES562: Waste Management (3 hours lecture)

This course examines liquid waste management (sewage, sewerage, septic, and acid mine drainage) and solid waste management (composting, incineration, dumps, sanitary landfills, ocean dumping, and resource recovery). Management of radioactive wastes is included. Previous course GEOS 513 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES563: Natural Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Provide background in natural resource management; wildlife, fisheries, forests, water and related components. Includes field trips. Previous course ENVR 551 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES565: Environmental Change and Communication (3 hours lecture)

Prepare students as professional environmentalists: Communication and journalism strategies, theory of persuasion, and roles as catalyst, solution giver, process helpers, and resource person. Previous course ENVR 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES566: Environmental Problem Solving (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to train students to define environmental problems, develop their skills in solving these problems, as well as commitment to work toward their solution. Each lesson consists of student preparation of reading selected articles, classroom orientation, field trips, and the student-instructor follow-up. Field trip topics include pedestrian/vehicle conflict, school site development, plants as a city resource, urban/rural recreation, sign ordinances, transportation and similar topics. Offered as ENVR 508 through Spring 2012. To become EAES 566 effective Summer 2012. 3 sh.

EAES569: Air Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Spatial distribution of energy in the atmosphere treated in terms of natural factors and man's induced changes (atmospheric pollution). Incoming sun energy as modified by man is traced through the atmosphere, vegetation, soil and water. Previous course GEOS 501 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES610: Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to techniques for the analysis of spatial data. The course will heavily utilize GIS and Remote Sensing data with particular attention to applications and manipulation techniques. Topics include characterizing spatial data, data sampling, visualization, data modeling, point pattern analysis, and spatial data interaction. Previous course EUGS 680 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) program and equivalent of EAES510 or departmental approval.

EAES611: Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a forum to explore cutting edge advances in remote sensing of the environment afforded by new satellite and aircraft based imaging platforms and to provide facility with image processing (IP) and geographic information systems (GIS) software. Topics covered include multispectral, hyperspectral and multiangular reflectance data, very high resolution panchromatic imagery, active radar and lidar systems, microwave imagery, advanced spatial and statistical raster analysis, and interfaces to GIS. Previous course ENVR 655 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES311 or EAES511 or departmental approval.

EAES660: Seminar in Environmental Management (3 hours seminar)

This is a methods seminar focusing on the techniques of managing a project with environmental significance. Students will design and plan in detail a project to improve an existing environmental problem or to implement an economically important project that would minimize environmental problems. Previous course ENVR 610 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES680: Reading Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies (2 hours seminar)

Required of all master's degree candidates concentrating in Geography and Urban Studies. This semester entails directed independent study in preparation for a 3-hour written comprehensive examination. Previous course EUGS 603 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

EAES700: Earth Systems Science (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates geosystems. In studying processes within the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere, the course provides a holistic understanding of earth's historical, present, and future systems. Current techniques and tools for data collection and analysis, such as field methods, GIS, Remote Sensing, are included in the course. Previous course ENVR 770 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES701: Modeling in Environmental Science (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces fundamental concepts of interphase and intraphase transfer and transport related to our living environment. It focuses more on natural interphase transfer, including pathways and fate, and is mainly designed to understand the mechanics and processes. Previous course ENVR 775 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES710: Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

This course will allow students with demonstrated knowledge and skills in the geographic information sciences (GIS and/or Spatial Analysis and/or Remote Sensing) to expand on the range of techniques at their disposal for analyzing and visualizing geographic and other spatial data sets. Students are expected to develop and effect a small but well-defined research project which will result in a paper and an oral presentation. The course will make much use of industry standard GIS and Remote Sensing software packages in data application, manipulation and visualization. The course will cover programming in 3GLs, 4GLs and macro languages for processing and analyzing extensive spatial data sets as well as the construction of customized graphical user interfaces for specific applications. Previous course EUGS 770 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 510, EAES 511, EAES 610 or departmental approval.

EAES760: Organizational Environmental Management (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the impact of profit, non-profit and public organizations on the natural environment. It analyzes the pressure, the types, and the procedures for implementing an environmental management system (EMS); and case studies from various organizations. It also studies the internal and external strategies of organizations relative to environmental sustainability goals. Previous course ENVR 760 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or department approval.

EAES792: Special Topics

Special Topics is a detailed and literature intensive exploration of one particular focus in contemporary environmental management. The topic for the course will fall under one of several general areas. Topics will cover specific research areas in water-land systems, sustainability, vulnerability and equity, modeling analysis and visualization. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the Doctoral Degree in Environmental Management. This course may be repeated twice for a maximum of 8.0 credits. Previous course ENVR 704 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES895: Research Project in Environmental Management I (3 hours lecture)

The course is structured to provide doctoral students with the opportunity to develop or update the research skills needed to design and complete a dissertation. Students can either develop an independent topic for their research project in consultation with faculty advisors or they can choose to work on one of the University's on-going environmental studies research projects. Previous course ENVR 895 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the PhD Environmental Management (ENVM) Program.

EAES896: Research Project in Environmental Management II (3 hours lecture)

The course is structured to provide doctoral students with the opportunity to develop or update the research skills needed to design and complete a dissertation. Students can either develop an independent topic for their research project in consultation with faculty advisors or they can choose to work on one of the University's on-going environmental studies research projects. Previous course ENVR 896 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 895.

EAES900: Dissertation Advisement

This department requires 30 credits of EAES 900. While enrolled in EAES 900, students will work with their Dissertation Chair and their Dissertation Committee. Credits are reported as IP (In Progress) while the dissertation is being written. At the conclusion of the dissertation defense, a final grade of Pass or Fail will be recorded. Previous course ENVR 900 effective through Winter 2012. 3 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the Ph.D. Environmental Management (ENVM) Program; Advancement to Candidacy.

ECON501: Economic Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The resource allocation and distribution of income implications of a market-oriented economy operating under various degrees of competition. Also analyzed are the determinants of consumer and market demand and the theoretical cost structure of firms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: M.B.A. degree students, M.A. Environmental Studies majors with concentration in Environmental Management (ESEM), Doctor of Environmental Management (ENVM) students; or M.B.A. Director approval.

ECON503: Economic Problems of the Third World (3 hours lecture)

A survey of major economic problems of the Third World; examination of the economic structure of developing countries and of general theories of economic development; critical evaluation of various policy alternatives for their development; analysis of possible economic relationships between First and Second Worlds with the Third World. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON508: Economics of Public Management (3 hours lecture)

Computer-based applications of capital theory to the decision-making process of government. Analysis of alternative approaches to public sector project evaluation. Spreadsheet applications of project analysis in physical and human resource management areas covering water resources, public health, and education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON544: Government and Business (3 hours lecture)

The evolution of government influences on the functioning of the American economy. The causes and consequences of government regulation and control. The importance of economic analysis in the foundation of public policies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501.

HLTH502: Determinants of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture)

Advanced study of health and safety aspects of the environment: air, water, industrial pollution and the impact of expanding population on health problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Environmental Studies w/ conc: Environmental Science (ESES) MA majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH565: Foundations of Epidemiology (3 hours lecture)

Provides an understanding of the epidemiologic method of identifying disease-causing agents. Emphasizes the generation of hypotheses based on descriptive epidemiologic data, the testing of hypotheses by analytical epidemiologic research design, the determination of causality and value of epidemiologic research in developing disease prevention programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, Health Education (HLPE) MA & CER and Nutrition and Food Science (NUFS) MS majors only.

INBS501: International Business: Concepts and Issues (3 hours lecture)

This course offers students an in-depth introduction to international business concepts and issues in addition to exposure to the fundamentals of international business, students will become aware of the dynamics of global business environment, international competition in both the domestic and foreign markets as well as strategic issues in international business management and operations. The course adopts a critical approach; it presents both sides of an international business issue. Greater emphasis will be placed on managerial implications of information presented in the course. The course also includes discussion of ethics and social responsibility in the conduct of international business. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501; M.B.A. degree students only.

INBS511: Global Business Endeavors (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an in-depth analysis of critical components of global business management. It examines the challenges of the changing international competitive environment, as well as the political, economic, and legal influences on global corporate leadership. This course will help students outline multinational business strategies, understand internationalization process, and develop analytical skills necessary to succeed in dynamic global business activities. Cross listed with MGMT 511. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 501. MBA degree students only.

INBS520: Managing The Global Workforce (3 hours lecture)

The objective of this course is to increase knowledge about managing a global workforce. The course provides a framework for understanding how individual, group, and organization factors impact global businesses and how organizations respond to them. Some focus will be placed on understanding cross-cultural issues within this context. Practical application, case analysis and effective management practices of international companies are emphasized. Cross listed with Management, MGMT 520. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 505. MBA degree students only.

LAWS590: Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of Environmental Law. The course will utilize a model and method approach, which will present theory and procedure in a case problen context. The course will acquaint students with various traditional legal theories and compare and contrast them with law as it has evolved to meet new changes in society. 3 sh.

MGMT510: Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how managers can utilize modern Human Resource practices in order to improve company performance and efficiencies. Topics include staffing for quality, outsourcing, use of core and contingent workforce, managing workforce commitment and performance, legal issues, managing careers, and reward systems. A case study approach is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 505. MBA degree students only.

PHMS565: Tidal Marsh Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Salt marsh development and physiography: community structure, energetics, and interrelationships. The role of salt marshes in estuarine and marine systems. The impact of man on the marsh. Offered at N.J. Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI581: Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce the student to the interesting and complex relationships that exist between society, health and health care. Class lecture discussions will focus on the connections between social structure, the quality of the physical and social environment and health. Special attention will be given to work environments. This course will also deal with the effects of social factors on the experience of one's body, the perception of disease and on the construction of medical knowledge. 3 sh.

STAT541: Applied Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Review of estimation and hypothesis testing for one sample and two sample problems; introduction to non-parametric statistics and linear regression; fundamental principles of design, completely randomized design, randomized block design, latin square, and 2 factor design. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 or STAT 443 and permission of graduate program coordinator.