Teaching, with Teacher Certification in English (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities (M.A.T.) Graduate (Combined B.A./M.A.T.) - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

The Bachelor's/MAT Dual-Certification Inclusive Education Program provides students with the opportunity to receive both a bachelor's and Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree with teacher certification in both general education and special education.  The program is designed to help teachers develop competencies needed to teach students who have disabilities along with those who do not.

In this program, students complete general education and major requirements and an initial set of coursework in education as undergraduates. As graduate students, they will complete the coursework in education and conduct their fieldwork and student teaching.

TEACHING (ENGLISH & STUDENTS w/DISAB)

Complete 36 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE PART I

    Complete 2 courses:

    SPED 586 Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
    SPED 591 Teaching Organization and Study Skills for the Inclusive Classroom. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI) or Master of Education (MED) (3 hours lecture) 2-3
  2. FALL SEMESTER

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete .

      ENGL 571 Teaching Methods (Secondary English) 4
    2. Complete 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete the following 2 courses:

        CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture) 3
        CURR 527 Fieldwork (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course from the following:

        ECEL 691 Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 691 Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE PART III

    Complete the following 2 courses:

    CURR 529 Student Teaching (6 hours lab) 6
    CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. ADDITIONAL GRADUATE COURSES

    The following coursework is completed as part of the undergraduate component.

    1. Complete 2 courses: (Courses are completed as part of the undergraduate program).

      SPED 584 Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom 2-3
      SPED 585 Technology for Inclusive Classrooms 2-3
    2. Complete 1 course from:

      ENGL 500 Old English Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 505 Chaucer (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 508 Shakespeare Studies: Tragedies (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 509 Shakespeare Studies: Comedies (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 510 Shakespeare Studies: Histories (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 511 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 512 Renaissance Literature I: Prose (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 513 Renaissance Literature II: Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 515 Seventeenth Century Literature: Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 516 Seventeenth Century Literature: Prose (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 518 Milton (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 520 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 521 The Augustan Age (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 525 The English Novel from Defoe to Austen (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 529 British Romanticism I: Wordsworth and Coleridge (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 530 British Romanticism II: Byron, Shelley, and Keats (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 531 Victorian Studies I: Prose (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 532 Victorian Studies II: Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 533 Victorian Studies III: Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 535 Turn-of-the-Century British Writers (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 540 The Modern British Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 542 The Irish Renaissance (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 550 Studies in Early American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 552 American Poetry to 1912 (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 555 American Romanticism (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 556 Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 557 American Realism (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 560 Modern American Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 561 Modern American Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 563 Recent American Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 564 American Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 565 Black American Women Writers (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 597 Independent Study in British Literature 3
      ENGL 598 Independent Study in American Literature 3
      ENGL 600 Seminar in British Literature (3 hours seminar) 3
      ENGL 601 Seminar in American Literature (3 hours seminar) 3
      ENGL 605 Seminar in Literary Research (3 hours seminar) 3

Course Descriptions:

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork (3 hours lecture)

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching (6 hours lab)

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ECEL691: Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

The culminating experience for the BA/MAT Dual Certification programs, this course focuses on policies, issues, and trends related to the education of students in inclusive settings. Relevant sociological and cultural persepctives focused on the social construction of dis/ability are examined as well as their implications for the schools. Students synthesize, analyze, and evaluate issues of relevance to inclusive education that will impact their professional careers as teachers in inclusive environments and the future of inclusive education. Students also conduct an empirical research project on inclusion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 graduate credits in the program.

ENGL500: Old English Literature (3 hours lecture)

Specimens of Old English prose and poetry are read in the original language and studied for an appreciation of their literary art. No previous study of Old English is required. The first half of the course is spent on grammar and pronunciation, using prose from the chronicles and other works as examples. Oral recitation is required of all students. Poetry is studied in the second half of the course. Topics include the oral-formulaic tradition, the verse types, and the mixture of Christian and pagan themes characteristic of the literature. 3 sh.

ENGL505: Chaucer (3 hours lecture)

An intensive study of the Canterbury Tales and other works against their literary and social backgrounds, with special attention to Chaucer's language and to the procedures of Chaucerian scholarship. No previous study of Middle English is required. 3 sh.

ENGL508: Shakespeare Studies: Tragedies (3 hours lecture)

Shakespeare's tragic drama against a background of classical and Medieval theories of tragedy, and in relation to the practice of his contemporaries. Consideration is given to Shakespeare's use of plot sources and to Elizabethan theories of rhetoric. 3 sh.

ENGL509: Shakespeare Studies: Comedies (3 hours lecture)

Shakespeare's comic art in the light of comic theory and practice from Aristotle to the present. Areas of analysis include Shakespeare's use of Roman and native English comedy, his language, characters, sources, and the traditions of Shakespearean criticism. 3 sh.

ENGL510: Shakespeare Studies: Histories (3 hours lecture)

A study of the ten English history plays. Shakespeare's use of historical sources and variations from historical fact are examined carefully. Attention is given to scholarship, criticism, and production of the history plays. 3 sh.

ENGL511: Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive view of the period of the apex of English drama, from 1550 to the closing of the theaters in 1642. Major works by Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists other than Shakespeare are studied in the light of Medieval English drama and the new Renaissance theories of Shakespeare's contemporaries. Attention is given to changes in subject matter, tone, dramaturgy, and staging during the latter part of the period. 3 sh.

ENGL512: Renaissance Literature I: Prose (3 hours lecture)

Major prose writers of the sixteenth century, including Erasmus, More, Castiglione, Sidney, Lyly, Nashe, and Hooker. Attention is given to the development of satire, romance, the picaresque, and utopian fiction. 3 sh.

ENGL513: Renaissance Literature II: Poetry (3 hours lecture)

A study of English poetry of the sixteenth century, a period of major changes. The principal focus is on poets who contributed to the development of the English lyric (Wyatt, Surrey, Raleigh, Sidney, Shakespeare). The unique poetry of Edmund Spenser, particularly the Faerie Queene, is also examined. 3 sh.

ENGL515: Seventeenth Century Literature: Poetry (3 hours lecture)

The poetry of Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton, supplemented by historical and intellectual background and by selections from the works of Vaughan, Traherne, Crashaw, Herrick, Suckling, Lovelace, Carew, and Cowley. Stylistic categories such as the metaphysical, the classical, and the meditative are considered in the light of a close critical analysis of the major poetry. 3 sh.

ENGL516: Seventeenth Century Literature: Prose (3 hours lecture)

English prose between the Elizabethan period and the age of Queen Anne, including the development of prose style and the origins of the short narrative, of scientific writing, and of modern literary criticism. Authors include Milton, Pepys, Bunyan, Walton, Burton, Bacon, Brown, and Aubrey. 3 sh.

ENGL518: Milton (3 hours lecture)

Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and some of the minor works are analyzed intensively. Styles, themes and techniques are considered in the light of Milton's life and the political and religious controversies of his time. The poetry is also studied in terms of its relation to Milton's Italian and classical models, his Elizabethan masters, and his contemporaries. 3 sh.

ENGL520: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (3 hours lecture)

Heroic, comic, and sentimental drama by playwrights from Dryden to Sheridan with emphasis on their reflection of the literary and social climate. Attention is also given to the physical theater and to the composition of the audience during the restoration and 18th century. 3 sh.

ENGL521: The Augustan Age (3 hours lecture)

The literature of the Restoration and early eighteenth century in its cultural contexts. Topics include criticism and aesthetics, satire, the new nature poetry, and the relationship between literary forms and philosophical and critical ideas. Emphasis on the works of Dryden, Swift, Pope, Gay, Addison and Steele, and Thomson. 3 sh.

ENGL525: The English Novel from Defoe to Austen (3 hours lecture)

The rise of the English novel and its various traditions: Comic, realistic, satirical, psychological, and gothic. Authors include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. 3 sh.

ENGL529: British Romanticism I: Wordsworth and Coleridge (3 hours lecture)

The poetry of the two most important writers of the first generation of the Romantic movement in England. Emphasis is placed on the significance of their poetry in terms of the poets' own personal experience and in the context of the age of democratic and industrial revolution. 3 sh.

ENGL530: British Romanticism II: Byron, Shelley, and Keats (3 hours lecture)

The major works of the second-generation Romantics are studied in relation to the experience of their lives and the movements of their time. Attention is also given to their letters and critical writings. 3 sh.

ENGL531: Victorian Studies I: Prose (3 hours lecture)

The responses of the major prose writers of the period to such issues as the rise of a large working class, the sudden growth of cities, demands for political freedom, and the promises and threats of science. The problems of establishing an aesthetic of nonfiction prose are also considered. Works by Carlyle, Mill, Arnold, Macaulay, Huxley, Newman, Pater, and Wilde. 3 sh.

ENGL532: Victorian Studies II: Novel (3 hours lecture)

The Victorian novel in its historical and cultural contexts, with emphasis on the responses of the most vital art form of the age to the unprecedented changes in English life that took place during the era. Works by Thackeray, Trollope, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, and others. 3 sh.

ENGL533: Victorian Studies III: Poetry (3 hours lecture)

The course concentrates on the major mid-Victorian poets, Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold, and to a lesser extent on their successors among the pre-Raphaelites, the aesthetes, and the rhymers. 3 sh.

ENGL535: Turn-of-the-Century British Writers (3 hours lecture)

An examination of British literature in the transitional period between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Writers might include Hardy, Conrad, Joyce, and Lawrence. Attention is given to the ways in which their works illuminate the movement from Victorian to modernist thinking and demonstrate the relation between literary consciousness and society. 3 sh.

ENGL540: The Modern British Novel (3 hours lecture)

Innovations in characterization, narrative technique, and theme under the impact of major twentieth-century political, economic, and cultural developments. Works by Forster, Huxley, Waugh, Orwell, Greene, Amis, Murdoch, Lessing, and others. 3 sh.

ENGL542: The Irish Renaissance (3 hours lecture)

The Irish contribution to twentieth-century literature and aesthetic theory, specifically to that brand of experimentation, individualism, and internationalism associated with the idea of the modern. Special attention to W. B. Yeats, James Joyce, J. M. Synge, Sean O'Casey, and Frank O'Connor. 3 sh.

ENGL550: Studies in Early American Literature (3 hours lecture)

All major and several minor American writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are studied within several contexts: literary, religious, philosophical, and political. Topics include the development of American literature, 1620-1800; the effects of puritanism and deism; the concept of the American dream; the originality of the founding fathers; and the extent to which modern American literature and culture reflect the colonial heritage. 3 sh.

ENGL552: American Poetry to 1912 (3 hours lecture)

The continuity of American poetry as a national body of literature, with distinctively American themes, subjects, techniques, and critical theories; the shaping influences of English and continental writers; and the impact of American poets on their European contemporaries. Particular emphasis on Poe, Whitman, Emerson, Melville, Dickinson, Crane, and Robinson. 3 sh.

ENGL555: American Romanticism (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the Romantic movement in America with attention to transcendentalism and other social movements. Writers might include Brown, Irving, Cooper, Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Louisa May Alcott, and Whitman. 3 sh.

ENGL556: Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville (3 hours lecture)

An intensive examination of the writings of the three "Dark Romantics" of the American Renaissance, set against their biographical backgrounds and the literary and historical contexts in which they worked. 3 sh.

ENGL557: American Realism (3 hours lecture)

The development of American realistic fiction, with emphasis on the works of Twain, Howells, and James in relation to their literary heritage and to their social milieu. Attention will also be given to local-color writers, such as Jewett and Freeman, and to naturalist writers, such as Crane, Norris, and London. 3 sh.

ENGL560: Modern American Fiction (3 hours lecture)

After a brief examination of late nineteenth-century realism, the major writers of the twentieth century (up to World War II) are studied with special attention to the critical attitudes of the period and to related scholarship. Authors include Dreiser, Stephen Crane, Sherwood Anderson, Hemingway, and Faulkner. 3 sh.

ENGL561: Modern American Poetry (3 hours lecture)

Beginning with background material on late nineteenth-century poetry, the course examines selected major modern poets. The changing scene in modern poetry is noted, and the reading of contemporary poets is included. Works by Hart Crane, Hilda Doolittle, T. S. Eliot, Robert Lowell, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and others. 3 sh.

ENGL563: Recent American Fiction (3 hours lecture)

American fiction of approximately the last forty years in the context of American culture and traditions. The course analyzes the characteristics of theme, technique, and sensibility which form the basis of a writer's response to the ambiguities of life in the contemporary world. Works studied might include Bellow, Roth, Didion, Walker, Doctorow, and Morrison. 3 sh.

ENGL564: American Drama (3 hours lecture)

The major American playwrights, such as Eugene O'Neill, Thornton Wilder, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams, are placed in the perspective of their contemporaries and of the traditions of the American stage. 3 sh.

ENGL565: Black American Women Writers (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the writings of Black American women. We will examine the conditions out of which Black women write and the ways in which their works are critiqued and theorized. Discussions will center on questions of race, gender, sexuality, and class; narrative approaches and literary devices; and the Black "womanist" creative tradition. 3 sh.

ENGL571: Teaching Methods (Secondary English)

This graduate level course prepares students to teach English on the secondary level (grades 6-12). ENGL 571 is required for graduate students enrolled in either the Initial Certification or MAT program. The course familiarizes students with the English classroom, the design of lesson and unit plans, writing assignments, and alignment of classroom activities with state curriculum standards and assessments. Students explore and experiment with approaches to teaching selected literary texts, including the adaptation of teaching styles and materials to meet the needs of diverse learners. This course provides a foundational understanding of composition pedagogy, including how to respond to and assess student writing. 4 sh.

ENGL597: Independent Study in British Literature

The student completes a research project under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. This course is designed to allow investigations into areas not covered by regular courses and seminars. Permission of the graduate program coordinator and of the project supervisor is required before registration. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ENGL598: Independent Study in American Literature

The student completes a research project under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. This course is designed to allow investigations into areas not covered by regular courses and seminars. Permission of the graduate program coordinator and of the project supervisor is required before registration. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ENGL600: Seminar in British Literature (3 hours seminar)

Advanced study of an author, genre, movement, theme, or critical theory. See current announcement for specific topic. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

ENGL601: Seminar in American Literature (3 hours seminar)

Advanced study of an author, genre, movement, theme, or critical theory. See current announcement for specific topic. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

ENGL605: Seminar in Literary Research (3 hours seminar)

Instruction and practical experience in such areas as reference sources, textual study, kinds of criticism, and the basics of editing. Recommended for the first or second semester of graduate study. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SPED584: Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom

This course is designed to be an introduction for pre-service teachers in the field of Special Education assessment and accountability. The course will introduce students to elements of traditional assessment, including record keeping, grading, objective and essay testing, theories of validity as well as authentic, performance, and portfolio assessment. The keeping of anecdotal records, inclusion, heterogeneous groups, and accommodations will also be components of this course. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED585: Technology for Inclusive Classrooms

The course is designed to provide educators with an understanding of how to use technology as a seamless part of the teaching and learning experience for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Two main purposes for students with disabilities will be emphasized. Teachers will learn how to provide access to the curriculum for students with disabilities by using the principles of Universal Design for Learning as a framework for curriculum design. They will learn how to utilize technology to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities in order for them to attain maximum independence and participation in all environments. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED586: Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on a Research-Based and Teacher-Tested Support Model for planning and implementing transition services for students with disabilities. Successful transition services will allow students to build the bridges toward becoming independent self advocates with the insights, skills, knowledge, and learning techniques for successful transition from school to adult life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED591: Teaching Organization and Study Skills for the Inclusive Classroom. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI) or Master of Education (MED) (3 hours lecture)

In this course, future and practicing teachers who work with students with disabilities in middle and secondary school learn how to enable those students to become more effective learners so they can have greater access to the general education curriculum. Increased inclusion has led to higher expectations for students with disabilities and the need to meet the more rigorous demands of the general education classroom. This requires study and organization skills, wich students with disabilities often lack as a result of the impact of their disability. In this course, teachers become familiar with research-based study and organization strategies as well as effective instructional methods for systematic and explicit instruction to teach these strategies. Through these strategies, they can help students compensate for their disability characteristics and become more independent, engaged learners. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 469, SPED 568 or SPED 587. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED691: Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

The culminating experience for the BA/MAT Dual Certification programs, this course focuses on policies, issues, and trends related to the education of students in inclusive settings. Relevant sociological and cultural persepctives focused on the social construction of dis/ability are examined as well as their implications for the schools. Students synthesize, analyze, and evaluate issues of relevance to inclusive education that will impact their professional careers as teachers in inclusive environments and the future of inclusive education. Students also conduct an empirical research project on inclusion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 Graduate credits in the program. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).