Teaching, with Teacher Certification in Spanish (Preschool-Grade 12) (M.A.T.) - Graduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Students with a baccalaureate degree and interest in teaching may pursue the Post-BA program for certification only OR the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) which simultaneously leads to certification AND Master's Degree. The content area program is open to students who wish to teach one of the following content areas in K-12 schools:
  • Art
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Earth Science
  • English
  • French
  • Health Education
  • Health & Physical Education
  • Italian*
  • Latin*
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Physical Education
  • Physical Science
  • Social Studies
  • Spanish
  • Teacher of English as a Second Language
* Post BA Certification only

Montclair State University’s Teacher Education Program is one of the most highly-regarded teacher preparation programs in the country. It has been consistently recognized both nationally and regionally for its unique features, including its structure, partnerships, and curricular emphases. The program is considered a model for other colleges and universities and has continuously been accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954.

The Teacher Education Program’s professional course sequence and field experiences emphasize teaching for critical thinking and culturally responsive teaching. The professional component for both graduate students addresses four broad areas: 1) student development and learning, 2) the classroom and the school, 3) the curriculum, and 4) effective teaching skills.


TEACHING (SPANISH)

  1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

    1. SPEECH

      Complete the following 1 course: (May be completed by examination)

      CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

      Pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the COP or have UG equivalent course approved by advisor.

    3. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

      Complete 1 course from:

      ELRS 580 Learning Theories (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHING FIELD REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 36 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. Complete 8 courses:

      SPAN 241 Fundamentals of Spanish Grammar (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 242 Spanish Composition and Stylistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 343 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 348 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 349 Introduction to Hispanic Literary Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 361 Voices of the Past and Present: Spain (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 363 Voices of the Past and Present: Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 410 Advanced Spanish Grammar (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following list.

      SPAN 374 Cultural Studies: Spain (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 376 Cultural Studies: Latin America and the Caribbean (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. Complete 3 courses from the followingL

      SPAN 373 Selected Topics in Spanish and Latin American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 375 Spanish Study Abroad 3
      SPAN 439 Spanish Film and Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 441 Contemporary Spanish Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 442 Spanish Poetry and Drama of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 443 Spanish Prose of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 444 Contemporary Spanish Theater (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 446 The Latin American Essay (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 447 Contemporary Spanish-American Short Story (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 448 Contemporary Latin American Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 449 The Spanish-American Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 460 El Quijote (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 466 Contemporary Latin American Theater (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 469 The Drama of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 470 Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      SPAN 471 Contemporary Trends in the Spanish-American Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 472 Puerto Rican Literature and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 473 Sexual Subversion in Contemporary Hispanic Literature and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPAN 480 Independent Study 3
      SPAN 521 Special Topics in Teaching Spanish K-12 (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 36 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      1. INTRODUCTORY SEQUENCE

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 1 semester hours.

          CURR 518 Technology Integration in the Classroom (1 hour lecture) 1
      2. DIVERSITY AND INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE

        Complete 5 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 509 Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 509 Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours from the following list

          CURR 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
          EDFD 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
        3. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours:

          CURR 517 Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools (1 hour lecture) 1
        4. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours: .

          READ 501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture) 3
        5. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE I

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 527 Fieldwork (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE II

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 6 semester hours from the following list. (CURR 514 is for in-service teachers).

          CURR 514 Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching 4-8
          CURR 529 Student Teaching (6 hours lab) 6
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. GRADUATE TEACHING FIELD/RELATED FIELDS

      Complete 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

        SPAN 518 Teaching Spanish in K-12 (2.5 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 3 semester hours from the following list.

        SPAN 501 Advanced Studies in the Spanish Language (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 504 Introduction to Literary Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 505 History of Spanish Language (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 506 Spanish Dialectology of the Americas (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 516 Medieval Spanish Literature to the Fifteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 521 Special Topics in Teaching Spanish K-12 (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 522 Theatre of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 523 Prose and Poetry of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 524 Cervantes (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 525 Enlightenment and Romanticism (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 526 Spanish Novel of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 527 The Generation of 98 (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 528 Spanish Fiction and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 530 Spanish Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 533 Contemporary Spanish Theater (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 534 Contemporary Spanish Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 535 Contemporary Spanish Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 537 Lorca (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 540 Colonial Spanish American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 541 Latin American Literature of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 542 Contemporary Latin American Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 543 Contemporary Latin American Theater (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 546 Modernismo in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 548 Contemporary Spanish American Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 549 Contemporary Spanish American Short Story (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 551 Contemporary Latin American Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 560 Topics in Spanish, Latin American and Caribbean Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPAN 562 Autobiographical Acts in Spain and in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination.


Course Descriptions:

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CURR505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with EDFD 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR509: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 509. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR514: Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching

Open only to post-baccalaureate and graduate students; this course replaces supervised student teaching for those already employed in teaching situations without standard certification. Joint supervision by the school district and University personnel. Student must obtain permission of department chairperson and the school district. Certain qualifications required. 4 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

CURR516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 516. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR517: Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools (1 hour lecture)

This course presents the central issues in the inclusion of students with disabilities in United States middle and secondary schools. It focuses on best practices for providing access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. In addition, students explore the legal, professional, and contextual influences on the implementation of inclusion. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR518: Technology Integration in the Classroom (1 hour lecture)

This one-credit course introduces pre-service teachers to the dimensions of educational technology for teaching and learning. Students also explore the history of educational technology with a focus on the pedagogical and practical implementation of educational technologies, youth technology culture, and emerging technologies. It enables the students to drawn upon field-based experiences in READ 501 to plan instructional technology environments that are student-centered, collaborative, and inquiry-based; that emphasize critical thinking; and that support specific curricular goals - as stated in institutional, state and national standards for technology in education. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR519: Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course provides prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for evaluating and understanding student growth and learning across diverse educational settings. Students consider assessment practices from the point of view of learners and how they experience learning opportunities. Teacher candidates also analyze assessment policies and practices, both local and national, in order to maximize both student and teacher performance. They draw on aspects of assessment policy and practice to evaluate their own understandings of assessment and its development. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 519. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork (3 hours lecture)

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching (6 hours lab)

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with CURR 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD509: Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 509. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD519: Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ELRS580: Learning Theories (3 hours lecture)

Study of the learning process and its measurement as it applies in the classroom and non-school settings. 3 sh.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. 3 sh.

READ501: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture)

Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School introduces pre-service and in-service teachers to an array of cross-content literacy strategies for the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties. Students learn how to ground literacy strategies in purposeful and meaningful curricular and pedagogical projects. 3 sh.

SPAN241: Fundamentals of Spanish Grammar (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to improve students' knowledge of the basics of Spanish grammar and their ability to apply this knowledge in oral and written exercises. It centers on the various lexical categories and on their syntactic functions in phrases and simple sentences. Attention is given to the linguistic and communicative needs of both native and non-native speakers of Spanish. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 104 or equivalent.

SPAN242: Spanish Composition and Stylistics (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to strengthen students' written Spanish in a variety of contexts: short naratives, descriptions, argumentative essays, and literary analysis. Attention is given to style, register, vocabulary enrichment, and referencing. The course emphasizes writing as a process and the critical thinking and research skills needed to fully develop, articulate, and support one's ideas. Meets the University Writing requirement for majors in Spanish. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 241.

SPAN343: Introduction to Spanish Phonetics (3 hours lecture)

The aim of this course is to examine the phonemic and phonetic systems of the Spanish language within the context of current linguistic theories. The course helps students and future teachers of the language improve their pronunciation in Spanish. It also helps them learn classroom techniques to foster the acquisition of proper pronunciation patterns. Special attention is given to phonetic dialectal differences in the Spanish-speaking world. Technology is used extensively. This course prepares students for the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 241.

SPAN348: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an introduction to the scientific study of the Spanish language. It explores the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic systems of the language within the context of current linguistic theories. It also gives special attention to the notion of linguistic variation and to sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects of the language and how they are manifested in the various communitites that constitute the Spanish-speaking world. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the structure and functionality of the Spanish language through a field study. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 242.

SPAN349: Introduction to Hispanic Literary Studies (3 hours lecture)

The course proposes to identify the characteristics of various literary genres and define the inner workings of a piece of literature. Selections from the epic poem, the ballad, drama, satirical essays, philosophical novels, etc., will be used to enable the students to define the uniqueness of each genre. Certain forms of literature such as the jarcha, romance, zejel, peculiar to the Spanish literary tradition will also be analyzed. The role of the author, the uses of images and irony, the narrative point of view, etc. will be stressed as essential to literary criticism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 241.

SPAN361: Voices of the Past and Present: Spain (3 hours lecture)

This course analyzes themes, topics and problems that are recurrent but also in the process of change in significant works of Spanish literature throughout the centuries. Readings will include canonical authors as well as lesser known writers. The focus of this course as well as the readings varies according to the instructor. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 241.

SPAN363: Voices of the Past and Present: Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course analyzes themes, topics and problems that are recurrent, but also in the process of change, in significant works of Latin American literature throughout the centuries. Readings will include canonical authors as well as lesser known writers. The focus of this course, as well as the readings, varies according to the instructor. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 241.

SPAN373: Selected Topics in Spanish and Latin American Literature (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of a topic in Spanish or Latin American Literature which deserves more in depth treatment than is possible in an existing course. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered. This course may be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361 and 363.

SPAN374: Cultural Studies: Spain (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the interaction between sociohistoric contexts and cultural expressions in Spain, taking into account the phenomenal culture development of Spain at the beginning of the 21st century and its surprising rupture from recurrent patterns of the past. Through the vehicles of literature, film, theater, art, and manifestations of pop culture, the course examines the tension between official and unofficial discourses of representation, manifestations of high and low culture, the negotiation of identity in Spain's various regions, and the restructuring of Spanish "nationhood." Contemporary phenomena will be analyzed in a retrospective fashion providing insights into earlier periods of Spanish cultural hisotry. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 241.

SPAN375: Spanish Study Abroad

Study at a university in a Spanish-speaking country to gain firsthand knowledge of the historical, social, economic and cultural life of the country. Credit by evaluation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 232 or SPAN 241.

SPAN376: Cultural Studies: Latin America and the Caribbean (3 hours lecture)

This course analyzes selected literary texts, films, and music from Latin America and the Caribbean that grapple such events and issues as the icons of culture; culture as commodity; culture as a site of resistance; and everyday cultural practices. Discussion will focus on theories about the nation, the role of national icons in the formation of cultural identity, cultural practices such as football, the bolero and Latin American telenovelas or soap operas, and the role of television and film. Students will be exposed to the cultural complexities of Latin America and the Caribbean and the relationship between "high" and "low" culture; oral culture and written culture; rural culture and urban culture; and the problems facing Latin America and the Caribbean today. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 232 or SPAN 241.

SPAN410: Advanced Spanish Grammar (3 hours lecture)

This course reviews and refines students' understanding of the most important structural features of Spanish. It gives special attention to the formation and analysis of complex syntactical structures, the interplay between Spanish morphology and syntax, and to areas that present the greatest level of difficulty for English speakers. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 348.

SPAN439: Spanish Film and Fiction (3 hours lecture)

A study of significant works of Spanish Literature from the end of the 19th century through the present time as well as films by important film directors that are either based on such texts or reflect their principal themes. The course will provide detailed study of the evolution of major political and social issues in Spain during the last two centuires and the representation of issues in literature and film. The specificities of the fiction and film will be an essential component of the course and different narrative strategies and cinematographic techniques relevant to each work will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN441: Contemporary Spanish Novel (3 hours lecture)

This course examines selected works of Spanish novelists from the beginning of the 20th century to the present time, with particular emphasis on post Civil War writers and the relationship between the evolution of the novel as a literary genre and changing social, cultural, and political structure. Special attention will be given to the novel's role in reflecting and challenging stratified cultural values and in using complex narrative techniques to suggest the dismantling of traditional authority. Authors include Cela, Moix, Goytisolo, Martin Gaite, Rodoreda, among others. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN442: Spanish Poetry and Drama of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine main Spanish poets and dramatists of the 19th century. Textual analysis of the works of Rosalia de Castro, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Leandro Fernandez de Moratin, Duque de Rivas, Jose de Espronceda, and Jose Zorrilla will be situated in the context of Neoclassical and Romantic Poetics. Spanish readings will be accomanied by a study of classical rhetoric and references to the Poetics of Aristotle, Luzan, Victor Hugo, and William Wordsworth. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN443: Spanish Prose of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine main literary trends in the Spanish prose of the 19th century: Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism. Selected readings from the works of Mariano Jose de Larra, Cecilia Bohl de Faber (Fernan Caballero), Juan Valera, Benito Perez Galdos, Leopoldo Alas, and Emilia Pardo Bazan will be studied in light of theories of the novel and the literary essay. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN444: Contemporary Spanish Theater (3 hours lecture)

This course examines representative works of contemporary Spanish theater from the perspective of the relationship between social, political, physological, and philosophical concerns and dramatic structure. The role of censorship during the Franco regime and its effect on Spanish theater and performance from 1939-1975 will be discussed as well as various political ideologies of the post Franco era and theater's role in portraying a changing urban society marked by shifting gender roles, consumerism, and the redefinition of cultural values. Readings include selection from main stream and independent theater, among them works of Lorca, Arrabal, Buero Vallejo, Pedrero, Romero, Falcon, and Alonso de Santos. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN446: The Latin American Essay (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the Latin American essay from its beginnings in 1900 with Rodo's seminal essay Ariel through contemporary exponents of the genre such as Roberto Schwarz. The essay will be studied as a form in its own right, as a vehicle for charting shifts in theories of identity, and a barometer for trends in Latin American literature from Romanticism through the "boom" and current theories of hybridity and globalization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN447: Contemporary Spanish-American Short Story (3 hours lecture)

Trends in the contemporary short story; the short story as an important genre in Spanish-American letters. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN448: Contemporary Latin American Poetry (3 hours lecture)

This course examines contemporary Latin American poetry and changing poetic movements from the Avant-garde through to the Neo-romantic and Neo-baroque. It explores the role of philosophy, religion, and myth in the elaboration of a poetic language. Students will investigate and approach the intricacies of diverse Latin American poetic strategies in the context of different critical practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN449: The Spanish-American Novel (3 hours lecture)

Development of the Spanish-American novel up to 1945. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN460: El Quijote (3 hours lecture)

This course examines in debth Miguel de Cervantes's masterpiece. It focuses on such aspects as Cervantes's literary hall of mirrors; his use of narrative techniques that anticipate aspects of the contemporary novel; and his profound view of the human condition and of such themes as madness, the complexities of self and identity, shifting gender norms, challenges to authority, and the transformation of fiction into life and life into fiction. It also examines Cervantes's critique of 16th and early 17th century Spain and the relationship between Cervantes's life and the creation of Don Quijote. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN466: Contemporary Latin American Theater (3 hours lecture)

Through critical reading of a corpus of works in contemporary Latin American theater, students will examine recurring themes of absolute power versus the quest for social justice, the colonial legacy and the forging of national identity, the power of language and the role of art in theater's trajectory over the course of the twentieth century. Major playwrights such as Rodolfo Usigli, Griselda Gambaro and Luis Rafael Sanchez are studied within the framework of contemporary theories of performance and reception in Latin America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN469: The Drama of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture)

An overall approximation to early modern Spanish theater, this course focuses on text analysis and performance as two fundamental elements in the understanding and appreciation of Spanish comedias. It allows students to access the plays from different angles: 1) as texts that need to be studied analytically; 2) as cultural and historical exponents of a specific period; 3) as objects of literary and theatrical research; 4) as would-be productions waiting to be staged. After an introductory account on early modern Spanish theater and comedia performance then and now, classes are organized around three phases resembling those of theater production: text analysism, pre-production workshop, and staging. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361.

SPAN470: Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar)

Selected topics from Spanish and Spanish-American literature acquaint the student with the techniques of literary research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361 and 363; Spanish majors only.

SPAN471: Contemporary Trends in the Spanish-American Novel (3 hours lecture)

The contemporary novel in Spanish America, with emphasis on the "Nueva Novela". 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN472: Puerto Rican Literature and Thought (3 hours lecture)

Insight into the literature and philosophy of the Caribbean Hispanic world; contemporary Puerto Rican writers and the emergent Puerto Rican influence in the United States metropolitan areas. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 363.

SPAN473: Sexual Subversion in Contemporary Hispanic Literature and Film (3 hours lecture)

This course examines various representations of sexual subversion in selected works and films of Spanish, Latin American, and Caribbean writers and film directors. It analyzes the role of the body and subversive sexualities in challenging politically imposed sexual norms and socially encoded gender practices. Topics include homosexuality and dissidence, transgender and performance, lesbianism, female bonding, and transsexualism. Selections from Allende, Goytisolo, Falcon, Arenas, Umpierre, Riera, Almodovar, Gutierrez Alea, Paris,and Bollain, among others. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361 or SPAN 363.

SPAN480: Independent Study

Directed independent study and research in Spanish. Open to students with a 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of Spanish electives. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SPAN501: Advanced Studies in the Spanish Language (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore various linguistic-oriented topics and theories in order to expand their knowledge of the structure, usage and variation of the Spanish language both in the Spanish-speaking world and in the United States. The study of these topics will be done in connection with the analysis of various literary texts. Topics to be explored will change with each offering of this course. 3 sh.

SPAN504: Introduction to Literary Theory (3 hours lecture)

This course gives students a comprehensive view of different critical and theoretical approaches to literary studies, among them Russian Formalism, Structuralism, Feminist Theory, Postmodern and Postcolonial Studies, and gender and queer theory. Major articles of such theorists as Jacobson, Genette, Levi-Strauss, Barthes, Moi, Kristeva, Derrida, Foucault, Lyotard, Sidonie Smith, Benedict Anderson, Said, and Butler will be applied to specific literary texts from Latin America and Spain. 3 sh.

SPAN505: History of Spanish Language (3 hours lecture)

The aim of this course is to examine the evolution of the Spanish language from its origins to the present. It focuses on the phono-phonetic, morphological, syntactical, and semantic changes that characterized the evolution from Latin to modern Spanish from a political, sociological, and historical point of view. Topics include a structural and textual analysis of ancient documents and literary pieces. 3 sh.

SPAN506: Spanish Dialectology of the Americas (3 hours lecture)

This course acquaints the student with the various dialects of Spanish found in America. The student learns to recognize, characterize and describe accurately the various dialects discussed. 3 sh.

SPAN516: Medieval Spanish Literature to the Fifteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

This course examines main philosphical concerns of the Middle Ages and the connections and dialogue that exist between works of this period and the contemporary world. Through close analyses of representative works, the course explores the roles played by identity, representation, and desire in the construction and reconstruction of the aesthetic of the self as well as the representation of the human in relation with the divine. 3 sh.

SPAN518: Teaching Spanish in K-12 (2.5 hours lecture)

This course is required for graduate students enrolled in either the Initial Certification or MAT program. It provides students with the theoretical and practical underpinnings of a communicative, standards-based approach to teaching Spanish as a world language in elementary and secondary schools. Students will become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition and explore their practical application to the Spanish language classroom. They wil learn a variety of teaching methods and develop lesson plans that incorporate state and national standards. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

SPAN521: Special Topics in Teaching Spanish K-12 (3 hours lecture)

This course builds on the theoretical and practical foundation established in SPAN 518 by enabling students to delve deeper into specific aspects of language teaching. Students will fine tune their ability to create a wide variety of original pedagogical materials and implement different forms of assessment. They will develop additional strategies for maximizing their use of the target language in the classroom, expand the ways in which they use technology to enhance language learning, and participate in multiple microteaching sessions. Students will explore strategies for addressing these needs. Required for students in the Teacher Education program. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 518.

SPAN522: Theatre of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture)

Focusing on the Baroque chiaroscuro as a metaphor for the scission of the 17th century Spanish subjectivity, this course draws from Lacanian theory to articulate and analytical framework that allows a postmodern reading of comedias by both leading and peripheral playwrights. Recurring topoi, such as gender confusion, honor, uxoricide, rape, order and chaos, are contextualized and deconstructed in light of psychoanalysis and performativity. 3 sh.

SPAN523: Prose and Poetry of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the works of major authors of the Spanish Golden-Age and concentrates on the subtextual dialogues established by these authors in reaction both against their time and space and themselves. Readings include canonical prose and poetry of the period as well as peripheral writings. Literary texts of the period are analyzed in the context of different currents in literary theory and genre studies. 3 sh.

SPAN524: Cervantes (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a closer look at the fragmented discourses intertwined in the texts of Cervantes. By drawing from different critiques and theories about Cervantes, among them those dealing with paradox, madness and sanity, nationhood and the satire of a monolithic Spanish identity, and the function of dialogue and intertextuality, this course delves into the many layers of Cervantes's writings. It also examines the narrative complexity of Cervantes's masterpiece and the ways in which Don Quijote anticipates many aspects of postmodern fiction. 3 sh.

SPAN525: Enlightenment and Romanticism (3 hours lecture)

This course exposes students to two of the literary manifestations of 18th and 19th century Spain. It explores the concept of the "Enlightenment" in the painting of Goya and the writings of Feijoo and Cadalso as well as the socioeconomic context of this period. It also examines European Romanticism in art and literature; selected Spanish Romantic poetry, drama, and essays, including the writings of Larra, Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Duque de Rivas, and Zorrilla are analyzed in light of literary theories of the 18th and 19th centuries. 3 sh.

SPAN526: Spanish Novel of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this course is the study of the so-called "novela realista" or the Spanish novel of the 19th century. It explores cultural, literary and socioeconomic influences on the novel as well as the theory and the practice of this genre in the 19th century. Texts of 19th century Spanish authors are accompanied by selected theoretical readings on the novel written by twentieth-century critics Miguel de Unamuno, Jose Ortega y Gasset, M. Bakhtin, Doritt Cohn, and Gerard Genette, among others. 3 sh.

SPAN527: The Generation of 98 (3 hours lecture)

This course examines major works of the generation of writers whose intellectual development coincides with the defeat of Spain in the Spanish-American War of 1898. Attitudes toward national identity, literature, culture, politics, gender, and philosophy will be explored as well as the concept of literary generations and their inclusions and exclusions. Readings will include selections from canonical writers - Unamuno, A. Machado, Valle-Inclan, Azorin, and Baroja - as well as texts from women writers - Caterina Albert and Carmen Burgos, among others - historically excluded from this generation. 3 sh.

SPAN528: Spanish Fiction and Film (3 hours lecture)

This course analyzes works of Spanish literature from the late 19th century to the present and films that are either based on specific texts or reflect their major themes. It discusses film and fiction as distinct modes of artistic expression and the process by which complex narrative strategies are rendered into visual images and cinematographic techniques. A variety of film genres, novelistic techniques, idological concerns, and gender roles are studied in the works of writers like Galdos, Tusquets, Rodoreda, Riera, and Munoz Molina and film directors, Bunuel, Bollain, Almodovar, Betriu and Miro, among others. 3 sh.

SPAN530: Spanish Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

A study of the formation and the nature of Spanish civilization through an investigation of the political, social and cultural trends and influences on the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. 3 sh.

SPAN533: Contemporary Spanish Theater (3 hours lecture)

This course examines selected works of Spanish theater from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. It explores the relationship between ideology and dramatic technique during the Franco regime and the Post Civil War and Post Franco periods, and the Spanish theater's appropriation and adaptation of theories of Artaud, Brecht, and the theater of the absurd, among others. The theater as a vehicle for social and political critique, subversion of gender norms, exploration of the complexities of identity formation, and challenge to historical values will be explored through selections of Valle-Inclan, Lorca, Arrabal, Buero Vallejo, Diosdado, Pedrero, and Romero, among others. 3 sh.

SPAN534: Contemporary Spanish Novel (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the evolution of the Spanish novel from the 20th century to the present and the relationship between the evolution of narrative techniques and strategies and changes in Spanish social and political structure. Theories of the novel offered by diverse European and American critics will be combined with the study of various novel forms from social realist to psychological realist and the postmodern and their respective debt to Cervantes's masterpiece, Don Quijote. The role of the novel in circumventing censorship, challenging official norms and myths, and dismantling traditional literary and political authority will be examined in the works of Cela, Delibes, Martin Santos, Falcon, Martin Gaite, Diaz-Mas, and Juan Goytisolo, among others. 3 sh.

SPAN535: Contemporary Spanish Poetry (3 hours lecture)

This course examines Spanish poetry from the beginning of the 20th century (Juan Ramon Jimenez, A. Machado) to the poetic expressions that emerged after Spanish Civil War (Miguel Hernandez and Gloria Fuertes, among others). Different trends, topics, influences and movements will be examined, among them Symbolist and post Romantic poetry at the beginning of the 20th century; European Ultraism and Futurism; Surrealist poetry; painting and cinema in Spain; the notion of "Avant-Garde"; art as a game; humor and irony in poetry; homoerotic expressions of love in the poetry of Federico Garcia Lorca and Luis Cernuda; and social poetry and the poetics of protest. Students will be exposed to classical notions of Rhetoric as part of the process of analysis of poetry. 3 sh.

SPAN537: Lorca (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the works of Spanish writer Federico Garcia Lorca (1936). His biography and his artistic collaborations with important artists such as Salvador Dali and Luis Bunuel will be explored. The course will pay attention to Lorca's traditional plays and poetry and will study Lorca's more obscure, surrealist endeavors such as Poeta en Nueva York, Asi que pasen cinco anos, Sonetos del amor oscuro and El publico. Students will be exposed to notions of classical rhetoric as well as queer readings of Lorca's writings. 3 sh.

SPAN540: Colonial Spanish American Literature (3 hours lecture)

This course examines Colonial Latin American texts such as Hernan Cortes's Cartas de relacion, Cristobal Colon's Cartas del descubrimiento, Sor Juan Ines del la Cruz's writings, Dabeza de Vaca's Naufragio and Bartolome de las Casas's Brevisima relacion del la destruccion de las Indias, among others, in light of postmodern and post colonial interpretations. Semiotic and anthropological readings are also applied to the course selections. 3 sh.

SPAN541: Latin American Literature of the 19th Century (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an in-depth study of the aesthetics of Romanticism in Europe and its subsequent adaptation by Latin American writers. Special emphisis is given to Argentine Romantic writers of the period. Texts will be analyzed in the context of Romantic aesthetics and political, historical and social change in the Latin American continent. Realistic and Naturalist aesthetics will also be discussed as will such aspects of economic and social change as the growth of the city, the influx of immigrants, social exploitation, and racial strife. 3 sh.

SPAN542: Contemporary Latin American Novel (3 hours lecture)

This course is divided into three main components. The first one studies in depth the novels of the Mexican Revolution from Azuela to Carlos Fuentes. A sociological approach will be applied to the novels of this period and students will trace the changes that the novel of the Revolution reveals as it moves from one generation to another. The second component examines the novels of the land and of social reform from J.E. Rivera to the indigenous novel. Attention will be given to the Andean novel and the reappearance and adaptation of neo-realistic aesthetics. The third component deals with novels of the city, mainly in the southern tip of the continent. Argentine and Uruguayan novels will be studied carefully to reveal such aspects as the growth of the city, the relationship with European novels, the need for a new language, and the birth of the psychological novel. 3 sh.

SPAN543: Contemporary Latin American Theater (3 hours lecture)

Designed to offer a critical introduction to contemporary dramatic writings in Latin America. Students examine a corpus of works by playwrights from a variety of Latin American nations, movements, and decades, up to the present. Taking as point of departure The Tempest, William Shakespeare's drama of conquest and resistance, students will examine themes of social justice, identity, the power of language and the role of art in theater's trajectory over the course of the twentieth century and into the present century. Major playwrights such as Rodolfo Usigli, Griselda Gambaro, and Luis Rafael Sanchez are studied within the framework of contemporary theories of performance and reception in Latin America. 3 sh.

SPAN546: Modernismo in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an in-depth study of the aesthetics of French Parnassian and Symbolist poetics and how these in turn lead directly to the Modernist aesthetics in Latin America. Special consideration is given to Decadentism and its rejection of the social and economic values represented by the European bourgeoisie. Works by Marti, Najera, Casals, Silva, Dario, and Lugones wil be approached stylistically and thematically for the purpose of identifying the radical changes in the literary text from the perspectives of language, versification, forms, themes, and the unique poetics of each member of this movement. Special attention will be given to the works of Ruben Dario in tracing the development of Modernist poetics from the pre-Modernist period through the post-Modernist period. 3 sh.

SPAN548: Contemporary Spanish American Novel (3 hours lecture)

A critical examination of representative examples of the Spanish American novel from the "boom" to the "post-boom". 3 sh.

SPAN549: Contemporary Spanish American Short Story (3 hours lecture)

The contemporary short story from the end of the "Modernista" period to the present time. Critical evaluation and analysis of representative works. 3 sh.

SPAN551: Contemporary Latin American Poetry (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an overview of significant trends in Latin American poetry from the Avant-Garde to the Postmodern, with particular attention given to the most contemporary expressions of Latin American poetry. The course will focus on authors such as Borges, Lange, Ocampo, Huidobro, Neruda, Vallejo, Lezama Lima, Pizarnik, German Belli, Gonzalo Rojas and Zurita. 3 sh.

SPAN560: Topics in Spanish, Latin American and Caribbean Literature (3 hours lecture)

This course explores contemporary narrative fiction from the Spanish Antilles (Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic). It examines foundational themes of Caribbean letters such as the plantation structure, the maroons, the repercussions of the French Revolution and the Age of the Enlightenment in the works of Alejo Carpentier, Miguel Barnett, Reinaldo Arenas and others. The works of Emilio Diaz Varcarcel, Ana Lydia Vega and Julia Alvarez highlight the problematic relationship of island and diaspora in the context of neocolonialism and identity. May be repeated once for a total of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Majors only.

SPAN562: Autobiographical Acts in Spain and in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course examines autobiographical texts from Spain and Latin America in light of general theories of the genre. Autobiography will be studied in the broadest sense and will encompass the study of testimony, letters, diaries, and autobiographical poetry. Readings will include texts written by Julia de Burgos, Garcia Marquez, Jorge Guillen, Lorca, Rigoberta Menchu, Renee Mendez-Capote, and Pedro Salinas, among others. 3 sh.