Teaching, with Teacher Certification in Social Studies (Preschool-Grade 12) (M.A.T.) - Graduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Students with a baccalaureate degree and interest in teaching may pursue the Post-BA program for certification only OR the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) which simultaneously leads to certification AND Master's Degree. The content area program is open to students who wish to teach one of the following content areas in K-12 schools:
  • Art
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Earth Science
  • English
  • French
  • Health Education
  • Health & Physical Education
  • Italian*
  • Latin*
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Physical Education
  • Physical Science
  • Social Studies
  • Spanish
  • Teacher of English as a Second Language
* Post BA Certification only

Montclair State University’s Teacher Education Program is one of the most highly-regarded teacher preparation programs in the country. It has been consistently recognized both nationally and regionally for its unique features, including its structure, partnerships, and curricular emphases. The program is considered a model for other colleges and universities and has continuously been accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954.

The Teacher Education Program’s professional course sequence and field experiences emphasize teaching for critical thinking and culturally responsive teaching. The professional component for both graduate students addresses four broad areas: 1) student development and learning, 2) the classroom and the school, 3) the curriculum, and 4) effective teaching skills.


TEACHING (SOCIAL STUDIES)

  1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

    1. SPEECH

      Complete the following 1 course: (May be completed by examination)

      CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

      Pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the COP or have UG equivalent course approved by advisor.

    3. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

      Complete 1 course from:

      ELRS 580 Learning Theories (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHING FIELD REQUIREMENTS

    A minimum of 66 semester hours of Social Science is required from the following area(s):

    1. 36 semester hours of an Undergraduate Social Sciences background required.

      ANTH 100 Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      ANTH 102 Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 103 Prehistoric Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 110 Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 115 Cultures of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 120 Native North Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 125 Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 130 Cultures of South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 135 Anthropology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 140 Non-Western Contributions to the Western World (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 145 Human Variation 3
      ANTH 150 Cultures of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 170 Peoples of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 180 Health and Healing in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 195 Cultures of Central Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 201 Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 220 American Folk Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 270 Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 301 Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 308 Primate Ethology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 310 Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 312 Peasant Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 330 The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 340 The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 350 Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 370 Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 380 Anthropology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 401 Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar) 3
      ANTH 405 Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 414 Selected Issues in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 416 The Anthropology of Human Reproduction (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 418 Ethnology of African Language and Belief Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 421 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 425 Anthropology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 430 Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 440 Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 460 Field Methods: Visual Anthropology 3
      ANTH 461 Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 470 Archaeological Field Methods 6
      ANTH 480 Independent Research in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 490 Internship in Anthropology 3-6
      EAES 100 Principles of Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 101 Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 102 Principles of Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 103 Earth in Space and Time (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 104 Natural Disasters (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 105 Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 106 The National Parks and their Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 107 Earth and the Environment (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 109 Freshman Seminar in Geoscience and Geography (1 hour seminar) 1
      EAES 120 The Study of Gems (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 140 Dinosaurs, Their Life and Times (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 150 General Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 160 The Human Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 161 Human Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 162 Energy, Society and Energy Alternatives Race (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 170 World Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 200 Geomorphology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 201 Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 202 Introduction to Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 204 Geology Field Trip 1
      EAES 210 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 211 Aerial Photograph Interpretation (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 212 Map Reading and Cartography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 220 Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 230 Hydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 240 Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      EAES 261 Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 262 Our Finite Earth: Population and Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 263 Noise Pollution: Contemporary Problems and Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 264 The Geography of Life and Death (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 270 Geography of North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 271 Geography of East and Southeast Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 272 Land and Life in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 273 New Jersey Environment: Problems and Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 280 Principles of Land Use (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 281 Introduction to American Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 282 Urban Design and Architecture: American Cityscape (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 283 Urban Georgraphy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 300 Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 301 Climatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 302 Structural Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 303 Field Geography 3
      EAES 310 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hours lab) 3
      EAES 311 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 320 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 321 Economic Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 322 Environmental Geochemistry (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 330 Fluvial Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 331 Geohydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 332 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 340 Sedimentology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 341 Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 342 Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 350 Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 360 Contemporary Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 361 Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 362 Environmental Gerontology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 363 Geopolitics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 370 World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 371 Geography of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 372 Geography of South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 373 Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 374 Latin American Environments and Economies in a Global Framework (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 375 Culture in Transition in India: An Anthropo-Geographical Approach (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 376 Geography of New Jersey (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 377 Geography of Sub-Sahara Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 378 Geography of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 379 Geography: The Former Soviet Union (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 380 Transportation (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 381 Urban Field Studies 3
      EAES 382 Geography of Manufacturing (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 383 Location of Economic Activity (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 384 Managing the Urban Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 385 Urbanization and Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 386 People and Cities: Comparative Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 390 Research Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 391 Quantitative Methods in Geography and Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 401 Geo-Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 402 Sustainability Science Seminar (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 403 Meteorology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 404 Field Geology (4 hours lecture, 6 hours lab) 6
      EAES 410 Advanced Topics in GIScience (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 412 Computer Mapping (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 419 Senior Seminar in Geographic Information Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 427 Organic Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 441 Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 443 Geology of the Vertebrates (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 451 Coastal Marine Geology (4 hours lecture) 4
      EAES 452 Dynamic Beach Processes (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      EAES 453 Tidal Marsh Sedimentations (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      EAES 454 Human Impact on the Coastal Zone 4
      EAES 455 Field Methods in Oceanography 2
      EAES 456 Physical Oceanography (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      EAES 458 Marine Science Education (1 hour lecture, 1 hour lab) 2
      EAES 459 Independent Study in the Marine Sciences 1-4
      EAES 460 Environmental Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 462 Population Problems of the World (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 463 Culture and Resource Utilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 470 The Geology of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 471 Urban Studies: London and the British New Towns Movement (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 476 Seminar in International Economic Geography (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 480 Urbanization in World Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 481 Problems in Urban Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 482 Real Estate Principles (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 483 Advanced Real Estate (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 484 Urban Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 486 Village to Metropolis: Urbanization in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 487 Senior Seminar in Urban Study (Urban Studies Internship) (3 hours semester) 3
      EAES 490 Independent Study in Geography (Independent Study) 1-4
      EAES 491 Internship 3-12
      EAES 492 Honors Research 3
      EAES 494 Independent Study in Geoscience 1-4
      EAES 495 Readings in Earth & Environmental Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 496 Pro-Seminar in Earth and Environmental Studies (Independent Study) 3
      EAES 497 Senior Seminar Geography (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 498 Seminar in Geoscience (2 hours seminar) 2
      EAES 499 Selected Topics in Earth & Environmental Studies 1-4
      ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 101 Principles of Economics: Macro (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 102 Principles of Economics: Micro (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 202 Economics and Finance for Business Minors (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 203 Economic Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 204 Real Estate Principles & Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 205 Collective Bargaining: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 206 Managerial Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 207 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 208 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 209 Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 213 Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 215 The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 221 Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 222 Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 223 Economics of Fine and Performing Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 250 Selected Topics in Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 300 World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 301 Money and Banking (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 303 Economic Growth and Development (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 304 Public Policies Toward Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 305 Commercial Real Estate: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 308 Public Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 310 Urban and Regional Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 311 Labor Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 312 Business Cycles and Forecasting (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 314 Development of Economic Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 320 Latin American Environments and Economies in a Global Framework (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 398 Economics Independent Study 3
      ECON 401 Financial Institutions (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 402 International Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 403 Comparative Economic Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 404 Interdependence in the Global Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 405 Economic Development of Sub-Saharan Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 407 Economics of Industrial Organization (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 409 Economics of National Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 410 Computer Applications in Economics and Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 414 Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 417 Mathematical Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 418 Economics Of Human Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 419 Economics Of Energy And Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 420 Econometrics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 438 Advanced Seminar in Economics (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 439 Advanced Seminar in Economics: Honors I (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 440 Advanced Seminar in Economics: Honors II (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 461 Seminar in International Economic Geography (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 490 Real Estate Internship 3
      ECON 497 Economics Independent Study 3
      HIST 100 The Study of History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 101 Connections: Years That Made History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 103 Foundations of Western Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 105 Emergence of European Civilization, 1500-1914 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 106 Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 108 Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 109 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 110 Introduction to American Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 111 Contemporary American Issues in Historical Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 112 Introduction to the Modern Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 114 Early Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 115 History of Puerto Rico (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 116 Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 117 History of the United States to 1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 118 History of the United States Since 1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 128 Pre-Modern Japan: A History or Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 129 Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 131 Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 132 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 133 Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 141 Foundations of Global Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 142 20th Century Global Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 204 The Second World War (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 205 Minorities in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 212 Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 213 Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 214 Diplomatic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 215 Women in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 216 Italian American History and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 217 History of Black Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 218 Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 219 Sport in History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 221 Europe's Conquest of the Americas, 1415-1763 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 222 Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 223 Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 225 The Poles, Czechs, Slovaks and Hungarians Since 1815 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 231 New Jersey: Past and Present (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 250 Selected Content (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 299 History Study Abroad 1-3
      HIST 300 Research Seminar (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 308 History of the American Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 309 Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 310 Immigrant in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 311 Early History of New Jersey 1702-89 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 312 Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 313 Biography in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 315 War in History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 319 American Urban History to 1880 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 320 American Urban History Since 1880 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 321 History of the American Worker Since 1877 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 322 Medieval European Civilization 450-1350 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 323 History of Russia to 1917 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 324 Russia Since 1917 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 326 Modern German History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 327 History of France Since 1789 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 328 Conflict in Modern Ireland (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 329 History of England to 1714 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 330 Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 331 History of England 1714-1914 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 333 History of Brazil (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 334 Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 339 Seminar in Latin American History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 343 Research Techniques-American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 400 Senior Seminar in History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 401 Kingdoms in the Sun:Sicily and Southern Italy in Antiquity and the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 406 History of American Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 408 Independent Study European History 3
      HIST 409 Independent Study Non-Western History 3
      HIST 410 Independent Study in American History 3
      HIST 411 Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 413 The Philosophy of History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 415 European Social History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 416 Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 419 Age of Renaissance, 1350-1517 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 420 The Reformation Era, 1500-1650 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 422 Studies in Enlightenment History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 424 Diplomatic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 425 Ideas in European History: Burke to Nietzsche (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 426 The Nazi Third Reich (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 427 The Holocaust, 1939-1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 430 Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 433 American Colonial History 1607-1763 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 434 American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1828 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 435 The Union in Crisis 1820-1877 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 436 America in the Gilded Age (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 437 American Society in the 20th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 438 America in the Sixties: The Crisis of Consensus Liberalism (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 443 Internship in History 3
      HIST 460 Independent Transcultural Study 3
      HIST 461 Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 499 Selected Topics 1-3
      POLS 100 Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,) 3
      POLS 101 American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 199 Freshman Seminar in Political Science and Law (1 hour lecture) 1
      POLS 201 Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 202 International Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 203 International Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 204 Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 205 Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 206 Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 207 American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 214 Women in Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 215 Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 216 Urban Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 300 Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 301 American Party System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 302 Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 303 Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 304 State and Local Government (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 306 Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 310 Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 311 Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 312 Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 313 The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 314 Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar) 3
      POLS 315 Urban Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 317 The American Congress (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 318 The American Presidency (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 319 Politics and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 320 Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 321 Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 322 American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 323 American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 332 U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 339 Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 340 Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 341 Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 342 Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 343 Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 344 Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 351 Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 360 Development of Political Thought to Machiavelli (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 362 International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 365 Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 409 Modern Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 410 Directed Study 3-6
      POLS 416 Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 420 Seminar and Internship in Political Science 4
      POLS 425 Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 426 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I 4-6
      POLS 427 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II 4-6
      POLS 429 Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 430 International Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 431 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 436 Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship 1-7
      POLS 497 Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 100 Religions of the World (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 101 Introduction to Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 102 Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 106 African Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 108 African-American Religious Experience (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 110 Native American Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 116 Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 200 Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 202 Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 204 New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 205 Religion and Ethical Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 206 New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 207 Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 212 Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 213 Buddhism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 214 Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 215 Hinduism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 217 Taoism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 218 Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 221 Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 223 Religion in North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 225 Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 230 Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 256 Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 258 Christian History and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 262 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 263 Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 267 Women and Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 273 The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 300 Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 301 Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 302 Judaism and Early Christian Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 304 Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 320 Religious Ethical Thinkers (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 322 Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 326 Theology (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 332 Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 350 Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 352 Selected Study in Religious Texts (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 355 Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 357 Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 460 Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 462 Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 465 Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 467 Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 490 Independent Study in Religion 3-12
      RELG 492 Independent Study in Religion 3-12
      SOCI 100 The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 102 Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 112 Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 113 Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 201 Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 204 Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 205 Black Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 206 Individual and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 207 Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 209 Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 212 Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 215 Sociology of Sports (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      SOCI 216 Sociology of Food and Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 218 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 219 Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 230 Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 231 Social Bases of the Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 238 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      SOCI 240 Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 301 Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 302 Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 303 Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 304 Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 309 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 310 Directed Independent Research 3-9
      SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 313 Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 315 Social Inequality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 316 Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 318 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 320 Sociology of Communes, Cooperatives and Collectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 330 Political Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 331 Sociology of Power (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 332 Sociology of Popular Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 334 Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 335 Workers and Their Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 336 Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 390 Cooperative Education in Sociology 3-4
      SOCI 400 Senior Project 3
      SOCI 401 Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 402 Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 403 Sociology of Knowledge (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 404 Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 405 Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 407 Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 408 Social Movements (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 411 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 416 Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other) 3
      SOCI 420 Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 421 Social Uses of Language (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 425 Sociology of the Future (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. HISTORY

      HIST 100 The Study of History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 101 Connections: Years That Made History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 103 Foundations of Western Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 105 Emergence of European Civilization, 1500-1914 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 106 Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 108 Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 109 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 110 Introduction to American Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 111 Contemporary American Issues in Historical Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 112 Introduction to the Modern Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 114 Early Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 115 History of Puerto Rico (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 116 Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 117 History of the United States to 1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 118 History of the United States Since 1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 128 Pre-Modern Japan: A History or Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 129 Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 131 Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 132 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 133 Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 141 Foundations of Global Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 142 20th Century Global Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 204 The Second World War (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 205 Minorities in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 212 Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 213 Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 214 Diplomatic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 215 Women in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 216 Italian American History and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 217 History of Black Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 218 Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 219 Sport in History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 221 Europe's Conquest of the Americas, 1415-1763 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 222 Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 223 Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 225 The Poles, Czechs, Slovaks and Hungarians Since 1815 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 231 New Jersey: Past and Present (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 250 Selected Content (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 299 History Study Abroad 1-3
      HIST 300 Research Seminar (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 308 History of the American Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 309 Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 310 Immigrant in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 311 Early History of New Jersey 1702-89 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 312 Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 313 Biography in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 315 War in History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 319 American Urban History to 1880 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 320 American Urban History Since 1880 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 321 History of the American Worker Since 1877 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 322 Medieval European Civilization 450-1350 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 323 History of Russia to 1917 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 324 Russia Since 1917 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 326 Modern German History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 327 History of France Since 1789 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 328 Conflict in Modern Ireland (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 329 History of England to 1714 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 330 Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 331 History of England 1714-1914 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 333 History of Brazil (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 334 Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 339 Seminar in Latin American History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 343 Research Techniques-American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 400 Senior Seminar in History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 401 Kingdoms in the Sun:Sicily and Southern Italy in Antiquity and the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 406 History of American Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 408 Independent Study European History 3
      HIST 409 Independent Study Non-Western History 3
      HIST 410 Independent Study in American History 3
      HIST 411 Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 413 The Philosophy of History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 415 European Social History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 416 Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 419 Age of Renaissance, 1350-1517 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 420 The Reformation Era, 1500-1650 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 422 Studies in Enlightenment History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 424 Diplomatic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 425 Ideas in European History: Burke to Nietzsche (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 426 The Nazi Third Reich (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 427 The Holocaust, 1939-1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 430 Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 433 American Colonial History 1607-1763 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 434 American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1828 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 435 The Union in Crisis 1820-1877 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 436 America in the Gilded Age (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 437 American Society in the 20th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 438 America in the Sixties: The Crisis of Consensus Liberalism (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 443 Internship in History 3
      HIST 460 Independent Transcultural Study 3
      HIST 461 Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 499 Selected Topics 1-3
      HIST 501 New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 502 History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 511 Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 512 American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 513 Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 514 The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 515 Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 517 Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 518 Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 519 America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 520 United States Far Eastern Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 521 Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 522 Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 523 History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 524 History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 525 History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 526 The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 527 Industrialization of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 529 Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 532 Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 533 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 534 France of the Republics (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 535 Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 536 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 537 Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 540 Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 541 Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 550 African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 570 Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 580 Seminar in Western History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 603 Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar) 2
    3. ANTHROPOLOGY

      ANTH 100 Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      ANTH 102 Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 103 Prehistoric Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 110 Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 115 Cultures of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 120 Native North Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 125 Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 130 Cultures of South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 135 Anthropology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 140 Non-Western Contributions to the Western World (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 145 Human Variation 3
      ANTH 150 Cultures of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 170 Peoples of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 180 Health and Healing in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 195 Cultures of Central Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 201 Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 220 American Folk Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 270 Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 301 Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 308 Primate Ethology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 310 Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 312 Peasant Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 330 The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 340 The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 350 Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 370 Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 380 Anthropology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 401 Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar) 3
      ANTH 405 Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 414 Selected Issues in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 416 The Anthropology of Human Reproduction (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 418 Ethnology of African Language and Belief Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 421 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 425 Anthropology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 430 Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 440 Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 460 Field Methods: Visual Anthropology 3
      ANTH 461 Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 470 Archaeological Field Methods 6
      ANTH 480 Independent Research in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 490 Internship in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 510 Ethnology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 520 Anthropology and International Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 521 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 522 Environment and Community 3-4
      ANTH 523 Community & Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 529 Building Sustainable Communities 3-4
      ANTH 530 Development Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 533 Spanish Cultural Influences in the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 534 The Transmission of Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 536 Cultural Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 538 Ethnopsychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 540 Anthropology of Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 541 Culture and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 542 Contract Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 547 Woman: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 555 Anthropology of Institutional Life (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 565 Social Anthropology and History (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 570 Prehistoric North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 601 Independent Anthropological Research 3
      ANTH 603 Reading Seminar in Anthropology (2 hours seminar) 2
    4. GEOGRAPHY

      EAES 100 Principles of Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 101 Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 102 Principles of Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 103 Earth in Space and Time (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 104 Natural Disasters (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 105 Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 106 The National Parks and their Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 107 Earth and the Environment (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 109 Freshman Seminar in Geoscience and Geography (1 hour seminar) 1
      EAES 120 The Study of Gems (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 140 Dinosaurs, Their Life and Times (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 150 General Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 160 The Human Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 161 Human Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 162 Energy, Society and Energy Alternatives Race (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 170 World Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 200 Geomorphology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 201 Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 202 Introduction to Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 204 Geology Field Trip 1
      EAES 210 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 211 Aerial Photograph Interpretation (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 212 Map Reading and Cartography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 220 Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 230 Hydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 240 Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      EAES 261 Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 262 Our Finite Earth: Population and Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 263 Noise Pollution: Contemporary Problems and Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 264 The Geography of Life and Death (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 270 Geography of North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 271 Geography of East and Southeast Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 272 Land and Life in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 273 New Jersey Environment: Problems and Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 280 Principles of Land Use (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 281 Introduction to American Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 282 Urban Design and Architecture: American Cityscape (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 283 Urban Georgraphy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 300 Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 301 Climatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 302 Structural Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 303 Field Geography 3
      EAES 310 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hours lab) 3
      EAES 311 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 320 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 321 Economic Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 322 Environmental Geochemistry (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 330 Fluvial Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 331 Geohydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 332 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 340 Sedimentology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 341 Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 342 Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 350 Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 360 Contemporary Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 361 Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 362 Environmental Gerontology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 363 Geopolitics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 370 World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 371 Geography of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 372 Geography of South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 373 Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 374 Latin American Environments and Economies in a Global Framework (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 375 Culture in Transition in India: An Anthropo-Geographical Approach (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 376 Geography of New Jersey (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 377 Geography of Sub-Sahara Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 378 Geography of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 379 Geography: The Former Soviet Union (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 380 Transportation (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 381 Urban Field Studies 3
      EAES 382 Geography of Manufacturing (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 383 Location of Economic Activity (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 384 Managing the Urban Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 385 Urbanization and Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 386 People and Cities: Comparative Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 390 Research Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 391 Quantitative Methods in Geography and Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 401 Geo-Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 402 Sustainability Science Seminar (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 403 Meteorology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 404 Field Geology (4 hours lecture, 6 hours lab) 6
      EAES 410 Advanced Topics in GIScience (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 412 Computer Mapping (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 419 Senior Seminar in Geographic Information Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 427 Organic Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 441 Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 443 Geology of the Vertebrates (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 451 Coastal Marine Geology (4 hours lecture) 4
      EAES 452 Dynamic Beach Processes (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      EAES 453 Tidal Marsh Sedimentations (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      EAES 454 Human Impact on the Coastal Zone 4
      EAES 455 Field Methods in Oceanography 2
      EAES 456 Physical Oceanography (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      EAES 458 Marine Science Education (1 hour lecture, 1 hour lab) 2
      EAES 459 Independent Study in the Marine Sciences 1-4
      EAES 460 Environmental Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 462 Population Problems of the World (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 463 Culture and Resource Utilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 470 The Geology of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 471 Urban Studies: London and the British New Towns Movement (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 476 Seminar in International Economic Geography (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 480 Urbanization in World Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 481 Problems in Urban Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 482 Real Estate Principles (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 483 Advanced Real Estate (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 484 Urban Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 486 Village to Metropolis: Urbanization in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 487 Senior Seminar in Urban Study (Urban Studies Internship) (3 hours semester) 3
      EAES 490 Independent Study in Geography (Independent Study) 1-4
      EAES 491 Internship 3-12
      EAES 492 Honors Research 3
      EAES 494 Independent Study in Geoscience 1-4
      EAES 495 Readings in Earth & Environmental Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 496 Pro-Seminar in Earth and Environmental Studies (Independent Study) 3
      EAES 497 Senior Seminar Geography (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 498 Seminar in Geoscience (2 hours seminar) 2
      EAES 499 Selected Topics in Earth & Environmental Studies 1-4
      EAES 500 Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 501 Environmental Studies Physical (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 502 The Dynamic Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 503 Advanced Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 504 Landscapes in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 505 Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 507 Tectonics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 508 Field Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 509 Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 510 Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 511 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 520 Advanced Mineralogy (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 521 Optical Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 522 Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 523 Sedimentary Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 524 Igneous and Metamorphic Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 525 X-ray Microanalysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 526 Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 527 Organic Geoghemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 528 Environmental Forensics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 529 Instrumental Environmental Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 531 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 532 Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 533 Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 535 Geophysics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 540 Advanced Historical Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 541 Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 542 Advanced Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 543 Vertebrate Paleobiology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 545 Paleoecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 546 Micropaleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 547 Paleobotany (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 548 Biostratigraphy of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 550 Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 551 Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 559 Special Problems in the Marine Sciences 1-4
      EAES 560 Environmental Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 561 Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 562 Waste Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 563 Natural Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 564 Environmental Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 565 Environmental Change and Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 566 Environmental Problem Solving (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 567 Human Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 568 Environmental Studies-Social/Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 569 Air Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 570 Culture Regions (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 580 Problems in Economic Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 581 Urban Systems Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 582 Urban and Regional Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 583 Transportation Analysis and Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 584 Urban Studies and Policy Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 585 The Metropolitan Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 590 Independent Study in Environmental Studies 1-4
      EAES 591 Methods in Environmental Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 592 Pro Seminar (1-4 hours seminar) 1-4
      EAES 593 Research Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 594 Research in Geoscience Literature (1 hour lecture) 1
      EAES 599 Special Problems in Earth and Environmental Studies 1-4
      EAES 610 Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 611 Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 612 Seminar in Environmental Graphics (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 660 Seminar in Environmental Management (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 661 Instructional Design for Environmental Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 680 Reading Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies (2 hours seminar) 2
      EAES 681 Urban Studies Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 690 Research Project in Environmental Studies 3
      EAES 696 Research Project in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 698 Master's Thesis 6
      EAES 699 Master's Thesis Extension 1
    5. ECONOMICS

      ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 101 Principles of Economics: Macro (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 102 Principles of Economics: Micro (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 202 Economics and Finance for Business Minors (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 203 Economic Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 204 Real Estate Principles & Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 205 Collective Bargaining: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 206 Managerial Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 207 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 208 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 209 Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 213 Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 215 The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 221 Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 222 Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 223 Economics of Fine and Performing Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 250 Selected Topics in Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 300 World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 301 Money and Banking (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 303 Economic Growth and Development (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 304 Public Policies Toward Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 305 Commercial Real Estate: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 308 Public Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 310 Urban and Regional Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 311 Labor Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 312 Business Cycles and Forecasting (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 314 Development of Economic Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 320 Latin American Environments and Economies in a Global Framework (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 398 Economics Independent Study 3
      ECON 401 Financial Institutions (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 402 International Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 403 Comparative Economic Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 404 Interdependence in the Global Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 405 Economic Development of Sub-Saharan Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 407 Economics of Industrial Organization (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 409 Economics of National Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 410 Computer Applications in Economics and Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 414 Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 417 Mathematical Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 418 Economics Of Human Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 419 Economics Of Energy And Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 420 Econometrics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 438 Advanced Seminar in Economics (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 439 Advanced Seminar in Economics: Honors I (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 440 Advanced Seminar in Economics: Honors II (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 461 Seminar in International Economic Geography (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 490 Real Estate Internship 3
      ECON 497 Economics Independent Study 3
      ECON 501 Economic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 502 Financial Institutions and Monetary Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 503 Economic Problems of the Third World (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 505 Aggregate Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 508 Economics of Public Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 510 Urban Economics: Problems and Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 521 Applied Econometrics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 530 Microeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
      ECON 531 Macroeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
      ECON 533 Corporations and International Financial Markets (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 540 Development in Economic Education (2 hours lecture) 2
      ECON 541 Foundations of Contemporary Economic Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 542 Business Fluctuations and Forecasting (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 543 United States and the International Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 544 Government and Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 545 Economics of Labor (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 550 Technical Change and International Competition (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 560 Economics Internship 3
      ECON 561 Internship Treatise 3
      ECON 562 Macroeconomics Analysis and Public Policy (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
      ECON 563 Managerial Economics (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
      ECON 570 Business and the Sociopolitical Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 575 Independent Study in Economics 1-3
      ECON 577 Selected Topics in Economics (1 - 3 hours lecture) 1-3
      ECON 590 Reading Seminar in Applied Economics (3 hours seminar) 3
      ECON 603 Reading Seminar in Economics (2 hours seminar) 2
      ECON 698 Master's Thesis 3
      ECON 699 Master's Thesis Extension 1
    6. POLITICAL SCIENCE

      POLS 100 Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,) 3
      POLS 101 American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 199 Freshman Seminar in Political Science and Law (1 hour lecture) 1
      POLS 201 Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 202 International Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 203 International Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 204 Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 205 Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 206 Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 207 American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 214 Women in Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 215 Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 216 Urban Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 300 Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 301 American Party System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 302 Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 303 Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 304 State and Local Government (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 306 Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 310 Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 311 Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 312 Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 313 The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 314 Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar) 3
      POLS 315 Urban Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 317 The American Congress (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 318 The American Presidency (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 319 Politics and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 320 Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 321 Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 322 American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 323 American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 332 U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 339 Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 340 Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 341 Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 342 Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 343 Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 344 Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 351 Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 360 Development of Political Thought to Machiavelli (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 362 International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 365 Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 409 Modern Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 410 Directed Study 3-6
      POLS 416 Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 420 Seminar and Internship in Political Science 4
      POLS 425 Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 426 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I 4-6
      POLS 427 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II 4-6
      POLS 429 Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 430 International Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 431 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 436 Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship 1-7
      POLS 497 Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar) 3
      POLS 501 Public Administration and Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 502 Modern Political Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 512 Origin and Development of the U.S. Constitution (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 521 History of Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 523 Politics of Developing Areas (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 524 The Third World in the International System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 525 International Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 526 The International Political Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 531 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 532 U.S.Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 551 Contemporary Constitutional Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 552 The President and Congress (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 553 Federal Judicial Process (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 554 Seminar in American Political Thought (3 hours seminar) 3
      POLS 560 Politics of Terrorism (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 603 Reading Seminar in Political Science (2 hours seminar) 2
    7. SOCIOLOGY

      SOCI 100 The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 102 Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 112 Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 113 Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 201 Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 204 Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 205 Black Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 206 Individual and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 207 Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 209 Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 212 Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 215 Sociology of Sports (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      SOCI 216 Sociology of Food and Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 218 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 219 Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 230 Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 231 Social Bases of the Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 238 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      SOCI 240 Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 301 Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 302 Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 303 Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 304 Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 309 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 310 Directed Independent Research 3-9
      SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 313 Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 315 Social Inequality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 316 Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 318 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 320 Sociology of Communes, Cooperatives and Collectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 330 Political Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 331 Sociology of Power (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 332 Sociology of Popular Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 334 Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 335 Workers and Their Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 336 Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 390 Cooperative Education in Sociology 3-4
      SOCI 400 Senior Project 3
      SOCI 401 Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 402 Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 403 Sociology of Knowledge (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 404 Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 405 Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 407 Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 408 Social Movements (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 411 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 416 Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other) 3
      SOCI 420 Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 421 Social Uses of Language (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 425 Sociology of the Future (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 500 Evaluation Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 556 Computer Applications in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 559 Sociology of Deviance (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 560 Sociological Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 562 Social Change (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 563 Self and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 564 Social Planning and Social Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 565 Sociology of Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 566 The Metropolitan Community (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 567 Power and Social Stratification (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 568 Social Research Methods I (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 569 Social Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 570 Independent Projects 3
      SOCI 571 Seminar in Applied Sociological Inquiry (3 hours seminar) 3
      SOCI 572 Selected Problems in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 574 Sociology of Ethnic Relationships (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 576 The Family as an Institution (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 577 Sociology of Poverty in the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 578 Community Resources and Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 579 Community Resources and Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 581 Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 582 The Sociology of Health Care Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 584 The Sociology of the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 585 The Sociology of Police (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 587 The Sociology of Juvenile Delinquency (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 588 Aging Individual in an Aging Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 589 Social Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 590 Sociology of the Life Course (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 591 The Sociology of Unequal Development (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 595 Internship in Applied Sociology: Crime and Justice 3
      SOCI 596 Internship in Applied Sociology: Aging 3
      SOCI 597 Internship in Applied Sociology: Health and Illness 3
      SOCI 598 Internship in Applied Sociology: Social Research and Policy 3
      SOCI 603 Reading Seminar in Sociology (2 hours seminar) 2
    8. RELIGION

      RELG 100 Religions of the World (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 101 Introduction to Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 102 Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 106 African Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 108 African-American Religious Experience (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 110 Native American Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 116 Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 200 Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 202 Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 204 New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 205 Religion and Ethical Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 206 New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 207 Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 212 Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 213 Buddhism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 214 Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 215 Hinduism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 217 Taoism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 218 Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 221 Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 223 Religion in North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 225 Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 230 Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 256 Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 258 Christian History and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 262 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 263 Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 267 Women and Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 273 The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 300 Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 301 Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 302 Judaism and Early Christian Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 304 Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 320 Religious Ethical Thinkers (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 322 Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 326 Theology (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 332 Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 350 Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 352 Selected Study in Religious Texts (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 355 Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 357 Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 460 Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 462 Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 465 Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 467 Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 490 Independent Study in Religion 3-12
      RELG 492 Independent Study in Religion 3-12
    9. ADDITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY OR SOCIOLOGY

      ANTH 100 Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      ANTH 102 Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 103 Prehistoric Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 110 Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 115 Cultures of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 120 Native North Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 125 Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 130 Cultures of South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 135 Anthropology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 140 Non-Western Contributions to the Western World (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 145 Human Variation 3
      ANTH 150 Cultures of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 170 Peoples of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 180 Health and Healing in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 195 Cultures of Central Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 201 Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 220 American Folk Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 270 Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 301 Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 308 Primate Ethology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 310 Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 312 Peasant Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 330 The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 340 The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 350 Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 370 Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 380 Anthropology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 401 Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar) 3
      ANTH 405 Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 414 Selected Issues in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 416 The Anthropology of Human Reproduction (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 418 Ethnology of African Language and Belief Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 421 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 425 Anthropology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 430 Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 440 Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 460 Field Methods: Visual Anthropology 3
      ANTH 461 Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 470 Archaeological Field Methods 6
      ANTH 480 Independent Research in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 490 Internship in Anthropology 3-6
      ANTH 510 Ethnology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 520 Anthropology and International Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 521 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 522 Environment and Community 3-4
      ANTH 523 Community & Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 529 Building Sustainable Communities 3-4
      ANTH 530 Development Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 533 Spanish Cultural Influences in the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 534 The Transmission of Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 536 Cultural Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 538 Ethnopsychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 540 Anthropology of Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 541 Culture and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 542 Contract Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 547 Woman: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 555 Anthropology of Institutional Life (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 565 Social Anthropology and History (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 570 Prehistoric North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 601 Independent Anthropological Research 3
      ANTH 603 Reading Seminar in Anthropology (2 hours seminar) 2
      SOCI 100 The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 102 Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 112 Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 113 Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 201 Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 204 Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 205 Black Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 206 Individual and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 207 Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 209 Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 212 Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 215 Sociology of Sports (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      SOCI 216 Sociology of Food and Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 218 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 219 Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 230 Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 231 Social Bases of the Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 238 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      SOCI 240 Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 301 Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 302 Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 303 Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 304 Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 309 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 310 Directed Independent Research 3-9
      SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 313 Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 315 Social Inequality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 316 Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 318 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 320 Sociology of Communes, Cooperatives and Collectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 330 Political Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 331 Sociology of Power (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 332 Sociology of Popular Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 334 Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 335 Workers and Their Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 336 Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 390 Cooperative Education in Sociology 3-4
      SOCI 400 Senior Project 3
      SOCI 401 Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 402 Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 403 Sociology of Knowledge (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 404 Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 405 Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 407 Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 408 Social Movements (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 411 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 416 Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other) 3
      SOCI 420 Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 421 Social Uses of Language (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 425 Sociology of the Future (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 500 Evaluation Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 556 Computer Applications in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 559 Sociology of Deviance (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 560 Sociological Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 562 Social Change (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 563 Self and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 564 Social Planning and Social Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 565 Sociology of Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 566 The Metropolitan Community (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 567 Power and Social Stratification (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 568 Social Research Methods I (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 569 Social Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 570 Independent Projects 3
      SOCI 571 Seminar in Applied Sociological Inquiry (3 hours seminar) 3
      SOCI 572 Selected Problems in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 574 Sociology of Ethnic Relationships (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 576 The Family as an Institution (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 577 Sociology of Poverty in the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 578 Community Resources and Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 579 Community Resources and Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 581 Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 582 The Sociology of Health Care Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 584 The Sociology of the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 585 The Sociology of Police (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 587 The Sociology of Juvenile Delinquency (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 588 Aging Individual in an Aging Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 589 Social Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 590 Sociology of the Life Course (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 591 The Sociology of Unequal Development (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 595 Internship in Applied Sociology: Crime and Justice 3
      SOCI 596 Internship in Applied Sociology: Aging 3
      SOCI 597 Internship in Applied Sociology: Health and Illness 3
      SOCI 598 Internship in Applied Sociology: Social Research and Policy 3
      SOCI 603 Reading Seminar in Sociology (2 hours seminar) 2
  3. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s) for 36 semester hours:

    1. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      1. INTRODUCTORY SEQUENCE

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 1 semester hours.

          CURR 518 Technology Integration in the Classroom (1 hour lecture) 1
      2. DIVERSITY AND INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE

        Complete 5 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 509 Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 509 Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours from the following list

          CURR 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
          EDFD 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
        3. Complete 1 course for 1 semester hours:

          CURR 517 Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools (1 hour lecture) 1
        4. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours: .

          READ 501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture) 3
        5. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          CURR 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 519 Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE I

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 527 Fieldwork (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. PEDAGOGICAL SEQUENCE II

        Complete 2 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course for 6 semester hours from the following list. (CURR 514 is for in-service teachers).

          CURR 514 Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching 4-8
          CURR 529 Student Teaching (6 hours lab) 6
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. CONTENT AREA COURSES (SOCIAL STUDIES)

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Teaching Methods

        Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

        HIST 502 History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Graduate-Level Teaching Field Course

        Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

        HIST 501 New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 511 Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar) 3
        HIST 512 American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 513 Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 514 The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 515 Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 517 Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 518 Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 519 America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 520 United States Far Eastern Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 521 Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 522 Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 523 History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 524 History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 525 History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 526 The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 527 Industrialization of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 529 Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 532 Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 533 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 534 France of the Republics (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 535 Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 536 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 537 Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 540 Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 541 Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 550 African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 570 Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar) 3
        HIST 580 Seminar in Western History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 603 Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar) 2
  4. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination.


Course Descriptions:

ANTH100: Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the basic concepts, goals, and research strategies of anthropology, the nature of culture, its role in human experience, and its universality. Presentation of cross-cultural examples and conceptual frameworks for understanding and explaining cultural diversity. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement, World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH101: Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course will introduce you to several important areas within physical anthropology including the genetic basis of human evolution, how evolution works as a process, modern human variation, race, bioarchaeology and forensics, primate ecology and behavior, and the human fossil record. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

ANTH102: Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Different linguistic systems will be analyzed through the use of informants (speakers) of non-Indo-European languages, and through published data from a variety of Amerindian and African languages. The relationship of linguistic structure and theory to cultural systems will be emphasized in individual student field experience and in readings and lectures. 3 sh.

ANTH103: Prehistoric Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

Have you ever wanted to time travel and experience a bygone era in a faraway place, say 20,000 years ago? Except for science fiction books like "The Time Machine," you might think this is fantasy. But do not despair,for we can still embark on a journey into the land of prehistory through archaeology. One might ask,"How is archaeology different from science fiction or novel writing?" No, we don't have time machines but we do have shovels. In this course, we will learn how archaeologists can say what they say without venturing into fantasy land. Meets Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH110: Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of the diversity of racial, ethnic, religious, occupational, and other subcultures and subgroups within the U.S. Emphasis on the character of American culture. Subpopulations are examined in relationship to each other and to the mainstream culture. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH115: Cultures of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

The Middle East culture area in anthropological perspective. Emphasis is placed on the nature of different interlocking cultural systems which are adaptations to environmental stresses in the Middle East. The concepts of culture and society will be explored in the context of course materials. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH120: Native North Americans (3 hours lecture)

Amerindian cultures north of Mexico; representative tribes, their world views, and their adaptations to the environment, each other and European contact. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH125: Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture)

Cross-cultural perspectives on the rapid social and cultural changes spawned by globalization. The implications and consequences of globilization on society. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH130: Cultures of South Asia (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a broad overview of society, culture, and history of South Asia. The goal is to convey the tremendous diversity of cultural expression and social plurality found in the region by focusing on specific events and concepts at scales varying from local to national, such as the emergence of nationalism, formation of nation states, and caste. The course will introduce students to an important region, home to one-fifth of the population of the world, and also help them understand contemporary political, economic, and environmental change in the subcontinent. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH135: Anthropology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture)

Types of conflict and violence including war, crime, family and sexual violence, class and ethnic violence, and genocide; biological determinist and cultural explanations of violence; theories of nonviolent social change. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH140: Non-Western Contributions to the Western World (3 hours lecture)

A survey of scientific, medical, artistic, and other contributions from cultures outside the mainstream of European, North American, and Judeo-Christian history that influence our lives in the West today. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH145: Human Variation

The study of the origins, adaptations and evolution of races from a physical anthropology perspective. Misconceptions about race, intelligence and racism as well as theories and explanations of human variations will be covered. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH150: Cultures of Latin America (3 hours lecture)

Study of indigenous peoples of Latin America. Surveys earliest evidence of human occupation of Middle and South America and the Caribbean; diverse origins of food production; intellectual achievements; political organization; material contributions to world culture; and aspects of early European contact and conquest. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH155: Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to a broad, cross-cultural, evolutionary perspective on urban settlements. The goal is to provide students with a framework of theoretical models and concepts for analyzing and understanding the learned behavior of people in cities. Most of the course examines contemporary North American cities with additional data from African, South American, and European cities. Topics covered include the archaeology of cities, world systems theory, transnational corporations, the community study model, urban fieldwork, migration, class, poverty, gentrification, homelessness and hip-hop. Meets General Education (GER) 2002 Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH170: Peoples of Africa (3 hours lecture)

Diversity in the lifestyles of representative African cultures; prehistory, culture change, and contemporary problems in sub-Saharan Africa. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH180: Health and Healing in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a variety of medical and healing traditions. It will address the connections between medicine and culture, and relate the medical practices to the cultures that produced them. The course will cover non-western healing systems, such as Traditional Chinese medicine (including herbs & acupuncture), Ayurvedic medicine from India, and Native American shamanism, as well as western biomedicine as a cultural system (or "ethnomedicine"). This course will examine how these different healing systems reflect and are reflections of the social, economic, and political history of a given society and region. Students will apply knowledge of these systems to contemporary social and individual contexts. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH195: Cultures of Central Asia (3 hours lecture)

Selected cultures of Central Asia; Russian and other influences on culture change among non-Russian peoples. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100.

ANTH201: Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The course emphasizes the uses of anthropology in contemporary societies by stressing the skills and knowledge needed for the development of practical solutions to current problems. Special attention is placed on: policy decision-making, community development, cultural resource management, advocacy and social impact assessment. This is a service-learning course. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Anthropology and is designed to pay close attention to and support for the enhancement of writing in the discipline of anthropology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 120 or ANTH 130 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 170 or ANTH 180 or ANTH 195 or departmental approval.

ANTH220: American Folk Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the anthropological literature concerning American oral (folklore) and material (folklife) folk culture. Students are exposed to the different folk traditions as well as analytical theory concerning them, in the first half of the course. The second half is devoted to student presentation and analysis of material folk culture. 3 sh.

ANTH270: Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture)

The archaeology of ancient cultures of Middle America. Consists of two major units (1) Northern Mesoamerica, the Gulf Coast, Oaxaco and Central Mexican Aztecs (2) Ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 120 or ANTH 130 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 170 or ANTH 180 or ANTH 195 or departmental approval.

ANTH301: Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture)

An overview of nonstatistical research methods commonly used in anthropology, including participant observation, interviewing, questionnaire design, cultural domain analysis, ethnographic decision tree analysis, and network analysis. Emphasis on practical experience in applying these methods to research and applied problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH308: Primate Ethology (3 hours lecture)

The relationship of non-human primate behavior to the origins of human behavior. Consists of two major units: (1) the study of lemurs and monkeys and their ecologies; (2) the study of the great apes and their societies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 101.

ANTH310: Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture)

This course will describe and analyze immigration from an anthropological perspective over time and space. Particular attention will be devoted to recent migration to the United States and how this movement is similar to and different from other migrations. We will examine how globalization has influenced contemporary migration by broadening who migrates and where migrants go, the role of social networks and cultural capital in facilitating migration, and the factors that affect reception, settlement, incorporation, and return. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH312: Peasant Culture (3 hours lecture)

Persistence and change among selected peasant peoples of the world. Characteristics of peasant society, personality in peasant culture and modernization trends and effects. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH100.

ANTH330: The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

Cultural effects on diet, nutritional status, disease, and ecology; anthropological contributions to the study of food and food habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH340: The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of human work across cultural space and historical time. Various subsistence strategies (e.g. foraging, pastoralism, agriculture and industrial) are covered. Connections among forms of work, the social relations of work, the meanings of work, and social stratification (e.g. class, gender, race/ethnicity, age) are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH350: Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the influences of cultural systems on the processes of aging. Special emphasis is placed on the behaviors and meanings attached to the stages of growing older in a variety of cultural systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH360: Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The relationships between culture and the bio-physical environment, as well as the cultural environment. The emphasis will be on primitive and non-Western cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH370: Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course will cover the manufacture, use, preservation, analysis, and cataloging of prehistoric artifacts made of stone, bone and wood. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH380: Anthropology of Women (3 hours lecture)

What do "sex," "sexuality" and "gender" mean, and how have anthropologists dealt with these concepts? Using an anthropological perspective stressing an "emic" or insider view and structural constrains of class, gender, race, and nation, we will describe and analyze how genders are constructed, negotiated, and maintained throughout the world. We will examine ethnographic material from a variety of cultural settings to understand how cross-cultural studies of gender and sexuality have contributed to more complex understandings of human experience and how gender/sexual identities are constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement- World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH401: Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar)

The development of anthropological theory during the past 100 years. Various subdisciplines of cultural and social anthropology are explored and applied to similar bodies of data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH405: Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Transcultural focus on the interrelated nature of culture and human behavior. Interdisciplinary course with emphasis on mutual dependencies of anthropological and psychological theory and method. Students work with bicultural informants. Cross listed with Psychology, PSYC 405. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ANTH 100; PSYC 301 must be taken by Psychology majors.

ANTH414: Selected Issues in Anthropology

Identification and analysis of contemporary issues and problems in anthropology - e.g., models of society; new directions in anthropological inquiry and methodology; etc. May be repeated twice, if the topics are different, for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH416: The Anthropology of Human Reproduction (3 hours lecture)

A biocultural study of pregnancy, childbirth, attitudes toward male and female children, sexual development of the newborn to adolescence, sexual maturity and behaviors and attitudes toward human reproduction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 101.

ANTH418: Ethnology of African Language and Belief Systems (3 hours lecture)

Study of the ways in which language and belief systems are integrated in African culture. Topics discussed will include language problems in contemporary Africa, African folklore and mythology, ideas of ethnicity, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100.

ANTH421: Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture)

Case studies of community, conflict and decay, conflicts over immigration, problems of racial and cultural diversity, multiculturism and cultural misunderstandings, role of education and the local school system, urban infrastructure and community decline, sprawl versus community, introduction to basics of program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH422: Environment and Community (3 hours lecture)

The overall goal of this course is to examine the relationship between the structure, composition, formation and evolution of communities and their environment. The course has three major and interrelated objectives: one, to provide an overview of the major theoretical frameworks that have been utilized to conceptualize community-environment interactions; two, using case studies, demonstrate the use of anthropological methods and perspectives in resolving environment problems affecting communities, in diverse socio-cultural contexts; three, provide examples of the contributions of anthropology to environmental policy making. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH423: Community and Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 312 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380.

ANTH425: Anthropology of Religion (3 hours lecture)

Patterns of religious beliefs and behaviors which relate to sacred, supernatural entities. Origin theories, divination, witchcraft, mythology and the relationship of religious movements to other aspects of culture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH429: Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture)

Selected case studies of community development programs nationally and internationally and their implications for community development in New Jersey, importance of citizen participation, inclusion of people with disabilities, aging in place, localization theory, smart growth, ecovillages, cohousing, permaculture, community supported agriculture, community land trusts, community development banks and corporations, program evaluation skills. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH430: Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on the development of the student's skill in gathering and analyzing linguistic data. Complements the more theoretically oriented courses in linguistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 102.

ANTH431: Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Indian behavior. Culture change in the perspective of colonialism and modernization: contributions of religion to social and political values and modern literature. Cross listed with History, HIST 431. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

ANTH432: Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Japanese behavior; cultural change in the perspective of traditional periodization of Japanese history; contributions of religion and philosophy to defining social values. Cross listed with History, HIST 432. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

ANTH440: Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Examination of cross-cultural concepts of illness, health and medical care. Ecological and historical aspects of diseases in human evolution are also studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH460: Field Methods: Visual Anthropology

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore potential uses of photography in anthropological research and practice. Each student is guided in the development of a project which demonstrates the significance of recording and interpreting visual data in the study of selected aspects of culture, social interaction patterns, and/or individual behavior. As the focus of this experience is on the collection and interpretation of visual data, not the technical aspects of photography, only basic skills and knowledge about effective camera usage are required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH461: Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture)

Interdisciplinary approach to the aims, methods and techniques of ethnohistorical research. Documentary and nondocumentary evidence in reconstructing the cultural history of pre or semiliterate societies. Cross listed with History, HIST 461. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or HIST 100.

ANTH470: Archaeological Field Methods

Provides practical field experience in the various aspects of survey and excavation techniques. A specific area will be surveyed and a site will be excavated. May be repeated once for credit. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH480: Independent Research in Anthropology

Preparation of a paper on a major theoretical issue in anthropology. A tutorial without formal class meetings. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH490: Internship in Anthropology

According to interest and preparation, students are placed in cooperating agencies in order to provide an opportunity to test their acquired theoretical knowledge and to gain disciplined practice in their profession. Under faculty guidance and agency supervision, students are to engage in anthropological fieldwork by conducting research and/or special projects. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH510: Ethnology (3 hours lecture)

A graduate introduction to anthropological field research, human evolution, cultural variation, and anthropological approaches to modern world problems. 3 sh.

ANTH520: Anthropology and International Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the knowledge of how to apply anthropological concepts to the practical world of international business, diplomacy and service. It focuses on the integration of verbal and non-verbal communication, as well as on cultural and personal values in the context of differences (rather than similarities) between members of different countries/cultures. Emphasis is placed on educating students on how to interact and communicate in new cultural and/or international settings. 3 sh.

ANTH521: Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture)

Case studies of community conflict and decay, conflicts over immigration, problems of racial and cultural diversity, multiculturalism and cultural misunderstandings, role of education and the local school system, urban infrastructure and community decline, sprawl versus community, introduction to basics of program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH522: Environment and Community

How environmental change affects community structures and practices, social and cultural responses to environmental change, role of citizen organizations, government and other institutions in solving environmental problems, green building and certification, ecological community planning and design, urban planning aspects of community and environment, sustainable cities initiatives, case studies, program evaluation skills, environmental policy making, perceptions of the environment, environmental discourses, environmental justice. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH523: Community & Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH529: Building Sustainable Communities

This course will analyze selected case studies of community development programs nationally and internationally and evaluate their implications for community development in New Jersey. Topics will include the importance of citizen participation, inclusion of people with disabilities, aging in place, localization theory, smart growth, ecovillages, cohousing, permaculture, community supported agriculture, community land trusts, and community developent banks and corporations. Program evaluation skills will be integrated into the topics. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH530: Development Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

A critical review of theories of development with emphasis on anthropological contributions to development debates. Selected case study examination of the role of anthropologists in formulating, executing, and evaluating development programs and projects. 3 sh.

ANTH533: Spanish Cultural Influences in the United States (3 hours lecture)

The cultural heritage of Spanish-speaking America. Utilizing anthropological concepts, problems of adjustment and educational implications are emphasized. 3 sh.

ANTH534: The Transmission of Culture (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on formal and informal processes of cultural transmission and renewal. Emphasis on the relationship of individuals to their cultures and problems of generational continuity and cultural revitalization. Anthropological strategies for educational research are explored. 3 sh.

ANTH536: Cultural Diversity (3 hours lecture)

Descriptive, historical and theoretical anthropological works provide the basis for studying likenesses and differences among folk and urban cultures, their historic development, and interrelationships between differing aspects of culture. 3 sh.

ANTH538: Ethnopsychology (3 hours lecture)

This is an interdisciplinary course on convergencies of theoretical and methodological concepts from anthropology and psychology. There is a cross-cultural focus on the relationship of culture to personality, cognition, stress, mental disorders, and aging. Cross listed with Psychology, PSYC 538. 3 sh.

ANTH540: Anthropology of Cities (3 hours lecture)

This course constitutes an examination of urbanism and the process of urbanization from a cross-cultural, comparative perspective. The course is designed to expose the student to the major conceptual models of urban communities, cities, nation states and the world system. We will study the works of scholars who have engaged in debates about these complex sociocultural formations. 3 sh.

ANTH541: Culture and Thought (3 hours lecture)

How different peoples organize and use their cultures; data from formal ethnography, semantic analysis, ethnoscience and componential analysis for purposes of studying culture and building culture theories. 3 sh.

ANTH542: Contract Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course provides a comprehensive knowledge of cultural resource surveys. Included is the study of the federal and state legislation governing contract archaeology. Other topics include: ethics, reading engineering plans, interviewing local informants, conducting documentary research and discussing various subsurface testing strategies. To gain practical experience, the student is required to prepare a cultural resource survey. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ANTH547: Woman: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture)

Physiological and psychological aspects of women studied cross-culturally, and their implications for contemporary society. Morphological and psychological developments from conception to death in various cultures, inferences about the roles of women in American society. Cross listed with Psychology, PSYC 547. 3 sh.

ANTH555: Anthropology of Institutional Life (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the relationship between culture, society, personality and institutional life. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between formal organizations and public interests. 3 sh.

ANTH565: Social Anthropology and History (3 hours lecture)

The relationship of social anthropology to history. The study of history as a cultural system, sources and methods utilized in reconstructing the histories of preliterate societies, and the inarticulate sectors in complex societies. 3 sh.

ANTH570: Prehistoric North America (3 hours lecture)

General background in Native American archaeology, and theory and method in this subdiscipline. Selected culture areas and problems relating to time depth, cultural interaction, and the nature of archaeological evidence north of Mexico. 3 sh.

ANTH601: Independent Anthropological Research

Directed research towards the preparation of a written paper on a topic of theoretical importance in anthropology. A tutorial without formal class meetings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ANTH603: Reading Seminar in Anthropology (2 hours seminar)

Required of all M.A. candidates concentrating in anthropology. Directed independent study in preparation for 3 hour comprehensive examination. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: 6 hours in anthropology and permission of the instructor.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CURR505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with EDFD 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR509: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 509. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR514: Inservice Supervised Graduate Student Teaching

Open only to post-baccalaureate and graduate students; this course replaces supervised student teaching for those already employed in teaching situations without standard certification. Joint supervision by the school district and University personnel. Student must obtain permission of department chairperson and the school district. Certain qualifications required. 4 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

CURR516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 516. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR517: Inclusive Classrooms in Middle and Secondary Schools (1 hour lecture)

This course presents the central issues in the inclusion of students with disabilities in United States middle and secondary schools. It focuses on best practices for providing access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. In addition, students explore the legal, professional, and contextual influences on the implementation of inclusion. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR518: Technology Integration in the Classroom (1 hour lecture)

This one-credit course introduces pre-service teachers to the dimensions of educational technology for teaching and learning. Students also explore the history of educational technology with a focus on the pedagogical and practical implementation of educational technologies, youth technology culture, and emerging technologies. It enables the students to drawn upon field-based experiences in READ 501 to plan instructional technology environments that are student-centered, collaborative, and inquiry-based; that emphasize critical thinking; and that support specific curricular goals - as stated in institutional, state and national standards for technology in education. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR519: Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course provides prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for evaluating and understanding student growth and learning across diverse educational settings. Students consider assessment practices from the point of view of learners and how they experience learning opportunities. Teacher candidates also analyze assessment policies and practices, both local and national, in order to maximize both student and teacher performance. They draw on aspects of assessment policy and practice to evaluate their own understandings of assessment and its development. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 519. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork (3 hours lecture)

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching (6 hours lab)

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EAES100: Principles of Geography (3 hours lecture)

The course studies the major elements of the natural environment and their interrelation. The principles and processes essential to the understanding of the natural environmental system and their significance are stressed. The elements studied include: atmosphere, weather and climate, continents, landforms, river systems, ocean currents and tides, soils, vegetation, animal and marine life. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Interdisciplinary Core, Scientific Issues. Previous course EUGS 100 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES101: Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

An introduction to the physical characteristics of planet earth. The focus is on processes and interactions of the four components of the earth system: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. An understanding of the human impact on earth systems is also developed and maintained in perspective. Satellite information, aerial photography, maps, charts and other Geographic Information Systems technologies are used to study planet earth in this course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 107 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES102: Principles of Geology (3 hours lecture)

Geologic materials and processes. Origin and development of the earth throughout geologic time. Evolution of life as interpreted through the study of fossils. Previous course GEOS 108 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES103: Earth in Space and Time (3 hours lecture)

The earth, its interactions with the sun, moon and planets; its origin; its major ecologic features and the geologic events of its past, present, and possible future. Previous course GEOS 109 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES104: Natural Disasters (3 hours lecture)

The study of natural disasters such as volcanic activity, earthquakes and hurricanes: the causes, effects and means of predicting, preventing and minimizing the effects of disasters will be discussed. The relationships between man and his sometimes hostile habitat will be included. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Interdisciplinary Core: Scientific Issues. Previous course GEOS 110 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES105: Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Materials of the earth; landforms and structures; the processes and agents responsible for their formation and modification. Modern tectonic concepts. Topographic and geologic maps. Required field trips. Not open to students who have had Principles of Geology. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 112 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES106: The National Parks and their Geology (3 hours lecture)

The National Parks and Monuments as regions of relatively undisturbed natural history. The minerals, fossils and rock formations which occur as well as the story of their formation. Specific parks and monuments will be studied in detail. Previous course GEOS 119 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES107: Earth and the Environment (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of the natural processes of the earth and the effects of human activities on the environment. Earth materials, processes and systems, and the engineering properties of natural materials will be discussed, as well as pollution of soil, water and air. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 125 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES109: Freshman Seminar in Geoscience and Geography (1 hour seminar)

This course introduces entering freshmen or transfer students to the University, the departments of the College of Science and Mathematics, the culture of higher education, and the field of geoscience and geography. Students learn about campus resources and activities, majors/careers in geoscience and geography, and techniques that foster the development of good study skills and academic success. Open to all MSU students. Previous course ENVR 199 effective through Spring 2012. 1 sh.

EAES120: The Study of Gems (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Mineralogy of gem materials through lectures, demonstrations and laboratory experience. Sources of gem materials; the cutting and polishing of gem materials. Not for major credit. 3 sh.

EAES140: Dinosaurs, Their Life and Times (3 hours lecture)

The origin, evolution, paleoecology and extinction of the dinosaurs as reflected in the history of the Mesozoic era. Previous course GEOS 135 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES150: General Oceanography (3 hours lecture)

A general study of the oceans and methods of modern oceanography including the physical, chemical, geological, and biological aspects of the oceans and their interrelationships. This course is designed for non-science majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Interdisciplinary Core, Scientific Issues. Previous course GEOS 162 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES160: The Human Environment (3 hours lecture)

An interdisciplinary course which explains the human impact, as social groups and individuals, on the natural environment. It explores the relationships and interconnectedness between natural processes and social, economic, cultural, technological, and political culture. Critical environmental issues are discussed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course ENVR 109 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES161: Human Geography (3 hours lecture)

Human Geography presents the interaction of culture and environment. Variations in environment and culture result in great differences how culture is imprinted upon the environment. The role of politics, language, religion, economics, urban systems, and technology reveal the relative intensity with which culture roots in nature. Emphasis is upon culture as a force that shapes the human use of the earth. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course EUGS 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES162: Energy, Society and Energy Alternatives Race (3 hours lecture)

This is a non-mathematical course designed: (1) to provide a knowledge of some of the principles of science about different types of energy, (2) to consider energy consumption by society, (3) to examine the advantages and disadvantages of each source of energy, and (4) construct a policy for an E.A.R., "Energy Alternatives Race." There are no science or mathematics prerequisites. Essentially the course consists of lecture-demonstration, discussions, and reports. Winter session only. Previous course GEOS 198 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES170: World Geography (3 hours lecture)

World geography aims to present essential facts and concepts about the natural and human environment of major regions and countries. The course presents a picture of regions as developed through the interactions of natural, cultural, economic and political forces. Geopolitical, social and economic relationships between and among countries are studied. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course EUGS 102 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES200: Geomorphology (3 hours lecture)

Major controls of climate and the landforms of North America are analyzed in order to gain an understanding of how the continent compares and is related to the rest of the world. The basis and distinct characteristics of the subdivisions of North America are examined in order to bring out contrasts and unique features within the continent. Previous course GEOS 254 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105 or EAES 107.

EAES201: Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Presents a basic understanding of the dynamic atmosphere and explores the impacts that weather and climate have on humans and the biosphere. Basic physical laws of energy and motion are employed to explain temperature, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, storms, and how climates vary regionally. Connections are made toward management of weather hazards, air pollution, impacts on agriculture and economy, and environmental and social implications of climate change. Lectures are supplemented by current events discussions and hands-on exercises in lab sections. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 257 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES202: Introduction to Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to sustainability science and the challenges confronting society's transition to global sustainability; an investigation into the systems and processes basic to sustainability science; and the relationship of sustainability science to business, public policy, and the sciences. Previous course ENVR 233 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125, ANTH 155, BIOL 113, ECON 100, ECON 101, ECON 102, EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107, EAES 160, EAES 161, EAES 170, POLS 100, POLS 101 or departmental approval.

EAES204: Geology Field Trip

A five-day to one-week trip through areas of geologic significance. A geoscience major is expected to participate in at least two of the trips. Field trip report and collection required. Expenses shared by the participants. Previous course GEOS 484 effective through Spring 2012. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107 or departmental approval.

EAES210: Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduces the basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing. Focus on digital cartographic science, graphic design, spatial data and image portrayal and inquiry, map overlays, and applications. Previous course EUGS 270 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMPT 183, EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107, EAES 160, EAES 161 or EAES 170.

EAES211: Aerial Photograph Interpretation (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Principles of photogrammetry and the use of aerial photographs as a significant research method to recognize and evaluate earth environments and resources. Previous course GEOS 251 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107, EAES 160, EAES 161 or EAES 170.

EAES212: Map Reading and Cartography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the characteristics of map computation, design and construction. Historical development of mapping and map reading will be important areas of emphasis. Remote sensing, computer mapping will provide up-to-date procedures. Each student will work toward a map suitable for commercial publication. Previous course GEOS 250 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107, EAES 160, EAES 161 or EAES 170.

EAES220: Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Crystallography, internal structure, origin, occurrence, and properties of minerals, laboratory study of common minerals. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 443 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 101, EAES 105 or EAES 107; and CHEM 120 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES230: Hydrology (3 hours lecture)

Water, its availability, distribution and usefulness. Hydrologic cycle examined in detail. Interaction with man and his usage. Applications to models and systematic processes. Previous courses ENVR 252 and GEOS 252 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105 or EAES 107.

EAES240: Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Geological history of the earth; the evolution of North America in terms of the changing geography, climate, and plant and animal life as interpreted from the rock and fossil record. Required field trips. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 114 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107 or EAES 250.

EAES250: Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A general study of the marine sciences, including origin and evolution of the oceans, physical and chemical properties of seawater, marine life, oceanic circulation, atmospheric-ocean exchange and other processes that take place in the oceans. This course also deals with marine resources and human interaction with the marine environment. Field trips required. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 250. Previous course PHMS 210 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES261: Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture)

The emphasis of this course is on the imbalance of world population growth and distribution in comparison with the availability of natural resources. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES262: Our Finite Earth: Population and Resources (3 hours lecture)

Implications of the population explosion and the rising rate of resource consumption. Focuses on the alternative ways various societies can achieve equilibrium between population and economic development within the framework of limited world resources. Previous course EUGS 203 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES263: Noise Pollution: Contemporary Problems and Issues (3 hours lecture)

Noise, noise pollution, the psycho-physical effects of noise, noise control, and hearing conservation is studied. Previous course GEOS 205 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES264: The Geography of Life and Death (3 hours lecture)

Study of medical geography of diseases of man and their relationship to physical setting. Factors such as climate, soils, water nutrition and sanitation in relation to diseases will be analyzed world-wide. Human diseases also examined; national, regional, and local geographic conditions. Previous course EUGS 222 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES270: Geography of North America (3 hours lecture)

Provides an understanding of the development of cultural, physical and economic landscape of the United States and Canada. Emphasizes elements of rapid change: urbanization, industrial growth, transportation, trade patterns, distribution of population and modern agriculture. Previous course EUGS 202 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES271: Geography of East and Southeast Asia (3 hours lecture)

Regional analysis of East Asia (China and Japan) and Southeast Asia (Indonesia): (1) physical environments; (2) human landscape and their cultural heritages; (3) contemporary issues including economic development, political configurations, and environmental problems. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Previous course EUGS 207 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES272: Land and Life in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

"Land and Life in Latin America" is a regional survey course that explores and explains the physical-human interface and the constantly changing environmental societal needs. The course focuses on the functional processes that mold contemporary states and regional realignments. Emphasis is upon environmental conservation, demographic transitions, the role of culture and politics to foster a viable ecumene. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course EUGS 208 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES273: New Jersey Environment: Problems and Issues (3 hours lecture)

Designed to focus attention on the physical characteristics of New Jersey in order to appreciate and understand the problems encountered in issues involved in management and protection of the natural environment. The significance of location, characteristics of landforms, climate weather patterns, soil and vegetation, will be examined together with the human impact on the landscape. Previous course GEOS 222 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES280: Principles of Land Use (3 hours lecture)

Geographical analysis of rural and urban land use patterns in the United States. Field work stresses mapping techniques and socio-economic aspects of urban land use in the New York-New Jersey metropolitan area. Previous course EUGS 204 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES281: Introduction to American Urban Studies (3 hours lecture)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the development of American cities and their suburbs, with an emphasis on current patterns of urbanism and urbanization. The growth and evolution of metropolitan systems, urban-suburban ecology, and planning responses to critical metropolitan issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course EUGS 206 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES282: Urban Design and Architecture: American Cityscape (3 hours lecture)

The evolution of American urban form and architecture from the colonial town to the contemporary metropolitan region; city plans and the emergence of professional planning; the architect and the urban environment cultural values and changing urban forms and new town design. Previous course EUGS 209 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES283: Urban Georgraphy (3 hours lecture)

Principles of location, interaction in the socioeconomic spheres, and the increasing importance of sustainable environmental management are dominant themes. Close attention to socio-spatial conditions, especially the housing sector, are addressed, as well as the suburbanization process and the urban sprawl challenge to a viable long-term urban system. Assignments are structured to introduce students to professional presentations, both maps and graphics, and written analysis. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course EUGS 213 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES300: Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture)

This course assesses the interactions of shifting energy dependence and adaptive technologies to add energy sources to the current national energy matrices. Included in this analysis will be a discussion of the growing roster of accessible energy sources by type and environmental source and environmental limitations. History, economy, politics, and culture will be addressed to provide the social context to gauge the growing impact of energy dependence in the contemporary global system. Previous course ENVR 315 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207, ECON 208, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES301: Climatology (3 hours lecture)

Basic climate elements examined in terms of their influence on habitats and various aspects of human activities. The energy flux between atmosphere and biosphere affords a fundamental understanding of limitations in ecosystems development. Knowledge and climatic influences on health, clothing, human comfort, architecture, commerce and industry encourages the student to investigate new ways of living rationally within a climatic environment. Previous course GEOS 201 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 201.

EAES302: Structural Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Recognition and interpretation of primary and tectonic rock structures laboratory work emphasizes the analysis of faults, joints, folds and foliation. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 472 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 220 or EAES 240.

EAES303: Field Geography

Geographic analysis of local region. Uses of reconnaissance and survey, interviews, maps and ground and aerial photographs in information gathering. Requires individual area study. Previous course EUGS 303 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 230, EAES 281 or EAES 283.

EAES310: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hours lab)

This course deals with fundamental principles and applications of GIS. Various ways in which GIS can be used in planning and management analysis and research will be discussed. Students will learn the issues which need to be considered when planning and implementing GIS. One or two widely used software packages will be employed as a tool to study GIS applications. Previous courses GEOS 470 and EUGS 470 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 210.

EAES311: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of Environment (3 hours lecture)

Systematic study of multiband spectral reconnaissance of the environment; multifrequency radar systems and their uses. Previous courses GEOS 455 and ENVR 455 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 210.

EAES320: Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Description, identification, classification, origin and occurrence of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks. Laboratory study of the common rocks. Required field trips. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geoscience. Previous course GEOS 444 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220.

EAES321: Economic Geology (3 hours lecture)

Geology and geography of non-metallic and metallic mineral resources and fuels. Problems associated with their occurrence and exploitation. Required field trips. (Not given every year.) Previous course GEOS 310 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220.

EAES322: Environmental Geochemistry (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Chemical principles and methods applied to the study of interactions among lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Topics such as water pollution, waste disposal and human impact on global geochemical cycles will be discussed. Laboratory will stress the measurement of chemical properties related to water and soil quality as well as computer modeling of chemical transport in porous media. Previous course GEOS 454 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220 or CHEM 230.

EAES330: Fluvial Geography (3 hours lecture)

Detailed study of streams and rivers emphasizing processes causing variations of size and shape; the morphology of streams and stream channels; processes, quantitative techniques. Previous courses GEOS 352 and EUGS 352 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200 or EAES 230 or departmental approval.

EAES331: Geohydrology (3 hours lecture)

The study of ground water with particular emphasis given to its mode of migration, chemistry and relation to the geographic environment. Particular attention is given to Darcy's law, soil porosity, soil permeability and the ability to withdraw water for human consumption. Water pollutants and salt water incursions are investigated. Spatial distributions are analyzed and the processes examined. Previous course GEOS 452 and ENVR 452 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 230 or EAES 240.

EAES332: Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture)

Climatology emphasizing moisture as one of the fundamental factors in climatic analysis; processes and problems of classification and variability. Examines energy and water balance. Previous course ENVR 456 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 201, EAES 230 or EAES 301.

EAES340: Sedimentology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Geological processes and agents which form, transport, deposit, consolidate and alter sediments. Interpretation of the resultant sedimentary rocks. Laboratory work on the texture, mineralogy and mass properties of sedimentary particles. Required field trips. (Not offered every year.) Previous course GEOS 437 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 220, EAES 230, EAES 240 and EAES 250.

EAES341: Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Origin, composition, properties and classification of soils. Additional topics include water in soils and human impact on soil resources. Laboratory covers the measurement of soil properties and principles of soil mapping and soil resource assessment. Field trips are required. Previous course GEOS 450 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 270, ANTH 360, ANTH 370, BIOL 213, CHEM 230, EAES 200, EAES 220, EAES 230 or EAES 240.

EAES342: Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Invertebrate fossils-their classification, morphology, evolution, stratigraphic distribution and paleoecology. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 431 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 240, BIOL 213 or BIMS 220.

EAES350: Oceanography (3 hours lecture)

Study of the physical and chemical properties of sea water, oceanic circulation, waves and tides, and estuarine and shoreline processes. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 350. Previous course GEOS 360 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 240, EAES 250, PHMS 250 or departmental approval.

EAES360: Contemporary Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture)

Designed to focus attention on specific environmental problem areas or utilization of resources through assigned readings which provide background for open class discussion. Previous course GEOS 320 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 261, EAES 262 or departmental approval.

EAES361: Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture)

The course studies U.S. environmental policy in air, water, land use, agriculture, energy, and waste disposal and other areas. It examines the major ideas that shape environmental policy, the institutional processes by which these ideas are turned into policy, and how these policies affect both U.S. and global environments. Issues of international environmental policy will also be discussed. Previous course ENVR 313 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES202, EAES281, EAES283, JUST209, LAWS200, JURI210, POLS201 or departmental approval.

EAES362: Environmental Gerontology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the social, political, economic and spatial impacts of the older adult on the environment. Topics discussed are: demographic characteristics and environmental design of senior leisure and housing environments; migration patterns; mobility, and location of older adults; and the planning, site location, design, and financing of independent and assisted adult living environments. Previous course EUGS 360 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES363: Geopolitics (3 hours lecture)

Main theories of the field and their application to selected political entities, current problem zones and the spatial interaction of nations. Previous course EUGS 408 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES370: World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture)

Distribution, flow and consumption of mineral resources. Political, economic and social implications of the geography of resources. Basic studies in industrial location, agricultural land use, problems of economic development and population-resource ratios. Examines world trend in production controls and market allocations. Previous course EUGS 300 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207, ECON 208, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281 or EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES371: Geography of Europe (3 hours lecture)

The modern European landscape created by the activities, over many centuries, by a variety of peoples of differing cultural backgrounds, economic systems and ideologies. Previous course EUGS 304 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES372: Geography of South Asia (3 hours lecture)

Political, cultural and economic study of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh; interrelationship between cultural and physical aspects of the regional landscape. Previous course EUGS 306 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES373: Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture)

The slow pace of settlement of the Eastern Seaboard and the development of distinctive culture hearths prior to 1800; the rapid settlement and diffusion of culture traits in the area beyond the Appalachians since 1800. Previous course EUGS 312 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES374: Latin American Environments and Economies in a Global Framework (3 hours lecture)

This course is structured to focus on the interactions of the physical world with economical, financial, and commercial activities in a global perspective. Environment and economics serve as thematic threads to develop dynamic models that are representative of regional--and increasingly--global linkages. Previous course EUGS 320 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON101 and ECON102 and EAES202, EAES210, EAES281, or EAES283 or departmental approval

EAES375: Culture in Transition in India: An Anthropo-Geographical Approach (3 hours lecture)

India in its geographical and socio-anthropological setting. The course focuses on the nature and processes bringing about transition in traditional values and social institutions. Previous course EUGS 330 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES376: Geography of New Jersey (3 hours lecture)

Demographic and economic organization of the State. Spatial contrasts in population density; suburban-central city interactions; the influence of New York and Philadelphia on landscape organization. Philosophical concepts of regionalism and investigation of micro-regionalism in New Jersey. Previous course EUGS 424 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES377: Geography of Sub-Sahara Africa (3 hours lecture)

Topical and regional study of African soils, vegetation, climate, physiography, mineral resources and other aspects of the physical environment in the light of man's habitation of the continent. Previous course EUGS 412 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES378: Geography of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

Topical study of area extending from Morocco to Iran: arid land agriculture, nomadism, land tenure systems, settlement patterns, problems of industrial development, and socio-economic and military implications of region's oil wealth. Includes Arab culture and Islamic influences on urban and rural landscapes. Previous course EUGS 413 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES379: Geography: The Former Soviet Union (3 hours lecture)

Topical and regional analysis. Emphasizes demographic-ethnic composition of Soviet people, physical resource base, interregional relationships, and spatial effects of state planning programs. Previous course EUGS 419 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES380: Transportation (3 hours lecture)

Transportation is the study of spatial interaction of economic factors and societal functioning. Transportation flows are analyzed in the context of technological change, degree of accessibility, different transport cost surfaces, and transportation as it relates to land use planning. Previous course EUGS 234 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281 or EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES381: Urban Field Studies

Off-campus study of urban conditions in New York-New Jersey metropolitan area: housing, mass transportation, social pathologies, inner city economics and the role of planning. On-campus discussion sessions alternate with field trips. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course EUGS 301 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 281 or EAES 283.

EAES382: Geography of Manufacturing (3 hours lecture)

The world's manufacturing activities; measurement techniques; analysis of the economic, cultural and geographic bases in industrialization; plant location problems and the special situation of underdeveloped nations. Previous course EUGS 311 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207, ECON 208, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281 or EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES383: Location of Economic Activity (3 hours lecture)

Organization of economic activity past and present refined with changes of more complex economic systems. Location factors such as physical & human resources, accessibility, routing, services, industrial sites and market advantages analyzed under varied conditions in different economic systems. Previous course EUGS 314 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281 or EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES384: Managing the Urban Environment (3 hours lecture)

An advanced interdisciplinary investigation of the modern city and its suburbs, emphasizing the impact of selected social, political and economic issues. Previous course EUGS 317 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES385: Urbanization and Environment (3 hours lecture)

Examines interaction between man and the physical urban environment. Studies dynamic and physical processes as related to air, water and noise pollution, and hydrologic and geologic hazards. Previous course EUGS 331 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES386: People and Cities: Comparative Urban Studies (3 hours lecture)

Introduction and cross-cultural investigation of the processes of urbanism and urbanization: formation, structure and functioning of cities throughout the world. Previous course EUGS 462 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 210, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES390: Research Methods (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces a widely used statistical package to analyze data. The application and interpretation of results of frequently used statistical techniques remains the primary focus. Survey research techniques are stressed. All the steps in the completion of a research project are emphasized. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geography. Previous course EUGS 309 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 109 and EAES 210.

EAES391: Quantitative Methods in Geography and Urban Studies (3 hours lecture)

Treatment of measurements and design in geography; definition of problems, hypotheses formulation and tests of hypotheses by alternative methods of measurement. Geographic applications of computer methods, multi-variate analysis, systems analysis, data bank maintenance and evaluation. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geography. Previous course EUGS 310 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 109 and EAES 210.

EAES401: Geo-Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Spatial relations of the living environment. A systems approach to functional processes, characteristics and relationships of the ecological elements, i.e. soil, water, air, vegetation, etc. Both natural succession and human-induced changes including pollution, within the ecosystem. Previous course GEOS 404 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 322, EAES 332, EAES 341, BIOL 370 or departmental approval.

EAES402: Sustainability Science Seminar (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of a literature search and application of research tools and methodologies appropriate for completion of a project, paper, or internship in sustainability science. Previous course ENVR 465 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, BIOL 213 and EAES 370.

EAES403: Meteorology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere. Meteorological instruments, principles of atmospheric physics, weather patterns and measurements of changes within the atmosphere. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geoscience. Previous course GEOS 457 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 301 or departmental approval.

EAES404: Field Geology (4 hours lecture, 6 hours lab)

Application of geologic principles to field mapping and interpretation in the North Central Applachians, Rocky Mountains, and/or regional geology of another designated area. Map production and writing field reports will be emphasized. This is an intensive summer field course. Previous course GEOS 480 effective through Spring 2012. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 302, EAES 320 and EAES 441; or departmental approval.

EAES410: Advanced Topics in GIScience (3 hours lecture)

This course will allow students with demonstrated knowledge and skills in the geographic information sciences (GIS and/or Spatial Analysis) to expand on those skills by applying them to a particular geological or geographical issue. Students will work closely with faculty to select appropriate project(s) based on the student's interest and the professor's expertise. Depending on the project's scope and scale, the course will use current software such as ESRI's ArcGIS or ERDAS Imagine. Previous courses EUGS 475 and GEOS 475 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 310 or EAES 311.

EAES412: Computer Mapping (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces a widely used computer mapping software to make thematic customized maps. Presentation of data in the form of a graph and a chart is also stressed. General cartographic principles are emphasized. Previous courses GEOS 405 and EUGS 405 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 310.

EAES419: Senior Seminar in Geographic Information Science (3 hours lecture)

Provides students with the tools and experience to develop and complete a research or problem-solving project in geographic information science. Students will produce a senior thesis or digital presentation portfolio. Previous course EUGS 467 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 310, EAES 311, EAES 410 or departmental approval.

EAES427: Organic Geochemistry (3 hours lecture)

This is a basic course in organic geochemistry, covering the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks, emphasizing fossil fuels and environmental contaminants. Previous course GEOS 453 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: AQUA 351, BIOL 350, BIOL 370, CHEM 310, CHEM 320, CHEM 370, EAES 320, EAES 322, EAES 340, EAES 341 and EAES 342.

EAES441: Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Stratigraphic principles and their application. Case studies of selected regions. Local stratigraphy interpreted through field studies. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geoscience. Previous course GEOS 434 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 302, EAES 340 or EAES 342.

EAES443: Geology of the Vertebrates (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The origin, development, biogeography, paleoecology, survival or extinction, stratigraphy, and morphology of selected fossil vertebrate groups. Bio-stratigraphic and paleogeographic significance of particular fossil vertebrate faunules. Reguired field trips. Previous course GEOS 435 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 342.

EAES451: Coastal Marine Geology (4 hours lecture)

A study of the geologic processes concerned with the supra-, inter-, and sub-tidal areas of the near shore environment. Field studies will emphasize the dynamics of erosion and deposition as well as general sedimentation associated with modification of barrier beaches and other land forms of the New Jersey shoreline. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 451. Previous course PHMS 481 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 340, EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 441 or departmental approval.

EAES452: Dynamic Beach Processes (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Study of the processes and forces involved in material transport within the beach zone. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 452. Previous course PHMS 483 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 340, EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 441 or departmental approval.

EAES453: Tidal Marsh Sedimentations (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Processes involved in sediment transport and deposition within the marsh system. Geologic history of tidal marshes. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 453. Previous course PHMS 484 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 340, EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 441 or departmental approval.

EAES454: Human Impact on the Coastal Zone

A study of man's economic, political, legal and social impacts on the physical and biological aspects of the coastal zone, primarily a field course with supporting lectures and discussion. Previous course GEOS 403 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 451, EAES 452 or departmental approval.

EAES455: Field Methods in Oceanography

This course is intended to familiarize the student with the applications and techniques of marine samplings. The nature and role of equipment will be stressed. Field experience at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium field station. Previous course GEOS 466 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 451, EAES 452 or departmental approval.

EAES456: Physical Oceanography (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A survey of modern oceanography and its methods including characteristics of sea water, theories of ocean currents and, in general, applications of biological, geological, physical, meteorological and engineering sciences to the study of the oceans. Offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 456. Previous course PHMS 411 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351 or departmental approval.

EAES458: Marine Science Education (1 hour lecture, 1 hour lab)

Selected field experiences and laboratory methods utilized to develop resources from the marine environment to be used in teaching the various disciplines. Offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 458. Previous course PHMS 460 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351 or departmental approval.

EAES459: Independent Study in the Marine Sciences

Individual research projects will be selected under the guidance of a professor associated with the consortium. Open only to those advanced undergraduate students who have indicated a potential for original thinking. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 459. Previous course PHMS 498 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES460: Environmental Law (3 hours lecture)

The study of the National Environmental Policy Act; the Environmental Impact Statement; the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; Solid and Hazardous Waste; related environmental laws, i.e. OS&H act; and litigation are analyzed. Aspects of environmental law, within which institutions and corporations must operate, are discussed. Previous courses ENVR 410 and EUGS 410 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 360, EAES 300, EAES 302, EAES 310, EAES 320, EAES 322, EAES 341, EAES 361, EAES 370, EAES 390, JUST 314, JUST 330, LAWS 302, JURI 300, POLS 365 or departmental approval.

EAES462: Population Problems of the World (3 hours lecture)

Identification, description and analysis of the present-day distributional patterns of the world's people; demographic trends, man-land ratios. Mobility, migration and socio-economics and geographic forces affecting world population. Techniques for measurement and analysis. Previous course EUGS 421 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 363, EAES 370, EAES 380, EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES463: Culture and Resource Utilization (3 hours lecture)

Evaluation and utilization of resources. Examines changes of characteristics of physical resources in relation to technological and cultural change, population increases, resource depletion and accelerated redundance of man. Previous course EUGS 423 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 300, EAES 363, EAES 370, EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES470: The Geology of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The physical features of New Jersey and their origin, geologic history, stratigraphy, palebiology, mineralogy, structural geology, economic geology. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 410 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 302, EAES 320 or EAES 441.

EAES471: Urban Studies: London and the British New Towns Movement (3 hours lecture)

An "in-the-field" study of London and the new towns movement in the greater London metropolitan region. Students will meet with officials and planners in such agencies as the department at environment, new towns association, and borough government and study: planning and design of new towns and greenbelts; contrasting social, political, economic, cultural and life styles of central city London and surrounding new towns; and urban re-development in central London. Previous course EUGS 428 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386 or departmental approval.

EAES476: Seminar in International Economic Geography (3 hours seminar)

An interdisciplinary seminar focusing the techniques of economics and geography on a common theme to achieve a synergistic conclusion. Previous course EUGS 461 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON101 and ECON102 and EAES300, EAES363, EAES370, EAES390, or departmental approval.

EAES480: Urbanization in World Perspective (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of characteristics and patterns of urbanism and urbanization in world perspective. Studies multi-faceted problems created by rapid urbanization. Examines role of cities in regional development and modernization of rural sector in Third World. Previous course EUGS 409 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 363, EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386, EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES481: Problems in Urban Geography (3 hours lecture)

Seminar on the application of geographic concepts and theories to the analysis of urban problems. Field or library research projects by students on specific urban problems. Previous course EUGS 411 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 363, EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386, EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES482: Real Estate Principles (3 hours lecture)

In this course the student is introduced to the principles of real estate from a historical, social, economic, legal, and spatial perspective. The topics explored are: urban-suburban development and the real estate product; the changing nature of real estate through planning, zoning, environmental and social considerations; real estate economics and demographics from a national, local and individual parcel level; and a detailed study of the legal instruments and concepts involved in residential, commercial and industrial real estate transactions. Previous course EUGS 417 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 363, EAES 373, EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386, EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES483: Advanced Real Estate (3 hours lecture)

This course builds on the fundamental principles introduced in EAES 482 and explores the following new topics: mortgage finance; market demand analysis for residential, retail commercial, office and industrial land use; location and site planning theory and analysis; real estate investment analysis and appraisal techniques; real estate research sources and methods; and public policy impacts on real estate. Previous course EUGS 418 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 482.

EAES484: Urban Planning (3 hours lecture)

The course focuses on the principles, processes, and practices of urban planning. The formulation of policies and the management roles of the planning agencies are emphasized. Previous course EUGS 460 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 373, EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386 or departmental approval.

EAES486: Village to Metropolis: Urbanization in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

Examines urbanization in Latin America from Columbian times to the present. Portugese and Spanish town planning practices and their evolution into modern times, including their impacts upon evolving urban morphology and subsequent metropolitanization. Previous course EUGS 444 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 363, EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386 or departmental approval.

EAES487: Senior Seminar in Urban Study (Urban Studies Internship) (3 hours semester)

A seminar to be taken in conjunction with the urban studies semester internship, and designed as a synthesis of the various approaches in urban studies which the student has acquired in previous urban-related courses. Each semester the seminar focuses upon a specific in-the-field research project, and an analysis and evaluation of the student's internship experience. Previous course EUGS 464 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES490: Independent Study in Geography (Independent Study)

Preparation of a research paper or project to be presented to members of the staff. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course EUGS 490 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES491: Internship

A full semester internship in an urban or environmental agency. Students will be expected to carry out agency assignments, observe and participate in decision making processes and engage in middle management activities. Previous course EUGS 463 effective through Spring 2012. 3 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES492: Honors Research

Provides original research experience to superior undergraduates. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES494: Independent Study in Geoscience

An opportunity for the qualified student to do library and/or laboratory investigation in a field of science of his/her choice under the guidance of a faculty member. The course is conducted exclusively by scheduled individual conferences and reports. (Offered on demand.) May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits. Previous course GEOS 495 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES495: Readings in Earth & Environmental Studies (3 hours lecture)

Open only to Geography honor students. Students will be expected to read a number of the more definitive works in modern geography. Examination will be both oral and written. Previous course EUGS 425 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES496: Pro-Seminar in Earth and Environmental Studies (Independent Study)

Problem-oriented seminar. Specific topics in urban, environmental studies or geography. Content changes according to the needs of the instructor. May be taken three times for a total of nine credits. Previous course EUGS 427 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES497: Senior Seminar Geography (3 hours seminar)

The course provides students with the tools and experience to develop and complete a geographic research project from start to finish. Students will be introduced to issues associated with becoming a professional geographer. Students will produce a senior thesis. Previous course EUGS 466 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 390 or departmental approval.

EAES498: Seminar in Geoscience (2 hours seminar)

Student field, laboratory and library investigation of a problem in the area of his/her interest in geoscience; results presented in oral and written form. Class discussion of the individual papers and of other pertinent topics of current interest in geoscience. (Not offered every year.) Previous course GEOS 490 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES499: Selected Topics in Earth & Environmental Studies

An in-depth study of a particular topic in geoscience, the specific subject matter of which is not offered regularly in an existing course. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course GEOS 494 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES500: Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture)

This course assesses the interactions of shifting energy dependence and adaptive technologies to add energy sources to the current national energy matrices. Included in this analysis will be a discussion of the growing roster of accessible energy sources by type and environmental source and environmental limitations. History, economy, politics, and culture will be addressed to provide the social context to gauge the growing impact of energy dependence in the contemporary global system. Previous course ENVR 515 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES300.

EAES501: Environmental Studies Physical (3 hours lecture)

A systems concept utilizing physical science. Provides some understanding of the abiotic environment to life. The atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere are examined as natural, man-modified, and human environments. Previous course ENVR 501 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES502: The Dynamic Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Origin, evolution and history of the earth. Internal and external processes by which minerals and rocks form and are modified. Interpretation of rock features and structures and significance of the fossil record. Plate tectonics, geomorphology, oceanography, and meteorology. The course is conducted at a more rigorous level than introductory, undergraduate courses. Research project and field trips are required. Previous course GEOS 502 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES503: Advanced Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

In-depth study of the major problems of physical geology processes of erosion, rock formation, continent and ocean-basin origin and relationships, earthquakes, interior of the earth, volcanism, island arcs, mountain building, paleomagnetism, continental drift, and sea-floor spreading. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 503 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES504: Landscapes in Transition (3 hours lecture)

The field in historical perspective, with emphasis upon contemporary trends; philosophical roots and quest for theory. Analyzes theory and methods of application and their relationships in order to understand the role of applied in contrast to theoretical geography. Previous course GEOS 520 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES505: Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of the relationships between man and the physical environment of atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Particular attention to problems of mineral resource and fossil-fuel depletion; pollution of air, water and soils and waste disposal and recycling, simple computer modeling of environmental situations. Previous course GEOS 525 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES507: Tectonics (3 hours lecture)

The study of the major structures of the earth, the principle of isostasy, mountain-building, continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and possible causes of tectonism in the earth. Discussion will include the methods of study, results obtained, interpretation of the data, and the latest theories of tectonism. Previous course GEOS 572 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program or departmental approval.

EAES508: Field Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The principles and techniques of geologic field work. Independent and team mapping of local areas of geologic interest using modern field methods and instruments. Previous course GEOS 580 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience; and equivalent of EAES 302; and EAES 320 or EAES 441 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 404.

EAES509: Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Overview of current issues in sustainability science and the challenges confronting society's transition to global sustainability: sustainable use of natural resources; social learning; engaging scientists at the science-policy interface; and the application of systems science to better predict the consequences of human actions and forecast outcomes of the multiple interacting stresses on the life support systems around us. Previous course ENVR 533 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES510: Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

Provides graduate students who have finished any introductory GIS courses or equivalents an opportunity to advance both the practical skills and theoretical understanding of GIS. The course will focus on application of GIS to urban planning, locational analysis, public health, crime analysis, resource and land use management, transportation planning, environmental management etc. In the meantime, specific topics such as geovisualization, geographic database design, GIS modeling and management will be treated as an integrated part during the applications. Previous course EUGS 570 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES310.

EAES511: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture)

This course affords graduate students who have completed introductory courses or equivalents the opportunity to advance both practical skills in and theoretical understanding of remote sensing. The course covers a wide range of applications and promotes facility in image processing and visualization, integration with Geographic Information Systems, and spatial modeling techniques. Industry-standard software is used for demonstration and laboratory exercises. A semester project must be completed that demonstrates an application of remote sensing to a real-world environmental problem. Students are required to submit a term paper, an oral presentation, and a poster related to this project. Previous courses ENVR 555 and GEOS 555 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES311.

EAES520: Advanced Mineralogy (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Chemical and physical principles as applied to minerals. Detailed study of representative minerals from the various families. Advanced techniques will be performed by the student. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 543 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy.

EAES521: Optical Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Theory and practice of using the polarizing microscope to study and identify minerals; theory of light transmission in minerals; the practical effect. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 545 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy.

EAES522: Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Rock textures, structures and mineralogy using the polarizing microscope. Identification and classification of rocks and the origin and history of the rock as determined by microscopic study of thin sections. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 546 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy.

EAES523: Sedimentary Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The interpretative study of the structures, textures, composition and genesis of sedimentary rocks. Laboratory analyses of sediments and sedimentary rocks by optical, mechanical and chemical methods and the graphical representation of the resultant data. Previous course GEOS 538 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience; and EAES 220 Mineralogy, EAES 337 Sedimentology or EAES 441 Stratigraphy or equivalent.

EAES524: Igneous and Metamorphic Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The intepretive study of igneous and metamorphic rocks in detail with the aim of properly identifying and naming the rocks and interpreting their history: rock suites from classical areas. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 578 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience (GEOS) and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy and EAES 320 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology or departmental approval.

EAES525: X-ray Microanalysis (3 hours lecture)

Students will learn energy dispersive spectroscopy, qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis, and x-ray mapping. Previous course GEOS 547 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 220, CHEM 410, PHYS 470 or BICL 406 or departmental approval.

EAES526: Geochemistry (3 hours lecture)

Chemical laws and principles applied to the earth, chemical composition of the earth, distribution and relative abundance of the elements. Radioactive materials, atmospheric precipitation of geochemicals, the geochemistry of polluted water (including solid and liquid wastes) study of meteorites. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 575 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES527: Organic Geoghemistry (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory graduate course in organic geochemistry, covering the occurence of natural and anthropogenic organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks, emphasizing fossil fuels and environemental contaminants. Previous course GEOS 576 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: CHEM 230, EAES 322, EAES 441 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 427.

EAES528: Environmental Forensics (3 hours lecture)

Environmental Forensics seeks to answer the questions: "How did environmental contamination occur?" and "Who/what caused it?" It involves the use of analytical (geo)chemistry, field geology and biology, remote sensing, integrated with law and policy. This course will focus primarily on the methods and applications of chemical fingerprinting, using petroleum biomarkers, polycyclic aromatic compounds, isotopes, and heavy metals. Previous course GEOS 577 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of EAES 427 or EAES 527 or departmental approval.

EAES529: Instrumental Environmental Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A survey of instrumentation and methods for quantitative environmental analysis of inorganic earth materials (e.g., waters, soils, sediments). Hands-on analytical techniques will typically include, but are not limited to, pH and conductivity measurements, ion chromatography, UV-Vis and optical ICP spectrometry, ICP mass spectrometry, and SEM-EDS depending on expertise of the instructor(s). Previous course GEOS 579 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 322, CHEM 410, EAES 526, EAES 527 or departmental approval.

EAES531: Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture)

Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES201, EAES230, or EAES301 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES332. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES201, EAES230, or EAES301 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES332.

EAES532: Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduction to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling, using a variety of current software packages. Saturated and unsaturated media will be considered. Emphasis is on application of models to the solution of common problems encountered in hydrology industry and research. Previous course GEOS 552 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of EAES 331; and MATH 116 or MATH 122 or departmental approval.

EAES533: Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

The spatial patterns of the water resource both as surface water and ground-water. Processes affecting availability and techniques of estimation are stressed. Previous course GEOS 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES535: Geophysics (3 hours lecture)

Theory and application of conventional geophysical methods: seismology, magnetism, electricity and gravity. Laboratory includes the collection and interpretation of geophysical data. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 571 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program.

EAES540: Advanced Historical Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

In-depth analysis of major problems in geologic history, stratigraphy and paleoenvironments as interpreted through lithologic and paleontologic evidence. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 504 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES541: Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Stratigraphic principles and their application. Case studies of selected regions. Local stratigraphy interpreted through field studies. Previous course GEOS 534 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program or departmental approval.

EAES542: Advanced Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Fossil invertebrates with emphasis on their evolutionary, paleoecologic and stratigraphic significance. Laboratory and field work stress collecting, preparation, identification, curatorial and faunal analysis techniques. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 533 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES543: Vertebrate Paleobiology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The geologic history, morphology, taxonomy, paleogeography and evolution of fossil vertebrates. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 535 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES545: Paleoecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Distribution and association of fossils as interpreted from the evidence presented in the geologic record. Detailed paleoecological field study made of selected faunal assemblages. Previous course GEOS 530 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES546: Micropaleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Taxonomic, morphologic, paleoecologic and stratigraphic consideration of microfossils with special emphasis on those from the marine environment. Previous course GEOS 532 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES547: Paleobotany (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The taxonomy, morphology, evolution, paleoecology and stratigraphic significance of fossil plants. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 536 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES548: Biostratigraphy of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The geologic history, paleontology, stratigraphy and paleogeography of New Jersey. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 537 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES550: Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture)

Development and evolution of the ocean basins; marine sedimentation; shoreline development and classification; submarine topography; mineral resources of the sea. Laboratory analysis of marine sediments and fossil assemblages. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 560 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program or department approval.

EAES551: Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Coastlines and their evolution; processes and materials of the coastal zone; shore zone hydrodynamics and sedimentation: beach and barrier systems with special emphasis on the New Jersey shoreline. Offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 551. Previous course PHMS 581 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES or MS Biology graduate program and equivalent of EAES 200 or departmental approval.

EAES559: Special Problems in the Marine Sciences

An opportunity for the qualified graduate student to do research in a field of marine science selected under the guidance of a professor. Open only to graduate students who have indicated a potential for original thinking. Also offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 559. Previous course PHMS 598 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES560: Environmental Law (3 hours lecture)

The course focuses on The National Environmental Policy Act; The preparation of an environmental impact statement; The Clean Air Act; The Clean Water Act; The Endangered Species Act; Toxic Substance Control Act; Solid and Hazardous Waste and other Environmental laws. The role of environmental professionals in the formulation and implementation of environmental law and policy are discussed. Previous course ENVR 510 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES561: Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of Environmental Law. The course will utilize a model and method approach, which will present theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course will acquaint students with various traditional legal theories and compare and contrast them with law as it has evolved to meet the changes in society. Previous course ENVR 590 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES562: Waste Management (3 hours lecture)

This course examines liquid waste management (sewage, sewerage, septic, and acid mine drainage) and solid waste management (composting, incineration, dumps, sanitary landfills, ocean dumping, and resource recovery). Management of radioactive wastes is included. Previous course GEOS 513 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES563: Natural Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Provide background in natural resource management; wildlife, fisheries, forests, water and related components. Includes field trips. Previous course ENVR 551 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES564: Environmental Education (3 hours lecture)

Foundations of environmental education-historical, theoretical, and conceptual. Includes models, gaming encounters, and teaching strategies. Previous course ENVR 550 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES565: Environmental Change and Communication (3 hours lecture)

Prepare students as professional environmentalists: Communication and journalism strategies, theory of persuasion, and roles as catalyst, solution giver, process helpers, and resource person. Previous course ENVR 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES566: Environmental Problem Solving (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to train students to define environmental problems, develop their skills in solving these problems, as well as commitment to work toward their solution. Each lesson consists of student preparation of reading selected articles, classroom orientation, field trips, and the student-instructor follow-up. Field trip topics include pedestrian/vehicle conflict, school site development, plants as a city resource, urban/rural recreation, sign ordinances, transportation and similar topics. Offered as ENVR 508 through Spring 2012. To become EAES 566 effective Summer 2012. 3 sh.

EAES567: Human Environment (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of population in relation to the physical environment; objectives and skills of numerous culture groups will be examined to clarify existing regional variations in the man-land relationship. Previous course ENVR 505 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES568: Environmental Studies-Social/Behavior (3 hours lecture)

A systems concept utilizing social and behavioral sciences. Provides some understanding of the relationships of the cultural environment to life. The social and behavioral conditions upon the grouping of individuals are examined in natural and man-modified environments. Previous course ENVR 502 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES569: Air Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Spatial distribution of energy in the atmosphere treated in terms of natural factors and man's induced changes (atmospheric pollution). Incoming sun energy as modified by man is traced through the atmosphere, vegetation, soil and water. Previous course GEOS 501 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES570: Culture Regions (3 hours lecture)

Seminar investigation of man's role in changing the face of the earth. Emphasis on spatial perception and cultural attitudes towards space as well as the diffusion process. Previous course EUGS 503 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES580: Problems in Economic Geography (3 hours lecture)

Research course examines spatial patterns of economic activities. Stress on current methodology and research interests. Previous course EUGS 502 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES581: Urban Systems Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The complexity of the city and its modification by means of planning, the systems approach to urban study, the ecological base, different models of urban systems, the impact of technological change, the hierarchy of urban regions, planning in the existing systems, and creating new ones. Previous course EUGS 510 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES582: Urban and Regional Planning (3 hours lecture)

Urban and regional planning analyzes planning goals at an integral level. Urban and regional planning are rooted in the need to anticipate social and economic change in space and how it needs to be organized to enhance the functions of the physical plant and conserve the habitat twenty and more years into the future. Data gathering and analysis, graphic presentation and model building are an integral part of the course. Previous course EUGS 511 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES583: Transportation Analysis and Planning (3 hours lecture)

Transportation analysis addresses such diverse subject matter as technological change in the transportation media, transportation and energy, degree of accessibility, passenger trip generation by kind, commodity flows, transportation and spatial order, and transportation planning as part of urban and regional planning. Previous course EUGS 512 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES584: Urban Studies and Policy Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Interdisciplinary study of urbanization, the processes that produce and shape urban agglomerations. From this holistic perspective the interaction of different social, cultural economic, political and planning forces examined for their impact upon the resulting system. Previous course EUGS 550 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES585: The Metropolitan Economy (3 hours lecture)

The spacing, location and size of cities, the role of transportation in city rhythms and intra and inner city relationships. Urban design planning juxtaposed with multi-faceted decision making processes for an examination of their relative position in the management of urban systems. Previous course EUGS 551 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES590: Independent Study in Environmental Studies

Student must develop statement of goals and phasing for completion, prior to consultation with instructor. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course ENVR 531 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES591: Methods in Environmental Research (3 hours lecture)

Formulation of the research problem, use of bibliographical sources and reference material organizing the research tests and measurements, analysis of data, and report writing. Previous course ENVR 503 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES592: Pro Seminar (1-4 hours seminar)

Research on selected problems which will vary according to instructor. May be repeated once for a maximum of eight semester hours as long as the topic is different each time. Previous course EUGS 504 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES593: Research Seminar (3 hours seminar)

Student field, laboratory, and library investigation of a problem in the area of his or her interest in geoscience, the results of which will be presented in oral and written form. Class discussion of the individual papers and of other pertinent topics of current interest in geoscience. Previous course GEOS 590 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES594: Research in Geoscience Literature (1 hour lecture)

Investigation and evaluation of a topic in geoscience under the supervision of a faculty member by: (1) preparing a bibliography from standard sources, including an on-line computer search; and, (2) preparing a report written in standard professional format. Previous course GEOS 594 effective through Spring 2012 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES599: Special Problems in Earth and Environmental Studies

Independent research project to be performed by the student under the guidance of the faculty. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course GEOS 592 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES610: Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to techniques for the analysis of spatial data. The course will heavily utilize GIS and Remote Sensing data with particular attention to applications and manipulation techniques. Topics include characterizing spatial data, data sampling, visualization, data modeling, point pattern analysis, and spatial data interaction. Previous course EUGS 680 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) program and equivalent of EAES510 or departmental approval.

EAES611: Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a forum to explore cutting edge advances in remote sensing of the environment afforded by new satellite and aircraft based imaging platforms and to provide facility with image processing (IP) and geographic information systems (GIS) software. Topics covered include multispectral, hyperspectral and multiangular reflectance data, very high resolution panchromatic imagery, active radar and lidar systems, microwave imagery, advanced spatial and statistical raster analysis, and interfaces to GIS. Previous course ENVR 655 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES311 or EAES511 or departmental approval.

EAES612: Seminar in Environmental Graphics (3 hours seminar)

Use of geographic materials suitable for analysis, understanding and presenting aspects of the environment through seminar presentation. Previous courses GEOS 658 and ENVR 628 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduatae program.

EAES660: Seminar in Environmental Management (3 hours seminar)

This is a methods seminar focusing on the techniques of managing a project with environmental significance. Students will design and plan in detail a project to improve an existing environmental problem or to implement an economically important project that would minimize environmental problems. Previous course ENVR 610 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES661: Instructional Design for Environmental Education (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the techniques for instructional design as they relate specifically to the goals, need, and objectives of environmental education. Previous course ENVR 553 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 564.

EAES680: Reading Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies (2 hours seminar)

Required of all master's degree candidates concentrating in Geography and Urban Studies. This semester entails directed independent study in preparation for a 3-hour written comprehensive examination. Previous course EUGS 603 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

EAES681: Urban Studies Seminar (3 hours seminar)

The seminar is designed to analyze the contents and the concepts to formulate a holistic view of the city. Benchmark papers and research frontiers will be investigated. Previous course EUGS 610 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES690: Research Project in Environmental Studies

To complete the research proposal initiated in the research methods course. Previous course ENVR 695 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES696: Research Project in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Students develop an independent research project in consultation with a faculty advisor to address a sustainability issue of our time. Topics might include energy use and conservation; globalization and negative externalities; climate change; global extinctions and biodiversity; the ecology of cities; eutrophication and nutrient flux; habitat loss, alteration and degradation; alteration of biogeochemical cycles and land use patterns; environmental and social justice, and the "north-south" divide; or an approved topic of the student's choice. Students will prepare a research paper with extensive literature search and orally present the results of the project at the end of the semester. Previous course ENVR 696 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 509 and EAES 591 and departmental approval.

EAES698: Master's Thesis

Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take EAES 699 if they don't complete EAES 698 within the semester. Previous courses ENVR 698 and GEOS 698 effective through Spring 2012. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES699: Master's Thesis Extension

Continuation of Master's Thesis Project. Thesis Extension will be graded as IP (in Progress) until thesis is completed, at which time a grade of Pass or Fail will be given. Previous courses ENVR 699 and GEOS 699 effective through Spring 2012. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 698.

ECON100: Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture)

Major objectives and features of the American economy, including operations of a market economy, structure and function of business, money and banking, government and business relations. For non-majors only. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not open to Economics majors; may not be taken after ECON 101 and/or ECON 102.

ECON101: Principles of Economics: Macro (3 hours lecture)

A study of the American economy, analytically and institutionally; the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long term growth. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

ECON102: Principles of Economics: Micro (3 hours lecture)

Organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. Resource allocation, price determination and behavior of the firm in the determination of quantity of output and the hiring of factors of production. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

ECON202: Economics and Finance for Business Minors (3 hours lecture)

This comprehensive course maintains a reasonable balance between the disciplines of economics and finance. It includes micro and macroeconomics as well as selected topics in finance. Economics underlines how market and non-market institutions can best allocate relatively scarce resources to promote individual and social welfare. Among other topics, students learn how one can measure in a precise way the responsiveness of the quantities bought and sold to changes in prices and other influences on buyers and sellers. They also explore how market economies operate by first working through the perfectly competitive model then turning to noncompetitive market structures. The finance portion of the course provides students with a basic professional background in both corporate finance and investment. They are exposed to the fundamentals of discounted cash flows valuations after they have been introduced to the time value of money in the most general sense. They also learn how to value major sources of financing for corporations such as bonds and stocks. This leads them to consider the most important techniques used by a firm to analyze possible investments to decide which ones are worth undertaking. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 106, MATH 109, MATH 114, MATH 116, MATH 122 or MATH 221. For Business minors only.

ECON203: Economic Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Basic elements of economic statistics including frequency distribution, sampling, index numbers, statistical inference, regression and correlation techniques. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101, and 102, and MATH 113, and 114. Major within School of Business.

ECON204: Real Estate Principles & Practice (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the economics of the real estate business, including the general practices and the language of real estate. Providing a basic knowledge of the real estate business the course covers such topics as the physical, legal, locational and other characteristics of real estate. The course emphasizes the market evaluation and financing of real estate, the nature of real estate markets and the regional and local factors that may influence real estate values. Ethical issues are emphasized throughout the course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102 and MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

ECON205: Collective Bargaining: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

The development of collective bargaining in the United States and an analysis of the factors that account for present practices. The impact of collective bargaining on contemporary American life. Work in field. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON206: Managerial Economics (3 hours lecture)

The application of economic theory in the decision-making processes of the firm; utilization of economic analysis in the study of demand, costs, pricing and capital investment decisions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 203 or ECON 101 and ECON 102 and INFO 270 or ECON 101 and ECON 102 and INFO 271. Major within School of Business.

ECON207: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The basic determinants of market demand. Input-output relationships in determining cost structure. Determination of prices received by resource owners in the productive process. Theory of the firm and pricing in different types of market organization with varying degrees of competitive conditions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON208: Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The factors comprising aggregate demand and how they interact to determine the level of employment, output and the price level; the role of monetary and fiscal policy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON209: Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector (3 hours lecture)

Course will analyze the sources of growth of collective bargaining in the public sector; examine processes utilized by the parties and evaluate the impact of collective bargaining. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON213: Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Evolution of economic institutions with emphasis on development of domestic and foreign markets, technological changes and industrial growth. Analysis and interpretation of cyclical changes. Cross listed with History, HIST 213. 3 sh.

ECON215: The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

The extent, causes and consequences of poverty, inequality and insecurity. An appraisal of reforms, social insurance, medical care, public housing, rural development. The economics of discrimination and educational opportunity. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ECON221: Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to the professional sports industry under alternative institutional structures. The course addresses the structure and conduct of various sports markets in terms of the relationship between economic theory and evolving public policy alternatives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON222: Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture)

The economic life and development of Europe from the Middle Ages to the present, emphasizing the period from about 1750; economic causes that underlie the dislocations and perplexities of the 19th and 20th centuries. Cross listed with History, HIST 222. 3 sh.

ECON223: Economics of Fine and Performing Arts (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to various aspects of the fine and performing arts field. It includes an examination of theater economics, museum economics, and cinema economics, based on microeconomic theory of decisions as it applies to for-profit and non-profit institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON250: Selected Topics in Economics (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of a particular theoretical or applied area of economics. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Major within School of Business.

ECON300: World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture)

Distribution, flow and consumption of mineral resources. Political, economic and social implications of the geography of resources. Basic studies in industrial location, agricultural land use, problems of economic development and population-resource ratios. Examines world trend in production controls and market allocations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or EUGS 101 or EUGS 102. Major within School of Business. Starting Summer 2012: ECON 101 or EAES 161 or EAES 170. Major within School of Business.

ECON301: Money and Banking (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the economic role of money and credit in our economy with primary emphasis on federal reserve and treasury operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON303: Economic Growth and Development (3 hours lecture)

Problems of hastening the growth of countries with low incomes per person; the requisites for the economic development, the obstacles to such development, the strategy and tactics of development and aid for development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207. Major within School of Business.

ECON304: Public Policies Toward Business (3 hours lecture)

The economic organization of particular American industries. U.S. policy toward competition, monopoly and bigness in business. Government control of public utilities, transportation, radio and television broadcasting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON305: Commercial Real Estate: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

By developing an understanding of the relevant market structures, institutional frameworks (e.g., tax laws, social regulations, monetary policy, etc.) and appropriate analytical tools, this course provides students with an operational knowledge of investing in commercial real estate. The analysis focuses on real world examples and emphasizes the use of computer-based programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 204. Major within School of Business.

ECON308: Public Finance (3 hours lecture)

The impact of governmental expenditures, taxes and debt operation on resource allocation, income distribution, economic stabilization and economic growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON310: Urban and Regional Economics (3 hours lecture)

The underlying economic forces operating in the urban economy development of the urban economic unit, relationship of the urban economy to the regional and national economy, economic activity within the urban area and the public sector of the urban economy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON311: Labor Economics (3 hours lecture)

The determinants of wages in the organized and unorganized markets; a historical survey and analysis of the principal institutions and central processes in the labor and manpower areas; an examination of current issues in labor relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON312: Business Cycles and Forecasting (3 hours lecture)

Fluctuations in economic activity which characterize modern industrial economies. Definitions, descriptions and statistical measurement of business cycles are presented along with theories describing the causes of the cycles. Practical application of forecasting techniques to predict the course of future economic and business activity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 203, or INFO 270, or INFO 271 and ECON 208. Major within School of Business.

ECON314: Development of Economic Thought (3 hours lecture)

Broadening and improving the command of modern economic theory by examining the outstanding contributors to economic thought over the past two centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON320: Latin American Environments and Economies in a Global Framework (3 hours lecture)

This course is structured to focus on the interactions of the physical world with economic, financial, commercial activites in a global perspective. Environment and economics serve as thematic threads to develop dynamic models that are representative of regional -- and increasingly -- global linkages. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON398: Economics Independent Study

Independent study for juniors and seniors who have developed a special interest as a result of work in a course or who wish to develop their interest through their own guided reading. A member of the Economics Department guides the student in his research and reading. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 and ECON 208.

ECON401: Financial Institutions (3 hours lecture)

The structure and operation of financial institutions, their role in the economy and in the money and capital markets. The techniques and objectives of monetary policy and its effect on financial institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 208 or 301. Major within School of Business.

ECON402: International Economics (3 hours lecture)

The how, why and consequences of the movement of goods, services and factors of production in international exchange and an examination of the financial arrangements used to facilitate trade. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON403: Comparative Economic Systems (3 hours lecture)

The economic systems of planned and mixed economies with special emphasis on the Soviet Union, China, the United Kingdom, the Scandinavian countries and the United States. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business, Russian Area Studies Minor.

ECON404: Interdependence in the Global Economy (3 hours lecture)

This course is a one semester introduction to the challenges and opportunities created by the increasing interdependence in the world economy. The emphasis is on empirical explorations of the implications of the core theories of international trade and finance for the U.S. consumer, entrepreneur and policymaker. In addition, some of the current economic issues flowing from our global linkages are examined with a view to assessing the propriety of the fiscal and monetary response. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 402. Major within School of Business.

ECON405: Economic Development of Sub-Saharan Africa (3 hours lecture)

An examination of economic policies in Africa as they affect prospects for growth and development of the region. Students will engage in a variety of research projects that combine theory with analytical tools to derive policy-relevant findings. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 203 and 207. Major within School of Business, African-American Studies minor.

ECON407: Economics of Industrial Organization (3 hours lecture)

The causes and effects of structure, size and concentration on competition and market prices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON409: Economics of National Security (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to basic dimensions of national security under alternative institutional structures. The course addresses political, economic, financial, and environmental issues, and includes and analysis of recent innovations in risk management as they apply to the economics of national security in a variety of policy settings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON410: Computer Applications in Economics and Finance (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to use computer concepts in the context of economics and finance applications. Empirical and theoretical aspects of economics and finance are studied. Computer applications are covered in statistics and econometrics, cost-benefit analysis, decision-making, portfolio analysis, input-output economics, and the simulation of economic and financial models. Students apply programming concepts, as well as use existing software. Cross listed with FINC 410. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 208 or FINC 321. Major within School of Business.

ECON414: Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture)

This course links economic analysis of the technology and economics of natural resources to global warming. The focus is on the structure of domestic and international natural resource markets, how pricing is derived, and how utilization of natural resources is related to patterns of global warming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON417: Mathematical Economics (3 hours lecture)

Formulation of economic theory in mathematical language. Application of mathematical methods to economic theory and to the derivation of theoretical conclusions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or ECON 206 and 208. Major within School of Business.

ECON418: Economics Of Human Resources (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of the role of human resources in the economic process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON419: Economics Of Energy And Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the economic, technological, and environmental dimensions of energy policy choices. Emphasis is given to the linkages among various economic models, elementary principles of energy storage and conversion, and specific energy technologies as they apply to past and current energy policy alternatives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON420: Econometrics (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the techniques of applied economic (social science) research. Examination of the tools necessary for applied economic research and methods for dealing with certain problems inherent in economic data. The primary emphasis will be on the application of the techniques to economic data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101, and ECON 102, and ECON 203, or INFO 270, or INFO 271. Major within School of Business.

ECON438: Advanced Seminar in Economics (3 hours seminar)

A seminar designed to integrate economic theory, quantitative tools, and institutional knowledge in a series of applied issues. Students are required to undertake a number of specific oral and written projects that describe their understanding of key elements within the discipline. This course serves as a capstone for Economics students. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Economics and Business Administration with a Concentration in Economics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 206 or ECON 207; ECON 208; INFO 270; seniors only; ECON, ECBE, ECOE and BAEC majors only.

ECON439: Advanced Seminar in Economics: Honors I (3 hours seminar)

Define the scope and methodology of the honor project through the presentation of a thesis prospectus. This process will involve preparation of a review of the relevant research literature, specification of an appropriate research methodology, gathering and testing of preliminary data where appropriate, as well as submission of the thesis prospectus to the departmental honors committee. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Major within School of Business.

ECON440: Advanced Seminar in Economics: Honors II (3 hours seminar)

Student will complete all appropriate quantitative and qualitative analysis of Seminar in Economics Honors I as well as prepare a summary and interpretation of their findings. Through discussion of findings, faculty and student will make suggestions for any additional analysis or revisions to be undertaken. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 439. Major within School of Business.

ECON461: Seminar in International Economic Geography (3 hours seminar)

An interdisciplinary seminar focusing the techniques of economics and geography on a common theme to achieve a synergistic conclusion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON490: Real Estate Internship

This course provides students with professional work experience before completing their concentration degree. The Real Estate Internship course enables students to apply their knowledge from various real estate courses in the areas of verbal and written communication, critical thinking, self directed learning, career readiness, decision-making, technology awareness, leadership and social responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 305. Major within School of Business.

ECON497: Economics Independent Study

Open to students who wish to undertake reading and/or research in specialized areas of economics. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 and ECON 208. Major within School of Business.

ECON501: Economic Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The resource allocation and distribution of income implications of a market-oriented economy operating under various degrees of competition. Also analyzed are the determinants of consumer and market demand and the theoretical cost structure of firms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: M.B.A. degree students, M.A. Environmental Studies majors with concentration in Environmental Management (ESEM), Doctor of Environmental Management (ENVM) students; or M.B.A. Director approval.

ECON502: Financial Institutions and Monetary Policy (3 hours lecture)

This course analyzes the structure and functioning of the monetary and financial system. The component parts and the system as a unit will be examined as they interrelate to affect the economy. Topics include commercial banking system, federal reserve system, financial markets, financial intermediaries, determination of the level and structure of interest rates, and contemporary problems, both theoretical and applied, in the area of monetary policy. This course is cross listed with FINC 502. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501 and 505. MBA degree students only.

ECON503: Economic Problems of the Third World (3 hours lecture)

A survey of major economic problems of the Third World; examination of the economic structure of developing countries and of general theories of economic development; critical evaluation of various policy alternatives for their development; analysis of possible economic relationships between First and Second Worlds with the Third World. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON505: Aggregate Economics (3 hours lecture)

This course develops contemporary macroeconomic theories to explain aggregate employment, national income and the levels of interest rates and prices. Along with developing various models the course examines current research and reviews the economy's recent macroeconomic performance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: M.B.A. degree students, M.A. Environmental Studies majors with concentration in Environmental Management (ESEM), Doctor of Environmental Management (ENVM) students; or M.B.A. Director approval.

ECON508: Economics of Public Management (3 hours lecture)

Computer-based applications of capital theory to the decision-making process of government. Analysis of alternative approaches to public sector project evaluation. Spreadsheet applications of project analysis in physical and human resource management areas covering water resources, public health, and education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON510: Urban Economics: Problems and Policy (3 hours lecture)

This course studies the location of economic activities, the growth of cities and the origins of some urban problems in a market economy. Also discussed are the problems of location and congestion due to agglomeration and non-market phenomena. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501.

ECON521: Applied Econometrics (3 hours lecture)

This course is aimed at applied research using econometric techniques. This course will provide the necessary theoretical and practical aspects of econometrics. In addition, students will be required to complete a working paper as a demonstration of their ability to gather data, choose and apply an appropriate econometrics model and finally prepare their findings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ECON530: Microeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the principles of microeconomics. Topics include: economics of scarcity and choice, marginal analysis and economic efficiency, elasticity of demand and supply, utility maximization and firm's profit maximization under various market structures. Using these tools will allow students to understand and critically evaluate real world circumstances and events. 1.5 sh.

ECON531: Macroeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the principles of macroeconomics and provides students with a thorough understanding of macroeconomic issues and problems. Topics include: unemployment, inflation, national income accounting, fiscal and monetary policies. Students will be exposed to modern macroeconomic models and be able to apply these to explain economic fluctuations and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the economy. 1.5 sh.

ECON533: Corporations and International Financial Markets (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the economic theories and problems which confront business institutions when dealing in international financial markets. Analyzes the various market instruments and how a corporation may use them. Cross listed with FINC 533 and International Business INBS 533. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON540: Development in Economic Education (2 hours lecture)

Insights into recent experiments incorporating economic education into the curriculum, K-12; restructuring of curriculum to promote economic understanding. Materials, written and audio-visual, designed for economic education. Guest lectures supplement the experience of the course instructor. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501.

ECON541: Foundations of Contemporary Economic Thought (3 hours lecture)

Antecedents of current economic theory; economics as a cumulative science; the works of the creative economists; the uses and limitations of economic theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501.

ECON542: Business Fluctuations and Forecasting (3 hours lecture)

Theories to account for variations in business activity; macroeconomic models and other forecasting approaches; economic fluctuations in the United States; proposals for reducing fluctuations; Harrod-Domar model and other modern theories of growth. Cross listed with Economics and Finance FINC 542. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission. MBA degree students only.

ECON543: United States and the International Economy (3 hours lecture)

Principles of international finance, monetary relations and trade. Discussion of contemporary international monetary and trade problems and policies. Discussion of the economic aspects of current American foreign policy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501 and 505. MBA degree students only.

ECON544: Government and Business (3 hours lecture)

The evolution of government influences on the functioning of the American economy. The causes and consequences of government regulation and control. The importance of economic analysis in the foundation of public policies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501.

ECON545: Economics of Labor (3 hours lecture)

Principal trends in the industrial and occupational distribution of labor; current developments in labor-management relations in both private and public sectors; market trends and institutional factors that determine employment, wage rates, fringe benefits and industrial peace. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON550: Technical Change and International Competition (3 hours lecture)

This course will discuss the theory of productivity and technical change in the context of the declining performance of U.S. manufacturing. It will focus attention on the nature of international competition and its effects on manufacturing productivity growth in the U.S. Based on the analysis, a tentative set of policy suggestions will be offered for restructuring the U.S. manufacturing sector and strengthening its competitive base. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501. MBA degree students only.

ECON560: Economics Internship

In conjunction with ECON 561, this course (ECON 560) is the initial course of a two course internship sequence. The purpose of ECON 560 is to integrate the student's educational experience with an off-campus, business or public sector, professional experience. In addition to applying their economic education to specific problems, the internship also provides each student with an opportunity for enhanced personal growth and professional awareness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ECON561: Internship Treatise

The post-internship treatise course provides the opportunity for the student to integrate their formal education and their internship experience in order to develop a treatise on a specific aspect and application of economic theory. This is the second course in the internship sequence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 560 with a minimum grade of B.

ECON562: Macroeconomics Analysis and Public Policy (1.5 hours lecture)

In this course students will learn how national and global economic conditions, fluctuations in the level of economic activity, and various economic policies affect the general business environment. Topics include business cycles; interrelationship among the private, public and foreign sector balances; the determination of national income, employment and the price level in classical, Keynesian and modern macroeconomic theories; fiscal and monetary policy; and the analysis of money and bond markets, and the determination of interest rates. 1.5 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 531.

ECON563: Managerial Economics (1.5 hours lecture)

In this course students will examine the application of microeconomic theory to the manager's responsibilities and decision making within the organization. Topics include the theory of consumer behavior, the theory of the firm within the framework of profit maximization, demand, supply and the concept of elasticity. Furthermore, this course explores different forms of markets: perfect competition, imperfect competitive markets such as monopoly, monopolistically competitive and oligopoly. The course will also explore the concept of externalities, and circumstances in which markets can fail and need to be corrected by government policies. 1.5 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 530.

ECON570: Business and the Sociopolitical Environment (3 hours lecture)

Study of the increasingly complex set of interrelationships among business, government and other interest groups in the public policy process. It explores the economic and legal environment, and the social and political factors which affect organizations. A series of current corporate and public policy problems are discussed in order to raise major issues, including ethical issues, involved in managing the corporation's relationships with its many publics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of the functional core, which consists of the following courses: ACCT 501, MGMT 505, MKTG 501, FINC 501, and INFO 505 ; M.B.A students only.

ECON575: Independent Study in Economics

Under faculty guidance and supervision, this tutorial course is open to students who wish to pursue individual study and research in a particular discipline. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental Approval. MBA degree students only.

ECON577: Selected Topics in Economics (1 - 3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of a selected topic, issue, problem or trend in business economics. The specific subject matter is not offered as an existing regular course or deserves more time-emphasis than is possible in a regular course. When offered, topics and prerequisites are announced in the course schedule book. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topics is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501 and 505. MBA degree students only.

ECON590: Reading Seminar in Applied Economics (3 hours seminar)

Required of all candidates in the BA/MA Applied Economics Program. This seminar entails directed independent study in preparation for a three (3) hour written comprehensive examination. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ECON603: Reading Seminar in Economics (2 hours seminar)

Required of all Master of Arts degree in Social Science candidates concentrating in economics, this seminar entails directed independent study in preparation for a three hour written comprehensive examination. 2 sh.

ECON698: Master's Thesis

Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take ECON 699 if they don't complete ECON 698 within the semester. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ECON699: Master's Thesis Extension

Continuation of Master's Thesis Project. Thesis Extension will be graded IP (In Progress) until thesis is completed, at which time a grade of Pass or Fail will be given. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 698.

EDFD505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with CURR 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD509: Sociocultural Perspectives of Teaching (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 509. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505, CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

EDFD519: Assessment for Authentic Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with CURR 516. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ELRS580: Learning Theories (3 hours lecture)

Study of the learning process and its measurement as it applies in the classroom and non-school settings. 3 sh.

HIST100: The Study of History (3 hours lecture)

The course is designed to introduce students to the nature of history as a scholarly intellectual pursuit. It is built around student activities dealing with the materials and typical research procedures used by historians and the challenges of criticizing and writing history at the beginner's level. Meets the University Writing Requirement majors in History. Restricted to History Majors and Minors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to History Majors and Minors.

HIST101: Connections: Years That Made History (3 hours lecture)

This special course will link people and events in eight significant years in history since 1500. Students will explore how events and prominent prople are tied together. While the course will emphasize Western history, elements of non-Western history will be incorporated to achieve a more global perspective. 3 sh.

HIST103: Foundations of Western Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Origins and development of Western civilization to about 1350: Egyptian, Judaic, Greek, Roman, Islamic and Medieval European contributions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST105: Emergence of European Civilization, 1500-1914 (3 hours lecture)

The emergence of Europe as a distinctive world civilization. The development of ideas, institutions and technologies from medieval times to World War I. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST106: Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present (3 hours lecture)

European society in transition since World War I. The role of two world wars in shaping contemporary times. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST108: Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Pre-colonial African civilization and its eclipse under slavery and the colonial onslaught. Principal social, political and cultural systems of the period. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST109: Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Examination of various institutions and value systems in Islam which characterize it as a major civilization. Important cultural developments as they are affected by the process of transition. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST110: Introduction to American Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The mainstreams of development in American civilization. Political, intellectual, social, economic and cultural forces and achievements which have made the U.S. distinctive. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST111: Contemporary American Issues in Historical Perspective (3 hours lecture)

Examines contemporary issues in American society in historical perspective. Topics will vary from semester to semester in the light of changing problems confronting our society. 3 sh.

HIST112: Introduction to the Modern Middle East (3 hours lecture)

This course aims to offer a general survey of the important themes and developments in Modern Middle Eastern History from 1750 to the present. By the end of the course, students should gain an appreciation of some of the major topics and issues that are central to the understanding of the Modern Middle East. Students will consider the social political and cultural history of the late eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth century Middle East. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western. 3 sh.

HIST114: Early Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a background in the main issues, themes and events in the history of colonial Latin America, including an introduction to the pre-contact (pre-1492) histories of Spain, Portugal and the Americas. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST115: History of Puerto Rico (3 hours lecture)

The history and culture of Puerto Rico and interaction with Spain, Latin America and the United States. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST116: Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an introduction to the history of Latin America, with an emphasis on the period since the 1810s. Students unfamiliar with the region should emerge from the course with a firm grounding in the major themes of modern Latin American history. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

HIST117: History of the United States to 1876 (3 hours lecture)

Issues and problems in the development of the American nation from discovery and exploration to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST118: History of the United States Since 1876 (3 hours lecture)

American development from an agrarian power after the Civil War into an urban-industrial society with the liberal institutions that accompanied it. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST128: Pre-Modern Japan: A History or Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory survey course in Japanese history from earliest times to the Meiji (1868-1912). It is a first step in Japan studies designed to provide a broad, useful, working knowledge of key aspects of traditional Japan. Culture, politics, society and economy will be built into a chronological, historical structure. Japan's uniqueness will be outlined against a background of greater East Asian and world interactions. This course will stand on its own, but will also serve as a useful background to understanding modern and contemporary Japan. The course also aspires to sensitizing students to the inherent value of East Asian culture as a part of human richness and diversity. 3 sh.

HIST129: Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory survey course in Japanese history from the Meiji (1868-1912) through the Showa (1925-present). While it would be useful to study premodern Japan before taking this course, modern Japan does stand on its own. A review of traditional Japan will be followed by study of the dynamic interaction of Japan and the West during the 19th Century. Japan's expansionism, World War II and the postwar period will be important topics. Cultural, military, economic, political, and social developments will be discussed in historical settings. Students will be encouraged to appreciate the unique dynamics of Japan's development as a modern nation state and to explore the likely progress of Japan into the 21st Century. 3 sh.

HIST131: Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The early history of India, 3000 B.C. to 1000 A.D. Principal religions, political and literary works, and their insights into Indian social values and institutions. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST132: Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The early history of China, 2000 B.C. to 1300 A.D. Principal social, political and metaphysical-philosophic works, corresponding values and institutions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST133: Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Modern China, 1600 to the present. Changes in values and mutual influence of East and West, studied through literary, philosophical, anthropological, historical and artistic works. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST141: Foundations of Global Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The increasing interaction between world cultures and civilizations during A.D. 1500-1914. The central role of Europe in the development of the first global phase of world history to 1914. Cultural confrontation between West and non-West in the age of Modern Imperialism. 3 sh.

HIST142: 20th Century Global Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The increasing interaction between world cultures and civilizations from 1914 to the present, the significance of World War I and II in world history. Contemporary world problems and issues in historical perspective. 3 sh.

HIST204: The Second World War (3 hours lecture)

A study of the origins and course of World War II in Europe, Asia and the Pacific. 3 sh.

HIST205: Minorities in American History (3 hours lecture)

A study of the historical background of the various ethnic, racial and religious minorities in contemporary American society. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST212: Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Social and cultural aspects of American history: population movements, rural and urban problems, status of women, utopian ventures, mass media, recreation, human rights. 3 sh.

HIST213: Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Major trends in agriculture, commerce, finance, manufacturing, transportation and industrial relations from colonial beginnings to the present. Cross listed with Economics and Finance, ECON 213. 3 sh.

HIST214: Diplomatic History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Evolution of American foreign policy and diplomacy from the Revolution to the present. Selected basic readings in the field. 3 sh.

HIST215: Women in American History (3 hours lecture)

The changing role and status of women in American society from colonial times to the present. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST216: Italian American History and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The history and culture of Italian Americans from the colonial era to the present. 3 sh.

HIST217: History of Black Americans (3 hours lecture)

Role of Americans of African descent in the development of the United States. Contributions of black Americans from initial discovery and exploration to mid-20th century. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST218: Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

The historical development of American political institutions from the early 1700s to the present. Focus upon the evolution of constitutional and legal structures, the party system and pressure groups, the role of bureaucracies, and the impact of political leaders. 3 sh.

HIST219: Sport in History (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a global approach to the history of sport, but focuses on the role of sport in American history. It examines sport in early world cultures, the development of sport as a mass spectator phenomenon in modern times, and the social significance of sport in the contemporary world. 3 sh.

HIST221: Europe's Conquest of the Americas, 1415-1763 (3 hours lecture)

A study of European explorations, discoveries and territorial settlements in the Americas during the 15th to the 18th century. Examination of the expansion and impact of Europe -- institutions, ideas, traditions, technologies -- and resulting confrontations with and impact on native American peoples. 3 sh.

HIST222: Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture)

European economic development from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis on the first industrial revolution in Britain; comparing 19th century economic growth in Britain, France, Germany and Russia. Cross listed with Economics and Finance, ECON 222. 3 sh.

HIST223: Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture)

Ideological and historical significance studied against the background of domestic and international events, personalities and ideologies. 3 sh.

HIST225: The Poles, Czechs, Slovaks and Hungarians Since 1815 (3 hours lecture)

This survey examines the history of east central Europe since the Congress of Vienna. The spread and impact of nationalism, democracy, fascism and Communism will be considered. 3 sh.

HIST231: New Jersey: Past and Present (3 hours lecture)

A survey of New Jersey history emphasizing (1) the state's political, economic, and social heritage and evolution, and (2) New Jersey's role in the development of the United States. 3 sh.

HIST250: Selected Content (3 hours lecture)

Students will study a specific historical period, topic, theme or problem. Individual course offerings will vary. Students may repeat this course twice, although not with same subject matter, for a total of 6 s.h. Consult advisor or History Department webpage for specifics about content for current semester offerings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100.

HIST281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman Conquest as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Cross listed with Classics and General Humanities,GNHU 281. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal Period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Cross listed with Classics and General Humanities, GNHU 282. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST299: History Study Abroad

This study abroad course is an exploration of a specific historical period, problem, theme, or geographical region. Particular course offerings will vary according to the location of study and the expertise of the instructor. Students will consult current schedule of courses for a specific semester offering. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the individual topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

HIST300: Research Seminar (3 hours lecture)

Students will study a specific historical topic or set of related topics in considerable depth. Advanced level research methodological skills will be integrated throughout, culminating with students writing a significant formal research paper. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100, and HIST 117 or HIST 118.

HIST308: History of the American Family (3 hours lecture)

Studies the history of the American family as a dynamic social institution. The course will focus on the changing role of the family in America; the varieties of family structures in past times, and the significance of the family in American cultural and social history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; and HIST 117 or 118; and HIST 103 or 105 or 106; and one of the following Non-Western History courses - HIST 108 or 109 or 114 or 116 or 128 or 129 or 131 or 132 or 133.

HIST309: Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture)

History of feminist ideas and theories about women and womanhood. Students examine important theoretical literature in Europe and America from 18th century to present. Original texts of Wollstonecroft, Fuller, Mill, and Freud will be considered against their socio-historic milieu. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST310: Immigrant in American History (3 hours lecture)

The processes by which the immigrant was incorporated into American society. Includes the cultural backgrounds from which the different groups came; the reasons for emigration; the nature of the communities they created once they reached the U.S.; their religious and social institutions; the problems of maintaining ethnic culture with the pressure to Americanize. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST311: Early History of New Jersey 1702-89 (3 hours lecture)

From royal colony to the establishment of the federal government under the constitution state; and local events during the American Revolution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST312: Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture)

The slow pace of settlement of the eastern seaboard and the development of distinctive culture hearths prior to 1800; the rapid settlement and diffusion of culture traits in the area beyond the Appalachians since 1809. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST313: Biography in American History (3 hours lecture)

The significant biographical materials available in the study of American history; the problems and uses of biography. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST314: Women and Migration (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on female migrants from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on historical studies, it considers issues of work, family, sexuality, and identity formation for migrant women past and present. Questions to explore include: what distinguishes the experiences of migration for women; what are the continuities and differences for women across time, ethnicity, and geography; how do historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and others, as well as the migrants themselves, understand female migration; what do women gain and lose through migration; and why a gendered approach to migration studies is crucial. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102; or HIST 100 and HIST 117 or 118.

HIST315: War in History (3 hours lecture)

Examines selected wars in the history of the world in an attempt to learn about causes and consequences of war. Consider attempts to prevent war in the past, and proposed methods for preventing war in the future. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST319: American Urban History to 1880 (3 hours lecture)

The urban dimension in American history and development of city life to 1880. Shapers of the 19th century city; instability and disorders due to transit and demographic revolutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST320: American Urban History Since 1880 (3 hours lecture)

Transformation of the 19th century industrial city into the 20th century metropolis; the emergence of the New York metropolitan region. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST321: History of the American Worker Since 1877 (3 hours lecture)

History of the American worker rather than his trade union. The worker's legal status, political behavior, social and cultural activities, treatment by employer and state. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST322: Medieval European Civilization 450-1350 (3 hours lecture)

Origins, development, and significance of a civilization whose political, social and cultural foundations had a spiritual basis and unity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST323: History of Russia to 1917 (3 hours lecture)

Factors shaping the Russian people: Byzantium and Greek Orthodox faith, Tartar state organization, the Mir, Westernization from Peter to Lenin, intellectual and radical movements. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST324: Russia Since 1917 (3 hours lecture)

Political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the Soviet Union and Russia; the relationship of ideology and national goals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST326: Modern German History (3 hours lecture)

German society, culture and politics from 1789 to the present. The formation of a unified state in the nineteenth century. The effects of World War I and of National Socialism. The division of Germany after World War II and the reunification of the country in 1989-90. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST327: History of France Since 1789 (3 hours lecture)

Political, social, economic and intellectual developments in France since the Revolution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST328: Conflict in Modern Ireland (3 hours lecture)

A history of Irish nationalism with emphasis on the period from 1782 to the present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST329: History of England to 1714 (3 hours lecture)

Emphasis on political and constitutional history, the formation of basic institutions of law and government and related economic, social and cultural factors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST330: Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture)

Masterpieces of the Chinese literary tradition from earliest times to the 20th century. Literary genre in historical perspective and as expression of social and cultural values. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST331: History of England 1714-1914 (3 hours lecture)

Political, social and economic history from the Hanoverian succession to the 20th century: Industrial Revolution, changing balance of the constitution, British imperialism, the Irish question. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST333: History of Brazil (3 hours lecture)

Traces the historical development from the pre-historical Indian cultures to the 1970s; covers the social, cultural, political, economic and religious aspects of the largest Latin-American nation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST334: Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture)

A survey of writings by and about Muslim women examined historiographically. We examine conventional wisdom about Muslim women through the ages, and how this "wisdom" was constructed: Who wrote about Muslim women? When? How? What purposes have these writings served at different times and places since the inception of Islam and during the course of its 1,500 year history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Passing grade in the following: HIST 100; HIST 117 or 118; HIST 103 or 105 or 106; 108 or 109 or 114 or 116 or 128 or 129 or 131 or 132 or 133.

HIST339: Seminar in Latin American History (3 hours seminar)

Intensive study of specific periods and/or problems in latin American history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST343: Research Techniques-American History (3 hours lecture)

This course is proposed for the three week January innovative instruction period as provided in the college calendar. The aim is to utilize this period for instruction of history majors in the techniques and problems of research with primary sources; also, to familiarize them with the sources of American history in the depositories. Limited enrollment of 12. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST400: Senior Seminar in History (3 hours seminar)

Directed research and preparation of seminar reports and written paper on special topics in the main fields of history. Required for senior history majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST401: Kingdoms in the Sun:Sicily and Southern Italy in Antiquity and the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture)

This course is an excursion into the history of Sicily and the southern Italian mainland from approximately 500 BC - 1300 AD. It is driven by the cultures that left lasting impressions on this diverse region, investigating Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Arab, Norman, German and French occupations and influences. Students will have an opportunity to engage in this exploration "on location," as it will be offered as part of a summer study abroad experience in Sicily. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST406: History of American Business (3 hours lecture)

Provides historical background toward understanding the present role business plays in American society. Examines the role of the entrepreneur and business manager in the evolution of American business. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST408: Independent Study European History

To provide opportunity for capable students, mainly history majors, to do independent work in the field of European history. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST409: Independent Study Non-Western History

To provide opportunity for capable students, mainly in history or transcultural studies, to do independent work in the field of non-Western history. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST410: Independent Study in American History

To provide an opportunity to do independent work in the field. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST411: Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Development and contributions of the thought of individuals and groups, dominant and minority, and their effect on the American mind, traditions and practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST413: The Philosophy of History (3 hours lecture)

Development of historical thought and the writing of history in the Western world from Herodotus to the present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST415: European Social History (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce history majors and other interested students to European social history in particular and social history in general. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST416: Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

The Roman Catholic church as the major spiritual institution as well as a cultural, moral, political and economic force in Latin America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST419: Age of Renaissance, 1350-1517 (3 hours lecture)

Political, economic, social and broad cultural developments in Italy and Western Europe during 1350-1517. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST420: The Reformation Era, 1500-1650 (3 hours lecture)

Religious movements of the 16th and 17th centuries; their medieval antecedents; the accompanying political, intellectual and socioeconomic forces. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST422: Studies in Enlightenment History (3 hours lecture)

Major intellectual developments in 18th century Europe: rise of skepticism, toleration, empiricism, idea of progress. Readings in Hume, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Kant and antecedent figures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST424: Diplomatic History of Europe (3 hours lecture)

Diplomatic history of Europe since the Congress of Vienna. Emphasis on development of diplomatic practice and relations between states during 1870 to present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST425: Ideas in European History: Burke to Nietzsche (3 hours lecture)

Conservative, liberal, romantic, utilitarian and early existential streams of thought in 19th century Europe. Readings in Burke, Bentham, Mill, Hegel, Nietzsche and others, with attention to historical background. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST426: The Nazi Third Reich (3 hours lecture)

Major economic, social, political and intellectual developments in 20th century Germany. Demise of Weimar Republic and ascension of Nazi Third Reich. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST427: The Holocaust, 1939-1945 (3 hours lecture)

The history of the Holocaust and an overview of its representations in the academic historiography as well as in literary and autobiographical texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST430: Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture)

Examines and compares the causes, course and consequences of three major social revolutions in Latin America: Mexico (1910), Bolivia (1952), Cuba (1959). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST431: Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Indian behavior. Culture change in the perspective of colonialism and modernization; contributions of religion to social and political values and modern literature. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 431. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

HIST432: Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Japanese behavior. Cultural change in the perspective of traditional periodization of Japanese history. Contributions of religion and philosophy to defining social values. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 432. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

HIST433: American Colonial History 1607-1763 (3 hours lecture)

Developments within the English colonies, interactions between England and the colonists, growth of a distinctive American society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST434: American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1828 (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of events leading to the war for independence; political, economic and foreign problems of the new nation; the growth of nationalism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST435: The Union in Crisis 1820-1877 (3 hours lecture)

Significant events and developments of the period: Jacksonian democracy, westward expansion and sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST436: America in the Gilded Age (3 hours lecture)

The forces which contributed to the development of modern, industrialized America; American society and its reaction to changes of the period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; and HIST 117 or 118.

HIST437: American Society in the 20th Century (3 hours lecture)

The continuing reactions to the problems of an industrialized America. The New Deal and recent Supreme Court decisions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST438: America in the Sixties: The Crisis of Consensus Liberalism (3 hours lecture)

Analyzes the crisis of American liberalism as that ideology was beset by the consequences of postwar affluence and the growing radicalism during the Kennedy-Johnson administration; and the backlash that developed into the Nixon "New Majority". 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST443: Internship in History

Opportunity for the advanced student to acquire practical experience working directly with primary sources of history in state and local depositories of historical materials. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST460: Independent Transcultural Study

No formal class meetings, this study program includes directed reading and preparation of written papers on transcultural subjects not offered in the regular curriculum and advanced independent study of subjects with which students have had course experience. Students seeking admission must secure approval of at least two professors representing different fields in the transcultural program. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST461: Cultural History of Primitive Societies (3 hours lecture)

Interdisciplinary approach to the aims, methods and techniques of ethno-historical research. Sources of data include both documentary and non-documentary evidence in reconstructing the culture history of pre-literate or semi-literate societies. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 461. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or HIST 100.

HIST499: Selected Topics

Study in a specific historical period, problem or theme. Particular course offerings will vary. Students may repeat course for up to nine credits as long as individual topic is different. Consult current schedule of courses for semester offering. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST501: New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture)

Designed to help students keep up to date in the fields of American, European and Non-Western history. Major trends and developments in the study of history in the light of recent representative examples of historical research and interpretation. 3 sh.

HIST502: History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture)

Designed to assist teachers, administrators and supervisors in acquiring a comprehensive view of modern materials, methods and curricula in history and the social sciences. 3 sh.

HIST511: Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar)

This course will examine the forces and conditions of the colonial period which contributed to the shaping of the characteristics of American political and economic institutions, social practices and ideas, intellectual outlooks, and attitudes. 3 sh.

HIST512: American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture)

The causes and course of the American revolution from both British and American viewpoints, including analysis of economic, political, social and intellectual factors. 3 sh.

HIST513: Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture)

The growth of political institutions under the Constitution, the gaining of respect as a new country in the family of nations. The establishment of economic credit, and the rise of American nationalism. 3 sh.

HIST514: The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture)

The crisis in American nationalism from Jackson through Reconstruction as the country's constitution, party system, and social structure contended with the disruptive effects of territorial expansion, the factory system, slavery and the new immigration. 3 sh.

HIST515: Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture)

This course in the history of American women will focus on major themes in nineteenth century women's culture. It will explore the implications of industrialization and modernization for women, the construction of domestic ideology, the development of feminism, and the centrality of gender in nineteenth century life and culture. The emphasis of the course is antebellum, but willl consider the implications of this legacy for post Civil War history. Readings will include contemporary scholarship as well as a selection of representative primary texts by and about nineteenth century American women. 3 sh.

HIST517: Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture)

An opportunity to study that part of recent American history centering about Franklin Delano Roosevelt. While concentrating on domestic aspects of American life, attention is given also to foreign affairs and their impact on the daily lives of Americans. 3 sh.

HIST518: Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture)

An advanced survey of the urban dimension in American history and of urban history as a discipline. Late 19th and 20th century national trends are pinpointed within the development of Paterson, Passaic, Jersey City, Newark and their suburbs. 3 sh.

HIST519: America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture)

This course studies the transformation of the Roosevelt coalition and its liberal policies since 1945 as they faced the challenge of the cold war abroad and growing class and racial upheaval at home. 3 sh.

HIST520: United States Far Eastern Relations (3 hours lecture)

United States relations with China and Japan, 1842 to the present. The people who formulated and implemented U.S. foreign policy. 3 sh.

HIST521: Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture)

The transformation of China from empire to Peoples Republic. Chinese concepts of revolution and the intellectual, political and social changes which preceded the formation of the Peoples Republic in 1949. 3 sh.

HIST522: Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture)

The historical forces of 19th and 20th century Russia which led to the Bolshevik revolution of November, 1917 and to the consolidation of Soviet power by 1921. 3 sh.

HIST523: History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture)

Changes in the ideological determinants of Soviet diplomacy contrasted with fluctuations in internal and external political and economic policies. Contributions of leading Soviet statesmen to diplomatic history. 3 sh.

HIST524: History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture)

Designed to familiarize students with major developments in American business history. The mutual impact of business and society is investigated through biographical studies of leading American businessmen. 3 sh.

HIST525: History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture)

Study of the American worker from the period after the Civil War to the present, with concentration on social, political and economic behavior as well as the union movement. 3 sh.

HIST526: The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture)

The causes and nature of the industrialization of the American economy after the Civil War; factors responsible for rapid economic growth; the impact of changing productive techniques on American institutions and human welfare. 3 sh.

HIST527: Industrialization of Europe (3 hours lecture)

European economic development with major attention to the period since about 1750. Comparing economic growth during the 19th and 20th centuries in Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Russia. 3 sh.

HIST529: Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the major states of Western Europe during the interwar period, with emphasis on varieties of fascism. 3 sh.

HIST532: Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

Modernization in East Asia with focus on Japan. Japanese experience in adjusting new world forces of the 19th and 20th centuries considered against the background of her traditional values and institutions. Comparisons with China and Korea. 3 sh.

HIST533: French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture)

The background of the French Revolution, its changing course and cast of characters during 1789-99, and the advent to power and imperial regime of Napoleon, 1799-1814. 3 sh.

HIST534: France of the Republics (3 hours lecture)

The development of modern France since 1870; political, economic and intellectual conditions and trends through the Third, Fourth and Fifth Republics. 3 sh.

HIST535: Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture)

Guided by the organizing principle that some medieval people themselves used, this course will approach the High Middle Ages through the eyes of those who fought (nobility), worked (peasants), and prayed (clergy). Social, political, economic, religious and cultural aspects of the medieval European experience will be explored through the investigation of topics such as the rise of the nation-state, the expansion of trade, the rise of the university, the launching of the Crusades, the development of Gothic architecture and the intensification of religious belief. A field trip is required as part of the course. 3 sh.

HIST536: Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the everyday lives and belief systems of early modern Europeans through a survey of developments in French, Italian, English and German popular culture over a period of three centuries from 1500 to 1800. Topics to be covered include Carnival, community policing, ritual behavior, religious beliefs, magic, family life, violence, deviant behavior, and the transmission of culture between groups and across generations. 3 sh.

HIST537: Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture)

Romantic, utilitarian, conservative, liberal and early existential streams of thought in 19th century Europe. The impact of these intellectual movements on European society. 3 sh.

HIST540: Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture)

General analysis and reappraisal of the place of Europe in world history. The development, distinctive contributions and future prospects of European civilization examined in the light of contemporary world conditions. 3 sh.

HIST541: Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

Course compares and contrasts central value systems, kinship institutions, social stratification and the exercise of political power in traditional India, China & Japan. These topics are related to differing patterns of nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. 3 sh.

HIST550: African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the construction and development of identities in Sub-Saharan Africa. It explores the meanings of concepts such as "tribe," "ethnicity," and "nation"; and it questions the role of history, culture and politics in the formation and evolution of African identities. The course focuses on particular themes such as traditions of origin, cultural nationalism, slavery, etc. These are illustrated by case studies from West, East, Central and Southern Africa, which are organized in a chronological order. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the notion of identity and its importance in the past and present of African societies. 3 sh.

HIST570: Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar)

Graduate level study in a period, problem, or theme in Non-Western History. Individual seminars will be offered in African History, South Asian History, Latin American History, etc. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Please see Course Schedule for specific offering each semester. 3 sh.

HIST580: Seminar in Western History (3 hours lecture)

Graduate-level study in a period, problem, or theme in Western history. Individual seminars will be offered in European and American history. Please see semester course listings for specific offering. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different each time. 3 sh.

HIST603: Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar)

Required for all master's degree candidates concentrating in history, this seminar entails directed independent study in preparation for a three-hour written comprehensive examination. Candidates should register to take the seminar in the semester preceding the examination date. Take the seminar in the fall if the examination is the following March; take the seminar in the spring if the examination is the following October. 2 sh.

POLS100: Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,)

This course analyzes politics from the four main vantage points of the discipline of political science, that is, political theory, comparative politics, international relations and American government. Of special concern is the U.S. Constitution, its classical and English roots, and its development to the present. This course is required for Political Science Majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS101: American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the basic institutions and processes of American politics, and will do so, in part, through a focus on current policy issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS199: Freshman Seminar in Political Science and Law (1 hour lecture)

An experience for Political Science, Jurisprudence and Pre-Law freshmen that will help them succeed as Political Science and/or Jurisprudence majors by learning study skills and becoming acquainted with the culture of higher education. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - New Student Seminar. 1 sh.

POLS201: Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture)

Constitutional principles, governmental institutions and political processes of selected contemporary states. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Political Science. 3 sh.

POLS202: International Relations (3 hours lecture)

Recent and contemporary world politics and the foreign relations and policies of selected states. 3 sh.

POLS203: International Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, need, evolution, principles, achievements and functioning of major international organizations, with emphasis upon the United Nations and selected regional organizations. 3 sh.

POLS204: Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture)

The salient characteristics of government and politics in the independent black African states, and the way these impinge on developmental efforts therein, are examined. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

POLS205: Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture)

Literature and developments in the field of public administration; the federal bureaucracy in the policy-making process. 3 sh.

POLS206: Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, institutions, and practices in contemporary China-Japan. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

POLS207: American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture)

A consideration and analysis of the goals that the nation's foreign policy officials seek to attain abroad, the values that give rise to those objectives, and the means or instruments through with they are pursued. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS214: Women in Politics (3 hours lecture)

The role of women in the functioning of the American political system. Meets the World Languages and Cultures - World Cultures. 3 sh.

POLS215: Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

The political behavior of American ethnic groups from the Puritans to the Puerto Ricans. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

POLS216: Urban Politics (3 hours lecture)

The policies, processes, inter-relationships and organization of governments in heavily poulated areas of the United States. 3 sh.

POLS300: Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major ideas that shape politics and political science as a discipline. Blending both historical and conceptual approaches to the development of political ideas, this class will also introduce fundamental concepts in political science as a whole. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course.

POLS301: American Party System (3 hours lecture)

Organization, function and practice of political parties in the U.S.; campaign functions, membership problems, political finance and policy-formation practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS302: Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture)

The nature and development of public opinion and pressure groups in the United States and their influence on public policy and political process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmenttal approval.

POLS303: Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture)

The major contemporary schools of political modernization and development theory; inter-relationship among political, social and economic variables. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201.

POLS304: State and Local Government (3 hours lecture)

State political sub-systems, including their administrative and local sub-systems, federal-state relations, political institutions and groups in the states and in New Jersey. This course helps students understand lawmaking and enforcement as functions of state and local government. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS306: Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course is taught in election years and provides the student with field experience at the local precinct or party level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101.

POLS307: American Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introduction to the main strands of American political thought from the founding of the American colonies to the present day. Our goal will be to come to grips with the major questions that have driven our politics throughout the nation's history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or JURI 300.

POLS310: Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture)

The problems and processes in the U.S. of public personnel administration at the state and local level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS311: Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture)

The budgetary process in governmental agencies from the perspective of political demands and influences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS312: Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

Black participation in the American political system from the colonial period to the present. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS313: The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces undergraduates to the intersection of the Internet and politics called "new media." Students will study various aspects of government and politics through a range of technologies from websites to blogs and social networking sites, exploring how these technologies impact the political landscape. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course or departmental approval.

POLS314: Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar)

Seminar in Campaign Politics provides an introduction to the history and theory surrounding elections in the United States and complements students practicums in POLS 306. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS315: Urban Administration (3 hours lecture)

Problems and policy-making in the larger urban or metropolitan complexes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS317: The American Congress (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the United States Congress. It will allow students to explore in depth one of the key American political institutions introduced to them in POLS 101, American Government and Politics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS318: The American Presidency (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the American presidency. It will allow students who were introduced to the presidency in POLS 101, American Government and Politics, to explore in depth one of the key institutions of the American political system. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS319: Politics and Film (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to film and politics. Films and assigned readings on a particular topic will familiarize students with particular aspects of government or politics, including but not limited to institutions, processes, movements, and the media. Students will attempt to reconcile portrayal of politics in films with scholarly work. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course or departmental approval.

POLS320: Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the American civil legal system as it affects a variety of our social institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS321: Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduces the student to institutions, processes, and social functions of criminal law. Students may take POLS 321 or PALG 301 but not both courses as part of the Political Science Major, the Paralegal Studies Minor or the Criminal Justice Minor. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS322: American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of supreme court decisions in the areas of the distribution of power within the national government and between the national government and the states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101.

POLS323: American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture)

The development of the constitution and the Supreme Court of the United States illustrated through reference to court opinions in civil rights and liberties. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS324: American Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the methods used to analyze public policy and an examination of current public policy issues. Special attention is given to the use of comparative analysis in analyzing American public policies. This course deals with issues such as crime, punishment, social welfare, drug abuse, child abuse, equality, health, education and the environment. It focuses on public policy responses to these issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS332: U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the interrelationships among the legal, political and societal factors in major legislative enactments of U.S. immigration and nationality law as they relate to government institutions and affected populations. The course examines the law and politics of restrictive immigration since the founding of our nation, including exclusion laws of the nineteenth century, quota systems of the twentieth century, and key legislative acts of the later 20th and early 21st centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS339: Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics of Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Institutions, parties, ideologies and interest groups. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS340: Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture)

The political experiences and institutions of the Indian subcontinent since 1947: The Republic of India, Pakistan, Ceylon and Bangladesh. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS341: Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, organization and practices in the states of Central America and South America. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS342: Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

Govenment and politics in the Arab states, Turkey, Israel and Iran. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS343: Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture)

The political and institutional organizations of the countries of the former Soviet Union; contemproary political issues; party and governmental structures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS344: Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture)

The political and governmental organizations of the Communist countries of Eastern and Central Europe (exclusive of the former U.S.S.R.);institutions, processes and problems, including inter-regional relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS351: Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture)

This seminar explores the legal and political traditions giving rise to contemporary Israeli and American legal systems. This encompasses such aspects as democratic process with its origins and influences, governmental institutions within each legal system, the role of religion and the protection of minority rights. Comparative perspectives provide an understanding of each legal system within its national context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or POLS 202 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or JAST 201 or permission of department.

POLS360: Development of Political Thought to Machiavelli (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the history of political thought from Plato to Machiavelli, the course will lead students to consider questions of enduring political importance. By engaging with the best of pre-modern thought,students will better understand the sources of our own political institutions, and the ancient inspirations for modern political science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300.

POLS362: International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture)

This course explores and debates some of the key questions facing the U.S. and other countries in Asia, including Japan, China, the Koreas and Russia. Students will study the concepts, institutions and cooperative frameworks in Asia that enable the countries in the region to address their common economic and security concerns. The course addresses three current conflicts (Taiwan-China relations, North Korea's nuclear program, war in Afghanistan) and looks at the costs and benefits of globalization for Asia. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS365: Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to the politics of global environmental issues. Students will begin by studying the key actors, concepts, forms of governance and debates that are central to the field. The course then will address important questions in international relations such as the relationship between environmental protection and trade, the achievement of sustainable development, the connection between environmental change and security, and differing perspectives on the environment among different types of states and social groups. The last section will involve case studies which highlight the state and human security consequences of particular environmental problems and explore the forms of governance designed to address them. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS409: Modern Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

Focusing on a selection of the most important primary sources in political philosophy since Machiavelli, the class will lead students to discuss certain permanent questions concerning political and social order. In their efforts, students will engage with some of the questions that animate modern politics, and come to a fuller understanding of the assumptions driving political science today. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or departmental approval.

POLS410: Directed Study

Juniors and seniors may elect three to six credits of independent study under the direction of a member of the Political Science staff. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS416: Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture)

This course allows the instructor to select a political problem which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS420: Seminar and Internship in Political Science

In this course students will work as interns for one semester in the office of a N.J. State Legislator, U.S. Congressperson or Senator, or state or federal executive. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 and departmental approval.

POLS425: Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture)

In-depth examination of the federal bureaucracy in relationship with national, state and local agencies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS426: Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I

A one semester public administration field experience in local government. Application must be made directly to the instructor in preceding semester. 4 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS427: Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II

A one semester public administration field experience in local government. Application must be made directly to the instructor in preceding semester. 4 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS429: Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture)

The main goal of this course will be to familiarize students with various polling methods used in political science research with the aim of giving them the ability to evaluate and criticize such research. A variety of polling techniques will be covered including simple descriptive statistics, tracking polls, and quota polls. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS430: International Law (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, evolution, subjects, sources, principles, role and substance of international law in the international system of nation-states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or POLS 203 or departmental approval.

POLS431: Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture)

After reviewing debates on globalization, this course covers its impact on global security through an examination of key issues such as crime, terrorism, migration, environment, and health, and a detailed case study of the Bosnian War. The course includes evaluation of the role of the international community and civil society in addressing these new security challenges. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or permission of instructor.

POLS436: Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship

In this course students intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty, and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Political Science and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 436. 1 - 7 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS497: Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar)

The course will involve intensive research in a seminar setting for junior and senior political science majors. Students will conduct original research and present reports to meetings of the seminar. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Open only to junior and senior majors with at least a 3.2 cumulative grade point average in Political Science.

POLS501: Public Administration and Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

Literature and developments in the field of public administration from Woodrow Wilson to the new public administration movement. Techniques of administrative management, budgetary and personnel administration, and analysis of the federal bureaucracy in the policy making process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in administration.

POLS502: Modern Political Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Required of all master's degree candidates concentrating in political science, this course deals with the methodologies and orientations that have guided the study of political phenomena. Utility of methods and the validity of theories are examined by reference to data related to specific political systems. Perspective is comparative and theoretical. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in the scope and theories of political science, or equivalent.

POLS512: Origin and Development of the U.S. Constitution (3 hours lecture)

The roots and influences that determine the nation's basic political document. The role of the Marshall court in shaping the constitution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in American government.

POLS521: History of Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

Systematic analysis of the main traditions of Western political thought. Study of major political philosophers from Plato to Marx. Leading concepts of each major tradition are related to their historical contexts and their contemporary significance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in political theory.

POLS523: Politics of Developing Areas (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the field of political stability and change in the world's developing areas. Theoretical and empirical factors that have contributed to the contemporary and continuing search for political modernization in the emerging nation-states of Africa, Asia and Latin America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in politics of development and modernization.

POLS524: The Third World in the International System (3 hours lecture)

The position and role of African and Asian nation-states in contemporary international relations, mutual relations; their encounters with the major powers; involvement in general international organizational and diplomatic activity and domestic political and economic factors that affect or underlie their international interactions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in government and politics of Africa, or government and politics of south Asia.

POLS525: International Relations (3 hours lecture)

A study of the nation-state system and those forces affecting its interactions. Special attention is given to the recent theories and approaches in the study and understanding of international politics today. 3 sh.

POLS526: The International Political Economy (3 hours lecture)

The concern of the course is to review the various theoretical explanations of the relationship between politics and economics: to depict the political forces that underpin the international economic system and its institutions and generally to shed light on the salient issues of the global political economy. 3 sh.

POLS531: Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture)

After reviewing debates on globalization, this course studies its impact on global security through an examination of key issues such as crime, terrorism, migration, environment, health, and a detailed case study of the Bosnian War. We will evaluate the role of the international community and civil society in addressing these new security challenges. 3 sh.

POLS532: U.S.Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the interrelationships among the legal, political and societal factors in major legislative enactments of U.S.immigration and nationality law as they relate to government institutions and affected populations. The course examines the law and politics of restrictive immigration since the founding of our nation, including exclusion laws of the nineteenth century, quota systems of the twentieth century, and key legislative acts of the latter 20th and early 21st centuries. 3 sh.

POLS551: Contemporary Constitutional Law (3 hours lecture)

The supreme court's decisions in the area of public law. Critical analysis and in-depth study of the first ten amendments, especially as related to the court's recent decisions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in constitutional law or permission of the instructor.

POLS552: The President and Congress (3 hours lecture)

Organization, structure and powers of the national executive and legislative branches of government. Emphasis on legislative executive relationships, nature and functioning of the legislative powers, respective roles of the president and congress in the formulation of public policy in a modern democracy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in American government.

POLS553: Federal Judicial Process (3 hours lecture)

The federal courts as a political subsystem: court organization, civil and criminal procedures, judicial behavior of federal judges, interactions between federal courts, relations with clientele groups and other branches of the federal government, the flow and content of litigation, and relations with state court systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in American government or state and local government.

POLS554: Seminar in American Political Thought (3 hours seminar)

The various interpretations of American political thought. Nature and limitations of the liberal ethos underlying the American political and constitutional system; the controversy over the "bias" of American pluralism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in American political thought.

POLS560: Politics of Terrorism (3 hours lecture)

This course explores international and domestic terrorism from a broad perspective consistent with comtemporary scholarship in a global context. The course will examine transnational security as it is manifest is the United States criminal, environmental, public health, terrorism and migratory policies in the broader context of evolving geopolitical realities. Special attention will be given to the post-cold war era and Bosnia. 3 sh.

POLS603: Reading Seminar in Political Science (2 hours seminar)

Required of all master's degree candidates concentrating in political science, this seminar entails directed independent study in preparation for a three-hour written comprehensive examination. 2 sh.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. 3 sh.

READ501: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture)

Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School introduces pre-service and in-service teachers to an array of cross-content literacy strategies for the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties. Students learn how to ground literacy strategies in purposeful and meaningful curricular and pedagogical projects. 3 sh.

RELG100: Religions of the World (3 hours lecture)

The major religious traditions, with emphasis on basic beliefs and on the nature and diversity of religious awareness. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

RELG101: Introduction to Religion (3 hours lecture)

An inquiry into man's religious questions and expressions, their implications, and their critical appreciation and assessment. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

RELG102: Ethics (3 hours lecture)

The nature of ethical judgments, the meaning of moral concepts, the conditions of moral responsibility and the methodological presuppositions of ethical theories in philosophy and religion. Meets the 2002 GenEd requirement - Humanities, Philosophy/Religion. 3 sh.

RELG106: African Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the indigenous cosmological concepts, ritual practices, and value systems of the peoples of sub-Sahara Africa. Variations on African religious beliefs and practices in the West Indies, such as Voodoo in Haiti, Santeria in Cuba, and Candomble in Brazil will also be examined. Meets General Education 2002, K2 NonWestern requirement. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

RELG108: African-American Religious Experience (3 hours lecture)

The course will aim at engaging students in an active examination of the role of religion in the life of African-Americans from the period of slavery to the present. Students will be expected to read extensively from a list of recommended texts and to write critical analyses on assigned topics. The style of instruction will combine lecture with discussion, thereby encouraging students to develop skills in critical thinking as well as the art of verbal expression. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

RELG110: Native American Religions (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the religious traditions and spirituality of the Native American peoples. The course recognizes the value of oral tradition and ritual practices in Native American religions and cultures as well as the variety that exists within this set of traditions. Meets GenEd 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets Multicultural Awareness Requirement. 3 sh.

RELG116: Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture)

The course will start by examining the rise of Islam through the eyes of two fundamental Islamic texts, the Qur'an and the biography of Prophet Muhammad. It will then explore the history of Islam's formative and classical periods (632-1258 CE) in terms of theology, philosophy, jurisprudence, and mysticism, while emphasizing diversity of perspectives. The heart of Islam will be approached through the teachings of the Qur'an, hadith and the Islamic intellectual tradition. The encounter between Islam and other religious traditions will also be traced briefly. Major trends in contemporary Islam (traditionalism, liberalism, revivalism, etc.) will be identified and discussed through the writings of their major proponents. Meets General Education 2002, K2 NonWestern requirement. 3 sh.

RELG200: Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture)

The evolution of the ancient Hebrew world view as developed in the biblical books covering the early period of Israelite history. The course includes a close reading of the books of Genesis, Exodus and numbers, comparison with contemporary Middle Eastern religious texts and study of the biblical story from the creation through the career of Moses (circa 1250 B.C.E.). 3 sh.

RELG202: Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture)

The history and theology of Israelite religion as seen in the biblical books covering the middle and late periods (1150-165 B.C.E.). 3 sh.

RELG204: New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture)

The story of Jesus of Nazareth as told in the gospels of Mark and Matthew. The course explores Old Testament backgrounds, Jesus' place in the Jewish religious context of first century Israel, the question of the historical Jesus and the origins of and relationships between the various gospel traditions. 3 sh.

RELG205: Religion and Ethical Issues (3 hours lecture)

An examination of religious perspectives on classic and contemporary ethical issues. Topics addressed include violence and war, biomedical issues, environmental issues, education, censorship, and marriage/family issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG206: New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture)

A close study of Luke-Acts, John, selected letters of Paul and other later epistles. The course explores the development of the theology and institutions of the early church as revealed in New Testament documents of the first and early second centuries. 3 sh.

RELG207: Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture)

Course will examine original texts by women written during the religious growth and development of such movements as Evangelicalism, Mormonism, the Westward missionary expansion, African-American slave narratives, hymns, sermons, and exhortations. Emphasis will be on the ways religion served as an acceptable locus of expression for women. 3 sh.

RELG209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with GNHU 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

RELG212: Asian Religions (3 hours lecture)

The cultural and theological bases for the faith and practice of major Eastern religions--Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Taoism. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

RELG213: Buddhism (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of Buddhist teachings, practices, history, and religious art in various Asian countries, notably India, Southeast Asia, Japan, and Tibet (may vary). No prerequisites, but RELG 100, Religions of the World, is suggested. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

RELG214: Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture)

This course emphasizes critical analysis and interpretation of primary textual sources. Students will read and examine primary documents from each of the Asian religions, their traditional interpretations and recent understandings and applications of these texts. 3 sh.

RELG215: Hinduism (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to Hindu religious traditions, including philosophy, yoga practice, ritual workship, and sacred art. No prerequisites, but RELG 100 Religions of the World is suggested. 3 sh.

RELG217: Taoism (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to Taoist religious texts and traditions, including Tao Te Ching and Chuang Tzu; Taoist connections with traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts; Taoist ritual traditions; and sacred art. No prerequisites, but RELG 100 Religions of the World is recommended. 3 sh.

RELG218: Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to study cross-cultural religious practices and attitudes toward death, dying and the afterlife. The course will cover the grieving process, rituals of death, and various cultural attitudes toward death, including symbolic "deaths" (initiations), and belief in limbo states, soul-survival, ghosts, heaven, hell, and karma and reincarnation. 3 sh.

RELG221: Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The interrelation of religion and culture in the formulation of human values and views, life-styles and institutions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

RELG223: Religion in North America (3 hours lecture)

The growth and development of various religious movements-- Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and sectarian minorities-- from colonial times to the present. 3 sh.

RELG225: Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture)

The impact of economic, social and political movements on religious belief and the ways in which religion has both furthered and impeded social development. 3 sh.

RELG230: Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the many new religions in Europe and the United states that focus on nature worship and the practice of magic and frequently claim to be recreating ancient, pre-Christian religions. This course will introduce students to the variety of religions co-existing under the Wicca and Neopaganism labels, examine their shared beliefs and practices, and debate the many controversies that arise around them. 3 sh.

RELG256: Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the ways religion, both indigenous and Western, has interacted with culture and society in Latin America. Particular emphasis is given to the diversity of religious expressions, including indigenous relitions (Mayan, Aztec, and Quechua), syncretistic religions (i.e., Voodoo and Santeria), alternative and evangelical forms of Christianity, contemporary popular religious expression, and liberation theology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

RELG258: Christian History and Thought (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the history of the development of the Christian world-view, the evolution of Christian institutions and doctrines, and the triumphs and failures of Christianity through the period of the Reformation. 3 sh.

RELG262: Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture)

A philosophical examination of religion. It includes the nature and shape of religious experience: criteria for meaning within religious thought and language, metaphysical and epistemological implications of such questions as the nature and existence of God, and the possibility of life after death. 3 sh.

RELG263: Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The views of faith and the religious person reached by such major psychological approaches as the Freudian, neo-Freudian, analytic-ego, existential and Jungian. The implications of such psychology for Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant believers and religious thinkers. 3 sh.

RELG267: Women and Religion (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on women's own experience in religions and the various perspectives of women held by both Eastern and Western religious traditions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women, patriarchy and religion, and roles of women in religions. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Religious Studies. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures 3 sh.

RELG273: The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture)

A study of Nazi extermination of 6,000,000 Jews during World War II and the moral and religious issues raised by this event. 3 sh.

RELG300: Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture)

Selected works of significant theologians of the Western tradition on issues such as the nature of God, christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, theodicy, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG301: Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture)

The writings of Rosenzweig, Buber, Heschel, Rubenstein, Fackenheim, Plaskow, Wyschogrod and others will be examined in detail. They will be studied in the context of the religious crisis of modern society which has generated Existentialism, Death of God Theology and radical shifts in Jewish life (the Holocaust and the rebirth of Israel). Students will be introduced to popular Jewish religious practice in America and elsewhere as well as to the most complex Jewish Theological speculation of this century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG302: Judaism and Early Christian Thought (3 hours lecture)

The Jewish and Christian foundations of Western religious thought from the second to the fifth centuries of the common era. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG304: Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture)

This course examines primary religious documents, their traditional interpretations, and recent feminist interpretations of these documents. It considers feminist criticisms of traditional Western religious thought as it relates to women. It also explores recent developments in feminist theology, such as female-centered religious ritual and practice and eco-feminist/creation spirituality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 267.

RELG320: Religious Ethical Thinkers (3 hours lecture)

An examination of selected ethical thinkers in the world's religious traditions. Students read the works of specific thinker/s in depth and explore their significance. Students are encouraged to consider the ways in which the ideas and/or practices of the thinker/s can be applied to contemporary ethical problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level Philosophy or Religion course.

RELG322: Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the pacifist tradition in philosohpy and religion, from its origins as a set of religious and philosophical ideals, to its current multifaith, secular, and political forms. Students will examine and evaluate both pacifist thought and peace activism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any 200-level Philosophy or Religion course.

RELG326: Theology (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the theological efforts of Jews, Christians, and Muslims to wrestle out "the meaning of" their communal faith in rational, speculative, critical, and creative ways. Includes study of how the most influential Jewish and Christian theologians shaped Western culture, and of how recent and contemporary criticism challenges theological approaches. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG332: Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture)

Selected psychological investigations and/or theories of religious phenomena; the implications for constructive theology and positive religious response. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG350: Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG352: Selected Study in Religious Texts (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG355: Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG357: Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A Philosophy (PHIL) or Religion (RELG) course; or PHIL or Religious Studies (RELS) major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG460: Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG462: Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminar in major movements, problems, theologians. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG465: Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG467: Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A PHIL or RELG course; or PHIL or RELS major or minor; or departmental approval.

RELG490: Independent Study in Religion

Directed independent study and research in religious studies. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of religion. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

RELG492: Independent Study in Religion

Directed independent study and research in religious studies to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of religion. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI100: The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the study of human groups, from peer groups to families to societies. How and why culture, social structure, and group processes arise. Consequences of social forces for individuals. 3 sh.

SOCI102: Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture)

The social meaning of race and ethnicity. The social, psychological and structural sources of racism; the consequences of this phenomenon to groups; situation and comparative data. Meets General Education 2002, K3 Social Science. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course SOCI 202 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

SOCI112: Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the sociology of sports and leisure from diverse theoretical perspectives. Activities explored include recreational and competitive sports (baseball, basketball, swimming, football, hockey, gymnastics) among children, high school, college, and adult age groups; youth and adult games (cops and robbers, power rangers, cards, etc.); sex; drinking; gambling; mushroom collecting; and T.V. (football games and soap operas). Topics discussed include the role of leisure and sport activities in character development, gender activity, and social relationships; the effect of leisure and sport activities on education and occupational mobility; risk and injury in leisure and sports; and the political, economic, and ideological role of leisure and sports activity in the reproduction of society. 3 sh.

SOCI113: Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

How social structure and social institutions are related to problems such as discrimination, environmental pollution, violence, and poverty. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

SOCI201: Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to the methods and theory of sociological inquiry. Topics include: comparisons of dominant paradigms of sociological thought, critical analysis of basic concepts in the field, logic and rhetoric of sociological analysis, and ethical and value issues in the practice of sociology. Emphasis will also be placed upon writing sociology: documentation, literature search, organization and style. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Sociology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or departmental approval.

SOCI204: Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of "official" and "unofficial" (single parent, gay/lesbian) family relationships; compare current U.S. family forms with those of other historical periods and societies; examine trends in contemporary societies affecting family forms, such as changing work role of women, changed sexual norms in courtship and recent changes in divorce rate; analyze issues in the "politics of the family." Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI205: Black Family (3 hours lecture)

The black family in American society; historical perspectives and contemporary conflicts surrounding the black family. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or departmental approval.

SOCI206: Individual and Society (3 hours lecture)

The relationship between culture, social structure, various institutions and the individual's social perceptions, sense of self and self-presentation are explored in this course. The structure of small groups is also discussed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI207: Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture)

Empirical materials on social structure. Inter-institutional relations as the form of the broad, general structure of American society. 3 sh.

SOCI208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 206.

SOCI209: Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture)

Poverty and welfare institutions as social phenomena. The meaning of poverty, absolute and relative deprivation, the functions of social welfare institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI212: Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture)

Social processes affecting technological innovation and the forms in which an innovation is institutionalized or abandoned. The social consequences and assessment of technological innovations. 3 sh.

SOCI215: Sociology of Sports (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course will examine the major theoretical and substantive writings on the sociology of amateur and professional sports. Topics to be explored from conflict, functionalist and symbolic interactionist perspectives include socialization and athletic identity, women in sports, race and class in sports, gender relations and sport participation, sport risk and injury, education and sports participation, sports in the media, sport and the reproduction of society, and fieldwork among college and professional athletes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI216: Sociology of Food and Population (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the ways in which people's food production and consumption patterns are affected by and related to other aspects of their social organization. The interrelationship between food production/consumption patterns, political life, stratification systems, and demography will be examined. The main focus will be a comparison between different forms of social organization with respect to the management of food and population issues. 3 sh.

SOCI218: Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture)

Problems of population and demographic change; social foundations and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration. Population and socio-economic development. The uses of demographic data in planning, policy making, and social research. Offered as SOCI 218 through Winter 2013. To become SOCI 318 effective Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI219: Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture)

With a shift in America's population toward an older society, it becomes important to understand the aging process and its implications for various social institutions. This course examines demographic characteristics which influence the aging process; various theories to explain the process; and specific policies, nationally and locally, to address it. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI220: Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture)

This course deals with the disparity in standards of living among the nations of the world today as well as with the strategies social scientists and social planners have formulated to eradicate poverty where it occurs. This course focuses on the historical, political, economic, cultural, and sociological relationships that have contributed to the current division of labor in the world and world inequalities. Furthermore, it focuses on specific social problems faced by poor nations while comparing social institutions in Western societies with their counterpart in non-Western societies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI230: Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture)

Types of conflict and violence including war, crime, family and sexual violence, class and ethnic violence, and genocide; biological determinist and cultural explanations of violence; theories of nonviolent social change. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or departmental approval.

SOCI231: Social Bases of the Arts (3 hours lecture)

The impact of social forces and institutions on the fine, performing and decorative arts; the social importance and functions of the several arts. 3 sh.

SOCI238: Research Methods in Criminal Justice (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

An introduction to methods of social research and their particular application to the study of criminal justice. Defining research questions and designing ways of getting systematic evidence relevant for those questions. Understanding the nature of aggregate data, probability, and social science generalization. Creating variables--conceptualization, definition, and measurement. Basic statistical measures, descriptive and inferential. Quantitative and qualitative data. A critical look at existing sources of criminal justice data. Problems of access, quality of data, and interpretation. Ethical issues. 3 sh.

SOCI240: Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture)

The use of statistics to summarize data, to show relationships among variables. Evaluating research reports based on statistics. Use of the computer to analyze data. Cross-listed with Justice Studies, JUST 240. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or MATH 109 or departmental approval.

SOCI301: Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture)

Introduction to primary methods of gathering sociological data: experimentation, survey research, participant observation, etc. Use of computers to analyze data. The formulation of hypotheses, survey design, participant observation and the use of elementary statistics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201.

SOCI302: Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture)

The formulation of hypotheses, survey design, participant observation and the use of elementary statistics; certain broad problems in the philosophy of social science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301.

SOCI303: Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The structure and functions of bureaucracy in modern society; the life cycle of large organizations and their methods of operation; selected contemporary problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI304: Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture)

The development of modern forms of work; the shift from manufacturing to service occupations; and problems of work alienation; current models of labor management relations in the U.S. compared to Western Europe and Japan; the effects of new technology on skill, employment levels, and on labor management relations; conceptions of the professions and their role in society; the process of an occupation becoming a profession. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI309: Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this course is on the relationship between society and health with a special emphasis on the role of culture and social structure. Health inequalities and the sociology of disability will be central concerns. Other topics will include social and cultural definitions of health and illness, the social role of the "sick", comparative medical beliefs and practices and medical institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or FCST 200 or departmental approval.

SOCI310: Directed Independent Research

Research and report under faculty direction. The student selects for investigation an area of sociological concern with the approval of a faculty supervisor. Multiple semester selection permitted with approval. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 - 9 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI311: Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture)

Processes of urbanization and suburbanization; nature of urban social relations, including racial and ethnic relations; urban ecological patterns and demographic conditions. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI312: Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The role of sociology in understanding and analyzing the environment, environmental issues and problems, and the sociocultural sources and structure of environmentalism and environmental movements. Various perspectives and approaches to explaining the relationship between society and the environment are explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI313: Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A comparison of important theories on key themes in sociology; the nature of social interaction, the definition of power, stratification, social control and deviance, alienation and anomie, social structure and function, social bases of knowledge and belief, and social conflict and change. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI314: Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture)

The domain of this course is the role of social inequities, especially those of class and race, in the distribution of environmental risks in societies at the local, national, and global levels and includes study of legal remedies and public policy measures that address environmental injustices. Cross listed with Justice Studies, JUST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or 200 or 201 or 232;or SOCI 100 or 113 or 201 or 202 or 204;or departmental approval.

SOCI315: Social Inequality (3 hours lecture)

The inequalities of social ranking systems in societies. Theoretical and empirical approaches to stratification delineating the variables of power, power elites, class consciousness, alienation and class mobility. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI316: Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture)

The school as an institution of social control and social change. The social organization of schools: social roles of students, teachers and other school personnel. (Not to be used for teacher certification.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100, SOCI 113, SOCI 201, SOCI 204 or departmental approval.

SOCI318: Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture)

Problems of population and demographic change; social foundations and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration. Population and socio-economic development. The uses of demographic data in planning, policy making, and social research. Previous course SOCI 218 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201, SOCI 204, SOCI 220 or departmental approval.

SOCI320: Sociology of Communes, Cooperatives and Collectives (3 hours lecture)

The sociology and history of communitarian ventures, with emphasis on contemporary communes, cooperatives, and collectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI330: Political Sociology (3 hours lecture)

This course will endeavor to give the student a relatively complete understanding of the social dynamics of political actions on various levels. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI331: Sociology of Power (3 hours lecture)

The nature of power; power on the national level in the United States; alternative theoretical approaches; the historical origins of several of these theories. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI332: Sociology of Popular Arts (3 hours lecture)

An examination of content and forms in the world of entertainment, including paperback and magazine fiction, films, theatre, and popular music. Also a study of artistic production and the relationship between producers (including owners and managers), audiences, and performers. This course incorporates various contemporary cultural studies perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI334: Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Comparative sociological schemes; the analytical blocks of total society; kinship, family and marriage; policy and bureaucracy; social stratification and mobility; industrialization and urbanization; belief systems and value orientations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI335: Workers and Their Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The course aims to provide the student with a general overview of the nature of work in modern society and of the ways in which workers react to it. In particular, the ways in which workers' organizations develop, and are shaped by community and political forces, will be an important focus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI336: Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the social functions, determinants, and consequences of helping professions such as social work,and helping institutions such as public welfare. Particular emphasis is placed on the relations of helping professions and institutions with their socio-political environment and with their clients. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI390: Cooperative Education in Sociology

The cooperative education option integrates academic study with a supervised employment experience outside the formal classroom environment. The co-op term is a semester off-campus, during which a student is supervised by a faculty coordinator and the office of Cooperative Education and is responsible for completing the terms of a learning contract. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI400: Senior Project

This course prepares students to design and complete a major project. This will involve the gathering, presentation, and analysis of evidence relevant to a particular theoretical or applied problem, using the relevant and appropriate sociological concepts. Since different faculty members emphasize different types of projects, students are urged to review individual syllabi prior to registering for the course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 and SOCI 240.

SOCI401: Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture)

Humans have a unique capacity to experience a large variety of emotions. This course examines how cultures label, shape, and guide their members' emotional experience. It also explores the interplay between social-structural arrangements (e.g., family and economic systems) and emotion, illustrating links between macro-social patterns. Students will conduct original research on social factors related to emotionality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI402: Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture)

Social conceptions of mental health and illness; social factors in the causes and treatment of mental illness. Mental institutions--their structures and ideologies. Comparative psychotherapies in social context; mental health personnel and professional ideologies; social movements and mental health and illness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI403: Sociology of Knowledge (3 hours lecture)

The interaction between the social structure, the ideas, beliefs, technology, and perceptions that prevail in society or in particular groups within society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI404: Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture)

The social bases of religious belief and activity; religious movements, denominationalism, sectarianism, secularization, pluralism, the social bases of belief and unbelief, and cross-cultural and historical comparisons. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI405: Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical perspectives on human deviance. The social organization of specific types of deviance and of formal and informal social control. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI407: Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture)

A sociological analysis and cultural critique of various mass media with an emphasis on radio, television, newspapers, and the internet. The course will examine their function and their relationship with constituent audiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI408: Social Movements (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the study of concerted collective behavior for social change, or social movements. Various approaches to the understanding of social movements, including the natural history, case study, and analytical models, will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on relating theoretical work to contemporary empirical examples of social movement activity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI411: Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor each semester. The course may be selected more than once with approval. Limited to only the general areas of sociological theory, research methodology, problems of institutional processes, and application of methodology and theory to social situations or community issues and problems. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI416: Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other)

The course will explore qualitative research from diverse theoretical perspectives. It will examine the personal, political, and scientific dilemmas that researchers typically face attempting to gather objective data about the "backstage regions" of the subjects' world. Topics may include the researcher's role in the field; developing rapport and trust; emotions and fieldwork; age, race, sex, and gender issues in research; politics and ethics in fieldwork; researching "high risk" settings; and techniques of data collecting in interviewing and fieldwork. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI420: Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture)

The impact of the social usages of law on all levels of operation as an instrument of social policy, social control and social regulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI421: Social Uses of Language (3 hours lecture)

The functions of language in everyday life. The sociology of language applied to other social phenomena such as social change, religion, stratification, gender roles, and power. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI425: Sociology of the Future (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the study of probable effects of alternative futures to American society. This course will examine, also, the manner in which such alternatives are studied; the role of prediction by scientific means, and the use of probabilities in projecting the outline of our society in the near and great future. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One course in sociology or departmental approval.

SOCI426: Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

The course examines theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of sexuality. It seeks to understand the social foundations of sexual behavior and sexual identity. It explores the relationship between sexuality and politics, focusing on current as well as historical conflicts over sexual behavior and ideologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI430: Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture)

The social determinants of differences between women and men and the effect of sex role differentiation in the social institutions of marriage and family, the economy and work situation, formal education, health, mass media, and religion; special emphasis is placed on the impact of social change on sex roles in contemporary society. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI500: Evaluation Research (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the ways in which sociological training and insight (especially research skills) are applied in various non-academic settings. Special attention will be given to assessing and evaluating social policy and programs. The political, ethical and moral dilemmas which are entailed in evaluation research will also be explored. 3 sh.

SOCI556: Computer Applications in Sociology (3 hours lecture)

One of the primary uses of computers in sociology is to summarize, describe, and analyze data sets using statistical packages. This course provides hands-on experience in computer data analysis of a variety of sociological data sets. Major techniques to be illustrated include cleaning data, constructing scales, and conducting univariate and multivariate analyses. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in statistics.

SOCI559: Sociology of Deviance (3 hours lecture)

The course will address the practical and political issues of defining, measuring, and responding to social deviance (e.g., mental illness, drug use, etc.). The course will concentrate on the role of formal agencies and institutions that deal with deviance and will examine problems in assessing various policy alternatives (e.g., decriminalization, deinstitutionalization, treatment, etc.). 3 sh.

SOCI560: Sociological Theory (3 hours lecture)

The practical and philosophical methods of the major sociological theorists are investigated and evaluated. 3 sh.

SOCI562: Social Change (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the processes of change and development in contemporary societies (industrial and developing), including technological issues. Social movements, both sacred and secular, will be analyzed for their effect on social structure; and special attention will be paid to revolution as a social, political and cultural phenomenon in the 20th century. 3 sh.

SOCI563: Self and Society (3 hours lecture)

The relationships between the human individual and his/her social environment; the formation, maintenance and transformation of self or identity; the structure and processes of small groups; symbolic communication; role theory, cognitive dissonance and inter-group conflict. 3 sh.

SOCI564: Social Planning and Social Policy (3 hours lecture)

The many elements and considerations in planning for a community, a state or a nation. The social context of planning; projective techniques; budgets, master plans, development programs and area proposals. The human, the economic, the ecological. Students will be expected to undertake a social planning project. A basic knowledge of statistics and the use of statistical data is desirable. 3 sh.

SOCI565: Sociology of Youth (3 hours lecture)

Socialization processes acting upon young people; the role of family, neighborhood, school and community; the effects of failures in these socializing agencies; changing relations among age grades; quantitative studies of the culture of youth with comparisons to other age grades. 3 sh.

SOCI566: The Metropolitan Community (3 hours lecture)

The many dimensions of the metropolitan community: human factors, problems an area faces, political difficulties, interaction between the center city and the other parts of the community. Emphasis on New York-New Jersey. 3 sh.

SOCI567: Power and Social Stratification (3 hours lecture)

This course will analyze the role of class, status and power in industrial society, and consider the relationship between issues of social stratification and the social environment. 3 sh.

SOCI568: Social Research Methods I (3 hours lecture)

This course will engage students in the research process from conceptualization to study design, data collection, and analysis. Specific methods covered are surveys, observation, focus groups, and secondary data analysis. Program evaluation and policy relevance will be stressed. 3 sh.

SOCI569: Social Research Methods II (3 hours lecture)

Continuation of Social Research Methods I. The elements of method included are coding techniques, analysis and scientific report writing. 3 sh.

SOCI570: Independent Projects

Student investigates a topic of sociological relevance under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI571: Seminar in Applied Sociological Inquiry (3 hours seminar)

Further develops competencies for the critical assessment of sociological literature, as it pertains to the formulation of research strategies for policy analysis and evaluation. Intensive study of a number of readings on applied areas of sociological concern. The comprehensive project based on the internship experience is written up during this course. 3 sh.

SOCI572: Selected Problems in Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The intensive exploration of a general problem in sociology. Participants contribute research into an aspect of the problem. Formed at the initiative of a department member or in response to student's interest with consent of the instructor. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

SOCI574: Sociology of Ethnic Relationships (3 hours lecture)

This course will analyze relationships among ethnic groups, and evaluate the causes, consequences and resolution of ethnic conflict. It will also consider the various policy implications of discrimination in institutional contexts. 3 sh.

SOCI576: The Family as an Institution (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the family system in the West from both historical and contemporary perspectives. It will consider the implications of recent research on changing role structure and cultural values regarding marriage, and problems of adaptation in current family systems (e.g., dual-earner marriages, single-parent families, adolescent sexuality, family abuse, divorce and remarriage). 3 sh.

SOCI577: Sociology of Poverty in the United States (3 hours lecture)

This course examines major contemporary definitions and ideologies of poverty and public welfare, and considers the extent and patterns of distribution of poverty. Alternative socio-economic explanations of poverty and their implications for policy will be assessed, and problem-solving aspects of program and policy research analyzed. 3 sh.

SOCI578: Community Resources and Aging (3 hours lecture)

This course examines resources for the aging within their communities. Additionally, it will acquaint students with services provided by public and private agencies and relevant federal and state legislation. 3 sh.

SOCI579: Community Resources and Youth (3 hours lecture)

Resources for the healthy as well as the deviant child, in the family and neighborhood, in addition to services provided by public and private agencies; relevant federal and state legislation. 3 sh.

SOCI581: Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce the student to the interesting and complex relationships that exist between society, health and health care. Class lecture discussions will focus on the connections between social structure, the quality of the physical and social environment and health. Special attention will be given to work environments. This course will also deal with the effects of social factors on the experience of one's body, the perception of disease and on the construction of medical knowledge. 3 sh.

SOCI582: The Sociology of Health Care Systems (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on the relationship between the social structure of medical institutions, professional values, the socialization of health professionals and health care. The social context for the emergence of the modern medical profession, technology and knowledge will be considered along with contemporary social trends in Western industrialized societies such as the increasing medicalization of life. The implications of these trends for social policy and a cross-cultural analysis of healers and health care will be considered. 3 sh.

SOCI584: The Sociology of the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the criminal justice system (the police, the courts, correctional institutions, probation and parole) and considers its manifest and latent functions. It explores sociologically the ways in which offenders are selected, processed and treated, and offers a view of the system from both occupational and experiential perspectives. 3 sh.

SOCI585: The Sociology of Police (3 hours lecture)

The course will examine the urban police organization from diverse sociological perspectives. Subjects include the origin and function of the police, social organization of policing, police and the community, police discretion, police use of force, police corruption, and police stress. Police professionalization and social change in status, gender, and race relations within the organization will be examined in terms of their impact on policing the public. Various policy recommendations to improve the relations between the police and the community, and to reduce police corruption and violence will be discussed. 3 sh.

SOCI587: The Sociology of Juvenile Delinquency (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the major sociological theories of juvenile delinquency from both etiological and treatment perspectives. Of particular concern is the relationship between juvenile crime and the larger culture. Topics to be explored include juvenile crime in industrial society; delinquency and the school experience; juvenile crime and adolescent development; the family and delinquency; class, ethnicity, gender; and the juvenile justice system, with an emphasis on treatment programs and facilities. 3 sh.

SOCI588: Aging Individual in an Aging Society (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the social causes of the "elder boom" as well as its consequences for family, education, the economy, politics and religion. 3 sh.

SOCI589: Social Epidemiology (3 hours lecture)

Social epidemiology is the study of social factors in the development of disease. This course examines these social factors with particular emphasis upon the relationship of power, stratification, social environment and stress. Other social factors (such as social status, gender, age, race, ethnicity, population, religion, and familial characteristics) in the chain of illness causality will also be examined. Students will explore how epidemiology is used to evaluate health-care needs and plan health-care programs. 3 sh.

SOCI590: Sociology of the Life Course (3 hours lecture)

This course addresses societal responses to individuals passing through stages of the life cycle: childhood, adolescence, middle age, and later life. It will explore the experience of aging and the social policies and institutions which shape that experience. 3 sh.

SOCI591: The Sociology of Unequal Development (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an analysis of the major sociological approaches to understanding the relations between societies at different levels of economic development, and the consequences of these relationships. Relationships between social institutions in the first and third worlds will be examined. Alternative strategies for dealing with poverty in the third world will be discussed. 3 sh.

SOCI595: Internship in Applied Sociology: Crime and Justice

Students will select an institution dealing with an aspect of crime and justice in the metropolitan area in which to become a participant-observer. Application of sociological perspective to the problems and structure of institutions is developed, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students should get faculty supervisor's approval of placement before the course begins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI596: Internship in Applied Sociology: Aging

Students will select an institution dealing with an aspect of aging in the metropolitan area in which to become a participant-observer. Application of sociological perspective to the problems and structure of institutions is developed, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students should get faculty supervisor's approval of placement before the course begins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI597: Internship in Applied Sociology: Health and Illness

Students will select an institution dealing with an aspect of health and illness in the metropolitan area in which to become a participant-observer. Application of sociological perspective to the problems and structure of institutions is developed, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students should get faculty supervisor's approval of placement before the course begins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI598: Internship in Applied Sociology: Social Research and Policy

Students will select an institution dealing with an aspect of social research and policy in the metropolitan area in which to become a participant-observer. Application of sociological perspective to the problems and structure of institutions is developed, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students should get faculty supervisor's approval of placement before the course begins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI603: Reading Seminar in Sociology (2 hours seminar)

May be taken by master's candidates concentrating in sociology prior to the comprehensive examination. The seminar will focus on general theoretical and methodological material and relevant readings in the student's particular area of sociology. 2 sh.