Teaching, with Teacher Certification in Art (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities (M.A.T.) - Graduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

The Master of Arts in Teaching Program in Subject Area and Teacher of Students with Disabilities is a 48-51 credit program designed to provide graduate students with a master's degree as well as dual certification: initial certification to teach in a subject area (P-12) and certification to teach students with disabilities in those settings.

Montclair State University’s Teacher Education Program is one of the most highly-regarded teacher preparation programs in the country. It has been consistently recognized both nationally and regionally for its unique features, including its structure, partnerships, and curricular emphases. The program is considered a model for other colleges and universities and has continuously been accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954.

The Teacher Education Program’s professional course sequence and field experiences emphasize teaching for critical thinking and culturally responsive teaching. The professional component for both graduate students addresses four broad areas: 1) student development and learning, 2) the classroom and the school, 3) the curriculum, and 4) effective teaching skills.

TEACHING (ART & STUDENTS w/DISABILITIES)

  1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

    1. SPEECH

      Complete the following 1 course: (May be completed by examination)

      CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

      Pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the COP or have UG equivalent course approved by advisor.

    3. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT

      Complete 1 course from the following list.

      ELRS 580 Learning Theories (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 515 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHING FIELD REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 45 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

    1. FINE ARTS CORE

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 5 courses for 15 semester hours:

        ARFD 122 Foundations II: 2D Design (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio) 3
        ARFD 123 Foundations III: Visual Organization - 3D Design (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio) 3
        ARFD 125 Foundations V: Color, Light and Time (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio) 3
        ARHT 105 Art in Western Civilization: Ancient Through Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 106 Art in Western Civilization: Renaissance through Modern (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list

        ARDW 200 Drawing, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
        ARDW 201 Life Drawing, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
    2. FINE ARTS EDUCATION

      Complete the following 7 courses for 21 semester hours:

      ARCE 200 Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARGD 200 Graphic Design, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARMJ 200 Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARPA 200 Painting, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARPH 200 Photography Beginning I: Contemporary Art Form (6 hours studio) 3
      ARPM 200 Printmaking, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARSC 200 Sculpture, Beginning I (6 hours studio) 3
    3. SECOND LEVEL STUDIO

      Complete 1 course from the following list

      ARCE 210 Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture, Beginning II (6 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 210 Fibers and Fabrics, Beginning II (6 hours studio) 3
      ARGD 210 Graphic Design, Beginning II (2 hours lecture, 3.75 hours studio) 3
      ARMJ 210 Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning II (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio) 3
      ARPA 210 Painting, Beginning II (6 hours studio) 3
      ARPH 210 Photography Beginning II: Contemporary Art Form (3 hours lecture, 3 hours studio) 3
      ARPM 210 Printmaking, Beginning II (6 hours studio) 3
      ARSC 210 Sculpture, Beginning II (6 hours studio) 3
    4. TEACHING METHODS I

      Complete for 3 semester hours.

      ARED 301 Foundations of Methods and Curriculum in Art Education I: P-12 (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 48 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      1. Complete for 3 semester hours.

        CURR 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 5 courses for 15 semester hours:

        CURR 509 Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 568 Instructional Planning for Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings II (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 579 Special Education for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 586 Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. Complete for 1 semester hours.

        CURR 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
      4. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 584 Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom 2-3
      5. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 585 Technology for Inclusive Classrooms 2-3
      6. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 588 Promoting Prosocial Behaviors in Inclusive Settings 2-3
      7. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 591 Teaching Organization and Study Skills for the Inclusive Classroom. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI) or Master of Education (MED) (3 hours lecture) 2-3
    2. GRADUATE LEVEL CONTENT AREA COURSE

      Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

      ARCE 500 Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio) 3
      ARCE 510 Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARCE 553 Independent Study in Graduate Ceramics I 1-9
      ARCE 600 Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARCE 610 Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARCE 653 Independent Study in Graduate Ceramics II 1-9
      ARDW 500 Graduate Drawing 3
      ARDW 501 Graduate Life Drawing I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARDW 511 Graduate Life Drawing II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARDW 601 Graduate Life Drawing III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARDW 611 Graduate Life Drawing IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARED 501 Contemporary Viewpoints in Art Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARED 502 Advanced Curriculum Construction in Art Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARED 505 Supervision and Evaluation in Art Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARED 525 Art and Special Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARED 550 Independent Study: Art Education 3
      ARFI 500 Graduate Form in Fiber I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 510 Graduate Form in Fiber II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 522 Graduate Decoration of Fabrics I (6 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 524 Graduate Off-Loom Textiles I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 532 Graduate Decoration of Fabrics II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 534 Graduate Off-Loom Textiles II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 580 Graduate Problems in Textile Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARFI 600 Graduate Form in Fiber III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 610 Graduate Form in Fiber IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 622 Graduate Decoration of Fabric III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 624 Graduate Off-Loom Textiles III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 632 Graduate Decoration of Fabrics IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARFI 634 Graduate Off-Loom Textiles IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARGD 500 Graduate Graphic Design I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARGD 510 Graduate Graphic Design II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARGD 521 Graduate Typography I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARGD 531 Graduate Typography II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARGS 553 Independent Study, Graduate I 1-8
      ARGS 560 Graduate Visual Arts Workshop 1-12
      ARGS 653 Independent Study, Graduate II 1-8
      ARGS 680 Field Trip in Studio 2-6
      ARHT 501 Artists on Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 502 Field Trips in Art History 2-6
      ARHT 536 Northern Renaissance Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 540 European Art of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 590 Modern Philosophies of Art I (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 600 Graduate Methods of Research in Art History (3 hours seminar) 3
      ARHT 601 Selected Problems in Art History (3 hours seminar) 3
      ARHT 603 The American Collector and New York Museums (3 hours seminar) 3
      ARMJ 500 Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry I (1 hour lecture, 3 hours studio) 3
      ARMJ 510 Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARMJ 600 Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARMJ 610 Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPA 500 Graduate Painting I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPA 510 Graduate Painting II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPA 600 Graduate Painting III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPA 610 Graduate Painting IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPH 500 Graduate Photography Beginning I: A Contemporary Art Form (6 hours studio) 3
      ARPH 510 Graduate Photography Beginning II: A Contemporary Art Form (3 hours lecture, 3 hours studio) 3
      ARPH 600 Graduate Photography Intermediate: A Contemporary Art Form (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPH 610 Graduate Photography Advanced: A Contemporary Art Form (5 hours studio) 4
      ARPH 660 Graduate Special Processes in Photography (5 hours studio) 4
      ARPM 500 Graduate Printmaking I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPM 510 Graduate Printmaking II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPM 600 Graduate Printmaking III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARPM 610 Graduate Printmaking IV (4 hours studio) 3
      ARSC 500 Graduate Sculpture I (4 hours studio) 3
      ARSC 510 Graduate Sculpture II (4 hours studio) 3
      ARSC 600 Graduate Sculpture III (4 hours studio) 3
      ARSC 610 Graduate Sculpture IV (4 hours studio) 3
    3. PROFESSIONAL YEAR

      1. First Semester

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 527 Fieldwork (3 hours lecture) 3
        3. Complete for 3 semester hours.

          ARED 401 Foundations of Methods and Curriculum in Art Education II: P-12 (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Second Semester

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 6 semester hours:

          CURR 529 Student Teaching (6 hours lab) 6
  4. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination.


Course Descriptions:

ARCE200: Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Introduction to the development of works in clay, studio forming methods, clay compositions, glazing and firing, design/aesthetic/stylistic concerns, historical and contemporary ceramics. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARCE210: Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture, Beginning II (6 hours studio)

Continuation of ARCE 200. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARCE 200.

ARCE500: Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours studio)

The emphasis of this course is on the development of a body of work that reflects a personal aesthetic and shows an imaginative, sophisticated application of ceramic studio technology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Portfolio review, departmental approval.

ARCE510: Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARCE 500. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARCE553: Independent Study in Graduate Ceramics I

Under this course designation graduate students engage in a program of advanced study in Ceramics. The direction, scope and evaluation of the work are developed in consultation with the instructor. Required readings, recommendations of research into artists, exhibitions and studio techniques will also be developed through consulation with the instructor. The progress of the work will be evaluated by regular meetings and by scheduled critiques. May be repeated for a maximum total of 9.0 credits. 1 - 9 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARCE600: Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARCE 510. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARCE610: Graduate Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARCE 600. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARCE653: Independent Study in Graduate Ceramics II

Under this course designation graduate students engage in a program of advanced study in Ceramics. The direction, scope and evaluation of the work are developed in consultation with the instructor. Required readings, recommendations of research into artists, exhibitions and studio techniques will also be developed through consultation with the instructor. The progress of the work will be evaluated by regular meetings and by scheduled critiques. May be repeated for a maximum total of 9.0 credits. 1 - 9 sh.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ARCE 553 and departmental approval.

ARDW200: Drawing, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Basic elements of line, tone, composition, and perspective; exploration of traditional and experimental media and materials; and investigation of still life, landscape, life drawing, portraiture, and abstraction. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARDW201: Life Drawing, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Structure and proportions of the human figure. Study of skeletal and muscular structure, the figure at rest and in motion, isolated and in a setting. Expressive as well as analytical approach to drawing. Exploration of traditional as well as current techniques and media. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARDW500: Graduate Drawing

In this course students will learn through perceptual and abstract studies to explore ideas of memory, symbolic form, utopian/dystopian concepts, and collaborative approaches to drawing. Contemporary and historical examples will be examined to enable students to better evaluate their own work and introduce new ways of thinking about graphic systems and their wider practice. 3 sh.

ARDW501: Graduate Life Drawing I (4 hours studio)

Advanced problems in drawing based upon a study of the human figure. 3 sh.

ARDW511: Graduate Life Drawing II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARDW 501. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARDW 501.

ARDW601: Graduate Life Drawing III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARDW 511. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARDW 511.

ARDW611: Graduate Life Drawing IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARDW 601. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARDW 601.

ARED301: Foundations of Methods and Curriculum in Art Education I: P-12 (3 hours lecture)

Philosophical and theoretical basis of fine arts education; the sources of creativity, concepts of visual literacy and the role of art in individual human experience and in society; organization and presentation of experience, curriculum construction and application of theory to the school, museum, community center, adult education and other teaching situations. For fine arts education majors in the Teacher Education Program. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 210 or READ 210 or EDFD 210; EDFD 220 and 221; or EDFD 200 or PSYC 200.

ARED401: Foundations of Methods and Curriculum in Art Education II: P-12 (3 hours lecture)

Organization and presentation of art experiences for a wide variety of teaching situations, including K-12, adult classes, museum settings and community centers. Exploration of media, understanding their expressive range, proficiency in their use, and adaptation to various teaching goals. Integration of theory and media. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARED 301; Fine Arts Education majors only; permission of instructor.

ARED501: Contemporary Viewpoints in Art Education (3 hours lecture)

A study of literature that influences art educators and the communities of learners they serve. Readings will be in papers and books selected from art, philosophy, sociology, psychology and education that deal primarily with various issues within the disciplines such as diversity, critical inquiry, democratic behavior, technology, assessment, integrated learning, creativity and special needs populations. 3 sh.

ARED502: Advanced Curriculum Construction in Art Education (3 hours lecture)

Overview of contemporary concerns in curriculum construction for visual arts teaching and learning. Philosophical nature and constructon of a comprehensive and democratic visual arts curriculum for elementary and secondary schools. 3 sh.

ARED505: Supervision and Evaluation in Art Education (3 hours lecture)

Supervisory methods and techniques for the experienced art teacher. Current and analogous supervisory data will be included. Will be based on state criteria and ways of evaluating from creative viewpoints. 3 sh.

ARED525: Art and Special Education (3 hours lecture)

Using a variety of approaches, including seminar, art making, and fieldwork, graduate students will enhance their understanding of how students with special needs learn in the art classroom; and how the visual arts may be used to enhance the learning experiences of special needs students in elementary and secondary schools. Least restrictive learning environment and best practices for insuring the success of students with exceptional educational needs are explored. Following a non-categorical approach, the course includes consideration of the social, psychological, and aesthetic needs of students with mild to moderate intellectual, social, emotional and physical disabilitites. This course is intended for teachers, museum staff and other education professionals who wish to increase their knowledge, effectiveness and management of art and special education learning and teaching experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: General Psychology, Educational Psychology and Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth.

ARED550: Independent Study: Art Education

Building upon their knowledge of applied classroom art education issues and concerns, students select an area of art teaching and learning and, with advisement, study the literature in the field, conduct in-depth observations of related programs and activities in schools, museums, and other centers of culture, conduct directed inquiry and write reports on findings in preparation for the Master's Thesis or the Seminar in Art II paper. Emphasis is placed upon systematically compiling and analyzing data from intra-, inter-, cross- and mixed cultural art education norms and interdisciplinary arts practices. Regular conferences with instructor for guidance and evaluation. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARED 501, ELRS 503, ARHT 600, departmental approval.

ARFD122: Foundations II: 2D Design (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio)

Foundations II introduces students to the principles of 2-dimensional design in a variety of media. Major principles covered include composition, line, shape, volume, movement, value, rhythm, repetition, variation, scale, size, perspective, proportion, texture, balance, unity, harmony, and contrast. The course content consists of a variety of projects focusing on critical, theory-based problem solving, together with lectures and demonstrations. 3 sh.

ARFD123: Foundations III: Visual Organization - 3D Design (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio)

An introduction to the 3rd dimension of the world that we inhabit ("made" things, natural forms, and the occupation of space). Three-dimensional sensibility is progressively developed when basic components are manipulated by the effective use of direction, balance, axis, orientation, and relationship; in other words, organization (composition). Assignments in light, shape, shadow, depth, form, and movement are examined in a natural progression from 2D knowledge to 3D. Activities include lectures, conceptualization, observation, creation, discussion, and critical analysis for each project. The aesthetic consideration of materials and tools in this context add to the expressive output of three-dimensional study. The process may begin with concept, material or observation; it continues by way of lecture, demonstration, critical analysis and class discussion until each project is crafted to completion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARFD125: Foundations V: Color, Light and Time (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio)

Color functions in many ways - as a visual phenomenon of light, as a perceptual occurrence, as a pigment with specific mixing properties, and as an element with powerful expressive and symbolic potential. It is important that artists and designers understand the principles and properties of color for use in their work in any medium. This course introduces students to the history, theory, and interdisciplinary use of color and color systems via lectures, demonstrations, and exercises. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARFI210: Fibers and Fabrics, Beginning II (6 hours studio)

One or more areas of endeavor selected for exploration. Emphasizes research into the various techniques and mastery of the methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 200.

ARFI500: Graduate Form in Fiber I (6 hours studio)

Designing with simple and four harness floor looms in a variety of techniques and materials. Taken serially. 3 sh.

ARFI510: Graduate Form in Fiber II (4 hours studio)

Primary emphasis on designing with simple and four harness table and floor looms. A variety of techniques and materials. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 500.

ARFI522: Graduate Decoration of Fabrics I (6 hours studio)

Survey course in all aspects of fabric embellishment; tie-dye, batik, blockprint, tritik discharge, silkscreen printing, 3M matrix, etc. Taken serially. 3 sh.

ARFI524: Graduate Off-Loom Textiles I (4 hours studio)

Development of forms through a variety of off-loom techniques used singly or in combination. Taken serially. 3 sh.

ARFI532: Graduate Decoration of Fabrics II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARFI 522. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 522.

ARFI534: Graduate Off-Loom Textiles II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARFI 524. Taken serially. Fabric embellishment which was begun in graduate Decoration of Fabric I, II, III. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 524.

ARFI580: Graduate Problems in Textile Research (3 hours lecture)

The effect of centuries of textile traditions on the modern fiber artist. 3 sh.

ARFI600: Graduate Form in Fiber III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARFI 510. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 510.

ARFI610: Graduate Form in Fiber IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARFI 600. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 600.

ARFI622: Graduate Decoration of Fabric III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARFI 532. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 532.

ARFI624: Graduate Off-Loom Textiles III (4 hours studio)

Intensive consideration of all fiber construction techniques that do not depend on the loom; choice of one technique for intensive study. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 534.

ARFI632: Graduate Decoration of Fabrics IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARFI 622. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 622.

ARFI634: Graduate Off-Loom Textiles IV (4 hours studio)

Intensive work in a chosen non-loom textile technique, eg., knotting. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFI 624.

ARGD200: Graphic Design, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Introduction to graphic design principles. This course is involved in taking basic design information and translating it into a graphic design context, with main emphasis on communicating original ideas in a creative manner. Projects deal with graphic design principles, i.e., visual communication of information, composition, color, type, illustration, materials and methods of graphic design. Introduction to critique and presentation, along with the principle of the designer/client relationship. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 122.

ARGD210: Graphic Design, Beginning II (2 hours lecture, 3.75 hours studio)

Focuses on creative design development within various graphic design specializations: print (flat and folding); packaging; product & environmental graphics; and graphics for interactive media. Students explore typeface choice and proper use of typography, as well as professional methods of comping and presentation by hand and with industry standard software: this begins development of a student's graphic design portfolio. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARGD 200. For Graphic Design (GRDN) majors only.

ARGD500: Graduate Graphic Design I (4 hours studio)

Techniques and principles of design of printed matter and displays, elements of layout, illustration, typography, printing process, and preparation of copy for the printer. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARGD510: Graduate Graphic Design II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARGD 500. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARGD 500 or instructor's permission.

ARGD521: Graduate Typography I (4 hours studio)

Styles and techniques of lettering applied in such forms as manuscripts, signs, posters, display and advertising layout. Brief introduction to typography. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARGD531: Graduate Typography II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARGD 521. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARGD 521.

ARGS553: Independent Study, Graduate I

Under this course designation advanced students may either expand or extend their experience in a chosen field or medium. Direction, conduct and evaluation of the work are developed in consultation with the instructor. As a basis for admission and planning, each student will present a representative selection of his/her prior work in the chosen medium. Credits to be arranged. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 1 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARGS560: Graduate Visual Arts Workshop

Selected studio topics which represent current concerns within the contemporary world of the visual arts. May be repeated for a maximum of 24.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARGS653: Independent Study, Graduate II

Under this course designation advanced students may either expand or extend their experience in a chosen field or medium. Direction, conduct and evaluation of the work are developed in consultation with the instructor. As a basis for admission and planning, each student will present a representative selection of his/her prior work in the chosen medium. Credits to be arranged. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 1 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARGS680: Field Trip in Studio

Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed six graduate credits. First hand contact with the historic art forms of the places visited and with artists and craftsmen. Each student selects an area of study in which the places visited have rich art sources. As preparation for the course, the student outlines a chosen study problem, reads background material, and lists sources they expect to utilize. Subject(s) to be defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. 2 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARHT105: Art in Western Civilization: Ancient Through Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The history of Western art, architecture, and material culture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages: Paleolithic and Neolithic art; ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art; Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic art. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for Fine Arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Animation and Illustration, Fine Arts, and Graphic Design. Previous course ARHS 105 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT106: Art in Western Civilization: Renaissance through Modern (3 hours lecture)

The history of Western art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present: the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romantic, Impressionist, and Modern Periods. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for Fine Arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Animation and Illustration, Fine Arts, and Graphic Design. Previous course ARHS 106 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT501: Artists on Art (3 hours lecture)

A selection of writings by artists on art are presented, including theoretical writings, excerpts from diaries and letters, manifestoes, interviews, etc. The class is designed as a seminar focusing on analysis, interpretation, and discussion of these primary sources. Previous course ARHS 581 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT502: Field Trips in Art History

Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed twelve graduate credits. Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed twelve undergraduate credits. First-hand contact with the art forms and visual culture of the places visited; study of monuments in the field and works in museums and galleries. Subject(s) to be defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. Previous course ARHS 680 effective through Spring 2012. 2 - 6 sh.

ARHT536: Northern Renaissance Art (3 hours lecture)

15th and 16th century paintings in northern Europe - especially Italy, Flanders and Holland; the development of Realism and style in relation to social change and the general ideas of the period, including contemporary music. Jan Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Bosch, Peter Breughel and Matthias Gruenewald. Previous course ARHS 594 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT540: European Art of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (3 hours lecture)

Principal developments in painting, sculpture, architecture and related arts during the Baroque and Rococo periods as affected by contemporary political, religious and economic factors. Artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velazquez, Rembrandt, Rubens, Watteau and Hogarth. Previous course ARHS 540 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT590: Modern Philosophies of Art I (3 hours lecture)

Major writers in art in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The nature of the creative experience; art in the life of the individual and of society; the creative process; new materials; institutions and sentiments affecting current thinking in the field. Discussions based on readings of philosophers, poets, social scientists and psychologists. Previous course ARHS 590 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT600: Graduate Methods of Research in Art History (3 hours seminar)

Introduction to the approaches, methods and goals of art-historical research, including descriptive, bibliographic, stylistic, and iconographic analysis. Previous course ARHS 503 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT601: Selected Problems in Art History (3 hours seminar)

Art problems, iconographic topics and themes of a historic, social and philosophical nature. Topic selection will depend upon the special areas of the professor or guest professor invited for the semester. May be repeated seven times for a maximum of 24.0 credits. Previous course ARHS 592 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT603: The American Collector and New York Museums (3 hours seminar)

The history of American art collecting is studied using the private collections that are now incorporated into museums in New York City. The contents of these collections, the ways they are housed, and the role of museum as educational institution will be examined in light of social and cultural ideals. Discussions based on readings and field trips. Previous course ARHS 580 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARMJ200: Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Introduction to metal working and jewelry techniques traditionally used in the shaping of useful articles. 3 sh.

ARMJ210: Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning II (2 hours lecture, 4 hours studio)

Advanced design concepts and metalworking techniques. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARMJ 200 or ARID 111 or departmental approval.

ARMJ500: Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry I (1 hour lecture, 3 hours studio)

Designing jewelry and small sculpture in varied metals; the techniques of flat sheet metal and casting. 3 sh.

ARMJ510: Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARMJ 500. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARMJ 500.

ARMJ600: Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARMJ 510. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARMJ 510.

ARMJ610: Graduate Metalwork and Jewelry IV (4 hours studio)

Designing jewelry and small sculpture in varied metals. The techniques of flat sheet metal and casting. Continuation of ARMJ 600. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARMJ 600.

ARPA200: Painting, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Exploration of painting media and modes of expression. Reading, gallery and museum visits. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARPA210: Painting, Beginning II (6 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPA 200. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPA 200.

ARPA500: Graduate Painting I (4 hours studio)

Studio in painting to further the creative expression and technical knowledge of the student in various painting media. Personal and professional development through studio work, trips and the study of the contemporary artists. 3 sh.

ARPA510: Graduate Painting II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPA 500. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPA 500.

ARPA600: Graduate Painting III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPA 510. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPA 510.

ARPA610: Graduate Painting IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPA 600. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPA 600.

ARPH200: Photography Beginning I: Contemporary Art Form (6 hours studio)

The essentials of the photographic process including developing, enlarging, and exhibiting. Trips, films, discussions, lectures, criticism and demonstration. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARPH210: Photography Beginning II: Contemporary Art Form (3 hours lecture, 3 hours studio)

The essentials of the photographic process including developing, enlarging, portfolio creation, exhibiting, trips, videos, discussion, lecture, critiques, and demonstrations. A continuation of ARPH 200, Photography Beginning Level I: A Contemporary Art Form. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPH 200.

ARPH500: Graduate Photography Beginning I: A Contemporary Art Form (6 hours studio)

Provides for the in-depth study and practice of photography as a visual language. Encourages exploration beyond the camera through studio work, discussions, criticism, films, trips and demonstrations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARPH510: Graduate Photography Beginning II: A Contemporary Art Form (3 hours lecture, 3 hours studio)

The essentials of the photographic process including developing, enlarging, portfolio creation, exhibition, trips, videos, discussion, lecture, critiques, and demonstrations. A continuation of ARPH 500, Graduate Photography Beginning I: A Contemporary Art Form. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPH 500.

ARPH600: Graduate Photography Intermediate: A Contemporary Art Form (4 hours studio)

Workshop, discussion, lectures, criticism, demonstrations: photography for self expression and greater visual awareness. Creative controls, craftsmanship, perception, presentation and the fine points will be investigated. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPH 510.

ARPH610: Graduate Photography Advanced: A Contemporary Art Form (5 hours studio)

Workshop, discussion, lecture, demonstrations, criticism: photography as an intensive learning experience. Light sensitive materials, controls, photographic approach, selection, zinc system and view camera will be investigated. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPH 600.

ARPH660: Graduate Special Processes in Photography (5 hours studio)

Investigation of nontraditional light sensitive materials for use in the photographic image making process. Extending traditional boundaries of photography through new tools that permit greater image manipulation: gum bichromate, cyanotype, platinum, photo etching, and others will be investigated. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPH 610.

ARPM200: Printmaking, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Woodcut, screen printing and monoprints; etching, drypoint and lithography. Exploration of new and advanced techniques. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARPM210: Printmaking, Beginning II (6 hours studio)

Consideration of printmaking media; particular attention to the growth and development of art-making concepts as they relate to the printmaking processes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPM 200.

ARPM500: Graduate Printmaking I (4 hours studio)

Advanced work in various print processes; emphasis on the development of images and concepts as they relate to the printmaking media. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARPM510: Graduate Printmaking II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPM 500. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPM 500.

ARPM600: Graduate Printmaking III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPM 510. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPM 510.

ARPM610: Graduate Printmaking IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARPM 600. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARPM 600.

ARSC200: Sculpture, Beginning I (6 hours studio)

Sculptural concepts using materials like plaster, metal, plastics, stone and wood. Gallery and museum visits. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARSC210: Sculpture, Beginning II (6 hours studio)

The course will focus on the figure (working from life) with auxiliary experiences in mold-making and casting. The materials will be clay (plasticine), plaster and armatures. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

ARSC500: Graduate Sculpture I (4 hours studio)

The student explores independently one or two materials and techniques, and begins to find direction as a sculptor. 3 sh.

ARSC510: Graduate Sculpture II (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARSC 500. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARSC 500.

ARSC600: Graduate Sculpture III (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARSC 510. Taken serially. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARSC 510.

ARSC610: Graduate Sculpture IV (4 hours studio)

Continuation of ARSC 600. Taken serially. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARSC 600.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CURR505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with EDFD 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR509: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 509. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 516. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork (3 hours lecture)

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching (6 hours lab)

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ELRS580: Learning Theories (3 hours lecture)

Study of the learning process and its measurement as it applies in the classroom and non-school settings. 3 sh.

FCST515: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

This course uses a developmental and ecological approach to study adolescents (11-18 years). Physical, cognitive, and social development throughout this age period are studied in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural, and political influences on adolescents are examined. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconimic status in adolescent development are like wise examined. Out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as an APA style research literature review or proposal paper are required. Starting Summer 2012: Students utilize developmental and ecological approaches to study physical, cognitive, and social development of adolescents (11-18 years) in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Students also examine how family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural factors, and politics can have an influence on adolescents. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status in adolescent development are likewise examined. Students also engage in out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as develop an APA style research literature review or proposal paper. 3 sh.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. 3 sh.

READ501: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture)

Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School introduces pre-service and in-service teachers to an array of cross-content literacy strategies for the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties. Students learn how to ground literacy strategies in purposeful and meaningful curricular and pedagogical projects. 3 sh.

SPED568: Instructional Planning for Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings II (3 hours lecture)

This course will enhance the ability of future educators to provide effective planning and instruction for students with disabilities in 6-12 inclusive classrooms. Educators will learn how to apply developmentally appropriate practice and curriculum design to improve the learning of students who exhibit competencies across a wide range. The emphasis will be on practical techniques and strategies that can be utilized in an inclusive setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED579: Special Education for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

An overview of instruction for students with special needs; characteristics of special populations, federal and state legislation, educational implications of disabling conditions, principles for instruction and planning for inclusion are presented; community resources and special issues related to the education of students with disabilities are discussed. 3 sh.

SPED584: Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom

This course is designed to be an introduction for pre-service teachers in the field of Special Education assessment and accountability. The course will introduce students to elements of traditional assessment, including record keeping, grading, objective and essay testing, theories of validity as well as authentic, performance, and portfolio assessment. The keeping of anecdotal records, inclusion, heterogeneous groups, and accommodations will also be components of this course. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED585: Technology for Inclusive Classrooms

The course is designed to provide educators with an understanding of how to use technology as a seamless part of the teaching and learning experience for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Two main purposes for students with disabilities will be emphasized. Teachers will learn how to provide access to the curriculum for students with disabilities by using the principles of Universal Design for Learning as a framework for curriculum design. They will learn how to utilize technology to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities in order for them to attain maximum independence and participation in all environments. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED586: Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on a Research-Based and Teacher-Tested Support Model for planning and implementing transition services for students with disabilities. Successful transition services will allow students to build the bridges toward becoming independent self advocates with the insights, skills, knowledge, and learning techniques for successful transition from school to adult life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED588: Promoting Prosocial Behaviors in Inclusive Settings

This course is designed to provide future teachers with theory and practice related to the development of appropriate prosocial behaviors within inclusive classroom settings for students with disabilities. This course will focus on behavior and the developmental and environmental factors that influence its expression. Emphasis will be placed on functional analysis of behavior, how to promote appropriate behavior, and how to develop a classroom setting that fosters prosocial behaviors. Principles of social/emotional learning, social skills development as well as data collection, schedules of reinforcement monitoring progress, social problem solving, and promotion of positive behavior plans will be explored. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED591: Teaching Organization and Study Skills for the Inclusive Classroom. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI) or Master of Education (MED) (3 hours lecture)

In this course, future and practicing teachers who work with students with disabilities in middle and secondary school learn how to enable those students to become more effective learners so they can have greater access to the general education curriculum. Increased inclusion has led to higher expectations for students with disabilities and the need to meet the more rigorous demands of the general education classroom. This requires study and organization skills, wich students with disabilities often lack as a result of the impact of their disability. In this course, teachers become familiar with research-based study and organization strategies as well as effective instructional methods for systematic and explicit instruction to teach these strategies. Through these strategies, they can help students compensate for their disability characteristics and become more independent, engaged learners. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 469, SPED 568 or SPED 587. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).