Teaching, with Teacher Certification in Mathematics (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities (M.A.T.) - Graduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

The Master of Arts in Teaching Program in Subject Area and Teacher of Students with Disabilities is a 48-51 credit program designed to provide graduate students with a master's degree as well as dual certification: initial certification to teach in a subject area (P-12) and certification to teach students with disabilities in those settings.

Montclair State University’s Teacher Education Program is one of the most highly-regarded teacher preparation programs in the country. It has been consistently recognized both nationally and regionally for its unique features, including its structure, partnerships, and curricular emphases. The program is considered a model for other colleges and universities and has continuously been accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954.

The Teacher Education Program’s professional course sequence and field experiences emphasize teaching for critical thinking and culturally responsive teaching. The professional component for both graduate students addresses four broad areas: 1) student development and learning, 2) the classroom and the school, 3) the curriculum, and 4) effective teaching skills.

TEACHING (MATH & STUDENTS w/DISAB)

  1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

    1. SPEECH

      Complete the following 1 course: (May be completed by examination)

      CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

      Pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the COP or have UG equivalent course approved by advisor.

    3. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT

      Complete 1 course from the following list.

      ELRS 580 Learning Theories (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 515 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHING FIELD REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s) for 34 semester hours:

    1. MATHEMATICS CORE

      Complete 8 courses for 28 semester hours:

      CMPT 183 Foundations of Computer Science I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      MATH 122 Calculus I (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 221 Calculus II (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 222 Calculus III (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 335 Linear Algebra (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 340 Probability (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 350 College Geometry (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 431 Foundations of Modern Algebra (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES

      Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours from the following list

      MATH 420 Ordinary Differential Equations (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 423 Complex Variables (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 425 Advanced Calculus I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 426 Advanced Calculus II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 433 Theory of Numbers (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 450 Foundations of Geometry (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 451 Topology (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 463 Numerical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 464 Operations Research I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 465 Operations Research II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 469 Mathematical Modeling (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 471 Selected Topics in Modern Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 475 History of Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 485 Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 490 Honors Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      MATH 495 Topics for Undergraduates 1-3
      MATH 497 Research I 1-3
      MATH 498 Research II 1-3
      MATH 574 Problem Analysis in Secondary Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 575 Selected Topics in Mathematics Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 579 Approaching School Mathematics Through Applications (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 441 Statistical Computing (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 442 Fundamentals of Modern Statistics II (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 48 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      1. Complete for 3 semester hours.

        CURR 505 Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 5 courses for 15 semester hours:

        CURR 509 Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 568 Instructional Planning for Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings II (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 579 Special Education for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 586 Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. Complete for 1 semester hours.

        CURR 516 Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
      4. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 584 Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom 2-3
      5. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 585 Technology for Inclusive Classrooms 2-3
      6. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 588 Promoting Prosocial Behaviors in Inclusive Settings 2-3
      7. Complete for 2 semester hours.

        SPED 591 Teaching Organization and Study Skills for the Inclusive Classroom. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI) or Master of Education (MED) (3 hours lecture) 2-3
    2. GRADUATE LEVEL CONTENT AREA COURSE

      Complete 3 semester hours from the following list.

      MATH 501 Mathematics for Computer Science I (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 502 Mathematics for Computer Science II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 503 Mathematics for Computer Science III (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 510 Workshop in Mathematics Education I 1-4
      MATH 511 Workshop in Mathematics Education II 1-4
      MATH 512 Technology in the Middle Grades Mathematics Curriculum (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 513 Computer Science Concepts for High School Teachers (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 514 Advanced Placement Computer Science Concepts (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 515 Intermediate Analysis I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 516 Intermediate Analysis II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 518 Foundations of Abstract Algebra (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 519 Teaching Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 520 Set Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 521 Real Variables I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 522 Real Variables II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 525 Complex Variables I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 526 Complex Variables II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 530 Mathematical Computing (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 531 Abstract Algebra I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 532 Abstract Algebra II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 535 Linear Algebra I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 536 Linear Algebra II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 537 Mathematical Logic (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 540 Probability (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 551 Topology (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 554 Projective Geometry (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 555 Differential Geometry (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 560 Numerical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 564 Ordinary Differential Equation (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 566 Partial Differential Equations (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 568 Applied Mathematics: Continuous (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 569 Applied Mathematics: Discrete (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 570 Administration and Supervision of Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 571 Curriculum Construction in Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 574 Problem Analysis in Secondary Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 575 Selected Topics in Mathematics Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 576 Research Seminar in Mathematics Education (3 hours seminar) 3
      MATH 577 Mathematics Education in the Elementary School (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 578 Special Topics in Mathematics Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 579 Approaching School Mathematics Through Applications (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 580 Combinatorial Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 581 Graph Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 584 Operations Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 590 Advanced Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 591 Applied Industrial Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 595 Seminar (1-4 hours seminar) 1-4
    3. PROFESSIONAL YEAR

      1. First Semester

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 526 Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 527 Fieldwork (3 hours lecture) 3
        3. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

          MATH 572 Contemporary Teaching of Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
          MATH 573 Mathematics Materials for Teachers of Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Second Semester

        1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

          CURR 543 Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course for 6 semester hours:

          CURR 529 Student Teaching (6 hours lab) 6
  4. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination.


Course Descriptions:

CMPT183: Foundations of Computer Science I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Basic theory of digital computers. Syntax and semantics of a programming language. Algorithms: logic, design, testing and documentation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100, MATH 112, MATH 114, MATH 116, MATH 122 or MATH 221.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CURR505: Teaching, Democracy, and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course brings together differing viewpoints regarding the purposes of teaching in the United States and the teacher's role in fostering democracy. It provides future teachers with the habits of mind, skills, tools and resources to analyze and evaluate the relationship between the history of public education, the evolution of teacher identity, and the roles teachers and teaching have played in shaping the United States as a society and vice versa. Using Montclair State's Portrait of a Teacher as an organizing framework, this course places particular emphasis on the idea that all students can learn regardless of their gender, ability, race, ethnicity, or economic background. Students in the course study the history, philosophy, and politics that shape differing views about the roles and responsibilities of teachers, especially as these views relate to integration and inclusion in the classroom. Cross listed with EDFD 505. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR509: Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how teachers, teaching, & schooling can foster the learning of pupils from diverse socio-economic, linguistic & cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways socialization shapes perceptions of oneself & others; reflect on their own beliefs & assumptions about their sociocultural identities & how those have been shaped through experience; examine the nature & impact of the increasing social, cultural, & linguistic diversity in K-12 schools; & reflect on their capacity to bring about educational change that promotes equity & affirms diversity. They investigate ways of teaching all children successfully, particularly through a culturally responsive curriculum, & of developing positive relationships among teachers, parents, & children across diversity. Through a community study of an urban area with a predominantly poor & diverse population, students develop a framework for understanding the relationship between schools, communities, & society; cultivate skills needed to familiarize themselves with diverse communities & their residents; & envision ways they can help future students see connections between their in-school & out-of-school experiences. They also develop their ability to work collaboratively with colleagues. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 509. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR516: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course examines the best practices in educating English language learners. Students gain a greater understanding of the linguistic difficulties and resources of English language learners as well as the importance of a multicultural curriculum. Students learn how to make content comprehensible and differentiate instruction based on the language levels of individual English language learners. Students develop an understanding of the academic and affective needs of English language learners, and of strategies for meeting these needs. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2.0 credits. Cross listed with EDFD 516. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 518. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR526: Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with CURR 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; CURR 509 or EDFD 509; CURR 516 or EDFD 516; CURR 517; CURR 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR527: Fieldwork (3 hours lecture)

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and EDFD 519 or CURR 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR529: Student Teaching (6 hours lab)

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 519 or EDFD 519; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

CURR543: Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (CURR 526, CURR 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CURR 505 or EDFD 505; and CURR 509 or EDFD 509; and CURR 516 or EDFD 516; and CURR 517; and CURR 518; and CURR 526; and CURR 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

ELRS580: Learning Theories (3 hours lecture)

Study of the learning process and its measurement as it applies in the classroom and non-school settings. 3 sh.

FCST515: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

This course uses a developmental and ecological approach to study adolescents (11-18 years). Physical, cognitive, and social development throughout this age period are studied in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural, and political influences on adolescents are examined. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconimic status in adolescent development are like wise examined. Out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as an APA style research literature review or proposal paper are required. Starting Summer 2012: Students utilize developmental and ecological approaches to study physical, cognitive, and social development of adolescents (11-18 years) in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Students also examine how family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural factors, and politics can have an influence on adolescents. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status in adolescent development are likewise examined. Students also engage in out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as develop an APA style research literature review or proposal paper. 3 sh.

MATH122: Calculus I (4 hours lecture)

Limits, continuity; derivative and differentiation; applications of the derivative, maxima, minima, and extreme considerations; antiderivatives; Riemann integral. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 112 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH221: Calculus II (4 hours lecture)

Riemann integral applications, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, L'Hospital's rule, infinite series. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 122.

MATH222: Calculus III (4 hours lecture)

Vector algebra; partial differentiation, and extreme considerations; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, multiple integration; introduction to line integrals. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221.

MATH335: Linear Algebra (4 hours lecture)

The course content will cover the foundations of the algebra of vector spaces, matrix operations, matrix invertibility theorems, linear independence, span, basis, linear transformations, finite dimensional Hilbert Spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, projections, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and applications. The focus of the course will be to develop advanced mathematical skills in reading and understanding abstract mathematical definitions, constructing examples, and developing mathematical proofs. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Mathematics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 or equivalent.

MATH340: Probability (3 hours lecture)

Chance and variability, elements of combinatorics, Bayes' theorem, random variables, binomial, poisson and normal distributions, applications to statistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221.

MATH350: College Geometry (3 hours lecture)

Study of Euclidean and other geometries from an axiomatic point of view. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221.

MATH420: Ordinary Differential Equations (4 hours lecture)

A course in the theory and applications of ordinary differential equations which emphasizes qualitative aspects of the subject. Topics include analytic and numerical solution techniques for linear and nonlinear systems, graphical analysis, existence-uniqueness theory, bifurcation analysis, and advanced topics. Prerequisite: MATH 335. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH423: Complex Variables (3 hours lecture)

This course is a study of the arithmetic and algebra of complex numbers, and an introduction to the differentiation and integration of complex functions. Topics include: rectangular and polar form of complex numbers, algebra of complex numbers, differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, and contour integrals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH425: Advanced Calculus I (3 hours lecture)

Properties of the real number system, limits, continuous functions, intermediate value theorem, derivative, mean value theorem, Riemann integral. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH426: Advanced Calculus II (3 hours lecture)

Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, Green's theorem, Stoke's theorem, divergence theorem, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem, infinite series, uniform convergence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425.

MATH431: Foundations of Modern Algebra (3 hours lecture)

Fundamental concepts of algebra including groups, rings, integral domains and fields, with important examples. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH433: Theory of Numbers (3 hours lecture)

Properties of integers, congruences, quadratic reciprocity law, primitive roots, diophantine equations, continued fractions, algebraic numbers, lattice points and partitions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH450: Foundations of Geometry (3 hours lecture)

Groups of transformations, an introduction to projective geometry. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH451: Topology (3 hours lecture)

Topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, compactness, connectedness, and separability properties; topological generalizations of basic continuity theorems of advanced calculus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425.

MATH463: Numerical Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Finite differences, approximation theory, linear and non-linear equations, error analysis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 and 335.

MATH464: Operations Research I (3 hours lecture)

Linear programming, transportation problem, assignment problem, duality, sensitivity analysis, network flows, dynamic programming, nonlinear programming, integer programming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH465: Operations Research II (3 hours lecture)

Game theory, queuing models, inventory models, Markov processes, reliability theory and applications. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and 340.

MATH469: Mathematical Modeling (3 hours lecture)

The art of constructing mathematical models for "real world" problems, solving the model, and testing the accuracy of the model. Problems will be selected from business, science, computer science, and the social sciences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, and MATH 340, and MATH 464 or STAT 330.

MATH471: Selected Topics in Modern Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Professionalized view of junior and senior high school mathematics topics: functions, real and complex numbers, analytic geometry, absolute value and inequalities, sets and logic, flow charting, linear programming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program and MATH 335.

MATH475: History of Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Histories of geometry, number theory, algebra, calculus and infinite processes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335.

MATH485: Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 hours lecture)

Problem solving by counting, enumeration, and graph theory. Permutation, combinations, binomial coefficients, generating functions, and recurrence relations, partitions, inclusion-exclusion, Polya's formula, graph theoretic models, trees, circuits, networks, matching, and their applications to puzzles, games, tournaments, traffic patterns, transportation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 340.

MATH490: Honors Seminar (3 hours seminar)

This course will concentrate on subject matter not usually covered within standard mathematics courses. A written and oral report are required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and departmental approval.

MATH495: Topics for Undergraduates

Study of advanced topics in undergraduate mathematics. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and departmental approval.

MATH497: Research I

Individual research in a mathematical area agreed upon by the student and the instructor. The results of the research will be a basis of a seminar or colloquium to be given by the student. Students must not accumulate more than 6 credits total in courses MATH 497, 498. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and departmental approval.

MATH498: Research II

Individual research in a mathematical area agreed upon by the student and the instructor. The results of the research will be a basis of a seminar or colloquium to be given by the student. Students must not accumulate more than 6 credits total in courses MATH 497, 498. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and departmental approval.

MATH501: Mathematics for Computer Science I (4 hours lecture)

Sets, relations, functions, graphs, trees, propositional calculus, induction and recursion, applications to computer science. May not be used for credit by Mathematics or Computer Science majors. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH502: Mathematics for Computer Science II (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to linear algebra, vectors, matrices, counting rules, probability theory, random variables, Poisson and binomial distribution, with applications to Computer Science. May not be used for credit by Mathematics and Computer Science majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH503: Mathematics for Computer Science III (3 hours lecture)

Differential and integral calculus, infinite series, applications to computer science. May not be used for credit by Mathematics and Computer Science majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH510: Workshop in Mathematics Education I

Specific contemporary topics and current issues in school mathematics. May be repeated for a maximum of 8.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH511: Workshop in Mathematics Education II

Specific contemporary topics and current issues in school mathematics. May be repeated for a maximum of 8.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH512: Technology in the Middle Grades Mathematics Curriculum (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide experiences in the integration of technology into middle grades mathematics classes. The primary emphases are on the analysis and evaluation of computer software addressing the middle grades mathematics courses. Other topics include the use of spreadsheets, fraction and graphing calculators, data probes, and hand-held digital assistants as problem-solving tools to enhance the teaching/learning process. The course also includes current literature describing exemplary models and practices in the use of technology in the mathematics classroom. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH513: Computer Science Concepts for High School Teachers (3 hours lecture)

This course is specifically designed to help high school mathematics teachers prepare to use the microcomputer as a tool in their classrooms. Topics include an introduction to computer literacy, elements of BASIC programming, the evaluation of commercial software, the appropriate use of the software and a survey of relevant professional literature. Minimal prior knowledge of BASIC is assumed. May not be used for credit by Computer Science majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH514: Advanced Placement Computer Science Concepts (3 hours lecture)

This course is specifically designed to help senior high school teachers prepare to instruct the AP course in computer science. Topics include the problem solving process, good programming style, the syntax of the current AP language, and their applications to computer science. Additional topics include algorithms, data structures, procedures, program design, sorting and searching. Minimal prior knowledge of a high level language is assumed. May not be used for credit for Computer Science majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH515: Intermediate Analysis I (3 hours lecture)

Properties of the real number system, limits, continuous functions, intermediate value theorem, derivative, mean value theorem, Riemann integral. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH516: Intermediate Analysis II (3 hours lecture)

This course is a continuation of MATH 515. Topics include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, Green's theorem, Stoke's theorem, divergence theorem, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem, infinite series, uniform convergence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 515 or MATH 425 or equivalent, permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH518: Foundations of Abstract Algebra (3 hours lecture)

Fundamental concepts of algebra including groups, rings, integral domains and fields, with important examples. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH519: Teaching Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Selection, organization, and presentation of secondary mathematics, classroom activities, lesson planning, techniques of motivation, evaluation, multi-sensory aids, principles of learning, assessment, and applications of technology to classroom teaching. 3 sh.

MATH520: Set Theory (3 hours lecture)

Historical development, paradoxes, ordered sets, Schroder-Bernstein theorem, axiom of choice, transfinite induction, cardinal and ordinal numbers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH521: Real Variables I (3 hours lecture)

Real number system, Lebesgue measure and integration, differentiation, Fourier series, LP, metric, normed vector, Banach and Hilbert spaces. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 426 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH522: Real Variables II (3 hours lecture)

Real number system, Lebesgue measure and integration, differentiation, Fourier series, LP, metric, normed vector, Banach and Hilbert spaces. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 521, permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH525: Complex Variables I (3 hours lecture)

Integration and differentiation in the complex domain, Cauchy's theorem, Cauchy's integral formula, Laurent expansion, residues, elements of conformal mapping, series and product representations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 426 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH526: Complex Variables II (3 hours lecture)

Integration and differentiation in the complex domain, Cauchy's theorem, Cauchy's integral formula, Laurent expansion, residues, elements of conformal mapping, series and product representations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 525, permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH530: Mathematical Computing (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to mathematical computing techniques using a computer algebra system and algorithmic approach to solving mathematical problems. Mathematical applications taken from various areas of mathematics, the sciences, engineering, and business. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of the graduate program coordinator or consent of the instructor.

MATH531: Abstract Algebra I (3 hours lecture)

Basic algebraic structures including groups, rings, fields, modules and lattices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 431 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH532: Abstract Algebra II (3 hours lecture)

Basic algebraic structures including groups, rings, fields, modules and lattices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 531, permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH535: Linear Algebra I (3 hours lecture)

Vector spaces and linear transformations, including inner product, matrix representations, binary and quadratic forms, eigenvectors, canonical forms, and functions of matrices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH536: Linear Algebra II (3 hours lecture)

Vector spaces and linear transformations, including inner product, matrix representations, binary and quadratic forms, eigenvectors, canonical forms, and functions of matrices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 535, permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH537: Mathematical Logic (3 hours lecture)

Propositional and predicate calculus, model theory, Godel's completeness theorems and decidability. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH540: Probability (3 hours lecture)

Sample spaces and events, combinatorial analysis, conditional probability and stochastic independence, random variables and probability distributions, expected value and variance, probability generating functions, continuous random variables. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 340 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH551: Topology (3 hours lecture)

Basic point-set topology, topological spaces, homeomorphisms, compactness, connectedness, separation properties, uniformities, metrizability, introductory algebraic topology, homology groups and homotopy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425, and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH554: Projective Geometry (3 hours lecture)

Projective planes and spaces are studied by synthetic and analytic approaches. Topics covered include the theorems of Desargues and Pappus, harmonic sequences, projectivities, coordinatization, finite planes, and conics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH555: Differential Geometry (3 hours lecture)

Application of vectors to the study of classical three-dimensional geometry. Topics include: plane and space curves, first and second fundamental forms, lines of curvature, asymptotic lines, geodesics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH560: Numerical Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Error analysis, interpolation and approximation theory, numerical solution of linear and nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of differential equations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH564: Ordinary Differential Equation (3 hours lecture)

Linear and nonlinear equations, Green's functions, power series solutions, autonomous systems, existence and uniqueness, singularities, Sturm-Liouville systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, and 420, and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH566: Partial Differential Equations (3 hours lecture)

First order equations, separation of variables, series solutions, hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic equations, characteristics, transform methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, and 420, and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH568: Applied Mathematics: Continuous (3 hours lecture)

Formulation, manipulation and evaluation of mathematical models of continuous systems. Topics selected from: conservation principles and the classical equations of mathematical physics, applications of the qualitative and quantitative theory of ordinary and partial differential equations, optimization, calculus of variations, stability theory, stochastic models. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, and 340, and 420, and 425, and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH569: Applied Mathematics: Discrete (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the basic ideas of discrete mathematics and its applications. Counting principles, permutations, combinations, algorithms, complexity, graphs, trees, searching and sorting, recurrence relations, generating functions, inclusion-exclusion, the pigeonhole principle, chromatic number, eulerian chains and paths, hamiltonian chains and paths, flows in networks, finite Markov chains. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, and 340, and 425, and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH570: Administration and Supervision of Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Problems of organization, administration and supervision in the mathematics program of the school. Functions, duties and qualifications of the supervisor investigated. Current problems and research findings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH571: Curriculum Construction in Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Contemporary proposals for the mathematics of grades K through 12. Consideration is given to the problem of implementation of current recommendations. Examination is made of mathematical concepts underlying various programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH572: Contemporary Teaching of Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Pedagogy, resources, and research related to the teaching of standards-based mathematics in grades 6-12. Emphasis is on creating student-centered learning environments, resources and materials for contemporary mathematics classrooms, models of effective teaching and learning, alternative assessment, appropriate uses of technology and multicultural aspects of mathematics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH573: Mathematics Materials for Teachers of Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

The construction, adaptation and effective use of classroom materials and activities designed to enhance and expand the teaching of mathematics and mathematical thinking in the middle and high school grades with special attention given to basic commercial and simple teacher- and student-made manipulatives and models with broad use from the development of concepts and skills to their maintenance, review, and extension plus applications to problem solving. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH574: Problem Analysis in Secondary Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Psychology and techniques of problem-solving. Discovery and heuristic methods. Intuitive and inductive reasoning in the solution of nonroutine problems from high school mathematics. Problem formation and solution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH575: Selected Topics in Mathematics Education (3 hours lecture)

Selection of topics associated with secondary and early college years of mathematics investigated from an advanced point of view. Topics selected to give the teacher a professionalized subject matter viewpoint of such areas as algebra, geometry, number theory, real and complex analysis, probability and history of mathematics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH576: Research Seminar in Mathematics Education (3 hours seminar)

Designed for matriculated graduate students in the mathematics education program. Students survey and analyze recent research projects. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH577: Mathematics Education in the Elementary School (3 hours lecture)

The contemporary mathematics curriculum of the elementary and middle school. The role of behavioral objectives and learning theory in curriculum development/teacher training. Related research findings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH578: Special Topics in Mathematics Education (3 hours lecture)

Topics may be selected from areas such as assessment, cooperative learning, elementary education, fractals, graphing calculators, NCTM Standards, and other special areas of interest to mathematics educators. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH579: Approaching School Mathematics Through Applications (3 hours lecture)

Topics in middle grade and secondary mathematics are explored with an emphasis on their application to both traditional and more recently developed areas. Applied problems are used to motivate mathematical topics, and mathematical knowledge is used to explore solutions to applied problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH580: Combinatorial Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Arrangements and selections, binomial coefficients, Stirling numbers, generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion-exclusion, Polya enumeration formula, combinatorial graph theory, combinatorial geometries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 and graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH581: Graph Theory (3 hours lecture)

Graphs, digraphs, and trees. Connectivity, separability, planarity, and colorability. Cliques, independent sets, matchings, flows and tours. Graphs as mathematical models; graph algorithms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222, and 335, and graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH584: Operations Research (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of one or at most two topics in operations research, selected from linear programming and game theory, linear and nonlinear programming, queuing theory, inventory theory, simulation models. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425 and STAT 440 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH590: Advanced Topics (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of a topic or topics selected from areas such as algebra, analysis, geometry, probability and statistics, and applied mathematics, with special emphasis upon recent developments in the field. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.

MATH591: Applied Industrial Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Formulation, modeling, and solution of mathematical problems from engineering, science and business. Topics include statistical distributions, Monte Carlo method, function fitting, transforms optimization, regression analysis, cost-benefit analysis, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, numerical methods, divided differences, splines, Galerkin's method, and finite elements. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335, MATH 425, MATH 530, STAT 440 or permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH595: Seminar (1-4 hours seminar)

Guided study of selected topics in major field of interest. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. 3 sh.

READ501: Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture)

Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School introduces pre-service and in-service teachers to an array of cross-content literacy strategies for the improvement of nonclinical reading difficulties. Students learn how to ground literacy strategies in purposeful and meaningful curricular and pedagogical projects. 3 sh.

SPED568: Instructional Planning for Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings II (3 hours lecture)

This course will enhance the ability of future educators to provide effective planning and instruction for students with disabilities in 6-12 inclusive classrooms. Educators will learn how to apply developmentally appropriate practice and curriculum design to improve the learning of students who exhibit competencies across a wide range. The emphasis will be on practical techniques and strategies that can be utilized in an inclusive setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED579: Special Education for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

An overview of instruction for students with special needs; characteristics of special populations, federal and state legislation, educational implications of disabling conditions, principles for instruction and planning for inclusion are presented; community resources and special issues related to the education of students with disabilities are discussed. 3 sh.

SPED584: Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom

This course is designed to be an introduction for pre-service teachers in the field of Special Education assessment and accountability. The course will introduce students to elements of traditional assessment, including record keeping, grading, objective and essay testing, theories of validity as well as authentic, performance, and portfolio assessment. The keeping of anecdotal records, inclusion, heterogeneous groups, and accommodations will also be components of this course. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED585: Technology for Inclusive Classrooms

The course is designed to provide educators with an understanding of how to use technology as a seamless part of the teaching and learning experience for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Two main purposes for students with disabilities will be emphasized. Teachers will learn how to provide access to the curriculum for students with disabilities by using the principles of Universal Design for Learning as a framework for curriculum design. They will learn how to utilize technology to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities in order for them to attain maximum independence and participation in all environments. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED586: Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on a Research-Based and Teacher-Tested Support Model for planning and implementing transition services for students with disabilities. Successful transition services will allow students to build the bridges toward becoming independent self advocates with the insights, skills, knowledge, and learning techniques for successful transition from school to adult life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED588: Promoting Prosocial Behaviors in Inclusive Settings

This course is designed to provide future teachers with theory and practice related to the development of appropriate prosocial behaviors within inclusive classroom settings for students with disabilities. This course will focus on behavior and the developmental and environmental factors that influence its expression. Emphasis will be placed on functional analysis of behavior, how to promote appropriate behavior, and how to develop a classroom setting that fosters prosocial behaviors. Principles of social/emotional learning, social skills development as well as data collection, schedules of reinforcement monitoring progress, social problem solving, and promotion of positive behavior plans will be explored. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED591: Teaching Organization and Study Skills for the Inclusive Classroom. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI) or Master of Education (MED) (3 hours lecture)

In this course, future and practicing teachers who work with students with disabilities in middle and secondary school learn how to enable those students to become more effective learners so they can have greater access to the general education curriculum. Increased inclusion has led to higher expectations for students with disabilities and the need to meet the more rigorous demands of the general education classroom. This requires study and organization skills, wich students with disabilities often lack as a result of the impact of their disability. In this course, teachers become familiar with research-based study and organization strategies as well as effective instructional methods for systematic and explicit instruction to teach these strategies. Through these strategies, they can help students compensate for their disability characteristics and become more independent, engaged learners. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 469, SPED 568 or SPED 587. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

STAT441: Statistical Computing (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed: (1) to acquaint students with the use of the computer in solving statistical problems, and (2) to develop intermediate level statistical methodology. Several statistical computing packages and the student's own programs will be utilized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 or STAT 401 and computer experience.

STAT442: Fundamentals of Modern Statistics II (3 hours lecture)

Continuation of STAT 440. Principles of statistical inference, categorical data analysis, one and two-way anova, multiple linear regression, nonparametric methods, bootstrap methods. Examples from a wide variety of disciplines. Statistical software is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 or STAT 401 or equivalent.