Archaeology Minor - Undergraduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Coordinator: Timothy Renner

Jointly sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Classics and General Humanities, and Art and Design, together with support from the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies, this minor offers an interdisciplinary program in the study of ancient and other past cultures through investigation of their material remains. Coursework includes overviews of ancient Old World and New World cultures and the study of archaeological method and theory. Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the extensive coursework offered by the University in modern and ancient languages and in the natural and social sciences. The overall course of study in Archaeology helps lead to a sophisticated understanding of material remains in the larger context of human society. It also shows how material evidence can compare with and supplement the evidence of written texts that are available for historical cultures (e.g., those of the Romans of the Imperial age or European settlers in 18th century North America).

Through programs run directly by the University's Center for Heritage and Archaeological Studies in northern New Jersey (for prehistoric and historical North American archaeology), as well as through faculty-conducted projects in other regions (e.g., the Caribbean or Mediterranean), students have excellent opportunities to participate in fieldwork as part of their curriculum and/or preprofessional experience in archaeology. Here they are able to develop  basic fieldwork skills in surveying, excavating, mapping, and artifact analysis. In addition, training in geoarchaeology is available from MSU's Earth and Environmental Studies faculty.

The Archaeology minor makes a good complement to any liberal arts or professional studies major. In general archaeology has recently become a subject of great interest to many parts of our society. Students who pursue careers in the media, the travel industry, and international business (to name  a few) profit from this interdisciplinary study. Moreover, historic preservation  legislation has resulted in important employment opportunities in the private (applied archaeology) and public (government agencies, state museums) sectors, especially for students who major in Anthropology. Government funded or permitted development projects frequently require environmental impact studies, including archaeological and heritage investigations; these kinds of studies are typically carried out by heritage preservation or large environmental engineering firms. Finally, students who wish to pursue master's or doctoral level studies in preparation for a career in teaching, research, or museum work will find the Archaeology minor to be excellent background, especially when combined with a major such as Anthropology, Art History, Classics, or Earth and Environmental Studies.

ARCHAEOLOGY MINOR

Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. Complete the following 2 courses:

    ANTH 103 Prehistoric Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 181 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. ELECTIVE COURSES FOR MINOR

    1. Complete 3 semester hours to 9 semester hours from the following:

      ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 3 semester hours to 9 semester hours from the following:

      ANTH 270 Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 370 Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 470 Archaeological Field Methods 6
      ANTH 490 Internship in Anthropology 3-6
      GNHU 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 351 The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 361 Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 362 Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology 3-6

Course Descriptions:

ANTH103: Prehistoric Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

Have you ever wanted to time travel and experience a bygone era in a faraway place, say 20,000 years ago? Except for science fiction books like "The Time Machine," you might think this is fantasy. But do not despair,for we can still embark on a journey into the land of prehistory through archaeology. One might ask,"How is archaeology different from science fiction or novel writing?" No, we don't have time machines but we do have shovels. In this course, we will learn how archaeologists can say what they say without venturing into fantasy land. Meets Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH270: Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture)

The archaeology of ancient cultures of Middle America. Consists of two major units (1) Northern Mesoamerica, the Gulf Coast, Oaxaco and Central Mexican Aztecs (2) Ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 120 or ANTH 130 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 170 or ANTH 180 or ANTH 195 or departmental approval.

ANTH370: Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course will cover the manufacture, use, preservation, analysis, and cataloging of prehistoric artifacts made of stone, bone and wood. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH470: Archaeological Field Methods

Provides practical field experience in the various aspects of survey and excavation techniques. A specific area will be surveyed and a site will be excavated. May be repeated once for credit. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH490: Internship in Anthropology

According to interest and preparation, students are placed in cooperating agencies in order to provide an opportunity to test their acquired theoretical knowledge and to gain disciplined practice in their profession. Under faculty guidance and agency supervision, students are to engage in anthropological fieldwork by conducting research and/or special projects. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ARHT314: Greek Art (3 hours lecture)

Greek art and material culture including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 328 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT315: Roman Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 485 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

GNHU181: Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The science of evaluating Greco-Roman and closely related cultures through observation and analysis of their physical remains. Problems and methods of dating artifacts and sites. Building materials, types, and decorations. Field trip in addition to illustrated lectures and discussions. 3 sh.

GNHU281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman conquest as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Classics. Cross listed with History, HIST 281. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors.

GNHU282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Cross listed with History, HIST 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors.

GNHU351: The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Cities and city-based culture in the Greek and Roman world seen through the evidence of archaeology, literary sources, and contemporary documents such as inscriptions. Town planning, economic life, social groups, and population patterns in selected ancient cities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval.

GNHU361: Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of in-depth study of the archaeological evidence for a selected period, region, or other thematic topic within the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined. Special attention will be given to the role which archaeology plays in reconstructing the history of past cultures and to the Mediterranean archaeologist's frequent need to reconcile ancient written evidence with archaeologically obtained data. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, GNHU 282, HIST 282, GNHU 285 or GNHU 181.

GNHU362: Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is a practical introduction to how archaeology is conducted in the field at an ancient site in the Mediterranean world. Students learn basic techniques of surveying, digging, artifact removal and processing, and on-site record keeping as well as the overall organization of an archaeological project in the field. The course is given on-site at an appropriate excavation location. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: One of the following: A previous course in some aspect of Mediterranean archaeology; previous archaeological fieldwork experience; or permission of the instructor.