Fine Arts, Museum Management Concentration (M.A.) - Graduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Program Overview

The Master of Arts (MA) in Fine Arts, Museum Management concentration is an experiential and practice-oriented program which prepares students for work in museums of all kinds including those which display art or are focused on history, archeology, anthropology, science and natural history; as well as children's museums, auction houses, historical societies, and/or virtually any type of cultural institution.  The program is designed for individuals at any stage of career, serving both the advancement needs of individuals already working in cultural organizations and those seeking entry for the first time. Students learn the most current organizational practices, legal responsibilities, collections management, and exhibition techniques required to operate a range of institutions including museums, galleries and historic sites. Likewise, students develop a critical sense of the ethics and politics of such institutions, developing skills for fundraising and lobbying for their support. The Museum Management curriculum and courses are grounded in progressive teaching methodologies reflecting the highest standards of the profession.

The Master of Arts in Fine Arts, Museum Management Concentration is a program offered by the College of the Arts. Further information on the concentration, including faculty, facilities and admission requirements may be found on the Department of Art & Design and Graduate School websites.


FINE ARTS w/CONC: Museum Management

  1. PREREQUISITES

    Courses in Art History MAY be required by Graduate Program Coordinator based on review of undergraduate program.

    ARHT 100 Selected Masterpieces of World Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 101 Art in Non-Western Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 105 Art in Western Civilization: Ancient Through Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 106 Art in Western Civilization: Renaissance through Modern (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 190 Women and Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 191 African-American Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 200 Research Methods in Art History (3 hours seminar) 3
    ARHT 202 Field Trip in Art History 2-6
    ARHT 203 Modern Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 280 Asian Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 281 African Art: Sub-Saharan (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 290 American Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 301 History of the Print (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 302 History of Photography (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 303 History of Industrial Design (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 304 History of Textiles (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 321 Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 322 Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 331 Renaissance Art in Italy: The Fifteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 332 Renaissance Art in Italy: The Sixteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 336 Northern Renaissance Painting (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 340 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 350 Art of the Nineteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 352 Nineteenth Century American Painting (3 hour lecture) 3
    ARHT 360 Twentieth-Century Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 361 Modern Architecture (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 393 The Critical Approach (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 470 Contemporary Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 490 Selected Problems in Art History (3 hour lecture) 3
    ARHT 491 Independent Study: Art History (3 hours lecture) 2-8
    ARHT 499 Independent Study: Senior Thesis (BA Art History) 3
  2. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 36 semester hours including the following 5 requirement(s):

    1. CORE COURSES

      Complete 4 courses for 12 semester hours:

      ACCT 501 Financial Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHM 583 The Business of Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 505 Management Process and Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
      THTR 585 Grantsmanship and Fundraising (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

      ARHM 501 Museum Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHM 520 Exhibition Planning and Management 3
      ARHT 600 Graduate Methods of Research in Art History (3 hours seminar) 3
    3. SPECIALIZATION ELECTIVES

      Complete 2 courses in one area of Specialization to be selected in consultation with advisor.

      ANTH 510 Ethnology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 520 Anthropology and International Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 521 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 522 Environment and Community 3-4
      ANTH 523 Community & Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 529 Building Sustainable Communities 3-4
      ANTH 530 Development Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 533 Spanish Cultural Influences in the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 534 The Transmission of Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 536 Cultural Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 538 Ethnopsychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 540 Anthropology of Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 541 Culture and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 542 Contract Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 547 Woman: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 555 Anthropology of Institutional Life (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 565 Social Anthropology and History (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 570 Prehistoric North America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 601 Independent Anthropological Research 3
      ANTH 603 Reading Seminar in Anthropology (2 hours seminar) 2
      ARHT 501 Artists on Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 502 Field Trips in Art History 2-6
      ARHT 536 Northern Renaissance Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 540 European Art of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 590 Modern Philosophies of Art I (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 600 Graduate Methods of Research in Art History (3 hours seminar) 3
      ARHT 601 Selected Problems in Art History (3 hours seminar) 3
      ARHT 603 The American Collector and New York Museums (3 hours seminar) 3
      BIOL 500 Introductory Molecular Cell Biology (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
      BIOL 501 Biology of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 503 Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (4 hours lecture) 4
      BIOL 505 Experimental Cell Culture (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 510 Biology Pedagogy for Secondary Teachers (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 512 Topics in Modern Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 513 Instrumentation and Techniques for Biological Science (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 514 Graduate Seminar in Biology (2 hours seminar) 2
      BIOL 515 Population Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 516 Biogeography (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 518 Strategies for Teaching College Biology (1 hour lecture) 1
      BIOL 520 Plant Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 521 Field Studies of Flowering Plants (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 522 Plant Pathology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 523 Mycology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 529 Advanced Herpetology (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 531 Medical Parasitology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 532 Advanced Entomology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 533 Advanced Cell Biology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 540 Mammalian Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 542 Advanced Endocrinology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 543 Advances in Immunology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 544 Advanced Comparative Animal Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 545 Experimental Endocrinology (1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 546 Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 547 Molecular Biology I (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 548 Molecular Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 549 Topics in Developmental Biology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 550 Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 551 Intermediary Metabolism I (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 552 Biology of Lipids (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 553 Microbial Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 554 Microbial Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 555 Medical Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 556 Molecular Biology of Proteins (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 557 Virology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 558 Microbial Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 560 Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 561 Genomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 562 Short Topics in Molecular Biology (1 hour lecture) 1
      BIOL 563 Statistical Genomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 564 Proteomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 565 Advanced Plant Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 566 Bioinformatics (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 568 Advanced Neuroscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 570 Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 571 Physiological Plant Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 572 Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 573 Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 574 Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 575 Avian Biology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 576 Biology of Extreme Habitats (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 579 Physiological Ecology of Animals (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 580 Evolutionary Mechanisms (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 586 Selected Avanced Topics in Biology 3-4
      BIOL 587 Selected Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3-4
      BIOL 588 Selected Advanced Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3-4
      BIOL 589 Selected Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3-4
      BIOL 592 Graduate Colloquium (1 hour lecture) 1
      BIOL 593 Molecular Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 594 Signal Transduction (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 595 Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 596 Selected Techniques in Biology Science Education (1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab) 1.5
      BIOL 597 Research in Biological Literature 1
      BIOL 598 Selected Techniques in Molecular Biology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab) 1.5
      BIOL 599 Introduction to Biological Research 4
      BIOL 601 Advanced Biological Science Education Pedagogy (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 501 Teaching Chemistry in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 510 Hazardous Materials Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 521 Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 525 Bioinorganic Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 531 Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 532 Organic Synthesis (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 533 Biosynthesis of Natural Products (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 534 Chromatographic Methods: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 536 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 538 Drug Design in Medicinal Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 540 Chemical Thermodynamics (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 542 Theoretical Physical Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 544 Electrochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 546 Chemical Spectroscopy (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 548 Chemical Kinetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 550 Organometallic Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 570 Selected Topics in Advanced Biochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 574 Protein Structure (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 575 Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanisms (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 576 Lipid Biochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 577 Nucleic Acid Biochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 578 Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      CHEM 579 Biomolecular Assay Development (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      CHEM 582 Biochemical Pharmacology (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 590 Selected Topics-Advanced Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 595 Graduate Research 1-3
      CHEM 599 Graduate Literature Search in Chemistry 2
      CNFS 500 Curriculum Development in Environmental Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      CNFS 501 Outdoor Teaching Sites for Environmental Education 2
      CNFS 502 American Heritage Skills (2 hours lecture) 2
      CNFS 503 Humanities and the Environment 3
      CNFS 504 Field Techniques for Teaching the Humanities (3 hours lecture) 3
      CNFS 505 Society and the Natural Environment (2 hours lecture) 2
      CNFS 510 Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas 2
      CNFS 511 Field Investigation of Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas 1
      CNFS 521 Field Laboratory Experience in Outdoor Teaching Sites for Environmental Education 1
      CNFS 522 Field Laboratory Experience in American Heritage Skills 1
      CNFS 525 Field Laboratory Experience in Society and the Natural Environment 1
      CNFS 530 Workshop in Wildlife Management Education 1
      CNFS 595 Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
      CNFS 601 Advanced Environmental Education Seminar (2 hours seminar) 2
      CNFS 609 Independent Study in Environmental Curriculum Development 1-4
      CNFS 610 Administration and Supervision of Environmental Field Study (2 hours lecture) 2
      CNFS 620 Field Laboratory Experiences in Admin and Supervision of Environmental Field Study 1
      CNFS 621 Field Laboratory Experience in Environmental Education 1
      EAES 500 Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 501 Environmental Studies Physical (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 502 The Dynamic Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 503 Advanced Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 504 Landscapes in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 505 Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 507 Tectonics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 508 Field Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 509 Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 510 Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 511 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 520 Advanced Mineralogy (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 521 Optical Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 522 Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 523 Sedimentary Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 524 Igneous and Metamorphic Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 525 X-ray Microanalysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 526 Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 527 Organic Geoghemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 528 Environmental Forensics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 529 Instrumental Environmental Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 531 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 532 Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 533 Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 535 Geophysics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 540 Advanced Historical Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 541 Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 542 Advanced Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 543 Vertebrate Paleobiology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 545 Paleoecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 546 Micropaleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 547 Paleobotany (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 548 Biostratigraphy of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 550 Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 551 Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 559 Special Problems in the Marine Sciences 1-4
      EAES 560 Environmental Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 561 Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 562 Waste Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 563 Natural Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 564 Environmental Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 565 Environmental Change and Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 566 Environmental Problem Solving (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 567 Human Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 568 Environmental Studies-Social/Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 569 Air Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 570 Culture Regions (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 580 Problems in Economic Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 581 Urban Systems Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 582 Urban and Regional Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 583 Transportation Analysis and Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 584 Urban Studies and Policy Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 585 The Metropolitan Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 590 Independent Study in Environmental Studies 1-4
      EAES 591 Methods in Environmental Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 592 Pro Seminar (1-4 hours seminar) 1-4
      EAES 593 Research Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 594 Research in Geoscience Literature (1 hour lecture) 1
      EAES 599 Special Problems in Earth and Environmental Studies 1-4
      EAES 610 Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 611 Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 612 Seminar in Environmental Graphics (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 660 Seminar in Environmental Management (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 661 Instructional Design for Environmental Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 680 Reading Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies (2 hours seminar) 2
      EAES 681 Urban Studies Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      EAES 690 Research Project in Environmental Studies 3
      EAES 696 Research Project in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 501 New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 502 History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 511 Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 512 American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 513 Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 514 The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 515 Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 517 Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 518 Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 519 America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 520 United States Far Eastern Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 521 Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 522 Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 523 History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 524 History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 525 History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 526 The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 527 Industrialization of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 529 Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 532 Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 533 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 534 France of the Republics (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 535 Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 536 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 537 Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 540 Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 541 Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 550 African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 570 Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar) 3
      HIST 580 Seminar in Western History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 603 Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar) 2
    4. BUSINESS, LEGAL STUDIES & COMMUNICATION

      Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours from the following list

      CMST 520 Public Relations Writing and Media Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      CMST 555 Survey of Public and Organizational Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 501 International Business: Concepts and Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 530 Export Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 537 Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 551 Negotiation Theory and Practice (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      LAWS 558 Cross-Cultural Conflict Resolution (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 599 Selected Topics in Law and Governance (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 510 Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 513 Leadership and Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 525 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 501 Marketing Management (3 hours lecture) 3
    5. MASTERS THESIS

      1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

        ARHM 698 Master's Thesis in Museum Management 3
      2. Submit the completed Thesis original and one copy to the Graduate Office. See Thesis Guidelines for details.


Course Descriptions:

ACCT501: Financial Accounting (3 hours lecture)

A study of basic accounting concepts and their significance to the financial analyst and manager. Problems relating to income determination, valuation, reporting and analysis are stressed. Alternative conceptual foundations of reporting standards are presented and evaluated. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: M.B.A. degree students, M.A. Fine Arts majors with concentration in Museum Management or M.A. Theatre majors with concentration in Arts Management only.

ANTH510: Ethnology (3 hours lecture)

A graduate introduction to anthropological field research, human evolution, cultural variation, and anthropological approaches to modern world problems. 3 sh.

ANTH520: Anthropology and International Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the knowledge of how to apply anthropological concepts to the practical world of international business, diplomacy and service. It focuses on the integration of verbal and non-verbal communication, as well as on cultural and personal values in the context of differences (rather than similarities) between members of different countries/cultures. Emphasis is placed on educating students on how to interact and communicate in new cultural and/or international settings. 3 sh.

ANTH521: Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture)

Case studies of community conflict and decay, conflicts over immigration, problems of racial and cultural diversity, multiculturalism and cultural misunderstandings, role of education and the local school system, urban infrastructure and community decline, sprawl versus community, introduction to basics of program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH522: Environment and Community

How environmental change affects community structures and practices, social and cultural responses to environmental change, role of citizen organizations, government and other institutions in solving environmental problems, green building and certification, ecological community planning and design, urban planning aspects of community and environment, sustainable cities initiatives, case studies, program evaluation skills, environmental policy making, perceptions of the environment, environmental discourses, environmental justice. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH523: Community & Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH529: Building Sustainable Communities

This course will analyze selected case studies of community development programs nationally and internationally and evaluate their implications for community development in New Jersey. Topics will include the importance of citizen participation, inclusion of people with disabilities, aging in place, localization theory, smart growth, ecovillages, cohousing, permaculture, community supported agriculture, community land trusts, and community developent banks and corporations. Program evaluation skills will be integrated into the topics. 3 - 4 sh.

ANTH530: Development Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

A critical review of theories of development with emphasis on anthropological contributions to development debates. Selected case study examination of the role of anthropologists in formulating, executing, and evaluating development programs and projects. 3 sh.

ANTH533: Spanish Cultural Influences in the United States (3 hours lecture)

The cultural heritage of Spanish-speaking America. Utilizing anthropological concepts, problems of adjustment and educational implications are emphasized. 3 sh.

ANTH534: The Transmission of Culture (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on formal and informal processes of cultural transmission and renewal. Emphasis on the relationship of individuals to their cultures and problems of generational continuity and cultural revitalization. Anthropological strategies for educational research are explored. 3 sh.

ANTH536: Cultural Diversity (3 hours lecture)

Descriptive, historical and theoretical anthropological works provide the basis for studying likenesses and differences among folk and urban cultures, their historic development, and interrelationships between differing aspects of culture. 3 sh.

ANTH538: Ethnopsychology (3 hours lecture)

This is an interdisciplinary course on convergencies of theoretical and methodological concepts from anthropology and psychology. There is a cross-cultural focus on the relationship of culture to personality, cognition, stress, mental disorders, and aging. Cross listed with Psychology, PSYC 538. 3 sh.

ANTH540: Anthropology of Cities (3 hours lecture)

This course constitutes an examination of urbanism and the process of urbanization from a cross-cultural, comparative perspective. The course is designed to expose the student to the major conceptual models of urban communities, cities, nation states and the world system. We will study the works of scholars who have engaged in debates about these complex sociocultural formations. 3 sh.

ANTH541: Culture and Thought (3 hours lecture)

How different peoples organize and use their cultures; data from formal ethnography, semantic analysis, ethnoscience and componential analysis for purposes of studying culture and building culture theories. 3 sh.

ANTH542: Contract Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course provides a comprehensive knowledge of cultural resource surveys. Included is the study of the federal and state legislation governing contract archaeology. Other topics include: ethics, reading engineering plans, interviewing local informants, conducting documentary research and discussing various subsurface testing strategies. To gain practical experience, the student is required to prepare a cultural resource survey. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ANTH547: Woman: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture)

Physiological and psychological aspects of women studied cross-culturally, and their implications for contemporary society. Morphological and psychological developments from conception to death in various cultures, inferences about the roles of women in American society. Cross listed with Psychology, PSYC 547. 3 sh.

ANTH555: Anthropology of Institutional Life (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the relationship between culture, society, personality and institutional life. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between formal organizations and public interests. 3 sh.

ANTH565: Social Anthropology and History (3 hours lecture)

The relationship of social anthropology to history. The study of history as a cultural system, sources and methods utilized in reconstructing the histories of preliterate societies, and the inarticulate sectors in complex societies. 3 sh.

ANTH570: Prehistoric North America (3 hours lecture)

General background in Native American archaeology, and theory and method in this subdiscipline. Selected culture areas and problems relating to time depth, cultural interaction, and the nature of archaeological evidence north of Mexico. 3 sh.

ANTH601: Independent Anthropological Research

Directed research towards the preparation of a written paper on a topic of theoretical importance in anthropology. A tutorial without formal class meetings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ANTH603: Reading Seminar in Anthropology (2 hours seminar)

Required of all M.A. candidates concentrating in anthropology. Directed independent study in preparation for 3 hour comprehensive examination. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: 6 hours in anthropology and permission of the instructor.

ARHM501: Museum Management (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates museums of different disciplines, object- or collections-based organizations, private collections, and commercial galleries, auction and government organizations, their different missions and organizational structure. Students are acquainted with visitor analysis, budgeting, financing, marketing and public relations. Students are also familiarized with ethical and legal issues concerning the field. Students participating in this course are required to serve as interns in a museum or arts organization if possible in their area of specialization. 3 sh.

ARHM520: Exhibition Planning and Management

The course investigates different types of exhibitions and discusses their usage and effectiveness in different disciplines, museums and other institutions which present animate or inanimate collections to the public. Students are familiarized with exhibition planning, preparation, management and maintenance. The course involves an internship component at The Montclair State Art Galleries which includes completion of praxis related assignments. 3 sh.

ARHM583: The Business of Art (3 hours lecture)

The course is designed to provide an overview of the economic, organizational and social factors that influence contemporary art organizations. The students will examine structures, practices and issues concerning the visual and performing arts in the nonprofit, government and commercial sectors. Structures to be studied include theatres, dance companies, art galleries and museums, arts councils, presenting organizations, orchestras and other music groups. The student will analyze the impact of unions and professional organizations on these structures. With an introduction to various practices including audience development, fund-raising, grantsmanship, lobbying, advocacy, planning and organizational development, this course prepares the student for more extensive and advanced work in the Arts Management concentration. Cross listed with Theatre and Dance, THTR 583. 3 sh.

ARHM698: Master's Thesis in Museum Management

Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take ARHM 699 if they don't complete ARHM 698 within the semester. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

ARHT100: Selected Masterpieces of World Art (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to key works of art representing prehistoric cultures, the ancient world, the East, the Renaissance, and the Modern period; museum and gallery trips, reading and discussion. For non-art majors. Previous course ARHS 217 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT101: Art in Non-Western Societies (3 hours lecture)

A consideration of the role of art in traditional non-western societies. Includes an examination of the integration of art into the society as a whole-the religions, economics, environment, and social order. The role art plays in social change and how it is affected by social change. Meets the Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 220 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT105: Art in Western Civilization: Ancient Through Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The history of Western art, architecture, and material culture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages: Paleolithic and Neolithic art; ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art; Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic art. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for Fine Arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Animation and Illustration, Fine Arts, and Graphic Design. Previous course ARHS 105 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT106: Art in Western Civilization: Renaissance through Modern (3 hours lecture)

The history of Western art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present: the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romantic, Impressionist, and Modern Periods. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for Fine Arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Animation and Illustration, Fine Arts, and Graphic Design. Previous course ARHS 106 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT190: Women and Art (3 hours lecture)

The role and status of women in art from the Old Stone Age through the present; women artists and the visual culture of women in Western culture; depictions of women in the arts. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 108 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT191: African-American Art (3 hours lecture)

Afro-American art in the United States from colonial times to the present. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ARHT200: Research Methods in Art History (3 hours seminar)

Bibliographic and other resources necessary for scholarly research in the visual arts; the writing of the research paper; special problems and methodology of art history. Required for Art History majors. Previous course ARHS 200 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 105 and ARHT 106 or departmental approval.

ARHT202: Field Trip in Art History

Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed twelve undergraduate credits. First-hand contact with the art forms and visual culture of the places visited; study of monuments in the field and works in museums and galleries. Subject(s) defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. Fulfills the Special Topics required for majors. Previous course ARHS 480 effective through Spring 2012. 2 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 105, ARHT 106, ENWR 105, or HONP 100.

ARHT203: Modern Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture)

The work of major writers about art from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the present day; the nature of the creative experience and process, the function of art in the life of the individual and of society, the rise of new materials and institutions; the development of sentiments and attitudes affecting thinking in the field. Fulfills the Twentieth Century requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 250 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT280: Asian Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of China, Korea, Japan, India, and Southeast Asia. How Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam commerce and migration shaped traditional Asian arts and societies. Specific focus defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits by permission of department. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 327 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT281: African Art: Sub-Saharan (3 hours lecture)

The art and material cultures of Africa from prehistoric remains to contemporary art: stylistic groupings; relation to ceremony and to daily life; symbolism; and relations to the arts of other cultures. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 458 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT290: American Art (3 hours lecture)

Art in the United States from the colonial period through the nineteenth century; the development of an American style in the light of its relationship to and dependence upon European art. Previous course ARHS 329 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 105, ARHT 106, ARHT 190, ARHT 191, ENWR 105, HONP 100, or departmental approval.

ARHT301: History of the Print (3 hours lecture)

The principal types of prints in Western and non-western cultures, from their beginnings to the present day. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 230 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT302: History of Photography (3 hours lecture)

The roots of photography, its practitioners and the social and historical circumstances surrounding its creation. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 477 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT303: History of Industrial Design (3 hours lecture)

The history of Industrial Design is traced from the industrial revolution to the present day. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 370 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT304: History of Textiles (3 hours lecture)

Great textile traditions of the world. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 276 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT314: Greek Art (3 hours lecture)

Greek art and material culture including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 328 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT315: Roman Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 485 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT321: Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The emergence and development of early Christian, Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art from Late Antiquity through Iconoclasm and the early Middle Ages. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 322 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT322: Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic (3 hours lecture)

The art and material culture of the High Middle Ages: how religious reform, crusade, and pilgrimage shaped the arts of Europe and Byzantium; Christian, Jewish, and Islamic art. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 323 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT331: Renaissance Art in Italy: The Fifteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture during the Quattrocento; Masaccio, Mantegna, Donatello, Brunelleschi, and Alberti emphasized. Fulfills the Renaissance requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 216 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT332: Renaissance Art in Italy: The Sixteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

The great masters of the Cinquecento: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione and Titan; the emergence of Mannerist art and architecture in Rome, Venice, Florence and Bologna. Fulfills the Renaissance requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 452 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT336: Northern Renaissance Painting (3 hours lecture)

Fifteenth and sixteenth century painting in northern Europe with particular attention to Flanders and Holland; emphasis on Jan Van Eyck, Van Der Weyden, Bosch, Peter Bruegel and Matthias Gruenewald. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 324 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT340: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art (3 hours lecture)

The art and material culture of Western Europe from 1600 to 1800; Baroque and Rococo styles with emphasis on El Greco, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Poussin and Watteau. Fulfills the Baroque requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 325 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT350: Art of the Nineteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

The major movements in nineteenth-century art: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, as seen in painting, sculpture, prints, and objects of material culture. Relationship of the art to political, social, cultural, and economic factors during this period. Fulfills the Nineteenth-century art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 459 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT352: Nineteenth Century American Painting (3 hour lecture)

Painting in the United States during the nineteenth century; portrait, landscape and genre traditions; the Hudson River school, the genre painters, the expatriates and the independents; folk and naif paintings. Some knowledge of European painting is desirable. Fulfills the Nineteenth-century art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 461 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT360: Twentieth-Century Art (3 hours lecture)

From Picasso to the end of the Twentieth-century: Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimalism; scientific and social forces transforming the artist's vision, including the theories of Freud and Bergson. Fulfills the Twentieth century requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 469 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT361: Modern Architecture (3 hours lecture)

Major contributions to the development of modern architecture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the development of styles, structural innovations and theories of design. Fulfills the Twentieth Century/Contemporary requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 450 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT393: The Critical Approach (3 hours lecture)

Historical criticism, criteria in art criticism, and an analysis of the critical process. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 326 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT470: Contemporary Art (3 hours lecture)

The work of major artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with particular reference to the dominant ideas and visual culture of the period; readings, museum trips, discussion of contemporary writing and criticism. Fulfills the Twentieth century/Contemporary requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 451 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 350 and ARHT 360.

ARHT490: Selected Problems in Art History (3 hour lecture)

A seminar in topics such as the works of an individual artist or a particular theme in art history (e.g. the human figure) or a particular technique (e.g. sculpture); lectures, reports, museum and studio visits, discussion. May be repeated seven times for a maximum of 24.0 credits. Previous course ARHS 455 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 105, ARHT 106, ARHT 350 and ARHT 360.

ARHT491: Independent Study: Art History (3 hours lecture)

Independent study. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. Previous course ARHS 483 effective through Spring 2012. 2 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 350, ARHT 360 and departmental approval.

ARHT499: Independent Study: Senior Thesis (BA Art History)

With art history faculty advisement, each Senior Art History major will conduct a course of research in art history and complete a scholarly paper. Previous course ARHS 484 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 200 and any 300-level ARHT course; or departmental approval.

ARHT501: Artists on Art (3 hours lecture)

A selection of writings by artists on art are presented, including theoretical writings, excerpts from diaries and letters, manifestoes, interviews, etc. The class is designed as a seminar focusing on analysis, interpretation, and discussion of these primary sources. Previous course ARHS 581 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT502: Field Trips in Art History

Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed twelve graduate credits. Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed twelve undergraduate credits. First-hand contact with the art forms and visual culture of the places visited; study of monuments in the field and works in museums and galleries. Subject(s) to be defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. Previous course ARHS 680 effective through Spring 2012. 2 - 6 sh.

ARHT536: Northern Renaissance Art (3 hours lecture)

15th and 16th century paintings in northern Europe - especially Italy, Flanders and Holland; the development of Realism and style in relation to social change and the general ideas of the period, including contemporary music. Jan Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Bosch, Peter Breughel and Matthias Gruenewald. Previous course ARHS 594 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT540: European Art of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (3 hours lecture)

Principal developments in painting, sculpture, architecture and related arts during the Baroque and Rococo periods as affected by contemporary political, religious and economic factors. Artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velazquez, Rembrandt, Rubens, Watteau and Hogarth. Previous course ARHS 540 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT590: Modern Philosophies of Art I (3 hours lecture)

Major writers in art in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The nature of the creative experience; art in the life of the individual and of society; the creative process; new materials; institutions and sentiments affecting current thinking in the field. Discussions based on readings of philosophers, poets, social scientists and psychologists. Previous course ARHS 590 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT600: Graduate Methods of Research in Art History (3 hours seminar)

Introduction to the approaches, methods and goals of art-historical research, including descriptive, bibliographic, stylistic, and iconographic analysis. Previous course ARHS 503 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT601: Selected Problems in Art History (3 hours seminar)

Art problems, iconographic topics and themes of a historic, social and philosophical nature. Topic selection will depend upon the special areas of the professor or guest professor invited for the semester. May be repeated seven times for a maximum of 24.0 credits. Previous course ARHS 592 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT603: The American Collector and New York Museums (3 hours seminar)

The history of American art collecting is studied using the private collections that are now incorporated into museums in New York City. The contents of these collections, the ways they are housed, and the role of museum as educational institution will be examined in light of social and cultural ideals. Discussions based on readings and field trips. Previous course ARHS 580 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

BIOL500: Introductory Molecular Cell Biology (1.5 hours lecture)

This course will focus on an introduction to the science and methods of cell and molecular biology. 1.5 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate advisor.

BIOL501: Biology of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

The course is designed to introduce the student in the graduate program in human sexuality and family life education to human anatomy and physiology, human genetics, endocrinology of the reproductive system and human developmental biology. These fields of knowledge are necessary in order to adequately understand and teach others about human sexuality, as well as to adequately counsel those who require assistance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Open only to graduate students in the College of Education and Human Services.

BIOL503: Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (4 hours lecture)

This course is designed for pre-service teachers and considers the standards-based objectives, curricula, planning, instructional strategies, materials, assessment, health and safety, and legal responsibilities in the secondary science program. The use of technology in the science program will be emphasized. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Teachers Education program for P-12 science certification.

BIOL505: Experimental Cell Culture (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This graduate course will provide theoretical and practical experience working on living cells. Provides understanding, observation, and hands-on experiences in tissue and organ culture techniques, primary cell culturing, cell differentiation, and techniques in toxicity and mutagenicity assays, plant callus and protopast experimentation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 380, or similar Genetics course with passing grade and a previous Microbiology course or experience.

BIOL510: Biology Pedagogy for Secondary Teachers (3 hours lecture)

Seminar and research course designed for study of methods and practices being used in teaching of secondary school biology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: 24 semester hours in biology.

BIOL512: Topics in Modern Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Seminar course. Selected topics from current development in genetic research, including chromosome and gene fine structure, extra chromosomal genetic elements, genetic engineering, and aspects of biomedical genetic research. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in genetics.

BIOL513: Instrumentation and Techniques for Biological Science (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

This course is designed to acquaint students with modern analytical and research techniques in biology, including manometry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, microbial batch growth and assay techniques, immunotechniques and evaluation of experimental design and data. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: 24 semester hours in biology.

BIOL514: Graduate Seminar in Biology (2 hours seminar)

Through a series of seminars delivered by faculty and guests, students will survey a broad range of topics in modern biology, and be introduced to the variety of specializations represented within the department. Emphasis shall be placed on recent advances in diverse areas of biology. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate biology majors only.

BIOL515: Population Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Detailed survey of the theory and application of the genetics of popoulations. Topics to be covered include Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and Evolution, Natural and Artificial Selection, Migration, Mutation, Bottlenecks, Random Genetic Drift, and Genetic Variation. Students will learn population genetic principles and the mathematical theory behind those principles. Students will be required to write a literature paper on a topic of their choice related to Population Genetics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or permission of instructor.

BIOL516: Biogeography (3 hours lecture)

Distribution of plants and animals of the world on continents and continental and oceanic islands and in various climatic zones. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Field course in biology.

BIOL518: Strategies for Teaching College Biology (1 hour lecture)

Biology Teaching Assistants and upper-level undergraduates with interests in teaching will interact with experienced teachers, but more importantly will gain access to a forum for discussing their experiences and concerns with other prospective biology teachers. Students will discuss contemporary articles on science teaching at the college level. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: B.S. in Biology and departmental approval.

BIOL520: Plant Physiology (3 hours lecture)

Investigation of physiology of plants. Plant growth, development and reproduction as well as the new advances in plant physiology. Water relations of plants, mineral nutrition, physiological significance of soil and soil moisture, photosynthesis, respiration, plant biosynthesis and dynamics of growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

BIOL521: Field Studies of Flowering Plants (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

The taxonomy, evolutionary trends and ecological adaptations of the gymnosperms and angiosperms. A variety of habitats will be visited and analyzed. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and field course in biology.

BIOL522: Plant Pathology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Causes, symptoms, and control of plant diseases. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and microbiology.

BIOL523: Mycology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Identification, and classification of fungi. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and microbiology.

BIOL529: Advanced Herpetology (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab)

Biology of the extant ectothermic tetrapods (amphibians and non-avian reptiles), including field identification, systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, reproduction, and ecology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 113.

BIOL531: Medical Parasitology (3 hours lecture)

To study the phenomenon of parasitism as applied to man and his domestic animals. Areas of emphasis include specific adaptations for parasitism and transmission, effects on the host, epidemiology and control. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Zoology.

BIOL532: Advanced Entomology (3 hours lecture)

Examination of insects as model systems for biological inquiry. Topics include an integrative treatment of insect molecular biology, genetics, physiology, behavior, evolution and ecology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in M.S. Biology program or permission of instructor.

BIOL533: Advanced Cell Biology (3 hours lecture)

Detailed analysis of cellular structure and function. Topics to be covered include the role of subcellular organelles in maintaining cell viability, analysis of cytoskeletal components, structure and function of the plasma membrane and cellular defects that lead to cancer and other disease states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the biology master's program or permission of professor.

BIOL540: Mammalian Physiology (3 hours lecture)

A broad survey of the physiology of mammalian systems aimed at graduate students who lack an upper-level background in physiology at the undergraduate level. The principles of homeostatis mechanisms as they apply to various organ systems will be stressed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, but not open to students who have completed undergraduate upper division Mammalian/Human Physiology classes.

BIOL542: Advanced Endocrinology (3 hours lecture)

A study of the physiology of the mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on hormonal control of homeostasis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Endocrinology and cell biology.

BIOL543: Advances in Immunology (3 hours lecture)

To study in detail selected topics in immunology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Immunology.

BIOL544: Advanced Comparative Animal Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

The physiological mechanisms involved in the varied responses of both vertebrates and invertebrates to critical fluctuations of their physico-chemical environment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in Biology or permission of instructor. Students who have previously completed BIOL451 may not enroll.

BIOL545: Experimental Endocrinology (1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab)

A seminar and laboratory course in endocrinology in which the various endocrine glands will be surgically removed or chemically destroyed and the morphologic and physiologic effects measured and observed. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Endocrinology.

BIOL546: Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture)

To give the student an in-depth understanding of a specific area of physiology in which there is a rapidly expanding body of knowledge. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: An undergraduate or graduate course in Physiology and permission of the department.

BIOL547: Molecular Biology I (3 hours lecture)

Central concepts at the cellular level will be emphasized. Contemporary viewpoints in the areas of biomolecules, energy yielding and energy requiring processes and transfer of genetic information. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Cell biology, and one year organic chemistry.

BIOL548: Molecular Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Central concepts at the cellular level will be emphasized. Contemporary viewpoints in the areas of biomolecules, energy yielding and energy requiring processes and transfer of genetic information. The laboratory will deal with up-to-date investigative procedures via selected experiments. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL549: Topics in Developmental Biology (3 hours lecture)

Seminar in the regulation of developmental events, including both classical morphogenesis and recent advances using techniques of cell and molecular biology. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Genetics and developmental embryology.

BIOL550: Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture)

Coverage of selected topics such as the microbial genetics, antibiotic action, bacteriophage, virus, cancer and microbial metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications of modern research in specific areas. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL551: Intermediary Metabolism I (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of interrelationships of catabolic and anabolic paths. Primary emphasis is placed on the metabolism of nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and proteins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry and cell biology.

BIOL552: Biology of Lipids (3 hours lecture)

Biological cycles, unity and diversity in metabolic paths, metabolic evolution, metabolic control mechanisms and other special topics. Primary emphasis is placed on the metabolism of lipids. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Cell biology and organic chemistry.

BIOL553: Microbial Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Exploration of the essential role of microorganisms in the ecosystem. Lecture, field trips and laboratory will demonstrate the ubiquitous and highly adaptive evolution of microorganisms, their interrelationships and their profound influence on the biosphere. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL554: Microbial Physiology (3 hours lecture)

A study of microorganisms in terms of their morphology and metabolism. The significance of metabolic diversity and secondary metabolic products of various microorganisms will be explored through lecture topics. The economic significance of microbial metabolism in relation to industry and pathogenic diseases will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL555: Medical Genetics (3 hours lecture)

A detailed study and analysis of human genetics, inborn genetic diseases, genomics, gene therapy, and the Human Genome Project. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A genetics course or permission of instructor.

BIOL556: Molecular Biology of Proteins (3 hours lecture)

Study of the molecular biology of biomolecules, including proteins. The course will examine how changes in the three dimensional structure of biomolecules affect their biological function. Protein engineering, enzyme catalysis, and site-directed mutagenesis will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission into the graduate biology program or permission of department.

BIOL557: Virology (3 hours lecture)

This course will develop the fundamental principles of modern virology and examine the connection between viruses and disease. It will examine the molecular biology of virus replication, infection, gene expression, the structure of virus particles and genomes, pathogenesis, classification of viruses, and contemporary viral research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of a Cell & Molecular Biology course or permission of instructor.

BIOL558: Microbial Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Microbial Genetics provides students with an understanding of the basis for genetic processes in microorganisms and the implication for higher organisms. The focus of the course will be on prokaryotes, particularily E.coli, and viruses, primarily bacteriophages. Current developments in microbial genetics, such as bioinformatics and genomics, will be presented. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 350, Microbiology.

BIOL560: Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture)

A course that will focus on biological research problems that are being addressed in eucaryotic systems from a molecular genetics viewpoint. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 with a grade of "B" or better.

BIOL561: Genomics (3 hours lecture)

Describes the entire DNA sequence of organisms. Faciltates the understanding of the function of the genomes. Specific topics include comparative genomics, functional genomics and bioinformantics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 380 or permission of instructor.

BIOL562: Short Topics in Molecular Biology (1 hour lecture)

Focus on specific topics in molecular biology including the development induced pleuripotent cells, advances in RNA interference and recent innovations in understanding transcriptional regulation. Emphasis will be placed on providing the most up to date information on these topics. May be taken for up to 6 credits as long as the topics are different. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL563: Statistical Genomics (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the statistical problems arising recently in gene mapping, high throughputomic data analysis, phylogenetics and sequence analysis by integrating of both statistics and genomics. To learn the statistical methods and concepts that are of particular use in analyzing genetics and genomic data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 and STAT 401 or equivalent Statistics course as determined by department.

BIOL564: Proteomics (3 hours lecture)

Proteomics is the study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by a genome. This course will describe the structure of the proteins in the proteome and the functional interaction between the proteins and cover the development of large-scale technologies for protein separation, isolation, detection and quantitation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL565: Advanced Plant Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on plant molecular biology and genetics and how plant systems differ from other eucaryotic systems at a cellular level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547, minimum grade of B.

BIOL566: Bioinformatics (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Describes the computational analysis of gene sequences, protein structures, and expression datasets on a large scale. Provides a way in which to manage and store huge amounts of data, and to create statistical tools for analyzing it. Specific topics include biological database search tools, DNA sequence alignment and comparison, analysis of protein structure, and phylogenetics analysis, as well as topics of current interest. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL568: Advanced Neuroscience (3 hours lecture)

The students will achieve an understanding of current concepts of nervous system function at the cellular level and at the level of higher systems and brain. The students will learn about the state of the art methods in modern neuroscience research and their applications. They will summarize and critique primary research papers and develop research proposals based on the acquired knowledge and their vision of future progress in neuroscience. A particular attention will be given to the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neurological diseases, and to current scientific approaches to treatment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or departmental approval.

BIOL570: Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Basic ecological principles and concepts. Habitat approach to field exercises in fresh water and terrestrial ecology. Intra and interspecific relationships with all living members of the ecosystem, problems in plant and animal biology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and zoology.

BIOL571: Physiological Plant Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

The effects of soil, light, and water on plant growth, as well as, toxic effects of metals and salinity are measured using growth chamber and greenhouse facilities. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and one course in field biology.

BIOL572: Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Important biotic, chemical and physical parameters of New Jersey's estuaries. Evolution and successional trends of estuarine communities. Ecology of individual communities studied by field trips to Delaware Bay shore and to some Atlantic coast bays, marshes and offshore barrier islands. Also offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL573: Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Community structure, trophic dynamics, species diversity and distribution of bottom dwelling organisms in relationship to their environment; lectures, laboratory work and field investigations of the marine benthos. Also offered at NJ Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL574: Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture)

This seminar course explains the ecological consequences of animal behavior, viewed within the context of how behavior evolves and how populations adapt to their environments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Field biology and zoology.

BIOL575: Avian Biology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

An in-depth examination of the biology and life histories of birds, including their anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and systematics. Laboratory includes field trips on a varying schedule. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 570 or permission of instructor.

BIOL576: Biology of Extreme Habitats (3 hours lecture)

The course will describe the adaptations that allow the survival of plants and animals, as well as microorganisms, in a variety of extreme habitats. Some of these habitats include: deserts, arctic, grassland, estuaries. 3 sh.

BIOL579: Physiological Ecology of Animals (3 hours lecture)

A variety of different animals, ranging from protists to mammals, will be examined and compared to demonstrate the physiological adaptations they have evolved to successfully survive and reproduce. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Biology or permission of instructor.

BIOL580: Evolutionary Mechanisms (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students the opportunity to read primary resource material and interpret the findings of the data. This course will also teach students how to read, critique and present scientific data to a peer group. Students will analyze, discuss and present primary research articles with respect to scientific content, accuracy of the data and significance of the experiments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the biology master's program or permission of the instructor.

BIOL586: Selected Avanced Topics in Biology

This course is designed to provide advanced biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in ecology, physiology, molecular biology, embryology and bioinformatics. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree. This course may be repeated once for a maximum of 8.0 credits. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 520 or BIOL 540 or BIOL 547 or BIOL 570.

BIOL587: Selected Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide advanced biology and molecular biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in molecular biology. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree and the molecular biology masters degree. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL588: Selected Advanced Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide advanced biology and molecular biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in physiology. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree and the molecular biology masters degree. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 520 or BIOL 540.

BIOL589: Selected Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide advanced biology and molecular biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in ecology. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree and the molecular biology masters degree. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 570.

BIOL592: Graduate Colloquium (1 hour lecture)

Students in this course will read primary resource material and interpret the data. This course will also teach students how to read, critique and present scientific data to a peer group. Students will analyze, discuss and present primary research articles with respect to scientific content, accuracy of the data and significance of the experiments. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the biology master's program or permission of the professor.

BIOL593: Molecular Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Detailed survey of the application of molecular methods to address ecological, behavioral, and conservation questions. Topics to be covered include the principles of most common molecular techniques used in molecular ecology, and application of those molecular techniques to phylogeography, behavioral ecology, population genetics, conservation genetics, and adaptive variation. Students will develop and present independent research proposal. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or instructor's permission.

BIOL594: Signal Transduction (3 hours lecture)

This course will cover various aspects of cellular signaling from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Topics will include specific signal transduction systems, methods for studying these systems and the results of these signaling events on cell division, cell differentiation and cell function. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or permission of instructor.

BIOL595: Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture)

This course addresses concerns about the loss of biological diversity and genetic resources through species extinctions. Students will learn about the importance of maintaining biological diversity, the problems involved in monitoring and protecting sensitive and crucial habitat, the impact of human societies on biodiversity, the alternatives to the destruction of habitat/species, the prospects of restoration, and the policies needed to prevent the loss of biological diversity. Students will also learn about population processes that are directly related to species survival. This course is cross listed with CNFS 595. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL596: Selected Techniques in Biology Science Education (1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab)

A laboratory course that trains teachers in manipulatives suitable for secondary biology education. Students will be introduced to a variety of physiological, ecological, molecular biological techniques applicable for implementation in secondary school classrooms. May be repeated three more times for a total of six semester hours. 1.5 sh.

Prerequisites: Biology teaching certification or approval of instructor.

BIOL597: Research in Biological Literature

To allow the student to investigate and evaluate a specific topic in biology under the supervision of a faculty member and to develop the student's skills in presenting current research in both the written and oral modes. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

BIOL598: Selected Techniques in Molecular Biology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab)

A laboratory course that trains students in advanced techniques in molecular biology. Students will learn how to perform a specific technique as well as learning the theory behind the technique. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 1.5 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate or graduate molecular biology courses or equivalent and permission of instructor.

BIOL599: Introduction to Biological Research

A research experience in which students will be exposed to current biologic techniques by working with scientific investigators in industry, or within the department. Students will work on projects involving research techniques, data collection and the analysis and interpretation of the data. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

BIOL601: Advanced Biological Science Education Pedagogy (3 hours lecture)

This course aims for the development of an understanding of the pedagogy of inquiry-based learning and of the processes of scientific investigation and reasoning, as well as other factors influencing effective teaching (e.g. equity issues, assessment methods, and communication skills). Modeling of the inquiry-based approach will be applied to a range of scientific concepts, focusing on biological concepts such as natural selection, meiosis and Mendelian genetics, and photosynthesis. As these concepts are explored, relevant science education literature will be examined in order to understand the nature of student conceptions as well as broader issues of constructivist and situated learning and implications of philosophy and sociology of science for science education. 3 sh.

CHEM501: Teaching Chemistry in the Secondary School (3 hours lecture)

Study of objectives, recent trends, methods of presentation, courses of study, lesson planning, instructional aids, and subject matter of high school chemistry. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: 16 semester hours in chemistry.

CHEM510: Hazardous Materials Management (3 hours lecture)

Exploration of the physical and chemical characteristics of hazardous chemicals, hazardous waste, and mixed waste materials. Their sources, handling, transportation, storage, disposal, and regulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 230 or equivalent. For majors in College of Sciences and Mathematics or instructor's permission.

CHEM521: Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

Current theories of inorganic structure, reactions and properties. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One year of physical chemistry.

CHEM525: Bioinorganic Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

Exploration of the vital roles that metal atoms play in biochemical processes. Transition metal interactions with proteins will be emphasized. The course will focus on the structural, regulatory, catalytic, transport, and oxidation-reduction functions of metal containing biomolecules. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II) or instructor's permission.

CHEM531: Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

Modern theories of organic chemistry with emphasis on electronic theory and reaction mechanisms. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 430 (Advanced Organic Chemistry).

CHEM532: Organic Synthesis (3 hours lecture)

Detailed study of the art, methods, and the philosophy of organic synthesis beginning with a review of classical and modern synthetic methods, followed by the planning theory of synthesis and culminating in a study of elegant syntheses in the literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 430 (Advanced Organic Chemistry).

CHEM533: Biosynthesis of Natural Products (3 hours lecture)

A study of natural products with emphasis on the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 430 (Advanced Organic Chemistry) or equivalent.

CHEM534: Chromatographic Methods: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

A combined lecture/hands-on course in the theory and practice of chromatography; including GC, HPLC, GC-MS, GPC, and SFC, as well as computerized instrument control, data acquistion, and processing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 310 (Analytical Chemistry) and 311 (Instrumental Analysis) or equivalents.

CHEM536: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

A combination lecture/hands-on course utilizing the department's FT-NMR's to provide students with theoretical background and practical experience in modern 1-D and 2-D FT-NMR. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 310 (Analytical Chemistry) and 311 (Instrumental Analysis) or equivalents.

CHEM538: Drug Design in Medicinal Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive course covering the design and action of pharmaceutical agents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation into the graduate program or permission of instructor.

CHEM540: Chemical Thermodynamics (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of classical thermodynamics. Development of thermodynamic functions describing chemical systems in equilibrium, with emphasis on systems of variable composition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II) or instructor's permission.

CHEM542: Theoretical Physical Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical development of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics as applied to chemistry. Application of theoretical procedures to atomic and molecular structure and bonding. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II) and MATH 420 (Differential Equations).

CHEM544: Electrochemistry (3 hours lecture)

Principles and application of electrochemistry, relationship of electrochemical principles to classical thermodynamics, and practical applications of electrochemistry. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II).

CHEM546: Chemical Spectroscopy (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the theory of molecular spectroscopy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II).

CHEM548: Chemical Kinetics (3 hours lecture)

Kinetics in its role of elucidating reaction mechanisms. Discussion of recent problems from the chemical literature including fast reactions and enzyme kinetics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II).

CHEM550: Organometallic Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to organometallic chemistry, mainly involving transition metals, but also including some main group metals. The material covered will focus on the unique chemistry of these compounds and their uses in organic synthesis, material science, and as catalysts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 420 and CHEM 430 or equivalents.

CHEM570: Selected Topics in Advanced Biochemistry (3 hours lecture)

A detailed treatment of selected topics in biochemistry. Special emphasis upon recent developments. Protein structure, enzymology, metabolism, nucleic acid chemistry are examples of topics. This course may be repeated for credit indefinitely as long as the topic is different each time. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 or instructor's permission.

CHEM574: Protein Structure (3 hours lecture)

Primary, secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, protein structural motifs and protein structural families. Globular proteins, DNA binding proteins, membrane proteins, signal transduction systems, immune system protein structure, methods used for determination of protein structure. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One semester of introductory Biochemistry or similar background.

CHEM575: Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanisms (3 hours lecture)

The following properties of enzymes are considered: structure, specificity, catalytic power, mechanism of action, multienzyme complexes, kinetics, regulation, and multienzyme systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 or equivalent.

CHEM576: Lipid Biochemistry (3 hours lecture)

Chemistry of plant and animal lipids, their occurrence, metabolism, and industrial uses. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 or equivalent.

CHEM577: Nucleic Acid Biochemistry (3 hours lecture)

This course will present fundamental aspects of nucleic acid biochemistry including structure and biological function and will be organized according to a systematic consideration of techniques used in the study of nucleic acids. Current literature and key topics such as protein-DNA, protein-drug complexes and nucleic acid repair mechanisms will be considered. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 or equivalent.

CHEM578: Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Fundamental techniques used to isolate, characterize, and study nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Theory and application of buffers, spectrophotometry, tissue fractionation, centrifugation, extraction, chromatographic separations, electrophoresis, radioactivity, enzyme purification and dinetics, enzymatic assays, NMR and MS structure determination. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 or equivalent.

CHEM579: Biomolecular Assay Development (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

This course will provide the student with hands-on experience of state of the art techniques used for drug discovery research in the pharmaceutical industry. These techniques include assay development for high throughput screening and molecular docking methods for lead discovery. Using these techniques will allow the student to understand the drug discovery process, which includes a dialogue between crystallographers, medicinal chemists, biochemists, and biologists. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 or instructor's permission.

CHEM582: Biochemical Pharmacology (3 hours lecture)

How drugs interact with, and influence biochemical pathways relevant to disease in the whole organism. Topics covered in this course deal with a review of fundamental concepts in biochemisty relevant to drug discovery, the process of drug discovery and specific examples of drug interactions with biochemical pathways and how they impact human disease. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 370 and CHEM 371.

CHEM590: Selected Topics-Advanced Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of selected areas in either analytical, inorganic, organic or physical chemistry, with special emphasis upon recent developments in the field. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12 credits as long as the topic is different each time. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341 (Physical Chemistry II) or instructor's permission.

CHEM595: Graduate Research

Directed individual laboratory investigation under guidance of faculty advisor. May be elected once or twice, maximum credit allowed is 3 semester hours. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 semester hours in this graduate program; instructor's permission.

CHEM599: Graduate Literature Search in Chemistry

An individual, non-experimental investigation utilizing the scientific literature. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 semester hours in this graduate program.

CMST520: Public Relations Writing and Media Relations (3 hours lecture)

Students practice public relations skills, including press release writing; press kit development and distribution; analyses of publics; and media relations. Special attention is devoted to the potentials of traditional and new media for enabling creative and effective public relations. Previous course SPCM 520 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CMST555: Survey of Public and Organizational Relations (3 hours lecture)

This course overviews the related disciplines of organizational communication and public relations, with an integrative approach to understanding organizations' internal and external communication processes. Topics include: comparative structural conceptions of organizations; key organizational processes (e.g., leadership, change management, technology/media use, cultural diversity, and assimilation); organizational identity; informative and persuasive public campaigns; dialogic public partnerships; and issue/crisis management. Previous course SPCM 555 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CNFS500: Curriculum Development in Environmental Education (3 hours lecture)

The historical, philosophical, and conceptual aspects of developing a K-12 environmental education curriculum. The focus is on the four major curriculum areas: humanities, social studies, environmental science and outdoor pursuits with proposed activities for the classroom, school grounds, community, and natural areas, intended to enhance the students' awareness of environmental problems and their possible solutions. 3 sh.

CNFS501: Outdoor Teaching Sites for Environmental Education

This course will include a working definition of outdoor environmental teaching sites as they relate to current developments in environmental education. Also incorporated, through lecture and discussion, will be pertinent information on the philosophy, design, construction, and use of outdoor environmental teaching sites, with special emphasis on sites which can be developed on land areas adjacent to schools. 2 sh.

CNFS502: American Heritage Skills (2 hours lecture)

This course will focus on the home lifestyle for the American colonies from the 1600s to the 1800s. Various skills such as spinning, working with wool, natural dyeing, candle making, rug making, soap making, quilting, and food processing will be demonstrated. Students will have the opportunity to develop their proficiency in these areas. The colonial living skills will be integrated into a general overview of the two-hundred-year period under consideration, rather than considered as isolated elements. 2 sh.

CNFS503: Humanities and the Environment

This course will focus on the cycle of humanity's relationship to nature, based on three sequential stages: 1) humans in nature, in which archaic religions, myths and legends will be investigated; 2) humans vs. nature, which will be a consideration of the alienation due to the influence of science and technology; and 3) humans and nature, which will consider the new mysticism of today. The coursework will include lecture, discussion, seminar, and independent study. 3 sh.

CNFS504: Field Techniques for Teaching the Humanities (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this course is the development and improvement of techniques for teaching the humanities via the natural environment. The course will include consideration of the process of communication, the development of perception and observational skills, creative writing, literature interpretation, music, philosophy, dramatics, art, as well as historical investigations and considerations of past ways of life through the study of colonial crafts. 3 sh.

CNFS505: Society and the Natural Environment (2 hours lecture)

This course will focus upon interrelationships of a forest ecosystem. Soil, water, plants, and animals found in a northeastern hardwood forest will be examined in detail. Their relationship to humankind will be discussed and reviewed. 2 sh.

CNFS510: Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas

Students will examine the impact of recreation on natural areas in four of New Jersey's major ecosystems: upland forest, pine lands, salt marsh and barrier beach. Investigation of recreation records and plans will allow for comparison and contrast of heavily used sites with those which have been relatively undisturbed. Students develop "recreation impact statements". CNFS 511 must be taken concurrently. 2 sh.

CNFS511: Field Investigation of Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas

The field experiences in this one-credit course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations communicated in the course, "Environmental Impact of Recreation on Natural Areas" (CNFS 510), and to provide practical exercises in measuring impact on recreational areas. CNFS 510 must be taken concurrently. 1 sh.

CNFS521: Field Laboratory Experience in Outdoor Teaching Sites for Environmental Education

The field experiences in this one credit course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations communicated in the course, "Outdoor Teaching Sites for Environmental Education" (CNFS 501), and to provide practical field exercises in developing environmental education teaching site strategies. 1 sh.

CNFS522: Field Laboratory Experience in American Heritage Skills

The field experiences in this one-credit course are designed to support, supplement, and amplify the theoretical foundations communicated in the course, "American Heritage Skills" (CNFS 502), and to provide practical applications of both the content of American Heritage Skills and its methodology. 1 sh.

CNFS525: Field Laboratory Experience in Society and the Natural Environment

The field experiences in this one-credit course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations communicated in the course, "Society and the Natural Environment" (CNFS 505). 1 sh.

CNFS530: Workshop in Wildlife Management Education

This is a field course designed to provide information about wildlife and environmental topics to be included in a school curriculum. Curriculum supplements include Project WILD and Aquatic WILD. 1 sh.

CNFS595: Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture)

This course addresses concerns about the loss of biological diversity and genetic resources through species extinctions. Students will learn about the importance of maintaining biological diversity, the problems involved in monitoring and protecting sensitive and crucial habitat, the impact of human societies on biodiversity, the alternatives to the destruction of habitat/species, the prospects of restoration, and the policies needed to prevent the loss of biological diversity. Students will also learn about population processes that are directly related to species survival. This course is cross listed with BIOL 595. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: One semester of college biology with laboratory.

CNFS601: Advanced Environmental Education Seminar (2 hours seminar)

The seminar for advanced students who want to examine, in depth, a selected topic related to current developments in environmental education. The seminar will choose a particular issue facing environmental education, develop a method for studying that issue, and produce a publishable work (e.g., curriculum materials or academic paper) related to the topic. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: CNFS 500.

CNFS609: Independent Study in Environmental Curriculum Development

Teachers, who have participated in academic programs at the School of Conservation and wish to deepen their understanding of environmental education activities, may enroll in this independent study. In doing so, they may develop an environmental education program for a specific grade level, subject discipline, or school district. Credit is dependent on the scope and depth of the program to be developed. May be repeated for a maximum of 4.0 credits. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

CNFS610: Administration and Supervision of Environmental Field Study (2 hours lecture)

This course is intended to provide an overview of administrative procedures in organizing and implementing a day or resident program in environmental education. Among the areas to be reviewed are: historical and philosophical perspectives, development of a field curriculum, staff selection and training, financial management, facility design, and selection of equipment. 2 sh.

CNFS620: Field Laboratory Experiences in Admin and Supervision of Environmental Field Study

The field experiences in this one-credit graduate course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations communicated in the course, "Administration and Supervision of Environmental Field Study" (CNFS 610) and to provide opportunities to conduct on-site facility evaluation, test teaching equipment, discuss training programs with faculty at other facilities, and review financial management and business procedures used in the variety of centers. 1 sh.

CNFS621: Field Laboratory Experience in Environmental Education

The field experiences in this one credit course are designed to support and supplement the theoretical foundations communicated in the course "Advanced Environmental Education Seminar" (CNFS 601). 1 sh.

EAES500: Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture)

This course assesses the interactions of shifting energy dependence and adaptive technologies to add energy sources to the current national energy matrices. Included in this analysis will be a discussion of the growing roster of accessible energy sources by type and environmental source and environmental limitations. History, economy, politics, and culture will be addressed to provide the social context to gauge the growing impact of energy dependence in the contemporary global system. Previous course ENVR 515 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES300.

EAES501: Environmental Studies Physical (3 hours lecture)

A systems concept utilizing physical science. Provides some understanding of the abiotic environment to life. The atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere are examined as natural, man-modified, and human environments. Previous course ENVR 501 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES502: The Dynamic Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Origin, evolution and history of the earth. Internal and external processes by which minerals and rocks form and are modified. Interpretation of rock features and structures and significance of the fossil record. Plate tectonics, geomorphology, oceanography, and meteorology. The course is conducted at a more rigorous level than introductory, undergraduate courses. Research project and field trips are required. Previous course GEOS 502 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES503: Advanced Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

In-depth study of the major problems of physical geology processes of erosion, rock formation, continent and ocean-basin origin and relationships, earthquakes, interior of the earth, volcanism, island arcs, mountain building, paleomagnetism, continental drift, and sea-floor spreading. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 503 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES504: Landscapes in Transition (3 hours lecture)

The field in historical perspective, with emphasis upon contemporary trends; philosophical roots and quest for theory. Analyzes theory and methods of application and their relationships in order to understand the role of applied in contrast to theoretical geography. Previous course GEOS 520 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES505: Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of the relationships between man and the physical environment of atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Particular attention to problems of mineral resource and fossil-fuel depletion; pollution of air, water and soils and waste disposal and recycling, simple computer modeling of environmental situations. Previous course GEOS 525 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES507: Tectonics (3 hours lecture)

The study of the major structures of the earth, the principle of isostasy, mountain-building, continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and possible causes of tectonism in the earth. Discussion will include the methods of study, results obtained, interpretation of the data, and the latest theories of tectonism. Previous course GEOS 572 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program or departmental approval.

EAES508: Field Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The principles and techniques of geologic field work. Independent and team mapping of local areas of geologic interest using modern field methods and instruments. Previous course GEOS 580 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience; and equivalent of EAES 302; and EAES 320 or EAES 441 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 404.

EAES509: Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Overview of current issues in sustainability science and the challenges confronting society's transition to global sustainability: sustainable use of natural resources; social learning; engaging scientists at the science-policy interface; and the application of systems science to better predict the consequences of human actions and forecast outcomes of the multiple interacting stresses on the life support systems around us. Previous course ENVR 533 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES510: Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

Provides graduate students who have finished any introductory GIS courses or equivalents an opportunity to advance both the practical skills and theoretical understanding of GIS. The course will focus on application of GIS to urban planning, locational analysis, public health, crime analysis, resource and land use management, transportation planning, environmental management etc. In the meantime, specific topics such as geovisualization, geographic database design, GIS modeling and management will be treated as an integrated part during the applications. Previous course EUGS 570 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES310.

EAES511: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture)

This course affords graduate students who have completed introductory courses or equivalents the opportunity to advance both practical skills in and theoretical understanding of remote sensing. The course covers a wide range of applications and promotes facility in image processing and visualization, integration with Geographic Information Systems, and spatial modeling techniques. Industry-standard software is used for demonstration and laboratory exercises. A semester project must be completed that demonstrates an application of remote sensing to a real-world environmental problem. Students are required to submit a term paper, an oral presentation, and a poster related to this project. Previous courses ENVR 555 and GEOS 555 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES311.

EAES520: Advanced Mineralogy (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Chemical and physical principles as applied to minerals. Detailed study of representative minerals from the various families. Advanced techniques will be performed by the student. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 543 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy.

EAES521: Optical Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Theory and practice of using the polarizing microscope to study and identify minerals; theory of light transmission in minerals; the practical effect. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 545 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy.

EAES522: Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Rock textures, structures and mineralogy using the polarizing microscope. Identification and classification of rocks and the origin and history of the rock as determined by microscopic study of thin sections. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 546 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy.

EAES523: Sedimentary Petrography (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The interpretative study of the structures, textures, composition and genesis of sedimentary rocks. Laboratory analyses of sediments and sedimentary rocks by optical, mechanical and chemical methods and the graphical representation of the resultant data. Previous course GEOS 538 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience; and EAES 220 Mineralogy, EAES 337 Sedimentology or EAES 441 Stratigraphy or equivalent.

EAES524: Igneous and Metamorphic Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The intepretive study of igneous and metamorphic rocks in detail with the aim of properly identifying and naming the rocks and interpreting their history: rock suites from classical areas. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 578 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience (GEOS) and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy and EAES 320 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology or departmental approval.

EAES525: X-ray Microanalysis (3 hours lecture)

Students will learn energy dispersive spectroscopy, qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis, and x-ray mapping. Previous course GEOS 547 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 220, CHEM 410, PHYS 470 or BICL 406 or departmental approval.

EAES526: Geochemistry (3 hours lecture)

Chemical laws and principles applied to the earth, chemical composition of the earth, distribution and relative abundance of the elements. Radioactive materials, atmospheric precipitation of geochemicals, the geochemistry of polluted water (including solid and liquid wastes) study of meteorites. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 575 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES527: Organic Geoghemistry (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory graduate course in organic geochemistry, covering the occurence of natural and anthropogenic organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks, emphasizing fossil fuels and environemental contaminants. Previous course GEOS 576 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: CHEM 230, EAES 322, EAES 441 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 427.

EAES528: Environmental Forensics (3 hours lecture)

Environmental Forensics seeks to answer the questions: "How did environmental contamination occur?" and "Who/what caused it?" It involves the use of analytical (geo)chemistry, field geology and biology, remote sensing, integrated with law and policy. This course will focus primarily on the methods and applications of chemical fingerprinting, using petroleum biomarkers, polycyclic aromatic compounds, isotopes, and heavy metals. Previous course GEOS 577 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of EAES 427 or EAES 527 or departmental approval.

EAES529: Instrumental Environmental Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A survey of instrumentation and methods for quantitative environmental analysis of inorganic earth materials (e.g., waters, soils, sediments). Hands-on analytical techniques will typically include, but are not limited to, pH and conductivity measurements, ion chromatography, UV-Vis and optical ICP spectrometry, ICP mass spectrometry, and SEM-EDS depending on expertise of the instructor(s). Previous course GEOS 579 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 322, CHEM 410, EAES 526, EAES 527 or departmental approval.

EAES531: Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture)

Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES201, EAES230, or EAES301 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES332. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES201, EAES230, or EAES301 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES332.

EAES532: Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduction to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling, using a variety of current software packages. Saturated and unsaturated media will be considered. Emphasis is on application of models to the solution of common problems encountered in hydrology industry and research. Previous course GEOS 552 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of EAES 331; and MATH 116 or MATH 122 or departmental approval.

EAES533: Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

The spatial patterns of the water resource both as surface water and ground-water. Processes affecting availability and techniques of estimation are stressed. Previous course GEOS 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES535: Geophysics (3 hours lecture)

Theory and application of conventional geophysical methods: seismology, magnetism, electricity and gravity. Laboratory includes the collection and interpretation of geophysical data. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 571 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program.

EAES540: Advanced Historical Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

In-depth analysis of major problems in geologic history, stratigraphy and paleoenvironments as interpreted through lithologic and paleontologic evidence. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 504 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES541: Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Stratigraphic principles and their application. Case studies of selected regions. Local stratigraphy interpreted through field studies. Previous course GEOS 534 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program or departmental approval.

EAES542: Advanced Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Fossil invertebrates with emphasis on their evolutionary, paleoecologic and stratigraphic significance. Laboratory and field work stress collecting, preparation, identification, curatorial and faunal analysis techniques. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 533 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES543: Vertebrate Paleobiology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The geologic history, morphology, taxonomy, paleogeography and evolution of fossil vertebrates. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 535 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES545: Paleoecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Distribution and association of fossils as interpreted from the evidence presented in the geologic record. Detailed paleoecological field study made of selected faunal assemblages. Previous course GEOS 530 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES546: Micropaleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Taxonomic, morphologic, paleoecologic and stratigraphic consideration of microfossils with special emphasis on those from the marine environment. Previous course GEOS 532 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES547: Paleobotany (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The taxonomy, morphology, evolution, paleoecology and stratigraphic significance of fossil plants. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 536 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES548: Biostratigraphy of New Jersey (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The geologic history, paleontology, stratigraphy and paleogeography of New Jersey. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 537 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience or MS Biology programs.

EAES550: Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture)

Development and evolution of the ocean basins; marine sedimentation; shoreline development and classification; submarine topography; mineral resources of the sea. Laboratory analysis of marine sediments and fossil assemblages. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 560 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program or department approval.

EAES551: Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Coastlines and their evolution; processes and materials of the coastal zone; shore zone hydrodynamics and sedimentation: beach and barrier systems with special emphasis on the New Jersey shoreline. Offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 551. Previous course PHMS 581 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES or MS Biology graduate program and equivalent of EAES 200 or departmental approval.

EAES559: Special Problems in the Marine Sciences

An opportunity for the qualified graduate student to do research in a field of marine science selected under the guidance of a professor. Open only to graduate students who have indicated a potential for original thinking. Also offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 559. Previous course PHMS 598 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES560: Environmental Law (3 hours lecture)

The course focuses on The National Environmental Policy Act; The preparation of an environmental impact statement; The Clean Air Act; The Clean Water Act; The Endangered Species Act; Toxic Substance Control Act; Solid and Hazardous Waste and other Environmental laws. The role of environmental professionals in the formulation and implementation of environmental law and policy are discussed. Previous course ENVR 510 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES561: Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of Environmental Law. The course will utilize a model and method approach, which will present theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course will acquaint students with various traditional legal theories and compare and contrast them with law as it has evolved to meet the changes in society. Previous course ENVR 590 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES562: Waste Management (3 hours lecture)

This course examines liquid waste management (sewage, sewerage, septic, and acid mine drainage) and solid waste management (composting, incineration, dumps, sanitary landfills, ocean dumping, and resource recovery). Management of radioactive wastes is included. Previous course GEOS 513 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES563: Natural Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Provide background in natural resource management; wildlife, fisheries, forests, water and related components. Includes field trips. Previous course ENVR 551 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES564: Environmental Education (3 hours lecture)

Foundations of environmental education-historical, theoretical, and conceptual. Includes models, gaming encounters, and teaching strategies. Previous course ENVR 550 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES565: Environmental Change and Communication (3 hours lecture)

Prepare students as professional environmentalists: Communication and journalism strategies, theory of persuasion, and roles as catalyst, solution giver, process helpers, and resource person. Previous course ENVR 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES566: Environmental Problem Solving (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to train students to define environmental problems, develop their skills in solving these problems, as well as commitment to work toward their solution. Each lesson consists of student preparation of reading selected articles, classroom orientation, field trips, and the student-instructor follow-up. Field trip topics include pedestrian/vehicle conflict, school site development, plants as a city resource, urban/rural recreation, sign ordinances, transportation and similar topics. Offered as ENVR 508 through Spring 2012. To become EAES 566 effective Summer 2012. 3 sh.

EAES567: Human Environment (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of population in relation to the physical environment; objectives and skills of numerous culture groups will be examined to clarify existing regional variations in the man-land relationship. Previous course ENVR 505 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES568: Environmental Studies-Social/Behavior (3 hours lecture)

A systems concept utilizing social and behavioral sciences. Provides some understanding of the relationships of the cultural environment to life. The social and behavioral conditions upon the grouping of individuals are examined in natural and man-modified environments. Previous course ENVR 502 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES569: Air Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Spatial distribution of energy in the atmosphere treated in terms of natural factors and man's induced changes (atmospheric pollution). Incoming sun energy as modified by man is traced through the atmosphere, vegetation, soil and water. Previous course GEOS 501 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES570: Culture Regions (3 hours lecture)

Seminar investigation of man's role in changing the face of the earth. Emphasis on spatial perception and cultural attitudes towards space as well as the diffusion process. Previous course EUGS 503 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES580: Problems in Economic Geography (3 hours lecture)

Research course examines spatial patterns of economic activities. Stress on current methodology and research interests. Previous course EUGS 502 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES581: Urban Systems Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The complexity of the city and its modification by means of planning, the systems approach to urban study, the ecological base, different models of urban systems, the impact of technological change, the hierarchy of urban regions, planning in the existing systems, and creating new ones. Previous course EUGS 510 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES582: Urban and Regional Planning (3 hours lecture)

Urban and regional planning analyzes planning goals at an integral level. Urban and regional planning are rooted in the need to anticipate social and economic change in space and how it needs to be organized to enhance the functions of the physical plant and conserve the habitat twenty and more years into the future. Data gathering and analysis, graphic presentation and model building are an integral part of the course. Previous course EUGS 511 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES583: Transportation Analysis and Planning (3 hours lecture)

Transportation analysis addresses such diverse subject matter as technological change in the transportation media, transportation and energy, degree of accessibility, passenger trip generation by kind, commodity flows, transportation and spatial order, and transportation planning as part of urban and regional planning. Previous course EUGS 512 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES584: Urban Studies and Policy Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Interdisciplinary study of urbanization, the processes that produce and shape urban agglomerations. From this holistic perspective the interaction of different social, cultural economic, political and planning forces examined for their impact upon the resulting system. Previous course EUGS 550 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES585: The Metropolitan Economy (3 hours lecture)

The spacing, location and size of cities, the role of transportation in city rhythms and intra and inner city relationships. Urban design planning juxtaposed with multi-faceted decision making processes for an examination of their relative position in the management of urban systems. Previous course EUGS 551 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES590: Independent Study in Environmental Studies

Student must develop statement of goals and phasing for completion, prior to consultation with instructor. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course ENVR 531 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES591: Methods in Environmental Research (3 hours lecture)

Formulation of the research problem, use of bibliographical sources and reference material organizing the research tests and measurements, analysis of data, and report writing. Previous course ENVR 503 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES592: Pro Seminar (1-4 hours seminar)

Research on selected problems which will vary according to instructor. May be repeated once for a maximum of eight semester hours as long as the topic is different each time. Previous course EUGS 504 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES593: Research Seminar (3 hours seminar)

Student field, laboratory, and library investigation of a problem in the area of his or her interest in geoscience, the results of which will be presented in oral and written form. Class discussion of the individual papers and of other pertinent topics of current interest in geoscience. Previous course GEOS 590 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES594: Research in Geoscience Literature (1 hour lecture)

Investigation and evaluation of a topic in geoscience under the supervision of a faculty member by: (1) preparing a bibliography from standard sources, including an on-line computer search; and, (2) preparing a report written in standard professional format. Previous course GEOS 594 effective through Spring 2012 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES599: Special Problems in Earth and Environmental Studies

Independent research project to be performed by the student under the guidance of the faculty. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course GEOS 592 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES610: Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to techniques for the analysis of spatial data. The course will heavily utilize GIS and Remote Sensing data with particular attention to applications and manipulation techniques. Topics include characterizing spatial data, data sampling, visualization, data modeling, point pattern analysis, and spatial data interaction. Previous course EUGS 680 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) program and equivalent of EAES510 or departmental approval.

EAES611: Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a forum to explore cutting edge advances in remote sensing of the environment afforded by new satellite and aircraft based imaging platforms and to provide facility with image processing (IP) and geographic information systems (GIS) software. Topics covered include multispectral, hyperspectral and multiangular reflectance data, very high resolution panchromatic imagery, active radar and lidar systems, microwave imagery, advanced spatial and statistical raster analysis, and interfaces to GIS. Previous course ENVR 655 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES311 or EAES511 or departmental approval.

EAES612: Seminar in Environmental Graphics (3 hours seminar)

Use of geographic materials suitable for analysis, understanding and presenting aspects of the environment through seminar presentation. Previous courses GEOS 658 and ENVR 628 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduatae program.

EAES660: Seminar in Environmental Management (3 hours seminar)

This is a methods seminar focusing on the techniques of managing a project with environmental significance. Students will design and plan in detail a project to improve an existing environmental problem or to implement an economically important project that would minimize environmental problems. Previous course ENVR 610 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES661: Instructional Design for Environmental Education (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the techniques for instructional design as they relate specifically to the goals, need, and objectives of environmental education. Previous course ENVR 553 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 564.

EAES680: Reading Seminar in Geography and Urban Studies (2 hours seminar)

Required of all master's degree candidates concentrating in Geography and Urban Studies. This semester entails directed independent study in preparation for a 3-hour written comprehensive examination. Previous course EUGS 603 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

EAES681: Urban Studies Seminar (3 hours seminar)

The seminar is designed to analyze the contents and the concepts to formulate a holistic view of the city. Benchmark papers and research frontiers will be investigated. Previous course EUGS 610 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES690: Research Project in Environmental Studies

To complete the research proposal initiated in the research methods course. Previous course ENVR 695 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES696: Research Project in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Students develop an independent research project in consultation with a faculty advisor to address a sustainability issue of our time. Topics might include energy use and conservation; globalization and negative externalities; climate change; global extinctions and biodiversity; the ecology of cities; eutrophication and nutrient flux; habitat loss, alteration and degradation; alteration of biogeochemical cycles and land use patterns; environmental and social justice, and the "north-south" divide; or an approved topic of the student's choice. Students will prepare a research paper with extensive literature search and orally present the results of the project at the end of the semester. Previous course ENVR 696 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 509 and EAES 591 and departmental approval.

HIST501: New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture)

Designed to help students keep up to date in the fields of American, European and Non-Western history. Major trends and developments in the study of history in the light of recent representative examples of historical research and interpretation. 3 sh.

HIST502: History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture)

Designed to assist teachers, administrators and supervisors in acquiring a comprehensive view of modern materials, methods and curricula in history and the social sciences. 3 sh.

HIST511: Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar)

This course will examine the forces and conditions of the colonial period which contributed to the shaping of the characteristics of American political and economic institutions, social practices and ideas, intellectual outlooks, and attitudes. 3 sh.

HIST512: American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture)

The causes and course of the American revolution from both British and American viewpoints, including analysis of economic, political, social and intellectual factors. 3 sh.

HIST513: Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture)

The growth of political institutions under the Constitution, the gaining of respect as a new country in the family of nations. The establishment of economic credit, and the rise of American nationalism. 3 sh.

HIST514: The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture)

The crisis in American nationalism from Jackson through Reconstruction as the country's constitution, party system, and social structure contended with the disruptive effects of territorial expansion, the factory system, slavery and the new immigration. 3 sh.

HIST515: Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture)

This course in the history of American women will focus on major themes in nineteenth century women's culture. It will explore the implications of industrialization and modernization for women, the construction of domestic ideology, the development of feminism, and the centrality of gender in nineteenth century life and culture. The emphasis of the course is antebellum, but willl consider the implications of this legacy for post Civil War history. Readings will include contemporary scholarship as well as a selection of representative primary texts by and about nineteenth century American women. 3 sh.

HIST517: Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture)

An opportunity to study that part of recent American history centering about Franklin Delano Roosevelt. While concentrating on domestic aspects of American life, attention is given also to foreign affairs and their impact on the daily lives of Americans. 3 sh.

HIST518: Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture)

An advanced survey of the urban dimension in American history and of urban history as a discipline. Late 19th and 20th century national trends are pinpointed within the development of Paterson, Passaic, Jersey City, Newark and their suburbs. 3 sh.

HIST519: America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture)

This course studies the transformation of the Roosevelt coalition and its liberal policies since 1945 as they faced the challenge of the cold war abroad and growing class and racial upheaval at home. 3 sh.

HIST520: United States Far Eastern Relations (3 hours lecture)

United States relations with China and Japan, 1842 to the present. The people who formulated and implemented U.S. foreign policy. 3 sh.

HIST521: Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture)

The transformation of China from empire to Peoples Republic. Chinese concepts of revolution and the intellectual, political and social changes which preceded the formation of the Peoples Republic in 1949. 3 sh.

HIST522: Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture)

The historical forces of 19th and 20th century Russia which led to the Bolshevik revolution of November, 1917 and to the consolidation of Soviet power by 1921. 3 sh.

HIST523: History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture)

Changes in the ideological determinants of Soviet diplomacy contrasted with fluctuations in internal and external political and economic policies. Contributions of leading Soviet statesmen to diplomatic history. 3 sh.

HIST524: History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture)

Designed to familiarize students with major developments in American business history. The mutual impact of business and society is investigated through biographical studies of leading American businessmen. 3 sh.

HIST525: History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture)

Study of the American worker from the period after the Civil War to the present, with concentration on social, political and economic behavior as well as the union movement. 3 sh.

HIST526: The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture)

The causes and nature of the industrialization of the American economy after the Civil War; factors responsible for rapid economic growth; the impact of changing productive techniques on American institutions and human welfare. 3 sh.

HIST527: Industrialization of Europe (3 hours lecture)

European economic development with major attention to the period since about 1750. Comparing economic growth during the 19th and 20th centuries in Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Russia. 3 sh.

HIST529: Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the major states of Western Europe during the interwar period, with emphasis on varieties of fascism. 3 sh.

HIST532: Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

Modernization in East Asia with focus on Japan. Japanese experience in adjusting new world forces of the 19th and 20th centuries considered against the background of her traditional values and institutions. Comparisons with China and Korea. 3 sh.

HIST533: French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture)

The background of the French Revolution, its changing course and cast of characters during 1789-99, and the advent to power and imperial regime of Napoleon, 1799-1814. 3 sh.

HIST534: France of the Republics (3 hours lecture)

The development of modern France since 1870; political, economic and intellectual conditions and trends through the Third, Fourth and Fifth Republics. 3 sh.

HIST535: Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture)

Guided by the organizing principle that some medieval people themselves used, this course will approach the High Middle Ages through the eyes of those who fought (nobility), worked (peasants), and prayed (clergy). Social, political, economic, religious and cultural aspects of the medieval European experience will be explored through the investigation of topics such as the rise of the nation-state, the expansion of trade, the rise of the university, the launching of the Crusades, the development of Gothic architecture and the intensification of religious belief. A field trip is required as part of the course. 3 sh.

HIST536: Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the everyday lives and belief systems of early modern Europeans through a survey of developments in French, Italian, English and German popular culture over a period of three centuries from 1500 to 1800. Topics to be covered include Carnival, community policing, ritual behavior, religious beliefs, magic, family life, violence, deviant behavior, and the transmission of culture between groups and across generations. 3 sh.

HIST537: Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture)

Romantic, utilitarian, conservative, liberal and early existential streams of thought in 19th century Europe. The impact of these intellectual movements on European society. 3 sh.

HIST540: Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture)

General analysis and reappraisal of the place of Europe in world history. The development, distinctive contributions and future prospects of European civilization examined in the light of contemporary world conditions. 3 sh.

HIST541: Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

Course compares and contrasts central value systems, kinship institutions, social stratification and the exercise of political power in traditional India, China & Japan. These topics are related to differing patterns of nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. 3 sh.

HIST550: African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the construction and development of identities in Sub-Saharan Africa. It explores the meanings of concepts such as "tribe," "ethnicity," and "nation"; and it questions the role of history, culture and politics in the formation and evolution of African identities. The course focuses on particular themes such as traditions of origin, cultural nationalism, slavery, etc. These are illustrated by case studies from West, East, Central and Southern Africa, which are organized in a chronological order. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the notion of identity and its importance in the past and present of African societies. 3 sh.

HIST570: Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar)

Graduate level study in a period, problem, or theme in Non-Western History. Individual seminars will be offered in African History, South Asian History, Latin American History, etc. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Please see Course Schedule for specific offering each semester. 3 sh.

HIST580: Seminar in Western History (3 hours lecture)

Graduate-level study in a period, problem, or theme in Western history. Individual seminars will be offered in European and American history. Please see semester course listings for specific offering. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different each time. 3 sh.

HIST603: Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar)

Required for all master's degree candidates concentrating in history, this seminar entails directed independent study in preparation for a three-hour written comprehensive examination. Candidates should register to take the seminar in the semester preceding the examination date. Take the seminar in the fall if the examination is the following March; take the seminar in the spring if the examination is the following October. 2 sh.

INBS501: International Business: Concepts and Issues (3 hours lecture)

This course offers students an in-depth introduction to international business concepts and issues in addition to exposure to the fundamentals of international business, students will become aware of the dynamics of global business environment, international competition in both the domestic and foreign markets as well as strategic issues in international business management and operations. The course adopts a critical approach; it presents both sides of an international business issue. Greater emphasis will be placed on managerial implications of information presented in the course. The course also includes discussion of ethics and social responsibility in the conduct of international business. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 501; M.B.A. degree students only.

INBS530: Export Management (3 hours lecture)

To familiarize MBA students of export policies, programs and procedures and develop export/import management skills. The students will become knowledgeable about global sourcing, negotiation, pricing, export/import financing, documentation, international tenders and bidding, logistics and distribution. Cross listed with Marketing, MKTG 530. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 501. MBA degree students only.

LAWS537: Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with theoretical foundations and practical applications of entertainment law. The course utilizes a model and method approach, which presents theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course acquaints students with various traditional legal theories and compares and contrasts them with law as it has evolved to meet new changes in society. Areas to be covered include representing minors, contract preparation, copyright infringement, publishing, the record industry, film, and television. 3 sh.

LAWS551: Negotiation Theory and Practice (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

In-depth study of negotiation theories and practical applications. Includes an examination and comparison of various negotiation theories and critical skills needed to be an effective negotiator. Extensive role plays. Study of ethical and policy issues. 3 sh.

LAWS558: Cross-Cultural Conflict Resolution (3 hours lecture)

Intensive study and application of theories and techniques of cross-cultural conflict resolution. Examination of issues of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexual preference within the context of dominant Western Culture. LAWS 552 is recommended as a prerequisite. 3 sh.

LAWS599: Selected Topics in Law and Governance (3 hours lecture)

Examination of a current topic in the legal environment that is of significance. Analysis of theoretical foundations and practical applications in the area studied. Development of the ability to critically analyze, observe, and research the topic under examination, as well as prepare a research paper. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

MGMT505: Management Process and Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture)

Review of classical and modern approaches to the managerial process as it relates to the manager's functions of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling. These reviews will be tied to the open-system model and the contingency approach as an overall framework for understanding the management of organizations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Only M.B.A.and D.Env.M.students, M.A.Fine Arts majors with concentration in Museum Management (FAMM) or M.A.Theatre majors with concentration in Arts Management (THAM).

MGMT510: Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how managers can utilize modern Human Resource practices in order to improve company performance and efficiencies. Topics include staffing for quality, outsourcing, use of core and contingent workforce, managing workforce commitment and performance, legal issues, managing careers, and reward systems. A case study approach is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 505. MBA degree students only.

MGMT513: Leadership and Behavior (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of the course is to help students understand leadership behavior. The course reviews current theoretical and empirical literature from the behavioral sciences as it relates to leadership. Topics covered include leadership styles, power and leadership, leader-follower interactions, and the manager as leader. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 502, INBS 501, ECON 505, FINC 501, INFO 505, MKTG 501, INFO 501, INFO 503 and MGMT 505. MBA degree students only.

MGMT525: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3 hours lecture)

This course is for students who want to start their own businesses or initiate new ventures in existing corporations. Topics include the importance of entrepreneurship in the U.S., identifying business opportunities and formulating business plans. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 505, MKTG 501, ACCT 501. MBA degree students only.

MKTG501: Marketing Management (3 hours lecture)

This business core requirement assumes little or no prior formal education in the discipline of marketing. As such, a solid introduction to the language of the discipline, body of knowledge, tools and techniques must necessarily be covered through a text and readings format supplemented with class lectures which are grounded in heavy case analysis and real-world illustrations. The pivotal distinctiveness of this graduate offering lies in drawing the student into issues that are industry and company specific (preferably drawn from the student's career related industry/company). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: M.B.A.degree students, M.A.Fine Arts majors with concentration in Museum Management (FAMM), or M.A.Theatre majors with concentration in Arts Management (THAM)only.

THTR585: Grantsmanship and Fundraising (3 hours lecture)

Methods of grantsmanship, fundraising and other strategies to secure support for institutional operations and programs in the arts. 3 sh.