Psychology Major with Teacher Certification in Social Studies (Preschool-Grade 12) (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2013 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2013 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Students who wish to pursue P-12 teacher certification in Social Studies must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. Please visit the Teacher Education Program web site for the required professional sequence of courses and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook. The course SOSC 401 Methods of Teaching Social Studies is the departmental requirement.

The social studies teacher is expected to have a broad understanding of the cultural and environmental factors which shape the individual and society. To meet the approved program for certification in social studies, course work is required in each of the following: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science and sociology. A detailed description of the requirements is available in the office of the Social Studies Teacher Education Coordinator in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.

Psychology majors must earn a grade of C- or above in all Psychology courses. Psychology course in which grades of less than C- are earned must be repeated and brought up to a minimum grade of C- or they will not count toward the major.


PSYCHOLOGY/TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR

Complete 63 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 33 semester hours with minimum grades of C- in the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete the following for 14 semester hours:

      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 203 Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 220 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture) 4
      PSYC 301 Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
    2. TEACHER EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

      Complete the following 4 courses:

      PSYC 246 Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 265 Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 300 The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 304 Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. ELECTIVES

      Complete the following 4 requirements:

      1. BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR

        Complete 3 semester hours from:

        PSYC 305 Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 308 Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 353 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 355 Motivation (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. COGNITION

        Complete 3 semester hours from:

        PSYC 313 Cognition (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 340 Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 358 Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. PERSONALITY

        Complete 3 semester hours from:

        PSYC 320 Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 332 Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 365 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. ADVANCED ELECTIVES

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        1.  

          PCOM 385 Advanced Community Psychology: Externship 3
          PCOM 387 Methods in Evaluation Research (4 hours lecture) 4
          PSYC 302 Health Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 303 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 310 Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 314 Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 324 Comtemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 330 Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 360 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 366 Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 375 Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 402 Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 488 Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar) 3
          PSYC 496 Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture) 4
        2. If not already used in the categories above, the following may also be taken:

          PSYC 305 Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 308 Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 313 Cognition (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 320 Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 332 Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 340 Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 353 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 355 Motivation (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 358 Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 365 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. RELATED SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 5 requirement(s):

    1. ECONOMICS

      Complete 1 course from:

      ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 215 The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. GEOGRAPHY

      Complete 2 courses:

      EAES 161 Human Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 170 World Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. HISTORY

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. UNITED STATES

        Complete the following 2 courses:

        HIST 117 History of the United States to 1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 118 History of the United States Since 1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. EUROPEAN

        Complete 1 course from the following:

        HIST 103 Foundations of Western Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 105 Emergence of European Civilization, 1500-1914 (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 106 Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. NON-WESTERN

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        HIST 108 Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 109 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 114 Early Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 116 Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 128 Pre-Modern Japan: A History of Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 129 Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 131 Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 132 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 133 Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 223 Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 330 Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 333 History of Brazil (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 334 Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 339 Seminar in Latin American History (3 hours seminar) 3
        HIST 409 Independent Study Non-Western History 3
        HIST 416 Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 430 Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 499 Selected Topics 1-3
    4. POLITICAL SCIENCE

      Complete the following 2 requirements:

      1. Complete 1 course from the following:

        POLS 101 American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete the following 1 course:

        POLS 201 Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
    5. RELIGION

      Complete

      RELG 100 Religions of the World (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

EAES161: Human Geography (3 hours lecture)

Human Geography presents the interaction of culture and environment. Variations in environment and culture result in great differences how culture is imprinted upon the environment. The role of politics, language, religion, economics, urban systems, and technology reveal the relative intensity with which culture roots in nature. Emphasis is upon culture as a force that shapes the human use of the earth. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course EUGS 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES170: World Geography (3 hours lecture)

World geography aims to present essential facts and concepts about the natural and human environment of major regions and countries. The course presents a picture of regions as developed through the interactions of natural, cultural, economic and political forces. Geopolitical, social and economic relationships between and among countries are studied. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. Previous course EUGS 102 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECON100: Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture)

Major objectives and features of the American economy, including operations of a market economy, structure and function of business, money and banking, government and business relations. For non-majors only. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not open to Economics majors; may not be taken after ECON 101 and/or ECON 102.

ECON215: The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

The extent, causes and consequences of poverty, inequality and insecurity. An appraisal of reforms, social insurance, medical care, public housing, rural development. The economics of discrimination and educational opportunity. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST103: Foundations of Western Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Origins and development of Western civilization to about 1350: Egyptian, Judaic, Greek, Roman, Islamic and Medieval European contributions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST105: Emergence of European Civilization, 1500-1914 (3 hours lecture)

The emergence of Europe as a distinctive world civilization. The development of ideas, institutions and technologies from medieval times to World War I. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST106: Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present (3 hours lecture)

European society in transition since World War I. The role of two world wars in shaping contemporary times. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST108: Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Pre-colonial African civilization and its eclipse under slavery and the colonial onslaught. Principal social, political and cultural systems of the period. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST109: Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Examination of various institutions and value systems in Islam which characterize it as a major civilization. Important cultural developments as they are affected by the process of transition. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST114: Early Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a background in the main issues, themes and events in the history of colonial Latin America, including an introduction to the pre-contact (pre-1492) histories of Spain, Portugal and the Americas. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST116: Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an introduction to the history of Latin America, with an emphasis on the period since the 1810s. Students unfamiliar with the region should emerge from the course with a firm grounding in the major themes of modern Latin American history. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

HIST117: History of the United States to 1876 (3 hours lecture)

Issues and problems in the development of the American nation from discovery and exploration to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST118: History of the United States Since 1876 (3 hours lecture)

American development from an agrarian power after the Civil War into an urban-industrial society with the liberal institutions that accompanied it. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST128: Pre-Modern Japan: A History of Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory survey course in Japanese history from earliest times to the Meiji (1868-1912). It is a first step in Japan studies designed to provide a broad, useful, working knowledge of key aspects of traditional Japan. Culture, politics, society and economy will be built into a chronological, historical structure. Japan's uniqueness will be outlined against a background of greater East Asian and world interactions. This course will stand on its own, but will also serve as a useful background to understanding modern and contemporary Japan. The course also aspires to sensitizing students to the inherent value of East Asian culture as a part of human richness and diversity. 3 sh.

HIST129: Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory survey course in Japanese history from the Meiji (1868-1912) through the Showa (1925-present). While it would be useful to study premodern Japan before taking this course, modern Japan does stand on its own. A review of traditional Japan will be followed by study of the dynamic interaction of Japan and the West during the 19th Century. Japan's expansionism, World War II and the postwar period will be important topics. Cultural, military, economic, political, and social developments will be discussed in historical settings. Students will be encouraged to appreciate the unique dynamics of Japan's development as a modern nation state and to explore the likely progress of Japan into the 21st Century. 3 sh.

HIST131: Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The early history of India, 3000 B.C. to 1000 A.D. Principal religions, political and literary works, and their insights into Indian social values and institutions. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST132: Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The early history of China, 2000 B.C. to 1300 A.D. Principal social, political and metaphysical-philosophic works, corresponding values and institutions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST133: Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Modern China, 1600 to the present. Changes in values and mutual influence of East and West, studied through literary, philosophical, anthropological, historical and artistic works. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

HIST223: Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture)

Ideological and historical significance studied against the background of domestic and international events, personalities and ideologies. 3 sh.

HIST330: Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture)

Masterpieces of the Chinese literary tradition from earliest times to the 20th century. Literary genre in historical perspective and as expression of social and cultural values. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST333: History of Brazil (3 hours lecture)

Traces the historical development from the pre-historical Indian cultures to the 1970s; covers the social, cultural, political, economic and religious aspects of the largest Latin-American nation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST334: Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture)

A survey of writings by and about Muslim women examined historiographically. We examine conventional wisdom about Muslim women through the ages, and how this "wisdom" was constructed: Who wrote about Muslim women? When? How? What purposes have these writings served at different times and places since the inception of Islam and during the course of its 1,500 year history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Passing grade in the following: HIST 100; HIST 117 or 118; HIST 103 or 105 or 106; 108 or 109 or 114 or 116 or 128 or 129 or 131 or 132 or 133.

HIST339: Seminar in Latin American History (3 hours seminar)

Intensive study of specific periods and/or problems in latin American history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST409: Independent Study Non-Western History

To provide opportunity for capable students, mainly in history or transcultural studies, to do independent work in the field of non-Western history. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST416: Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

The Roman Catholic church as the major spiritual institution as well as a cultural, moral, political and economic force in Latin America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST430: Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture)

Examines and compares the causes, course and consequences of three major social revolutions in Latin America: Mexico (1910), Bolivia (1952), Cuba (1959). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST431: Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Indian behavior. Culture change in the perspective of colonialism and modernization; contributions of religion to social and political values and modern literature. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 431. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

HIST432: Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Japanese behavior. Cultural change in the perspective of traditional periodization of Japanese history. Contributions of religion and philosophy to defining social values. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 432. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

HIST499: Selected Topics

Study in a specific historical period, problem or theme. Particular course offerings will vary. Students may repeat course for up to nine credits as long as individual topic is different. Consult current schedule of courses for semester offering. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

PCOM385: Advanced Community Psychology: Externship

Supervision is provided in a variety of community action programs which have preventive as well as treatment goals. Day and hour assignments can usually be arranged, but effective study participation will require a 3 hour block of time in order to serve directly in a community setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PCOM 245.

PCOM387: Methods in Evaluation Research (4 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the application of psychological research methods and knowledge to the evaluation of the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of community programs. Emphasis will be on techniques for program planning and for constructive innovations in community settings. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PCOM 385.

POLS101: American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the basic institutions and processes of American politics, and will do so, in part, through a focus on current policy issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS201: Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture)

Constitutional principles, governmental institutions and political processes of selected contemporary states. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Political Science. 3 sh.

POLS307: American Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introduction to the main strands of American political thought from the founding of the American colonies to the present day. Our goal will be to come to grips with the major questions that have driven our politics throughout the nation's history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or JURI 300.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

PSYC203: Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to different methods of psychological research including survey, correlational and experimental methods. Introductory descriptive statistics and correlational analysis will be covered. Basic aspects of sound scientific writing, including conducting a literature search and writing a scientific manuscript following American Psychological Association guidelines, will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC220: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to basic statistical methods in the behavioral sciences. The course begins with a review of descriptive statistics. The main course emphasis will be on probability theory and inferential statistics and their application to psychological research. This includes such methods as z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and nonparametric statistics. Laboratory sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply concepts from class using computers, particularly statistical software packages. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC246: Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture)

Covers the historical impact of scientific and institutional racism on the psychological study of blacks. Survey and critical analysis of traditional European approaches with non-traditional methods for comparison. Future development and advancement of a black psychology considered. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirements (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC265: Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture)

The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC300: The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Students in this course will simultaneously learn concepts in teaching psychology, and work with a Psychology professor who will mentor them as the student acts as a teacher's assistant. Students will engage in a critical examination of the teaching of psychology. The course will run as a seminar where issues of curriculum development, teaching techniques, and ethical aspects will be discussed based on journal articles. The work as an assistant includes anonymous record keeping, leading study groups and providing a brief lecture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; Psychology majors only; departmental permission.

PSYC301: Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introduction to laboratory methods of research in areas such as motivation, perception and learning. Emphasis is on design and execution of exploratory investigations. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 and PSYC 220;or PSYC 220 and PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC302: Health Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The theoretical, empirical and clinical aspects of health psychology will be presented. The relation of health psychology with other areas of psychology and other scientific disciplines will be discussed. The historical developments of the field, its research methodologies, theoretical models and exemplary interventions will be described. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC303: Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Application of psychological principles and practices in business and industry. Problems of communication, group dynamics, man-machine relations, employee attitudes, accident prevention, industrial job selection techniques, motivation, executive leadership. Commonly used selection tests will be evaluated. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC304: Social Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on social behavior of the individual and the group, social perception, motivation, and learning; attitudes and values; development and dynamics of social groups; inter-group tension and prejudice; mass phenomena; psychological approaches to social issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC305: Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Anatomical, neural and biochemical bases of behavior are studied. Topics include localization of function, neuro-hormonal interaction, sensory and motor functioning, emotions, the relationship of neurophysiological processes and personality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC308: Perception (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the theory and procedure of perceptual research. Theoretical approaches; modern psychophysical and perceptual research; traditional problems of perception, constancies of size and color brightness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC310: Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture)

Tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement and personality; principles of psychological testing; approaches to test construction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC313: Cognition (3 hours lecture)

The study of the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge, utilizing behavioral, observational, and computer modeling methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC314: Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how human beings make decisions and judgments. It reviews how personal values, uncertainty and cognitive, social, and neurological processes affect decision making. This course draws upon a wide range of examples from many fields including psychology, economics, criminology, and medicine. Students will also learn strategies and techniques to enhance judgment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC320: Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys human psychological development from the prenatal period to adolescence. The interacting forces of heredity, environment and physical, cognitive, emotional and socio-cultural factors are reviewed in the light of current research and theory in these areas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC324: Comtemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of current topics in the field of child advocacy. The impact of Megan's Law, advocacy for adopted children, child right-to-life movement, and repressed memory syndrome are among the possible issues to be explored. A multi-disciplinary focus will be used to enhance student understanding and learning. Previous course PSYC 430 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior Psychology or Justice Studies majors only.

PSYC330: Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the interaction between psychology and the legal system. Emphasis placed on the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathic behavior, court-mandated evaluations and the role of the psychologist as expert witness. The application of psychological knowledge within the criminal justice context. Ethical guidelines in forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior Psychology or Justice Studies majors only. Starting Fall 2013: PSYC 203 or JUST 300 or LAWS 302.

PSYC332: Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture)

Explores current approaches and theories of personality development and organization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC340: Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture)

Covers research, language and methods of learning theory. Classical and operant conditioning, complex habits, remembering and forgetting, transfer of training, cognition and behavior modification. Review of animal research but primary emphasis is on people. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture)

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC353: Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture)

The student will explore experimental and field studies of behavior in a few selected animal species with particular reference to the behavior of vertebrates. The course will involve detailed study of instinctive behavior and imprinting, respondent and operant behavior with emphasis upon the procedures and variables concerned with the acquisition of new forms of behavior. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC355: Motivation (3 hours lecture)

The concepts of instincts, homeostasis, drive, reinforcement, arousal and inception are analyzed with reference to data drawn from many areas of experimentation. The primary emphasis is on the experimental, rather than the theoretical literature: motivational concepts relevant to human and animal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC358: Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture)

Major theoretical problems and theories of learning are considered. Includes experimental analysis of basic phenomena of conditioning and learning, studied primarily through experimental studies of infra-human organisms. Students may study selected topics more extensively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC360: History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the historical development of psychology, comparative analysis of the major schools of contemporary psychology, and new trends and movements in psychological theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC365: Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Topics include an overview of psychopathological processes: neuroses, psychoses, and characterological disorders; feeling, thinking and behavioral aspects during the life span; diagnostic and treatment procedures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC366: Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture)

The course will present psychological contributions to interventions designed to promote health, prevent illness and avert further disability. Appropriate techniques to assess, plan, and implement programs at the community level will be discussed. The multidisciplinary, multilevel nature of community programs will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC375: Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines behavior from a Darwinian perspective attempting to understand how our behaviors have evolved throughout time. By examining behavior in terms of natural selection, this course provides a new and insightful perspective to all areas of psychology, including cognitive, social, developmental, and neuropsychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC402: Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture)

An overview of classical and contemporary systems of psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on understanding each system in terms of its underlying theory of personality, psychopathology and therapeutic impact. Studies of therapeutic efficacy are also covered. Other issues include such topics as the training of psychotherapists and the ethical issues involved in psychotherapy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 354 or PSYC 365 or departmental approval.

PSYC488: Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar)

Seminar discussion of foundation works and contemporary research articles in Cognitive Science. With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of Cognitive Science for comprehensive in-depth review of research and write a literature review. Professional issues in Cognitive Science are discussed. Cross listed with Linguistics LNGN 488. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288 or PSYC 288.

PSYC496: Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture)

This course constitutes the second semester of Psychology Honors. Students are expected to gather, analyze and interpret the data for their honors project, write the analysis and discussion chapters, and submit their completed honors thesis. Students who successfully complete this course will graduate with honors in psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 495 with a grade of A or A-.

RELG100: Religions of the World (3 hours lecture)

The major religious traditions, with emphasis on basic beliefs and on the nature and diversity of religious awareness. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.