Business Administration Major, Hospitality Management Concentration (B.S.) - Undergraduate - 2013 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2013 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Hospitality management is all about providing exceptional service – from anticipating customer needs to exceeding expectations. This dynamic, expanding field is built on people who are team builders, strategic planners, quality control specialists, and “people” people. If this sounds like you, consider a concentration in Hospitality Management. We support our program with practical training through internships, field experiences and on-site courses at local hotels.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

Complete 74 semester hours including the following 5 requirement(s):

  1. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR

    Complete 2 requirement(s):

    1. BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS

      Complete 5 courses for 15 semester hours:

      ACCT 204 Fundamentals of Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
      BSLW 235 Legal, Ethical, and Global Environment of Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      BUGN 280 Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 250 Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      INFO 290 Technology in Business (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. INTEGRATED CORE

      Complete 6 courses for 18 semester hours:

      BUGN 295 Elements of Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      FINC 300 Integrated Core: Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
      INFO 300 Integrated Core: Operations Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 300 Integrated Core: Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 439 Applied Business Strategy (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 300 Integrated Core: Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT CORE

      Complete the following 4 courses:

      HOSP 250 Hospitality Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      HOSP 380 Lodging System Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      HOSP 390 Food and Beverage Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      HOSP 490 Entrepreneurship in Hospitality (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. HOSPITALITY MGMT CONCENTRATION ELECTIVE

      Complete 2 courses from the following:

      HOSP 320 Hosptiality Co-Op Ed 3
      HOSP 355 Organizational Issues in Hospitality (3 hours lecture) 3
      HOSP 370 Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Technologies in Hospitality (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 492 Selected Topics in Management 1-3
      NUFD 353 Catering and Banquet Management (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT COLLATERALS

      Complete the following 3 courses:

      NUFD 192 Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      NUFD 240 Sanitation Management and Food Microbiology: Certification (1 hour lecture) 1
      NUFD 350 Quantity Food Applications (4 hours lab) 3
  3. MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

    1.  

      1.  

        ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 302 Intermediate Accounting II (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 304 Contemporary Issues in Intermediate Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 305 Taxation for Individuals (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 307 Cost Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 309 Accounting Information Systems (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab) 3
        ACCT 310 Taxation of Business Entities and Advanced Tax Concepts (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 312 Principles of Corporate Controllership (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 400 Auditing Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 401 Advanced Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 403 Advanced Auditing (3 hours lecture) 3
        ACCT 404 Senior Seminar in Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 204 Real Estate Principles & Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 206 Managerial Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 207 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 208 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 215 The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 221 Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 223 Economics of Fine and Performing Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 250 Selected Topics in Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 300 World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 301 Money and Banking (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 303 Economic Growth and Development (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 305 Commercial Real Estate: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 308 Public Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 310 Urban and Regional Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 311 Labor Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 312 Business Cycles and Forecasting (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 398 Economics Independent Study 3
        ECON 401 Financial Institutions (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 402 International Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 403 Comparative Economic Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 407 Economics of Industrial Organization (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 409 Economics of National Security (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 414 Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 420 Econometrics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 438 Advanced Seminar in Economics (3 hours seminar) 3
        ECON 497 Economics Independent Study 3
        FINC 322 Capital Budgeting Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 326 Investment Principles and Portfolio Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 327 International Financial Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 350 Special Topics in Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 423 Advanced Corporate Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 425 Working Capital Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 429 Real Estate Investment (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 430 Futures/Options, and other Derivatives (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 431 Advanced International Financial Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        FINC 490 Seminar in Finance (3 hours seminar) 3
        HOSP 320 Hosptiality Co-Op Ed 3
        HOSP 355 Organizational Issues in Hospitality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HOSP 370 Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Technologies in Hospitality (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 347 Export/Import Marketing Process (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 349 International Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 352 Economic Relations in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 356 International Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 358 Finance in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 370 World Trade and Investment (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 380 Global Financial Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 420 Globalization and World Development (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 430 International Financial Markets and Investment (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 440 International Retailing (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 482 International Business Co-op Ed 3
        INBS 484 Senior Seminar in International Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 209 Personal Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 281 Programming & Database Fundamentals (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 282 Network & Systems Fundamentals (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 306 Introduction to Web Development (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 320 Administrative Business Communications (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 357 Business Computer Programming (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 380 Computer Networks in Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 410 Database Development for Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 412 Management for Information Systems Continuity (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 470 Electronic Commerce: Creating Business Value Using Information Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 475 Quantitative Decision Making for Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 490 Decision Support Systems for Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        INFO 491 Independent Study in Information Systems 3
        INFO 492 Special Topics in Information Systems 1-3
      2.  

        LITM 201 Introduction to Leisure and Tourism (3 hours lecture) 3
        LITM 301 Leisure and Tourism Operations (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 315 Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 316 Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 318 Motivation and Leadership (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 327 Training, Development, and Career Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 331 Family Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 335 Small Business Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 363 Business and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 392 Management Co-Op Ed 3
        MGMT 433 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 435 Organizational Development and Change (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 436 Project Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 491 Small Business Institute 3
        MGMT 492 Selected Topics in Management 1-3
        MKTG 307 Retail Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 309 Buying and Distribution Strategies (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 310 Services Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 315 International Tourism Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 320 Sports Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 321 Event Marketing and Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 341 Consumer Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 342 Sales Concepts and Practices (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 344 Advertising Theory and Techniques (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 345 Service and Nonprofit Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 350 Pharmaceutical and Health Care Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 355 Sports, Events and Tourism Marketing Internship (3 hours cooperative education) 3
        MKTG 442 Marketing Research (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 445 Marketing Strategies in Sports, Event and Tourism Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 446 Marketing Strategy and Implementation (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 482 Independent Owned and Franchised Retailing (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 483 Seminar in Retail Management (3 hours seminar) 3
        MKTG 489 Internet Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
        MKTG 490 Marketing Co-op Ed 3
        MKTG 492 Independent Study in Marketing 1-3
        MKTG 493 Special Topics in Marketing 1-3
    2. 3 hours of the following course may also be used:

      INFO 230 Introduction to Business Co-Op Work Exp 3-6
    3. 3 hours of the following course may also be used:

      MKTG 399 Business Work Experience II 3-6
  4. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COLLATERALS

    Complete the following for 12 semester hours:

    ECON 101 Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
    ECON 102 Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
    INFO 173 Spreadsheet Modeling for Business Decisions (3 hours lecture) 3
    INFO 240 Statistical Methods in Business (3 hours lecture) 3
  5. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CAREER LEARNING

    Complete the following course a minimum of 4 times: . There is no credit associated with this course.

    BUGN 310 Campus to Career Transition (3 hours lecture) 0

Course Descriptions:

ACCT204: Fundamentals of Accounting (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a foundation for non-accounting business majors. Topics covered include both financial and managerial accounting from a user perspective. Students will be exposed to the four financial statements and ethical issues in accounting along with other accounting reporting issues in the financial accounting phase of the course. Managerial accounting focuses on generating accounting data for internal business decision-making in today's increasingly competitive and complex business world. Students need to become familiar with the use of accounting data for both investment and credit decisions as well as strategic decision making for firms' operation. Major topics covered include financial statement analysis, budgeting, accounting-based decision making, and performance evaluation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100; Not open to BS Accounting Majors.

ACCT301: Intermediate Accounting I (3 hours lecture)

This course builds on material presented in Fundamentals of Financial Accounting. Students acquire an improved understanding of the composition and significance of various segments of income statements and balance sheet, particularly related to current assets and various income statement revenue and expense items leading to an improved understanding of the preparation of various aspects of the financial statements as well as an enhancement of their ability to critically evaluate financial statements. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 201; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT302: Intermediate Accounting II (3 hours lecture)

Continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. Students acquire an improved understanding of the composition and significance of various segments of the income statement and the balance sheet, particularly non-current assets, liabilities, owners' equity, and earnings per share leading to an improved understanding of the preparation of various aspects of the financial statements as well as an enhancement of their ability to critically evaluate accounting and its impact to the international community. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 301; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT304: Contemporary Issues in Intermediate Accounting (3 hours lecture)

In-depth discussion and analysis of traditional intermediate financial accounting topics as well as recent developments in accounting valuation and reporting practices. Course builds on topics discussed in Intermediate Accounting I and II leading to an improved understanding of the preparation of various aspects of the financial statements as well as enhancement of their ability to critically evaluate financial reporting. This course is designated as the writing requirements course for the department. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 301 and ACCT 302 (ACCT 302 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite with the Department Chair's approval). Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT305: Taxation for Individuals (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a broad range of tax concepts and types of taxpayers to emphasize the role of taxation in the business decision-making process. Coverage includes on a broad basis the taxation of individuals and a brief introduction to corporate taxation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 201; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT307: Cost Accounting (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the development of theory, concepts and techniques for providing, using and reporting cost information within the organization. Topics discussed include process costing, activity-based costing and management, cost allocation, inventory management and capacity analysis, Theory of Constraints management and control of quality costs, transfer pricing, profitability analysis, tactical decision making and corporate social responsibility. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 202; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT309: Accounting Information Systems (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab)

Accounting information system development will be studied with emphasis on systems analysis and design, form design, internal controls, and proper documentation. The course will expand on several typical AIS application systems including the revenue cycle, the procurement cycle, and others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 173 and ACCT 201; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT310: Taxation of Business Entities and Advanced Tax Concepts (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to follow the ACCT 305 tax course, Taxation for Individuals. This course will introduce students to a broad range of tax concepts dealing with the taxation of corporations, partnerships, and S corporations and will emphasize the role of taxation in the business decision-making process. Coverage includes on a broad basis the taxation of corporations and their shareholders, the tax treatment of pass through entities such as partnerships and S corporations and their owners, tax consequences influencing the choice of business entity, income taxation of estates and trusts, and estate and gift taxation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 305; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT312: Principles of Corporate Controllership (3 hours lecture)

Connects the Controller's responsibilities as operating officer and management accountant with the management of the firm's working capital. Topics covered in detail include working capital components; managing cash, receivables, payables and inventory; cash budgeting; short-term financial planning; managing bank relations and cash transactions; basic risk management of credit and foreign currency. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 202, ACCT 302, FINC 321. Accounting major students only except by permit from Department Chair.

ACCT400: Auditing Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

The course is the first of two courses that focus on various types of audits performed by accountants in public practice. Specifically the requirements for audits, compilations, reviews and other type of engagements are addressed. The role of the auditor and related professional responsibilities are discussed. The content of this course is structured for individuals who wish to enter the public accounting profession. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 302 and ACCT 309; Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT401: Advanced Accounting (3 hours lecture)

Advanced Accounting is an upper level course in the undergraduate accounting curriculum. It is an in-depth study of accounting problems for affiliated business enterprises and multinational corporations. It deals with business combinations of two or more business entities. It involves combination and consolidation of financial statements for multi-affiliated corporations. It concerns intercompany transactions between parent and subsidiary companies. The aim is to measure the operating results and financial position for these complex operations. The course further investigates the accounting problems associated with foreign transactions, translation of foreign currencies and hedging activities of an international business enterprise. A high level of knowledge and sophistication in accounting techniques is required for understanding the course material. Relevant pronouncements of the authoritative accounting profession are greatly emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 304 (with departmental approval, ACCT 304 may be taken concurrently); Accounting major students only except by permit from the Department Chair.

ACCT403: Advanced Auditing (3 hours lecture)

This course is a continuation of ACCT 400, Auditing Theory and Practice. Auditing sampling and internal controls in a computerized environment will be discussed. The course will then focus on the application of auditing techniques to transaction cycles such as revenues, warehousing, property, plant and equipment, etc. using a generalized auditing software package and a comprehensive case. Techniques to complete the audit and the other assurance services such as internal, operational and compliance auditing will be the other topics covered in this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 400. Accounting major students only except by permit from Department Chair.

ACCT404: Senior Seminar in Accounting (3 hours lecture)

This course is a comprehensive course in accounting integrating concepts from different functional areas such as Financial & Managerial Accounting, International Accounting, Taxes, Auditing and Accounting Information Systems. The course will require students to apply their analytical skills to research and recommend solutions to unstructured and open-ended problems closely based on current issues facing businesses. This course will utilize cases from various sources, involve oral and/or written presentations, and will emphasize the importance of working as an effective team member. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 400; ACCT 401 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.) Accounting majors only except by permit from Department Chair.

BSLW235: Legal, Ethical, and Global Environment of Business (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the interrelationship of social policies, the legal system, and global business practices in society, with emphasis on the rapidly changing business-legal environment. The relationship among governmental, ethical, social and business issues will also be examined. Previous course BSLW 264 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

BUGN280: Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course will teach business communication concepts in the framework of data analysis and interpretation. Students will be introduced to a variety of technical and business writing practices for information sharing and persuasion. Protocols for letters, memoranda, electronic mail, persuasive messages, executive summaries, and formal reports and proposals are covered. Students will work individually and in teams and be expected to present the results of their analyses in written, graphical and oral formats. Students will be exposed to data sets from various business disciplines and become knowledgeable about regression modeling as well as refresh and apply data analysis skills that include the use of graphical design, descriptive statistical measures, and statistical inference methods in order to draw meaningful conclusions that connect context and the analysis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 173 and INFO 240; and ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

BUGN295: Elements of Business (3 hours lecture)

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with key content knowledge and the skills required to understand and succeed in the business environment. They will explore the organization and operation of contemporary business. Students will be exposed to the elements of Business Strategy and the operation of key functional areas of business such as: production, R&D, marketing, finance and accounting, management, management information systems, and human resources. They will develop an appreciation for the extent to which these functional areas are interdependent. In addition, this course emphasizes the leadership, teamwork and decision making skills necessary to be successful in business. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 204; INBS 250, BSLW 235, INFO 290 and BUGN 280 (May be taken as prerequistes or corequisites.)

BUGN310: Campus to Career Transition (3 hours lecture)

All SBUS majors must register for "Campus to Career Transition" to document their participation in career programming organized by the SBUS Career Services Office and their respective departments. This course is offered each semester on a Pass/Fail only basis. Students must register for CCT for four semesters and attend five programs each semester. Students must attend the "Job Search," "Resume Basics" and "Interviews 101" the first time they register for CCT; otherwise all other program selections are at the discretion of the student. 0 sh.

ECON101: Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces undergraduate students to the macro economy of the United States of America. Students learn how to apply the mechanism needed for the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long-term growth. In addition, they learn to analyze the macroeconomic data and the implications of fiscal and monetary policies. 3 sh.

ECON102: Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture)

In this course, undergraduate students will learn about the organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Students learn the mechanism behind the pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. In addition, they learn to analyze microeconomic data and apply the abstract theoretical models into real life situations. 3 sh.

ECON204: Real Estate Principles & Practice (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the economics of the real estate business, including the general practices and the language of real estate. Providing a basic knowledge of the real estate business the course covers such topics as the physical, legal, locational and other characteristics of real estate. The course emphasizes the market evaluation and financing of real estate, the nature of real estate markets and the regional and local factors that may influence real estate values. Ethical issues are emphasized throughout the course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102 and MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

ECON206: Managerial Economics (3 hours lecture)

The application of economic theory in the decision-making processes of the firm; utilization of economic analysis in the study of demand, costs, pricing and capital investment decisions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 203 or ECON 101 and ECON 102 and INFO 270 or ECON 101 and ECON 102 and INFO 271. Major within School of Business.

ECON207: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The basic determinants of market demand. Input-output relationships in determining cost structure. Determination of prices received by resource owners in the productive process. Theory of the firm and pricing in different types of market organization with varying degrees of competitive conditions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON208: Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3 hours lecture)

The factors comprising aggregate demand and how they interact to determine the level of employment, output and the price level; the role of monetary and fiscal policy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON215: The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

The extent, causes and consequences of poverty, inequality and insecurity. An appraisal of reforms, social insurance, medical care, public housing, rural development. The economics of discrimination and educational opportunity. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ECON221: Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to the professional sports industry under alternative institutional structures. The course addresses the structure and conduct of various sports markets in terms of the relationship between economic theory and evolving public policy alternatives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON223: Economics of Fine and Performing Arts (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to various aspects of the fine and performing arts field. It includes an examination of theater economics, museum economics, and cinema economics, based on microeconomic theory of decisions as it applies to for-profit and non-profit institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON250: Selected Topics in Economics (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of a particular theoretical or applied area of economics. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Major within School of Business.

ECON300: World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture)

Distribution, flow and consumption of mineral resources. Political, economic and social implications of the geography of resources. Basic studies in industrial location, agricultural land use, problems of economic development and population-resource ratios. Examines world trend in production controls and market allocations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or EAES 161 or EAES 170. Major within School of Business.

ECON301: Money and Banking (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the economic role of money and credit in our economy with primary emphasis on federal reserve and treasury operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON303: Economic Growth and Development (3 hours lecture)

Problems of hastening the growth of countries with low incomes per person; the requisites for the economic development, the obstacles to such development, the strategy and tactics of development and aid for development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207. Major within School of Business.

ECON305: Commercial Real Estate: Theory and Practice (3 hours lecture)

By developing an understanding of the relevant market structures, institutional frameworks (e.g., tax laws, social regulations, monetary policy, etc.) and appropriate analytical tools, this course provides students with an operational knowledge of investing in commercial real estate. The analysis focuses on real world examples and emphasizes the use of computer-based programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 204. Major within School of Business.

ECON308: Public Finance (3 hours lecture)

The impact of governmental expenditures, taxes and debt operation on resource allocation, income distribution, economic stabilization and economic growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON310: Urban and Regional Economics (3 hours lecture)

The underlying economic forces operating in the urban economy development of the urban economic unit, relationship of the urban economy to the regional and national economy, economic activity within the urban area and the public sector of the urban economy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON311: Labor Economics (3 hours lecture)

The determinants of wages in the organized and unorganized markets; a historical survey and analysis of the principal institutions and central processes in the labor and manpower areas; an examination of current issues in labor relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON312: Business Cycles and Forecasting (3 hours lecture)

Fluctuations in economic activity which characterize modern industrial economies. Definitions, descriptions and statistical measurement of business cycles are presented along with theories describing the causes of the cycles. Practical application of forecasting techniques to predict the course of future economic and business activity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 203, or INFO 270, or INFO 271 and ECON 208. Major within School of Business.

ECON398: Economics Independent Study

Independent study for juniors and seniors who have developed a special interest as a result of work in a course or who wish to develop their interest through their own guided reading. A member of the Economics Department guides the student in his research and reading. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 and ECON 208.

ECON401: Financial Institutions (3 hours lecture)

The structure and operation of financial institutions, their role in the economy and in the money and capital markets. The techniques and objectives of monetary policy and its effect on financial institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 208 or 301. Major within School of Business.

ECON402: International Economics (3 hours lecture)

The how, why and consequences of the movement of goods, services and factors of production in international exchange and an examination of the financial arrangements used to facilitate trade. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON403: Comparative Economic Systems (3 hours lecture)

The economic systems of planned and mixed economies with special emphasis on the Soviet Union, China, the United Kingdom, the Scandinavian countries and the United States. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business, Russian Area Studies Minor.

ECON407: Economics of Industrial Organization (3 hours lecture)

The causes and effects of structure, size and concentration on competition and market prices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

ECON409: Economics of National Security (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to basic dimensions of national security under alternative institutional structures. The course addresses political, economic, financial, and environmental issues, and includes and analysis of recent innovations in risk management as they apply to the economics of national security in a variety of policy settings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON414: Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture)

This course links economic analysis of the technology and economics of natural resources to global warming. The focus is on the structure of domestic and international natural resource markets, how pricing is derived, and how utilization of natural resources is related to patterns of global warming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON420: Econometrics (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the techniques of applied economic (social science) research. Examination of the tools necessary for applied economic research and methods for dealing with certain problems inherent in economic data. The primary emphasis will be on the application of the techniques to economic data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101, and ECON 102, and ECON 203, or INFO 270, or INFO 271. Major within School of Business.

ECON438: Advanced Seminar in Economics (3 hours seminar)

A seminar designed to integrate economic theory, quantitative tools, and institutional knowledge in a series of applied issues. Students are required to undertake a number of specific oral and written projects that describe their understanding of key elements within the discipline. This course serves as a capstone for Economics students. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Economics and Business Administration with a Concentration in Economics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 206 or ECON 207; ECON 208; INFO 270; seniors only; Economics (ECON and ECOE), Economics w/conc: Business Economics (ECBE) and Business Administration w/conc: Economics (BAEC) majors only.

ECON497: Economics Independent Study

Open to students who wish to undertake reading and/or research in specialized areas of economics. May be repeated five times for a maximum of 18.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 and ECON 208. Major within School of Business.

FINC300: Integrated Core: Finance (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the concepts of corporate finance and its interrelationship with operations, marketing and management. Students will review the content of financial statements, and the implications of the widely used financial ratios. The content of the course is centered on the time value of money relationship and its application to security valuation and capital budgeting decisions. The students will also be introduced to financial planning, working capital management, capital structure policy, the capital acquisition process, and payout policy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BUGN 295.

FINC322: Capital Budgeting Management (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of various investment criteria, especially net present value and internal rate of return. Risk in capital budgeting, capital budgets and performance evaluation, stressing the distinction between accounting and financial criteria. Application of concepts and techniques to such issues as leasing, mergers and acquisitions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321; major within the School of Business.

FINC326: Investment Principles and Portfolio Theory (3 hours lecture)

A review of risk analysis and methods of valuing, fixed-income and equity instruments, the efficient frontier, portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model and an introduction to option and futures market. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321; major within the School of Business.

FINC327: International Financial Management (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to multinational business finance. Foreign exchange markets and exchange rate forecasting. Balance of payment accounts, measures of surplus or deficit and their relevance to financial planning. International financial markets and international banking. Import and export financing. Positioning of funds. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321; major within the School of Business.

FINC350: Special Topics in Finance (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study focusing on a specific area in the theory, policy and contemporary practices in Finance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321. Major within School of Business.

FINC423: Advanced Corporate Finance (3 hours lecture)

Interaction of investment and financing decisions. Optimal capital structure and dividend policy: The Miller-Modigliani propositions. Calls and puts. Option valuation models. Valuation of risky debt and term structure of interest rates. Warrants and convertibles. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 322; major within the School of Business.

FINC425: Working Capital Management (3 hours lecture)

Detailed treatment of topics such as components of working capital; cash budgeting; short-term financial planning. Credit management; cash and inventory management; short-term lending and borrowing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321; major within the School of Business.

FINC429: Real Estate Investment (3 hours lecture)

Covers mortgage financing, ownership forms, tax factors, inflation, leverage, risk/return, cash flow projection, holding period, and disposition strategy. Examines the rent or house-buying decision; land, apartment building, office building, and shopping center investments; and the current investment climate. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321. Major within School of Business.

FINC430: Futures/Options, and other Derivatives (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to derivative instruments including options, futures and swaps. Definitions, concepts, and strategies are explained. Valuation methods are presented. This course also discusses different hedging strategies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 326; major within the School of Business.

FINC431: Advanced International Financial Management (3 hours lecture)

Measurement and management of foreign exchange exposure. Exchange and country risk. The Foreign Investment Decision, multi-national capital budgeting, cost of capital and financial structure. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 327; major within the School of Business.

FINC490: Seminar in Finance (3 hours seminar)

The seminar is the terminal course in the concentration. It has two principal objectives. It provides students with an integrated overview of the major subfields of the concentration - Investments, Corporate and International Finance and Financial Markets and Institutions. Second, students will choose a research topic in consultation with the instructor, make a classroom presentation, and write a formal paper on the topic. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in Finance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 322, and 326, and 327; major within the School of Business.

HOSP250: Hospitality Management (3 hours lecture)

Provides students a basic understanding of the hospitality industry by tracing the industry's growth and development; reviewing the organization of hotels, resorts, casinos, timeshares, food and beverage, club management, managed foodservice and related operations; and by focusing on industry trends and career opportunities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

HOSP320: Hosptiality Co-Op Ed

Provides students with a professional work experience before completing their degree. Enables students to apply their course work knowledge to a professional work setting. Students gain work experience in the areas of oral and written communication, critical thinking, global awareness, leadership, technology, self-directed learning, career readiness, decision-making, social responsibility and responsiveness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 250. Major within School of Business.

HOSP355: Organizational Issues in Hospitality (3 hours lecture)

The hospitality industry offers unique challenges to the general business management student. This course explores those challenges. The course seeks to leverage general management topics by helping students apply their knowledge and skills to the unique aspects of the hospitality industry. The course covers applications in human resources, especially diversity, employment discrimination and union-management relations. Ethics, as it applies to the hospitality industry, is also covered. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 250, MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

HOSP370: Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Technologies in Hospitality (3 hours lecture)

Customer Relationship Management Technologies providing in-depth knowledge and skills in designing, developing, and maintaining computer-based systems for warehousing and mining customer information for such purposes as customer segmentation studies, targeted marketing, and frequency and loyalty programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 250 and INFO 290. Major within School of Business.

HOSP380: Lodging System Management (3 hours lecture)

This is an advanced course providing in-depth knowledge and skills to manage all aspects of the lodging industry in different settings, such as full-service hotel, limited-service hotel/motel, bed and breakfast, extended stay-hotel, suite hotel, resort, casino hotel, cruise line, timeshare and assisted living facility. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 250, MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

HOSP390: Food and Beverage Management (3 hours lecture)

This is an advanced course providing mechanisms and techniques to manage food and beverage provisions in various sectors of the hospitality industry, such as restaurant, bar or beverage operaton, club, contracted or institutional foodservice. In addition, food and beverage functions within various lodging settings (hotel, resort, casino hotel and cruise line) are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 250 and MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

HOSP490: Entrepreneurship in Hospitality (3 hours lecture)

This capstone course guides students through the strategic business development process of lodging and food and beverage establishments. From concept to operations, students engage in a business planning project applying knowledge and skills acquired from foundation and major courses. Students who complete the course will have developed a complete business plan for the design, financing, opening, and on-going operations of a viable business. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in Hospitality Management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 380, HOSP 390. Major within School of Business.

INBS250: Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture)

The course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the dynamics of the global economy, international trade and investment and their linkages with the U.S. economy. Students will learn the fundamentals and interrelationships among the components of international business operations. An emphasis will be on the role of multinational institutions and the cultural, economic, legal, and political environments facing businesses. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or ECON 202.

INBS347: Export/Import Marketing Process (3 hours lecture)

This course covers all aspects of the export/import function from a marketing process standpoint. Topics include: export/import policies -- national and international environment; government programs and incentives to promote exports; tariff systems; choosing export markets and analyzing exports and imports; developing an export program; setting up an export organization; export/import financing; export/import documentation; export pricing; packaging, shipping, traffic and insurance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250, major within the School of Business.

INBS349: International Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course reviews and compares the marketing efforts and specific strategies which firms employ in different cultural, political, economic, and legal environments. Students examine changing international markets, exploring how firms need to quickly adapt to global competition. Issues to be examined include global sourcing, internationl alliances, export regulation, regional trade areas, and the influence of multinational firms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240 or INBS 250. Major within School of Business, Spanish and International Business (SPIB) minor.

INBS352: Economic Relations in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

In the context of global trade and investment initiatives, the course focuses on the motivation and gains from the operating regional trade agreements in the Western Hemisphere. Critical analysis of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Central American Common Market (CACM), the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the Andean Community (AC), and the Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR) receive special attention in this course. New initiatives in bilateral and multilateral trade agreements and their significance for global integration of Latin America are also highlighted in this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250 or LALS 201. Major within School of Business, Spanish and International Business Minor, Latin American and Latino Studies Minor.

INBS356: International Management (3 hours lecture)

Managing organizations in foreign markets is much more complex than managing them in the domestic market. This course emphasizes international/cross-cultural management, including the impact of the foreign country's culture, legal system, government, economics, technology, and political system on entry strategies, organizational structures, leadership styles, motivation techniques, human resources management, and controls. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250. Major within School of Business, Spanish and International Business (SPIB) minor.

INBS358: Finance in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide a framework coupled with a "hands-on" approach relating to investments and overall exposure to Latin America economies. The perspective is that of the financial manager, responsible for real investments in the Latin America economies as well as investment managers, responsible for investment portfolios in the markets of these economies. This course also discusses several outstanding problems of Latin America economies including foreign exchange risk, political risk, and country risk. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250. Major within School of Business, Spanish and International Business Minor.

INBS370: World Trade and Investment (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive overview of economic approaches to trade and investment in the global economy. The topics covered include trends in international trade and investment, causes and effect of trade and investment flows, multilateral institutions and world trading system, political economy of trade and investment policies, international payment accounts, multinational enterprises and foreign direct investment exchange rate determination, and international policy coordination. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250. Major within School of Business.

INBS380: Global Financial Environment (3 hours lecture)

Understanding how foreign exchange markets work and how that knowledge applies to international investing and financing decisions. Determination of exchange rates and exchange rate risk. Linkages between foreign exchange rates, interest rates and inflation rates. Operations of spot and forward currency markets. Hedging, speculation and arbitrage strategies using currency. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250. Major within School of Business.

INBS420: Globalization and World Development (3 hours lecture)

In-depth analysis of current issues faced by developing countries in a continuously integrating world. Analyzes the effect of international trade and international financial markets on a country's development path and changes within. Highlights the role of industrialized nations and multilateral institutions in world development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 370 or INBS 380 or FINC 327 or ECON 402. Major within School of Business.

INBS430: International Financial Markets and Investment (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the current developments and market structure of major international financial markets such as Euro currency, global bond, Euro credit and global equity markets as well as the risks and investment opportunities faced by business operating in these markets. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 370 or INBS 380 or FINC 327 or ECON 402. Major within School of Business.

INBS440: International Retailing (3 hours lecture)

A study of international retailing covering such areas as: (1) retail institutions modi operandi variations from country to country, (2) effects of economic growth, cultural, legal-political and technological environment, (3) the West versus less developed countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the emerging free Eastern Europe, (4) know-how of retailing: business concepts, operating policies, managerial dimensions, (5) foreign direct investments in retailing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 349. Major within School of Business.

INBS482: International Business Co-op Ed

Enhances students' in-class education by providing an opportunity for the students to connect their knowledge in international business with practice in the work place. Working with regional, national, or international profit or non-profit organizations for an extended period of time, students get to observe the international dimension of doing business abroad or at home. The students will need to submit a daily journal and monthly reports reflecting on their learning experience. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Senior standing or departmental approval.

INBS484: Senior Seminar in International Business (3 hours lecture)

This capstone course integrates preceding international business courses and provides an overview of principles and techniques associated with the formulation and implementation of international business strategies and policies. Topics covered include foundations of international business strategy, business-level strategy and corporate-level strategy. Other issues addressed include international regional strategies, world-wide competitors, managing industry competition, leveraging resources, and the impact of technology on international business strategy. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in International Business. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 347 or INBS 349 or INBS 336 and INBS 370 or INBS 380; and departmental approval. Senior standing. Major within School of Business.

INFO173: Spreadsheet Modeling for Business Decisions (3 hours lecture)

This course will emphasize analysis and solutions to contemporary business problems through the use of current version of Microsoft Excel. Recognizing that the business world is technology-driven, affecting people both professionally and personally, extensive knowledge of application-based software is essential as the language of business. Students will be introduced to business decision modeling processes to strengthen their logical and analytical skills. Strong emphasis of the course will be to use Excel as the basis for managerial decision support through the analysis of contemporary business case problems. Students will apply the appropriate functions and features of Excel to solve business cases. The course will also emphasize oral presentation and written reports on business processes used in case solutions in order to further strengthen students' communication skills. 3 sh.

INFO209: Personal Finance (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the principles of personal financial management. Using a life cycle view of the role(s) of money at various stages of life, students discover principles underlying decisions such as how to budget, managing consumer credit, managing taxes, selecting investments, planning for retirement, and estate planning. 3 sh.

INFO230: Introduction to Business Co-Op Work Exp

This is an introductory cooperative education course which integrates formal classroom study and assignments with a supervised full-time or part-time off-campus employment experience. The purpose of this course is to develop self awareness and to explore educational and occupational alternatives. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Sophomore level status (45+ semester hours completed) with a 2.25 minimum grade point average. Major within School of Business.

INFO240: Statistical Methods in Business (3 hours lecture)

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the application of modem statistical methods used in enumerative and analytic studies in business. Topics covered include: use of percentages, proportions, rates, ratios and indices; descriptive statistical methods of data analysis; probability; an introduction to discrete and continuous probability distributions; the normal distribution; classical statistical inference - sampling distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing for the mean and the proportion and for differences in two means and differences in two proportions; an introduction to control charts. Spreadsheet software is integrated in all topics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or Placement Through MSU Placement Test.

INFO281: Programming & Database Fundamentals (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of management information systems. This course focuses on developing foundation knowledge and skills in programming logic and database development. May be taken prior to or concurrently with INFO 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 173 or passing SBUS Computer Proficiency exam. Major within School of Business.

INFO282: Network & Systems Fundamentals (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of management information systems. This course focuses on developing foundation knowledge and skills in computer networks and systems analysis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 173. Major within School of Business.

INFO290: Technology in Business (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an introduction to the impacts of information systems on business. The course focuses on business processes and information needs in organizations, the roles of information systems in addressing these needs, and ultimately, providing support for the tactical and strategic directions of the business. The building blocks of information systems (hardware, software, networking, Internet, cloud computing, systems analysis, security, e-business, database systems, enterprise systems, etc.) are presented with an emphasis on how each of these components impacts business processes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 173.

INFO300: Integrated Core: Operations Management (3 hours lecture)

This course is an intro to managerial concepts & quantitative tools required in the design, operation, and control of processes & systems needed to deliver a product or service in a business. Clearly, this material must be integrated with all of the other functional areas of an organization. In addition to examining the operational concepts, theories and tools, the course will include discussions of the interrelationships of these topics and their usefulness in the areas of marketing, management, finance & business strategy. The course will present methods that ensure that business operations are efficient in using as few resources as needed, & effective in meeting customer requirements. Focus will be on managing the processes that convert inputs (in the forms of materials, labor, and energy) into outputs (in the form of goods and/or services). This course incorporates mathematical, statistical, & decision making methods in the analysis of specific business processes & systems. The topics covered include operations strategy, process optimization & management, inventory control, production planning & scheduling, queuing, supply chain management, quality control, decision making, & project management. Computers are used to solve problems involving complex systems. 1 of 4 courses within the Integrated Semester of the undergraduate program. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BUGN 295.

INFO306: Introduction to Web Development (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to increase awareness and understanding of the movement to Web-based applications and enterprise-level management information systems as well as electronic commerce. This is a hands-on, lab-based Web page design course with significant exposure to the tools and requirements for the production of such systems. Students will learn to use a variety of development tools such as MS-Front Page, scripting languages such as JavaScript, VBScript and Perl and programming styles to develop both individually and in teams applications that simulate the realities of today's information systems and environment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 281; Business Administration major.

INFO320: Administrative Business Communications (3 hours lecture)

The study of communication processes using special problem applications with a theoretical and practical base. Writing proposals, business correspondence, business plans, and handling electronic messaging are covered. Emphasis is also on using presentation materials to complement interpersonal and organizational communication. This course counts as an elective within the business major for all concentrations in Business Administration. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in Management Information Systems or Operations Management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Business Administration majors only; and MKTG 240.

INFO357: Business Computer Programming (3 hours lecture)

This course enhances students' ability to use computer programming to solve business problems. Students are introduced to the concepts of object-oriented programming in business applications. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 281 or departmental approval. Major within School of Business, Information Technology.

INFO380: Computer Networks in Business (3 hours lecture)

This course enhances students' knowledge of data communications, network design, administrations, and distributed information systems. The concepts essential to the design and application of both communication hardware and software are examined. Emphasis is on the analysis and design of networking applications in business. Management of networks, networking security, cost-benefit analysis, introduction of major emerging networking technologies, and evaluation of connectivity options are also covered. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 282 or departmental approval. Major within School of Business.

INFO410: Database Development for Business (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students an opportunity to examine various issues in all phases of database development, including requirement analysis and data modeling, logical design and physical design, data integrity control, SQL queries, internet applications and database administration. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 281 and INFO 290 or departmental approval. Major within School of Business.

INFO412: Management for Information Systems Continuity (3 hours lecture)

This course provides the knowledge and skills required to complete an in-depth analysis of an organization's information systems and infrastructure needs from planning, control, and strategy to the role of security protection, disaster recovery, and business continuity with reliability engineering, performance management, storage-networking and facility design. In addition to the technical and logistical aspects, the course provides an important framework of the management perspective necessary to plan for and successfully react to operational vulnerability and disruptions in public and private organizations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 290. Major within School of Business.

INFO470: Electronic Commerce: Creating Business Value Using Information Technology (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide the student an understanding of the consequences of the introduction of the Internet and the World Wide Web in the way business is conducted. The electronic commerce world is viewed primarily from the point-of-view of MIS. That is, the managerial issues related to the information infrastructure requirements are mainly attended to. Both individuals and organizations have been profoundly affected by related network technologies that have since permutated in form ever since the convergence of advanced communications and information infrastructure and the cable, telephone, television, and telecommunications industries. The student will learn about new forms of business practices in business-to-business, consumer-to-business, and intraorganizational transactions. Specifically, activities in the areas of electronic shopping, publishing, distribution, and collaboration will be explored. The following issues that have arisen as a result of electronic commerce (EC) will be explored: security, authentication, privacy, data encryption, intellectual property rights, freedom of expression using electronic media, fair use policies, legal liabilities, etc. Students will also learn about new organizational forms such as the "virtual" firm that are emerging as a result of EC. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 290. Information Technology (INFT) majors only.

INFO475: Quantitative Decision Making for Business (3 hours lecture)

This course is a capstone course for the Quantitative Methods concentrations and is aimed at applying the quantitative methods learned in the prerequisite courses to solve some real world business problems. It will be a project-oriented course. The class time will be used to discuss the problems and their solution strategies rather than learning more techniques. Computerized tools will be used to solve the problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 372 and INFO 463; Business Administration majors.

INFO490: Decision Support Systems for Business (3 hours lecture)

The course will cover the following topics: decision types and models, heuristics in decision making, the role of data and its collection, group decision making, design of DSS and GDSS, neural computing/learning, uncertainty issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 290; Business Administration major.

INFO491: Independent Study in Information Systems

A student, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, will conduct an in-depth study on a current topic in information systems. A project report or a research paper will be produced after this study. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval; and INFO 290. Major within School of Business.

INFO492: Special Topics in Information Systems

This course covers the topics in the design, implementation, and applications of information systems. The topics also include various information technologies and their applications. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the "special topic" in each course differs from topics previously taken. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 290 and departmental approval. Major within School of Business.

LITM201: Introduction to Leisure and Tourism (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the diversified businesses that comprise the Leisure and Tourism industries. They include, but are not limited to, destination resorts, cruise ships, ski resorts, sports venues and event, meeting, and conference delivery. Topics examined cover the historical development of leisure and tourism as well as events, trends, and issues which shape the industries. 3 sh.

LITM301: Leisure and Tourism Operations (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the basic operations of the most important businesses within the leisure and tourism industries, e.g., food services, gift shops, tour companies, game rooms, casinos, and hotels. In addition, students are afforded the opportunity to network with industry professionals via required field studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LITM 201, SBUS or RPCM majors only.

MGMT300: Integrated Core: Management (3 hours lecture)

Management is viewed as a skill that goes into every function within organizations that involve people, be it marketing, finance or operations. Whether supervisory level management or top level management, students need to understand how organizations work, how to lead, work with, and motivate people within organizations, and how to integrate and manage the dynamic interrelationships among the functional areas of business such as marketing, finance, and operations. The course also stresses current management issues such as workplace diversity, globalization, and digitization of today's firms, and how these forces influence the manager's functions. Topics to be discussed will include manager's functions of planning, organizing, communicating, motivating, leading, controlling and managing change. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BUGN 295.

MGMT315: Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture)

Major approaches to the study of organizations. Organizational systems and structure, systems of communication, power and influence, organizational conflict, coordination and control, leadership, motivation, interpersonal dynamics and change and renewal. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

MGMT316: Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

Motivating managerial and non-managerial employees; effective use of human resources in the organization. The personnel function, techniques of job analysis, description and evaluation, and overall organizational development particularly with minority group members and female employees. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in Management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231; junior standing; Business Administration, Allied Health, Recreation Profession, Fashion Studies or Nutrition and Food Science with concentration in Food Management majors only.

MGMT318: Motivation and Leadership (3 hours lecture)

In-depth analysis of personality and the development of practical models to assist in the solution of leadership problems. Special attention to techniques of analysis and the interpretation of research findings. Examination of different leadership problems facing managers today in various organizations and industries. Focus of the course is on using theory for the development of skills for practical application. Case studies are discussed in class to support this theme. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

MGMT327: Training, Development, and Career Planning (3 hours lecture)

Theory and design of training, development and career planning programs. Assessment of training needs, training and development methods and procedures for evaluating training are considered. Some emphasis is placed on the development of managerial skills through student workshops. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 316. Major within School of Business.

MGMT331: Family Business (3 hours lecture)

Family businesses are an important force in the U.S. economy, contributing over 50% of the country's gross domestic product. This course explores unique challenges and opportunities involved in managing a family business. Some key issues to be covered are dynamics of family interactions with family business culture, market strengths and weaknesses of family-owned firms, and leadership succession. May be repeated once for a total of six credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231. Major within School of Business, Fashion Studies.

MGMT335: Small Business Management (3 hours lecture)

The problems and opportunities of starting and operating a small business. Capital accumulation, adapting technologies to specialized needs, assessing local market opportunities, governmental aids, establishing working relationships with large organizations and problems of growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 202 or ACCT 204; and ECON 101 and ECON 102 and MGMT 231 and MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MGMT363: Business and Society (3 hours lecture)

Business as an institution in our pluralistic society; its relationship with other societal elements such as government, academia, labor and the consumer. American business past, present and future; strengths, weaknesses and overall contribution to society; ecology, minority groups and the quantity and quality of economic growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

MGMT392: Management Co-Op Ed

The Management Internship posts the student to a real business to perform actual management tasks in a going business concern. The student focuses on the practical needs of the business while maintaining liaison with a course coordinator in the Department of Management. Compensation for the assignment is at the discretion of the firm. The firm will assign and monitor meaningful intern tasks and achievements. The primary evaluator of student achievement is the host business supervisor. May only be taken for one semester. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, MGMT 316, senior standing, Business Administration major with concentration in Management only, and departmental approval.

MGMT433: Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 hours lecture)

Attitudes and perspectives for effecting meaningful and profitable change. Concepts of creativity, optimum use of resources, and the impact of technological change. Anticipating needs and wants of all groups influenced by the enterprise; examples of successful entrepreneurship, role-playing and situational exercises. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, FINC 321, MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MGMT435: Organizational Development and Change (3 hours lecture)

Purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of and some skill in the process of planning, introducing, and managing change in organizations. Considerable time will be devoted to the role of the manager as a change agent. Cases and experiential exercises will be used to illustrate the various phases of the change process as well as the different change techniques available. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, majors only, instructor's permission.

MGMT436: Project Management (3 hours lecture)

This course prepares students to develop a project management plan, develop schedules, estimate personnel requirements and estimate costs and delays for typical project management problems in business. This course may be repeated once for a total of six credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, MGMT 316 and INFO 375. Major within School of Business.

MGMT439: Applied Business Strategy (3 hours lecture)

This is the capstone course in the business curriculum that requires students to integrate and build on the knowledge and skills acquired in the business core courses. The course emphasizes the use of business skills in the formulation and implementation of strategy through processes such as industry analysis, value chain analysis, SWOT analysis, and analysis of strategic success including financial performance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 202 or ACCT 204; and FINC 321, MKTG 240, MGMT 231, INBS 250. Seniors only. Starting Summer 2014: MGMT 300, FINC 300, INFO 300 and FINC 300.

MGMT491: Small Business Institute

A field studies course providing management assistance to small businesses in the local community. Students work individually or in small groups under faculty supervision directly with a small business person who has requested their counseling services. Students gain experience in problem solving and in applying marketing, accounting, finance and/or management concepts to actual business situations. The course is focused on the preparation and delivery of the students' consulting report to the client at the end of the semester. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, MKTG 240, FINC 321. Major within School of Business.

MGMT492: Selected Topics in Management

The content of this course varies with each offering. Its purpose is to provide for the comprehensive development and study of an advanced topic of current interest not covered in-depth in the regular curriculum. Examples of topics covered in the past include: labor relations, women in management and database management systems. This course may be repeated for credit as long as the "special topic" in each course differs from topics previously taken. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval; and MGMT 315 or MGMT 316 or MGMT 318. Major within School of Business.

MKTG300: Integrated Core: Marketing (3 hours lecture)

Marketing is viewed as a process for creating value for customers that must be carefully integrated with all other functional areas of an organization. In addition to examining the application of marketing's essential theories, concepts, and tools to organizations, the course will examine the interrelationships of marketing with management, operations and finance. Topics to be discussed will include market research, new product development, demand/sales forecasting, segmentation analysis, branding, pricing, distribution strategies, and promotional tools. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BUGN 295.

MKTG307: Retail Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an overview of the field of retailing. Major retail institutions, e.g., department stores, specialty stores, discount stores, the components of the retail mix and the functional areas of retailing are examined. The marketing strategies of major retail companies as well as the trends that shape them, e.g., globalization, technology, electronic commerce, are analyzed. The course stresses an understanding of the retail customer and the importance of customer service and relationship management. Issues in the management of retail employees are also explored. The concepts in this course are useful for students interested in careers in consumer products and services marketing as well as retailing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240, major within the School of Business, Recreation Profession major (RECR), Fashion Studies major (FASH) or Nutrition and Food Science major with concentration in Food Management (NUFM).

MKTG309: Buying and Distribution Strategies (3 hours lecture)

Buying practices that have changed since the development of giant retail organizations (Wal-Mart and Home Depot) are studied and the effect it has had on "traditional" buying. Other areas covered are the functions of the merchandise division and the job challenges today. Micro-retailing, the buying and merchandise problems of today's stores are covered. Physical handling, comparison shopping, planning the buyer's budget and the six-month buying plans are also important topics. Buying for fashion vs. staple merchandise is compared as are the different problems of buying for a large or small retail firm. Resident buying offices and foreign buying are important topics in this buying course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG310: Services Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course builds on basic marketing concepts to focus on the role of service as a primary source of competitive advantage for both service and non-service organizations in a predominantly service economy. The course examines the marketing and managerial implications of the differences between goods and services. The course discusses many service marketing concepts, including the relationship between the service provider and customer, the service profit chain, the real-time process experience of services, customer satisfaction and service quality. Specific applications for service sectors such as retail, sports, events, tourism, financial services, healthcare, and professional services will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; Major within the School of Business.

MKTG315: International Tourism Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on marketing practice and strategy within the context of global and international tourism markets, which include, but are not limited to, destination resorts/lodging, amusement parks and tourist attractions, festivals and fairs, cruise ships, ski resorts, sports venues, and event, meeting, and conference delivery. It evaluates cultural differences as well as encourages students to apply marketing strategy and skills to the tourism industry. Satisfies the Graduation Writing Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; Major within the School of Business.

MKTG320: Sports Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture)

The sports industry is examined from a leisure and tourism perspective applying marketing and management theories. An interdisciplinary approach is applied in developing the ability to address the array of problems faced by sports marketers. Some of the topics include: sport consumers; promotions (advertising, sponsorship, endorsements); venue management; crowd and safety control; and licensing. The course provides a foundation for entry into middle level marketing and management positions in sports-related industries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 310 and MKTG 315; School of Business major only.

MKTG321: Event Marketing and Planning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how successful events are created and marketed. It explores the structure of the events industry; the unique challenges of planning and executing an event; and how marketing theory can be applied to increase an event's success. Best practices related to event safety, event sponsorship and promotion and market analysis are also discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 310 and MKTG 315; School of Business major only.

MKTG341: Consumer Behavior (3 hours lecture)

An examination and analysis of consumer behavior related theories and concepts, which contribute towards successful domestic and international marketing management. This will include understanding behavioral science findings; market research techniques and consumer attitudes; socio-economic and demographic variables as they apply to end-user consumers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240, major within the School of Business, Recreation Profession major (RECR), Fashion Studies major (FASH), or Nutrition and Food Science major with concentration in Food Management (NUFM).

MKTG342: Sales Concepts and Practices (3 hours lecture)

Understanding the organization, administration and evaluation of the selling function within the firm. Topics will include: mechanics of the selling process, developing personal attributes necessary for a career in sales; selection, training, and supervision; performance evaluation; compensation and motivation of sales personnel and relationship with other marketing functions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG344: Advertising Theory and Techniques (3 hours lecture)

A broad introduction to advertising, promotion and marketing communications: historical roots of advertising; advertising from the viewpoint of clients, ad agencies and media; and both the marketing aspects (strategy development; account management) and creative aspects (copywriting; art direction; production and editing) of advertising. Covers all forms of advertising: print, broadcast; out-of home; and the latest advertising media such as direct mail and response; cable TV; and internet/interactive. In addition to traditional lectures, guest lectures are provided by the advertising professionals. Students also have a practical opportunity to create ads and commercials. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business, Graphic Design, Fashion Studies.

MKTG345: Service and Nonprofit Marketing (3 hours lecture)

While noting the increasingly blurred distinguishment between the manufacturing and service sectors in today's post industrial economies, the first half of this course focuses on the problems and issues surrounding the effective marketing of the intangible aspects of a product service offering. Current methods for researching and analyzing service markets are taught and then applied by students in marketing plan formulation and case analyses with particular stress placed on translating the intangible aspects of a service into more measurable (and therefore, tangible) characteristics aimed at enhancing customer satisfaction and retention. The second part of the course focuses on the nonprofit marketing, i.e., public and private nonprofit organizations. Students learn how to manage organizations such as government, religious, charitable, political, educational, and fund raising, institutions as well as marketing their endeavors more effectively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG350: Pharmaceutical and Health Care Marketing (3 hours lecture)

A broad overview of the unique roles played by consumers, health care professionals, pharmacists, drug manufacturers, hospitals, clinics, government agencies, health insurers and others in this field that represents more than 20 percent of national GDP. Students learn how a complex mosaic of market, economic, social and governmental forces make these dynamic arenas in which to apply marketing theories, strategies and techniques. Team-teaching approach, as well as guest lecturers from the pharmaceutical and health care fields. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG355: Sports, Events and Tourism Marketing Internship (3 hours cooperative education)

Students are required to accumulate 200 hours of marketing experience (approximately 15 - 20 hours/per week) working for a sport, events or tourism organization. In addition, students complete assignments designed to enhance their understanding of marketing strategies and tactics used by the employing organization, industry trends, career opportunities, and the attitudes and skills necessary for advancement. Job performance is assessed via progress reports submitted by the cooperating employer and a site visit by a member of the Sports Events and Tourism Marketing faculty. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; Major within the School of Business; departmental approval.

MKTG399: Business Work Experience II

Business Work Experience II integrates classroom study with supervised work experience and intensifies the experience gained through participation in Introduction to Business Work Experience. This course will develop, through practical experience, the student's expertise in the major field of study by providing a bridge from the academic environment to the world of the entering professional. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 230; departmental approval. Major within School of Business.

MKTG442: Marketing Research (3 hours lecture)

A broad overview of the many methods used to collect consumer, business and market data and turn it into useful information for marketing decision-makers. Starting with the historical factors leading to development of MR in America, this course touches on all the vital theories, methods, and practices: secondary research (including databases and computer literature searches); qualitative (focus group) research; quantitative research (observational, surveys and experiments); data analysis (coding, tabulation, and an introduction to multivariate techniques); and effective communication of research findings (written reports, personal presentations, computer graphics and mapping.) The course includes student research projects, field trips and a MR videotape series produced at MSU, as well as traditional lectures. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in Marketing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240, MKTG 341, INFO 270. Major within School of Business.

MKTG445: Marketing Strategies in Sports, Event and Tourism Industries (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the marketing planning process in relationship to overall corporate strategic planning framework is presented from theoretical and practical perspectives in the field of sports, events and tourism industries. An increased understanding of the many variables involved in marketing decision-making and an awareness of current and sophisticated techniques used in the problem-solving process are analyzed. This capstone course integrates materials from the curriculum in an applied format utilizing group case analysis, marketing simulations and sport, event and tourism market/business plan production. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 320, MKTG 321 and MKTG 307; Major within the School of Business.

MKTG446: Marketing Strategy and Implementation (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the marketing planning process in relationship to overall corporate strategic planning framework is presented from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. An increased understanding of the many variables involved in marketing decision-making and an awareness of current, more sophisticated techniques used in such problem solving are analyzed. This capstone course integrates materials from the entire marketing curriculum in an applied format utilizing group case analysis, marketing simulations and market/business plan production. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Seniors only. MKTG 442 may be taken as a Prerequisite or Corequisite. Major within School of Business.

MKTG482: Independent Owned and Franchised Retailing (3 hours lecture)

The opportunities and challenges of independent and franchised retail entrepreneurship are explored. Emphasis is placed on the steps necessary to establish a new retail venture and how to successfully compete with the discount mass merchandisers which proliferate today's retail landscape. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG483: Seminar in Retail Management (3 hours seminar)

Students analyze trends/problems in the major retail segments and study the "best practices" of the top domestic and international retailers. In addition, the various ethical/legal dilemmas confronting today's retail executive are explored. Visiting experts, field trips, and reading assignments from current retail trade journals are utilized to keep the course on the "cutting edge." Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Business Administration with a Concentration in Retail Merchandizing and Management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 307 or MKTG 341; departmental approval; School of Business (SBUS) majors only.

MKTG489: Internet Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an introduction to internet marketing and customer-centric marketing programs. The course focuses on the various unique factors and issues that electronic tools bring to marketing, namely the ability to directly market to individuals and to interact in ways that consumers find valuable. Issues examined are using the internet to attract new customers, retain existing customers, build brand awareness, and expand into new markets. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business, Fashion Studies.

MKTG490: Marketing Co-op Ed

Working with public and private organizations (for profit), students are afforded an opportunity to apply classroom theoretics to real-world job situations. Illustrative engagements include team coordinated marketing research and advertising effectiveness studies; sales assistantships, public relations and retailing and distribution experiences. Market analysis and product feasibility and assessment exposures are accompanied by more organizationally tailored practical experiences in cultivating the student's resume. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; departmental approval; School of Business (SBUS) majors only.

MKTG492: Independent Study in Marketing

An opportunity for a student to study or engage in a topic currently not covered in existing course selections or to take a required course normally given, but unavailable in conventional format. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 341; departmental approval; SBUS majors only.

MKTG493: Special Topics in Marketing

An examination of topics not covered in normal marketing course work. Course to be given on demand with topics varying according to current issues arranged between faculty and student. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; School of Business (SBUS) majors only.

NUFD192: Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the components of the food we eat and the nutrients necessary for life. The functions of nutrients, their interrelationships, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients are discussed. The factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, physical activity, and environmental factors, which influence food intake and requirements of nutrients, are covered. Students learn to measure and evaluate their nutritional status and body composition using equipment used in laboratory and analyze their diets using computer software. They plan meals considering individual's nutritional requirements in the laboratory. Historical, national, and international issues regarding food and nutrition are presented. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Management (NUFM), or General (NUFG), Business Administration majors with a concentration in Hospitality Management (BAHM), and American Dietetic Association Certificate Program students (ADA).

NUFD240: Sanitation Management and Food Microbiology: Certification (1 hour lecture)

Food safety for effective food service management. Understanding of Sanitation Risk Management, microbial food contaminants, and food safety regulations. Students will be entitled to take the "ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification" examination. 1 sh.

NUFD350: Quantity Food Applications (4 hours lab)

Capstone lecture and laboratory experiences to support basic concepts of quantity food purchasing and production. Students will learn hands-on skills to produce culinary products in large quantities. Laboratory assignments in the MSU Food Management laboratory and in functioning food service facilities off campus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 253; HOSP 411 or HOSP 390; and junior or senior standing. Students must provide proof of current health insurance coverage and a negative PPD test.

NUFD353: Catering and Banquet Management (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed for those who need to know how food is prepared and then served in a catered or banquet setting. Students learn how to select and determine costs of catered food, plan a catered banquet and various culurally influenced serving styles. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 350. Current health insurance and negative PPD test required.