Sustainability Science Major (B.S.) - Undergraduate - 2013 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2013 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.


SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE MAJOR

Complete 76 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. CORE COURSES

    Complete the following for 16 semester hours:

    EAES 101 Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    EAES 160 The Human Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 202 Introduction to Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 370 World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 402 Sustainability Science Seminar (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. COLLATERAL COURSES

    Complete the following 2 requirements:

    1. Complete one of the following sequences:

      1. Complete 2 courses:

        MATH 112 Precalculus Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
        MATH 116 Calculus A (4 hours lecture) 4
      2. Complete 2 courses:

        MATH 122 Calculus I (4 hours lecture) 4
        MATH 221 Calculus II (4 hours lecture) 4
    2. Complete 6 courses:

      BIOL 113 Principles of Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 4
      BIOL 213 Introduction to Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      CHEM 120 General Chemistry I (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      CHEM 121 General Chemistry II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      ECON 101 Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 102 Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete 2 requirements for a total of 30 semester hours - 31 semester hours:

    1. Complete one course from each of the following 6 groups for a total of 16 semester hours - 21 semester hours:

      1. GLOBAL SYSTEMS

        1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list

        ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
        ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
        EAES 261 Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 262 Our Finite Earth: Population and Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 300 Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 360 Contemporary Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 215 The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 414 Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECON 419 Economics Of Energy And Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 230 Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
        SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
        SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. URBAN SYSTEMS

        1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list

        ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
        EAES 281 Introduction to American Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 283 Urban Georgraphy (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 380 Transportation (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 385 Urbanization and Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 391 Quantitative Methods in Geography and Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 484 Urban Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 315 Urban Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
        SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. DECISION-MAKING SYSTEMS

        1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list

        EAES 361 Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 363 Geopolitics (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 460 Environmental Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 250 Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture) 3
        INBS 370 World Trade and Investment (3 hours lecture) 3
        LAWS 220 Conflict and Its Resolution (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 231 Management Processes (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 315 Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 363 Business and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
        MGMT 436 Project Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. SURFACE PROCESSES

        1 course for 2 semester hours - 4 semester hours from the following list

        EAES 200 Geomorphology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 210 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        EAES 310 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hours lab) 3
        EAES 311 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 321 Economic Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 340 Sedimentology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 341 Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        EAES 410 Advanced Topics in GIScience (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 451 Coastal Marine Geology (4 hours lecture) 4
        EAES 452 Dynamic Beach Processes (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
        EAES 453 Tidal Marsh Sedimentations (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      5. CLIMATE AND HYDROLOGIC PROCESSES

        1 course for 3 semester hours - 4 semester hours from the following list.

        EAES 201 Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 230 Hydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        EAES 330 Fluvial Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 331 Geohydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 332 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 350 Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 403 Meteorology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 454 Human Impact on the Coastal Zone 4
      6. BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES

        1 course for 2 semester hours - 4 semester hours from the following list

        AQUA 351 Aquatic Biological Processes (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 254 Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 256 Applied Environmental Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 300 Environmental Biology and Related Controversial Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 370 Principles of Ecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 460 Biological Oceanography (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 461 Aquatic Ecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I (3 hours lecture) 3
        CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II (3 hours lecture) 3
        CHEM 232 Experimental Organic Chemistry I (4 hours lab) 2
        CHEM 233 Experimental Organic Chemistry II (4 hours lab) 2
        CHEM 320 Environmental Chemical Analysis (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        CHEM 325 Atmospheric Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
        CHEM 330 Green Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 322 Environmental Geochemistry (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        EAES 427 Organic Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 9 semester hours - 15 semester hours from the following:

      ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      AQUA 351 Aquatic Biological Processes (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 254 Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 256 Applied Environmental Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 300 Environmental Biology and Related Controversial Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 370 Principles of Ecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 460 Biological Oceanography (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 461 Aquatic Ecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry II (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 232 Experimental Organic Chemistry I (4 hours lab) 2
      CHEM 233 Experimental Organic Chemistry II (4 hours lab) 2
      CHEM 320 Environmental Chemical Analysis (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      CHEM 325 Atmospheric Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHEM 330 Green Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 200 Geomorphology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 201 Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 210 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 230 Hydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      EAES 261 Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 262 Our Finite Earth: Population and Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 280 Principles of Land Use (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 281 Introduction to American Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 283 Urban Georgraphy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 300 Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 310 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hours lab) 3
      EAES 311 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 321 Economic Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 322 Environmental Geochemistry (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 330 Fluvial Geography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 331 Geohydrology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 332 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 340 Sedimentology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 341 Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 350 Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 360 Contemporary Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 361 Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 363 Geopolitics (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 380 Transportation (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 385 Urbanization and Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 391 Quantitative Methods in Geography and Urban Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 403 Meteorology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 410 Advanced Topics in GIScience (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 427 Organic Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 451 Coastal Marine Geology (4 hours lecture) 4
      EAES 452 Dynamic Beach Processes (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      EAES 453 Tidal Marsh Sedimentations (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 2
      EAES 454 Human Impact on the Coastal Zone 4
      EAES 460 Environmental Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      EAES 484 Urban Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 215 The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 414 Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 419 Economics Of Energy And Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 250 Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 370 World Trade and Investment (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 220 Conflict and Its Resolution (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 231 Management Processes (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 315 Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 363 Business and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 436 Project Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 315 Urban Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 230 Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

ANTH155: Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to a broad, cross-cultural, evolutionary perspective on urban settlements. The goal is to provide students with a framework of theoretical models and concepts for analyzing and understanding the learned behavior of people in cities. Most of the course examines contemporary North American cities with additional data from African, South American, and European cities. Topics covered include the archaeology of cities, world systems theory, transnational corporations, the community study model, urban fieldwork, migration, class, poverty, gentrification, homelessness and hip-hop. Meets General Education (GER) 2002 Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH360: Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The relationships between culture and the bio-physical environment, as well as the cultural environment. The emphasis will be on primitive and non-Western cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH422: Environment and Community (3 hours lecture)

The overall goal of this course is to examine the relationship between the structure, composition, formation and evolution of communities and their environment. The course has three major and interrelated objectives: one, to provide an overview of the major theoretical frameworks that have been utilized to conceptualize community-environment interactions; two, using case studies, demonstrate the use of anthropological methods and perspectives in resolving environment problems affecting communities, in diverse socio-cultural contexts; three, provide examples of the contributions of anthropology to environmental policy making. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH423: Community and Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 312 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380.

ANTH429: Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture)

Selected case studies of community development programs nationally and internationally and their implications for community development in New Jersey, importance of citizen participation, inclusion of people with disabilities, aging in place, localization theory, smart growth, ecovillages, cohousing, permaculture, community supported agriculture, community land trusts, community development banks and corporations, program evaluation skills. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

AQUA351: Aquatic Biological Processes (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Aquatic Biological Processes is a course that introduces students to the fundamental biological systems associated with marine and fresh water communities and serves as the foundation aquatic biological course for the BS/MS program in Aquatic and Coastal Sciences. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 113, CHEM 120, CHEM 121.

BIOL113: Principles of Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)

Principles of Biology II will provide an introductory level study of biodiversity and the origins of life, phylogenetic relationships among organisms, genetics, developmental biology, reproduction, the biology of populations and communities, and ecosystem processes. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Interdisciplinary Core, Scientific Issues. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or a satisfactory score on the Math department's precalculus readiness test.

BIOL213: Introduction to Ecology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Semester-long field oriented course designed as an introduction to the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on identifying and characterizing the variety of habitats in New Jersey through field observations, group and individual projects and specimen collection. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 113.

BIOL254: Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Microbiological concepts and techniques applicable to food and dairy processing, health and disease, water, waste and other environmental problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL256: Applied Environmental Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Microbiological concepts and techniques applicable to environmental microbiology: water, waste and other environmental problems, health and diseases. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 120.

BIOL300: Environmental Biology and Related Controversial Issues (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of ecological problems of today's population trends and control, food production, environmental deterioration, waste disposal etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 213.

BIOL370: Principles of Ecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

To acquaint the biology majors with the general principles of ecology, population dynamics and adaptations of plants and animals to the various habitats. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 213.

BIOL460: Biological Oceanography (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Biological processes within oceans and estuaries are considered in relation to the physical environment. Field and laboratory work. (Not offered every year.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 213.

BIOL461: Aquatic Ecology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Biological and physical processes of rivers and lakes. Field work and laboratory. (Not offered every year.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and BIOL 113 (or BIOL 120 and BIOL 132 if completed prior to Fall 2002) or departmental approval.

CHEM120: General Chemistry I (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introductory lecture and laboratory course for science majors, prerequisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Introduction to atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory stresses techniques and data treatment and their use in examining chemical systems. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics readiness test OR a grade of C- or better in MATH 100 or MATH 111 or MATH 112 or MATH 116 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or MATH 222. Satisfactory score on the Chemistry readiness test OR a grade of C- or better in CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 113.

CHEM121: General Chemistry II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introductory lecture and laboratory course for science majors, prerequisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Introduction to thermochemistry, kinetics; general acid base, precipitation, redox equilibria, electrochemistry and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory stresses techniques and data treatment and their use in examining chemical systems. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM230: Organic Chemistry I (3 hours lecture)

Structure and bonding in organic compounds: nomenclature, reactions, properties, and aromatic compounds: stereochemistry; structure analysis by IR, NMR, UV, and MS; introduction to molecular orbital theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 121 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM231: Organic Chemistry II (3 hours lecture)

Nomenclature, reactions, properties, and synthesis of ethers, epoxides, alcohols, amines, and carbonyl compounds; carbohydrates; amino acids, peptides and proteins; pericyclic reactions; synthetic polymers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 230 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM232: Experimental Organic Chemistry I (4 hours lab)

A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM 230. Basic techniques for the separation, analysis and synthesis of organic compounds: recrystallization, distillation, extraction, GC, HPLC, TLC, GC/MS, IR, H/C13- NMR, chemical safety methods and regulations. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 230 is a prerequisite or corequisite.

CHEM233: Experimental Organic Chemistry II (4 hours lab)

A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM 231 and after completion of CHEM 232. Basic techniques for organic synthesis, mechanistic studies, separation and analysis, and chemical safety: multistep syntheses, spectral data-base searching, phase-transfer catalysis, anhydrous procedures, analysis of unknowns by wet-chemical and spectral methods. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 231 and 232 with a grade of C- or better. CHEM 231 may be taken as a corequisite.

CHEM320: Environmental Chemical Analysis (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

A study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the environment. Lecture and lab will stress the theory, methodology, techniques, and instrumentation for air, water and soil analysis for contaminants. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 230 and CHEM 232 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM325: Atmospheric Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

Atmospheric chemistry of the major pollutants of concern in today's environment, the emission sources, air/water and air/soil partitioning and exchange, atmospheric transport pathway, transformation processes (biological degradation, hydrolysis, photochemical transformations), deposition processes, pollutant chronic and acute health impacts, prevention and regulation. Course requirements: 2 field trips. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 230 and CHEM 232 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM330: Green Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

The focus of the course will be on the principles and applications of Green Chemistry, and its potential role in the minimization or elimination of negative impacts on the environment by the chemical industry, and the establishment of safe chemical practices. Topics such as, catalysis, development of more environmentally friendly and sustainable chemical processes and industrial case studies will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 231 with a grade of C- or better.

EAES101: Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

An introduction to the physical characteristics of planet earth. The focus is on processes and interactions of the four components of the earth system: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. An understanding of the human impact on earth systems is also developed and maintained in perspective. Satellite information, aerial photography, maps, charts and other Geographic Information Systems technologies are used to study planet earth in this course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 107 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES160: The Human Environment (3 hours lecture)

An interdisciplinary course which explains the human impact, as social groups and individuals, on the natural environment. It explores the relationships and interconnectedness between natural processes and social, economic, cultural, technological, and political culture. Critical environmental issues are discussed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course ENVR 109 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES200: Geomorphology (3 hours lecture)

Major controls of climate and the landforms of North America are analyzed in order to gain an understanding of how the continent compares and is related to the rest of the world. The basis and distinct characteristics of the subdivisions of North America are examined in order to bring out contrasts and unique features within the continent. Previous course GEOS 254 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105 or EAES 107.

EAES201: Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Presents a basic understanding of the dynamic atmosphere and explores the impacts that weather and climate have on humans and the biosphere. Basic physical laws of energy and motion are employed to explain temperature, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, storms, and how climates vary regionally. Connections are made toward management of weather hazards, air pollution, impacts on agriculture and economy, and environmental and social implications of climate change. Lectures are supplemented by current events discussions and hands-on exercises in lab sections. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 257 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES202: Introduction to Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to sustainability science and the challenges confronting society's transition to global sustainability; an investigation into the systems and processes basic to sustainability science; and the relationship of sustainability science to business, public policy, and the sciences. Previous course ENVR 233 effective through Spring 2012. Satisfies the Graduation Writing Requirement for all BS Sustainability Science majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENVR 109 and GEOS 107.

EAES210: Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduces the basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing. Focus on digital cartographic science, graphic design, spatial data and image portrayal and inquiry, map overlays, and applications. Previous course EUGS 270 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMPT 183, EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107, EAES 160, EAES 161 or EAES 170.

EAES230: Hydrology (3 hours lecture)

Water, its availability, distribution and usefulness. Hydrologic cycle examined in detail. Interaction with man and his usage. Applications to models and systematic processes. Previous courses ENVR 252 and GEOS 252 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105 or EAES 107.

EAES250: Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A general study of the marine sciences, including origin and evolution of the oceans, physical and chemical properties of seawater, marine life, oceanic circulation, atmospheric-ocean exchange and other processes that take place in the oceans. This course also deals with marine resources and human interaction with the marine environment. Field trips required. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 250. Previous course PHMS 210 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES261: Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture)

The emphasis of this course is on the imbalance of world population growth and distribution in comparison with the availability of natural resources. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES262: Our Finite Earth: Population and Resources (3 hours lecture)

Implications of the population explosion and the rising rate of resource consumption. Focuses on the alternative ways various societies can achieve equilibrium between population and economic development within the framework of limited world resources. Previous course EUGS 203 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES280: Principles of Land Use (3 hours lecture)

Geographical analysis of rural and urban land use patterns in the United States. Field work stresses mapping techniques and socio-economic aspects of urban land use in the New York-New Jersey metropolitan area. Previous course EUGS 204 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES281: Introduction to American Urban Studies (3 hours lecture)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the development of American cities and their suburbs, with an emphasis on current patterns of urbanism and urbanization. The growth and evolution of metropolitan systems, urban-suburban ecology, and planning responses to critical metropolitan issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course EUGS 206 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES283: Urban Georgraphy (3 hours lecture)

Principles of location, interaction in the socioeconomic spheres, and the increasing importance of sustainable environmental management are dominant themes. Close attention to socio-spatial conditions, especially the housing sector, are addressed, as well as the suburbanization process and the urban sprawl challenge to a viable long-term urban system. Assignments are structured to introduce students to professional presentations, both maps and graphics, and written analysis. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. Previous course EUGS 213 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES300: Energy Transitions: A Global Dependence (3 hours lecture)

This course assesses the interactions of shifting energy dependence and adaptive technologies to add energy sources to the current national energy matrices. Included in this analysis will be a discussion of the growing roster of accessible energy sources by type and environmental source and environmental limitations. History, economy, politics, and culture will be addressed to provide the social context to gauge the growing impact of energy dependence in the contemporary global system. Previous course ENVR 315 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207, ECON 208, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES310: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hours lab)

This course deals with fundamental principles and applications of GIS. Various ways in which GIS can be used in planning and management analysis and research will be discussed. Students will learn the issues which need to be considered when planning and implementing GIS. One or two widely used software packages will be employed as a tool to study GIS applications. Previous courses GEOS 470 and EUGS 470 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 210.

EAES311: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of Environment (3 hours lecture)

Systematic study of multiband spectral reconnaissance of the environment; multifrequency radar systems and their uses. Previous courses GEOS 455 and ENVR 455 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 210.

EAES321: Economic Geology (3 hours lecture)

Geology and geography of non-metallic and metallic mineral resources and fuels. Problems associated with their occurrence and exploitation. Required field trips. (Not given every year.) Previous course GEOS 310 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220.

EAES322: Environmental Geochemistry (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Chemical principles and methods applied to the study of interactions among lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Topics such as water pollution, waste disposal and human impact on global geochemical cycles will be discussed. Laboratory will stress the measurement of chemical properties related to water and soil quality as well as computer modeling of chemical transport in porous media. Previous course GEOS 454 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220 or CHEM 230.

EAES330: Fluvial Geography (3 hours lecture)

Detailed study of streams and rivers emphasizing processes causing variations of size and shape; the morphology of streams and stream channels; processes, quantitative techniques. Previous courses GEOS 352 and EUGS 352 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200 or EAES 230 or departmental approval.

EAES331: Geohydrology (3 hours lecture)

The study of ground water with particular emphasis given to its mode of migration, chemistry and relation to the geographic environment. Particular attention is given to Darcy's law, soil porosity, soil permeability and the ability to withdraw water for human consumption. Water pollutants and salt water incursions are investigated. Spatial distributions are analyzed and the processes examined. Previous course GEOS 452 and ENVR 452 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 230 or EAES 240.

EAES332: Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture)

Climatology emphasizing moisture as one of the fundamental factors in climatic analysis; processes and problems of classification and variability. Examines energy and water balance. Previous course ENVR 456 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 201, EAES 230 or EAES 301.

EAES340: Sedimentology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Geological processes and agents which form, transport, deposit, consolidate and alter sediments. Interpretation of the resultant sedimentary rocks. Laboratory work on the texture, mineralogy and mass properties of sedimentary particles. Required field trips. (Not offered every year.) Previous course GEOS 437 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 220, EAES 230, EAES 240 and EAES 250.

EAES341: Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Origin, composition, properties and classification of soils. Additional topics include water in soils and human impact on soil resources. Laboratory covers the measurement of soil properties and principles of soil mapping and soil resource assessment. Field trips are required. Previous course GEOS 450 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 270, ANTH 360, ANTH 370, BIOL 213, CHEM 230, EAES 200, EAES 220, EAES 230 or EAES 240.

EAES350: Oceanography (3 hours lecture)

Study of the physical and chemical properties of sea water, oceanic circulation, waves and tides, and estuarine and shoreline processes. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 350. Previous course GEOS 360 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 240, EAES 250, PHMS 250 or departmental approval.

EAES360: Contemporary Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources (3 hours lecture)

Designed to focus attention on specific environmental problem areas or utilization of resources through assigned readings which provide background for open class discussion. Previous course GEOS 320 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 261, EAES 262 or departmental approval.

EAES361: Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture)

The course studies U.S. environmental policy in air, water, land use, agriculture, energy, and waste disposal and other areas. It examines the major ideas that shape environmental policy, the institutional processes by which these ideas are turned into policy, and how these policies affect both U.S. and global environments. Issues of international environmental policy will also be discussed. Previous course ENVR 313 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES202, EAES281, EAES283, JUST209, LAWS200, JURI210, POLS201 or departmental approval.

EAES363: Geopolitics (3 hours lecture)

Main theories of the field and their application to selected political entities, current problem zones and the spatial interaction of nations. Previous course EUGS 408 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES370: World Resources and Industries (3 hours lecture)

Distribution, flow and consumption of mineral resources. Political, economic and social implications of the geography of resources. Basic studies in industrial location, agricultural land use, problems of economic development and population-resource ratios. Examines world trend in production controls and market allocations. Previous course EUGS 300 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207, ECON 208, EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281 or EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES380: Transportation (3 hours lecture)

Transportation is the study of spatial interaction of economic factors and societal functioning. Transportation flows are analyzed in the context of technological change, degree of accessibility, different transport cost surfaces, and transportation as it relates to land use planning. Previous course EUGS 234 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281 or EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES385: Urbanization and Environment (3 hours lecture)

Examines interaction between man and the physical urban environment. Studies dynamic and physical processes as related to air, water and noise pollution, and hydrologic and geologic hazards. Previous course EUGS 331 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, EAES 210, EAES 281, EAES 283 or departmental approval.

EAES391: Quantitative Methods in Geography and Urban Studies (3 hours lecture)

Treatment of measurements and design in geography; definition of problems, hypotheses formulation and tests of hypotheses by alternative methods of measurement. Geographic applications of computer methods, multi-variate analysis, systems analysis, data bank maintenance and evaluation. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geography. Previous course EUGS 310 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 109 and EAES 210.

EAES402: Sustainability Science Seminar (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of a literature search and application of research tools and methodologies appropriate for completion of a project, paper, or internship in sustainability science. Previous course ENVR 465 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 202, BIOL 213 and EAES 370.

EAES403: Meteorology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere. Meteorological instruments, principles of atmospheric physics, weather patterns and measurements of changes within the atmosphere. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geoscience. Previous course GEOS 457 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 301 or departmental approval.

EAES410: Advanced Topics in GIScience (3 hours lecture)

This course will allow students with demonstrated knowledge and skills in the geographic information sciences (GIS and/or Spatial Analysis) to expand on those skills by applying them to a particular geological or geographical issue. Students will work closely with faculty to select appropriate project(s) based on the student's interest and the professor's expertise. Depending on the project's scope and scale, the course will use current software such as ESRI's ArcGIS or ERDAS Imagine. Previous courses EUGS 475 and GEOS 475 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 310 or EAES 311.

EAES427: Organic Geochemistry (3 hours lecture)

This is a basic course in organic geochemistry, covering the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks, emphasizing fossil fuels and environmental contaminants. Previous course GEOS 453 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: AQUA 351 or BIOL 350 or BIOL 370 or CHEM 310 or CHEM 320 or CHEM 370 or EAES 320 or EAES 322 or EAES 340 or EAES 341 or EAES 342.

EAES451: Coastal Marine Geology (4 hours lecture)

A study of the geologic processes concerned with the supra-, inter-, and sub-tidal areas of the near shore environment. Field studies will emphasize the dynamics of erosion and deposition as well as general sedimentation associated with modification of barrier beaches and other land forms of the New Jersey shoreline. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 451. Previous course PHMS 481 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 340, EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 441 or departmental approval.

EAES452: Dynamic Beach Processes (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Study of the processes and forces involved in material transport within the beach zone. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 452. Previous course PHMS 483 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 340, EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 441 or departmental approval.

EAES453: Tidal Marsh Sedimentations (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Processes involved in sediment transport and deposition within the marsh system. Geologic history of tidal marshes. Offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 453. Previous course PHMS 484 effective through Spring 2012. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 340, EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 441 or departmental approval.

EAES454: Human Impact on the Coastal Zone

A study of man's economic, political, legal and social impacts on the physical and biological aspects of the coastal zone, primarily a field course with supporting lectures and discussion. Previous course GEOS 403 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 350, PHMS 350, AQUA 351, EAES 451, EAES 452 or departmental approval.

EAES460: Environmental Law (3 hours lecture)

The study of the National Environmental Policy Act; the Environmental Impact Statement; the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; Solid and Hazardous Waste; related environmental laws, i.e. OS&H act; and litigation are analyzed. Aspects of environmental law, within which institutions and corporations must operate, are discussed. Previous courses ENVR 410 and EUGS 410 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 360, EAES 300, EAES 302, EAES 310, EAES 320, EAES 322, EAES 341, EAES 361, EAES 370, EAES 390, JUST 314, JUST 330, LAWS 302, JURI 300, POLS 365 or departmental approval.

EAES484: Urban Planning (3 hours lecture)

The course focuses on the principles, processes, and practices of urban planning. The formulation of policies and the management roles of the planning agencies are emphasized. Previous course EUGS 460 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 373, EAES 380, EAES 385, EAES 386 or departmental approval.

ECON101: Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces undergraduate students to the macro economy of the United States of America. Students learn how to apply the mechanism needed for the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long-term growth. In addition, they learn to analyze the macroeconomic data and the implications of fiscal and monetary policies. 3 sh.

ECON102: Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture)

In this course, undergraduate students will learn about the organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Students learn the mechanism behind the pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. In addition, they learn to analyze microeconomic data and apply the abstract theoretical models into real life situations. 3 sh.

ECON215: The Economics of Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

The extent, causes and consequences of poverty, inequality and insecurity. An appraisal of reforms, social insurance, medical care, public housing, rural development. The economics of discrimination and educational opportunity. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ECON414: Economics of Natural Resources and Global Warming (3 hours lecture)

This course links economic analysis of the technology and economics of natural resources to global warming. The focus is on the structure of domestic and international natural resource markets, how pricing is derived, and how utilization of natural resources is related to patterns of global warming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

ECON419: Economics Of Energy And Environmental Policy (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the economic, technological, and environmental dimensions of energy policy choices. Emphasis is given to the linkages among various economic models, elementary principles of energy storage and conversion, and specific energy technologies as they apply to past and current energy policy alternatives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 or 206. Major within School of Business.

INBS250: Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture)

The course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the dynamics of the global economy, international trade and investment and their linkages with the U.S. economy. Students will learn the fundamentals and interrelationships among the components of international business operations. An emphasis will be on the role of multinational institutions and the cultural, economic, legal, and political environments facing businesses. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or ECON 202.

INBS370: World Trade and Investment (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive overview of economic approaches to trade and investment in the global economy. The topics covered include trends in international trade and investment, causes and effect of trade and investment flows, multilateral institutions and world trading system, political economy of trade and investment policies, international payment accounts, multinational enterprises and foreign direct investment exchange rate determination, and international policy coordination. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INBS 250. Major within School of Business.

LAWS220: Conflict and Its Resolution (3 hours lecture)

A study of conflict, its management and resolution. Exploration of conflict management skills negotiation and mediation. Considerations of culture, gender, race, and age in resolving conflicts. Current developments and practical applications such as peer mediation, negotiation in the workplace, and dispute resolution in the court system. Students may take LAWS 220 or PALG 308, but not both courses. Students in the Paralegal Minor should take PALG 308. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

MATH112: Precalculus Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Binomial theorem, relations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, right triangle trigonometry, circular functions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Precalculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Precalculus Readiness Test.)

MATH116: Calculus A (4 hours lecture)

Differentiation and integration of functions, including trigonometric functions. Applications to biology and geoscience. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 112 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH122: Calculus I (4 hours lecture)

Limits, continuity; derivative and differentiation; applications of the derivative, maxima, minima, and extreme considerations; antiderivatives; Riemann integral. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 112 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH221: Calculus II (4 hours lecture)

Riemann integral applications, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, L'Hospital's rule, infinite series. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 122.

MGMT231: Management Processes (3 hours lecture)

To provide undergraduate students a review of classical and modern approaches to the managerial process as it relates to the manager's functions of planning, organizing, communication, motivation, leading, controlling, and managing change. Emphasizing new forces in the managerial environment such as workplace diversity and economic globalization, these reviews will be tied to the open-system model and the contingency approach as overall frameworks for understanding organizations and management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

MGMT315: Organizational Behavior (3 hours lecture)

Major approaches to the study of organizations. Organizational systems and structure, systems of communication, power and influence, organizational conflict, coordination and control, leadership, motivation, interpersonal dynamics and change and renewal. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

MGMT363: Business and Society (3 hours lecture)

Business as an institution in our pluralistic society; its relationship with other societal elements such as government, academia, labor and the consumer. American business past, present and future; strengths, weaknesses and overall contribution to society; ecology, minority groups and the quantity and quality of economic growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

MGMT436: Project Management (3 hours lecture)

This course prepares students to develop a project management plan, develop schedules, estimate personnel requirements and estimate costs and delays for typical project management problems in business. This course may be repeated once for a total of six credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, MGMT 316 and INFO 375. Major within School of Business.

POLS315: Urban Administration (3 hours lecture)

Problems and policy-making in the larger urban or metropolitan complexes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS324: American Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the methods used to analyze public policy and an examination of current public policy issues. Special attention is given to the use of comparative analysis in analyzing American public policies. This course deals with issues such as crime, punishment, social welfare, drug abuse, child abuse, equality, health, education and the environment. It focuses on public policy responses to these issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

PSYC230: Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers the influence of the physical environment on the behavior of organisms: population growth and regulation; crowding; sensory experience, enrichment and deprivation; motivational force of environmental stimulation; adaptation to environment as a function of prolonged exposure; salutary effects of aesthetically pleasing stimulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

SOCI220: Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture)

This course deals with the disparity in standards of living among the nations of the world today as well as with the strategies social scientists and social planners have formulated to eradicate poverty where it occurs. This course focuses on the historical, political, economic, cultural, and sociological relationships that have contributed to the current division of labor in the world and world inequalities. Furthermore, it focuses on specific social problems faced by poor nations while comparing social institutions in Western societies with their counterpart in non-Western societies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI311: Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture)

Processes of urbanization and suburbanization; nature of urban social relations, including racial and ethnic relations; urban ecological patterns and demographic conditions. Meets the Human and Intercultural Relations Requirement (HIRR). Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI312: Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The role of sociology in understanding and analyzing the environment, environmental issues and problems, and the sociocultural sources and structure of environmentalism and environmental movements. Various perspectives and approaches to explaining the relationship between society and the environment are explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI314: Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture)

The domain of this course is the role of social inequities, especially those of class and race, in the distribution of environmental risks in societies at the local, national, and global levels and includes study of legal remedies and public policy measures that address environmental injustices. Cross listed with Justice Studies, JUST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.