Family and Child Studies Major, Family Services Concentration (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

  Office: University Hall, Room 4144
Phone Number: (973) 655-4171
Email: deptfcst@mail.montclair.edu


The Bachelor of Arts degree in Family and Child Studies prepares students for careers working with youth and families in various settings. A major in Family and Child Studies may be for you if you answer yes to any of the following questions:
  • Are you curious about the way children and adults grow and develop?
  • Have you wondered about how environmental and social factors affect physical, cognitive, and emotional development?
  • Are you interested in learning more about specific stages of human development such as infancy, childhood, adolescence, and aging?
  • Would you like to work with hospitalized children to help reduce the stress of medical treatment on them and their families?
  • Have you ever thought about a career in family counseling, working with youth in various settings, working with older adults, or teaching at the preschool or elementary grades level?
Graduates from the program work in a variety of human service settings. These include family and community services; youth service organizations; health care settings; juvenile and adult corrections; family courts system; long term care facilities; and early childhood, elementary, and parent education programs. This degree also provides students with the educational background they need to pursue graduate study in a variety of areas.

The Family Services concentration emphasizes the study of the family. Students learn about family development, relationships, dynamics, functioning, health, and resource management. They examine the various cultural, community, and socioeconomic contexts in which families function and study interventions used to support families. The concentration combines family research and theory with application in a variety of human services organizations and community agencies.


FAMILY SERVICES CONCENTRATION

Complete 53 semester hours including the following 5 requirement(s):

  1. FAMILY AND CHILD STUDIES CORE

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete the following 5 courses:

      FCST 200 Introduction to Family Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 304 Research Methods for Studying Families and Children (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 348 Individual and Family Development Over the Life Span 3
      FCST 418 Working with Diverse Families and Children (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 445 Poverty and Families (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      FCST 315 Field Experiences in Family and Child Services (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 316 Service-Learning Experiences with Families and Children (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. FAMILY SERVICES REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete the following 2 requirements for 14 semester hours:

    1. Complete 2 courses:

      FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 400 Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
    2. Complete for at least 8 semester hours.

      FCST 409 Internship 6-12
  3. MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete 9 semester hours of any courses beginning with FCST.

    FCST 100 Professional Orientation (2 hours lecture) 2
    FCST 140 Family in Society (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 141 Interpersonal Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 201 Social Gerontology: The Study of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 205 Women in Contemporary Society (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 210 Introduction to Child Life (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 215 Infant Development (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 216 Techniques for the Study of Child Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 217 Family Stress and Coping (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 225 Exploring Family Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 230 Dynamics of One-To-One Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 231 The Family in the Economic System (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 240 Volunteer in the Community (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 241 Group Dynamics (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 270 Individual and Professional Development in Family and Child Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 275 Comparative Studies of Global Families (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 300 Field Trip Experiences in Family and Child Studies 1
    FCST 305 Death and Bereavement in the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 308 Independent Study 1-3
    FCST 310 Teaching Daily Living Skills to Special Needs Populations (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 313 Organization and Management of Child Care Centers (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 317 Fieldwork Experience in Family and Child Studies: The Hospitalized Child (3 hours field experience) 3
    FCST 318 Gender Development Across the Life Course (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 320 Parenting Skills and Resources (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 322 Play Techniques in Working with Children (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 325 Adult Development and Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 328 Peer Counseling 3
    FCST 329 Theories and Techniques of Group Processes 3
    FCST 331 Money Management (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 332 Action Approaches to Personal Awareness 3
    FCST 340 Aging and Social Policy (3.0 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 342 Family Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 344 Challenge of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 345 Gender in a Changing World (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 350 Immigrant Families (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 360 Families in Later Life (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 370 Individual and Family Problem-Solving (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 401 Advanced Research Methods in Family and Child Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 408 Workshop in Family and Child Studies 1-3
    FCST 411 Sibling Relationships (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 415 Child in the Community (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 419 Special Studies in Family and Child Services (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 430 Evidence-Based Family Policy and Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 448 Family Counseling (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 470 Family Management (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. REQUIRED COLLATERALS

    Complete the following course:

    PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  5. ELECTIVE COLLATERALS

    Complete 1 of the following areas of emphasis by advisement:

    1. CHILD ADVOCACY

      for 9 semester hours

      CHAD 100 Introduction to Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 110 Introduction to Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 200 Ecological Systems of the Developing Child (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 202 Cultural Competencies in Child Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 210 Child Abuse and Neglect (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 212 Children and Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 220 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 300 Forensic Interviewing of Children (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 302 Public Child Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 310 Child Welfare Research and Evaluation (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 312 Fatherhood (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 320 Children and the Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 325 Helping and Engagement Skills (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 330 Problems of Childhood: Advocacy and Intervention (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 340 Current Social Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 420 Practicum in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 425 Seminar in Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      CHAD 470 Senior Seminar in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. HEALTH STUDIES

      for 9 semester hours

      HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 102 Introduction to Public Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 105 Medical Terminology (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 204 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 208 Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 215 Drug Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 222 Mental Health in the Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 240 Foundations of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 245 Observation of Health Agencies. Starting Winter 2016: Introduction to Fieldwork and Professionalism (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 295 Sexuality Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 301 Addictions and Dependencies (2 hours lecture) 2
      HLTH 304 Behavioral and Social Science in Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 328 Program Planning and Evaluation (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 342 Health Promotion (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 347 Health Issues Forum 1-3
      HLTH 350 Field Study in Health 2-6
      HLTH 355 Addressing Health Disparities Through Social Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 360 Health Policy and Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 365 Science of Public Health: Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 374 Health Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 375 Women's Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 401 The Teaching of Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 404 Foundations of Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 405 Senior Seminar/CHES. Starting Winter 2016: Culminating Reflective Seminar (2 hours seminar) 2
      HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 425 Vital Statistics. Starting Winter 2016: Applied Statistics for Public Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 428 Program Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 433 Behavioral Aspects of Diet, Activity and Health. Starting Winter 2016: Population Approaches to Diet and Activity (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 440 Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 444 Community Organization and Health Advocacy. Starting Winter 2016: Community Organizing and Health Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 445 Perspectives on Death (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 450 Health Disparities and Social Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 455 Core Concepts in the Delivery of Health Care (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 458 Curriculum and Teaching in Health Occupations Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 460 Systems of Health Services Delivery (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 470 Patient Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 475 Health Communication and Social Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 495 Writing for Publication in Health (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. JUSTICE STUDIES

      for 9 semester hours

      JUST 101 Criminology (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 102 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 103 Introduction to International Justice (3 lecture hours) 3
      JUST 200 Perspectives on Justice Studies I (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 201 Perspectives on Justice Studies II (2 hour lecture, 2 hour other) 3
      JUST 202 Innovation and Evaluation in Criminal Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 209 Environmental Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 210 International Justice II (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 220 Crime in the Life Course (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 223 Ethnography in Justice Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 230 Family Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 240 Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture) 4
      JUST 250 Current Issues in Policing (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 251 Gangs in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 252 Community Policing (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 300 Research Methods in Justice Studies (2 hours lecture, 1 hour lab) 3
      JUST 310 Theoretical Issues in Justice Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 313 Organized Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 315 Restorative Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 316 Victimology (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 317 Race and the U.S. Legal System (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 318 Animals and Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 319 Hate Crimes (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 320 Women and Prison (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 321 White Collar Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 322 Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 323 Serial Killers (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 324 Terrorism and Social Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 325 Police and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 326 Death Penalty Perspectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 327 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 328 Prisons and Punishment (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 329 Homeland Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 330 International Environmental Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 331 Police Civil Liability (3 lecture hours) 3
      JUST 332 Cybercrime (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 333 Media and the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 334 Technology and the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 340 Wrongful Convictions (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 341 International Criminal Law and Procedure (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 342 Wildlife Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 349 Policing Terrorism (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 351 Juries and Justice 3
      JUST 352 Crime and Globalization (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 353 Corrections (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 354 International Prisoners' Rights (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 355 Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 356 Genocide (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 358 Crime Scene Investigation (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 359 Women and the Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 360 Rights, Liberties and American Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 390 Independent Study in Justice Studies 3
      JUST 398 Selected Topics in Justice Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 400 Drugs and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 401 Social Justice and Family Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 402 Sex Crimes (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 403 Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 404 Corrections Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 406 International Civil Conflicts (3 hours seminar) 3
      JUST 495 Senior Honors Seminar in Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 496 Peer Mentoring for Justice Studies 3
      JUST 497 Senior Seminar and Internship (2 hours seminar, 1 hour other) 3-8
      PALG 210 Law and Litigation (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 301 Criminal Law and Procedure (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 304 Real Estate Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 305 Immigration Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 306 Contract Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 308 Negotiation, Mediation and Arbitration (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 310 Fundamentals of Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 312 Research and Writing for Paralegals (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 316 Skills for Bilingual Legal Personnel (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 317 Evidence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 318 Computer-Assisted Research in the Legal Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 320 Bankruptcy Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 322 Wills, Trusts and Probate Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 330 Family Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 331 Administrative Law and Procedure (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 332 Personal Injury Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 336 Corporations and Partnerships (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 339 Computer Applications in the Legal Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 360 3
      PALG 378 Employment Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 390 Independent Study in Paralegal Studies 3
      PALG 398 Selected Topics in Paralegal Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 411 Advanced Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 412 Consumer Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 413 Elder Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 420 Civil Trial Preparation (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 437 Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 438 Trademark Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 440 Criminal Trial Preparation (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 450 Law Office Management and Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PALG 497 Paralegal Seminar and Internship (3 hours seminar, 3 hours other) 3
      PALG 498 Cooperative Education: Paralegal Studies 4-8
    4. POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW

      for 9 semester hours

      LAWS 200 Introduction to Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 220 Conflict and Its Resolution (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 290 Language of the Law 3
      LAWS 302 Legal Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 362 Legal Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 388 Advocacy and Persuasion (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 390 Independent Study in Law 3
      LAWS 391 Women and the Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 460 Advanced Legal Research and Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 473 Seminar in Law and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 497 Pre-Law Internship 3
      LAWS 499 Selected Topics in Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 100 Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,) 3
      POLS 101 American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 199 Freshman Seminar in Political Science and Law (1 hour lecture) 1
      POLS 201 Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 202 International Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 203 International Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 204 Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 205 Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 206 Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 207 American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 214 Women in Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 215 Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 216 Urban Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 300 Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 301 American Party System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 302 Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 303 Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 304 State and Local Government (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 306 Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 310 Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 311 Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 312 Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 313 The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 314 Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar) 3
      POLS 315 Urban Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 317 The American Congress (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 318 The American Presidency (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 319 Politics and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 320 Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 321 Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 322 American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 323 American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 327 Food and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 329 Narco-Terrorism (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 331 Animal Rights: Law, Politics and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 332 U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 333 Topics in Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 334 Politics of Science Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 335 Theories of Political Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 339 Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 340 Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 341 Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 342 Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 343 Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 344 Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 351 Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 353 Intelligence and National Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 362 International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 363 Politics and Morality of War (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 364 War and International Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 365 Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 410 Directed Study 3-6
      POLS 416 Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 420 Seminar and Internship in Political Science 4
      POLS 425 Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 426 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I 4-6
      POLS 427 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II 4-6
      POLS 429 Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 430 International Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 431 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 436 Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship 1-7
      POLS 497 Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar) 3
    5. PSYCHOLOGY

      for 9 semester hours

      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 109 The Human Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 120 Psychology of Leadership for Emerging Leaders: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 200 Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 201 Child Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 202 Adolescent Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 203 Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 220 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture) 4
      PSYC 224 Children's Rights and Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 225 Psychology of Adjustment (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 227 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 230 Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 231 Psychology of Aggression (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 235 Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 245 Hispanic/Latino Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 246 Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 248 Psychology and Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 265 Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 268 Psychological Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 294 Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 300 The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 301 Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      PSYC 302 Health Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 303 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 304 Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 305 Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 306 Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 307 Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 308 Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 310 Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 313 Cognition (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 314 Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 320 Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 324 Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 330 Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 332 Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 340 Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 353 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 354 Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 355 Motivation (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 358 Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 360 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 365 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 366 Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 375 Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 402 Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 405 Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 420 Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology (1 hour lecture) 1
      PSYC 459 Special Topics in Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 488 Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar) 3
      PSYC 491 Independent Study I: Research 1-3
      PSYC 492 Independent Study II: Research 1-3
      PSYC 495 Psychology Honors I (4 hours lecture) 4
      PSYC 496 Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture) 4
    6. SOCIOLOGY

      for 9 semester hours

      SOCI 100 The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 102 Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 104 Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 105 Black Family (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 106 Individual and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 112 Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 113 Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 201 Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 207 Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 209 Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 212 Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 215 Sociology of Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 219 Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 230 Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 240 Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 301 Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture) 4
      SOCI 302 Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 303 Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 304 Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 309 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 310 Directed Independent Research 3-9
      SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 313 Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 315 Social Inequality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 316 Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 318 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 330 Political Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 334 Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 336 Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 340 Social Change in a Global World (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 390 Cooperative Education in Sociology 3-4
      SOCI 400 Senior Project 3
      SOCI 401 Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 402 Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 404 Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 405 Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 407 Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 408 Social Movements (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 411 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 416 Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other) 3
      SOCI 420 Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
    7. WOMEN'S STUDIES

      for 9 semester hours

      WMGS 101 Introduction to Women's Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 102 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 200 Transnational Feminisms (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 201 Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 301 Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 302 Selected Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 308 Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 316 Victimology (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 345 Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 355 Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 401 Independent Study: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
      WMGS 402 Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
      WMGS 403 Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 410 Cooperative Education: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
      WMGS 436 Washington, D.C. Internship 3
      WMGS 481 The Legal Rights of Women (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

CHAD100: Introduction to Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an overview of the field of child advocacy. The role of the child advocate is explored in a myriad of professional settings. Ethical, legal and professional responsibilities are discussed. 3 sh.

CHAD110: Introduction to Social Work (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the social work profession, its values and ethics, fields of practice, and unique models of intervention. Topics covered include the historical roots of the profession, its mission and purpose, description of client groups, and the settings in which social workers typically operate. The profession's commitment to diverse and at-risk populations, as well as to social and economic justice will be highlighted. 3 sh.

CHAD200: Ecological Systems of the Developing Child (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with an understanding of major issues in normal development from infancy through adolescence, with a particular focus on areas that are most germane to current child advocacy efforts in child protection, education, juvenile justice and custody determinations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 100 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

CHAD202: Cultural Competencies in Child Welfare (3 hours lecture)

This course will identify the three components of cultural competency that have been identified in the child welfare field: value base, knowledge, and skills. The course will focus on enabling students to examine the values that are necessary for a culturally competent understanding and response to child welfare, specifically accepting the existence of biases and developing a commitment to a strengths-based model that relies on respect and working toward empowerment as a goal for intervention. Culture is defined broadly, and the course will expose students to a range of belief systems common in different groups concerning child rearing and child maltreatment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 100 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

CHAD210: Child Abuse and Neglect (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with an understanding of the concepts of child abuse and neglect, utilizing social science theory and research. Causes and consequences of child abuse and neglect will be explored, and multidisciplinary approaches to intervention and prevention will be addressed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or CHAD 100.

CHAD212: Children and Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a multi-systemic view of child welfare issues. It reviews and discusses children's rights from a systems perspective. Societal issues of poverty, violence and isolation within a historical context are explored. The course explores and discusses advocacy protocols and practice. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or CHAD 100.

CHAD220: Social Welfare Policy and Services (3 hours lecture)

This course explores social welfare issues in the United States, in the context of their history, primary rationale, and the values supporting different approaches. Emphasis is placed on policies, programs and institutional structures affecting children, youth and families across multiple service systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 100 or CHAD 110 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

CHAD300: Forensic Interviewing of Children (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an investigation and analysis of the process and nature of different forms of interviewing techniques. It explores intra-personal and inter-personal aspects of the communication process. A framework for interviewing individuals of diverse backgrounds is examined. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212.

CHAD302: Public Child Welfare (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an examination of the field of Public Child Welfare, its historical roots and the contemporary systems that have evolved to serve the needs of children at risk. This course will provide an in depth study of provisions made to respond to the needs of children, youth, and families for whom protection and advocacy are required to ensure their survival and quality of life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212.

CHAD310: Child Welfare Research and Evaluation (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with an overview of research processes and methods, focusing on program evaluation within the child welfare system. Students will develop skills on how to appropriately interpret empirical research as well as how to apply research to best practices in child welfare. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212.

CHAD312: Fatherhood (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on changing role of fathers. While fathering was traditionally considered a secondary activity for men and men seen as ancillary in children's lives, this view is not only outdated, but fading in contemporary society. This course will focus on the importance of a father role in child advocacy and how men's family roles has taken on different dimensions, and how these roles are reflected in contemporary society, movies, media, and in the legal arenas. From a multidisciplinary perspective, students will analyze the dynamics of the "father" role in a child's life and explore strategies for advocacy on the importance of a father role is a child's life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 100; CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212 or departmental approval.

CHAD320: Children and the Law (3 hours lecture)

Students will examine legal and policy concepts regarding the status and rights of children and society's obligation to them throughout the American Legal System. Students will gain a deeper and broader understanding of constitutional law concepts, juvenile court, criminal procedure, family courts and contract law. Students will analyze legal principles and court decisions and how they impact, change and shape public policy. In addition, strategies for advocacy and for policy changes will be described. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 100; CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212 or departmental approval.

CHAD325: Helping and Engagement Skills (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the helping process in social work, and describes the skills necessary to work with various client systems, including individuals, families and groups. Specific emphasis will be placed on engaging vulnerable children, adolescents and their families. Ethical considerations, essential values and theories, and the "use of self" in the helping process will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 220.

CHAD330: Problems of Childhood: Advocacy and Intervention (3 hours lecture)

Students will gain an understanding of learning disabilities and emotional and behavioral disorders of childhood and adolescence. Emphasis will be placed on both risk and protective factors that influence children's development. Advocacy and intervention strategies to address problems of childhood will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 100; CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212 or departmental approval.

CHAD340: Current Social Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course reviews and discusses selected problems of social disorganization. It takes a multi-disciplinary approach in examining family problems related to poverty, drug abuse and violence. Causation of delinquency and the fragmentation of the family system are examined. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212.

CHAD420: Practicum in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with a supervised field placement in an agency engaged in child advocacy. The seminar will provide classroom instruction and discussion about issues related to the students' placements. Site supervisors will provide guidance and supervision regarding the tasks assigned. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 300 or CHAD 302 or CHAD 310 or CHAD 340.

CHAD425: Seminar in Social Work (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who seek an in depth, integrative understanding of the field of social work and its relationship to other disciplines that serve the needs of children, adolescents and families. This course will rely on specialists in the field to present research, knowledge of their field, career opportunities, and entry level requirements involved in becoming a social work professional. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 325.

CHAD470: Senior Seminar in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to meet the needs of undergraduate students who are exploring the field of child advocacy and its relationship to other disciplines that serve the needs of children and families. This course will rely on specialists in the field to present research, knowledge of their field, opportunities, and entry level requirements involved in becoming a professional in the student's area of interest. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 300 or CHAD 302 or CHAD 310 or CHAD 340.

FCST100: Professional Orientation (2 hours lecture)

Orientation to the philosophy of the profession. Field experiences in a variety of settings to provide exposure to the breadth of professional opportunities. 2 sh.

FCST140: Family in Society (3 hours lecture)

Students gain fundamental insight into and understanding of concepts from the social sciences. Students study the history and structure of the family as a basic but changing institution in modern America. 3 sh.

FCST141: Interpersonal Relations (3 hours lecture)

Students learn about relevant and up-to-date information about meaningful human relationships throughout the life cycle. 3 sh.

FCST200: Introduction to Family Studies (3 hours lecture)

Students examine families from historical, socio-cultural and theoretical perspectives, with a focus on the changes in American families over time and the implications of those changes for contemporary and future families. Students also examine issues that impact family development, structure and functions. Those issues include but are not limited to race, ethnicity, class, ablelism, age, gender and sexual orientation. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Family and Child Studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 OR PSYC 101. May be taken concurrently.

FCST201: Social Gerontology: The Study of Aging (3 hours lecture)

In this course students examine issues related to aging in America from an individual and family perspective. They gain an understanding of biological, physiological, and cognitive changes related to aging and their impact upon families and daily life. Students also develop knowledge of the field of gerontology, utilizing a variety of perspectives including biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging and how personal values, attitudes, beliefs, race, ethnicity, and rituals affect the aging experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST205: Women in Contemporary Society (3 hours lecture)

Through this course students gain an understanding of how historical developments and social forces have shaped the status of women in America. Students engage in discussion about current concerns and role options available to today's women. Special attention is given to the construction of womanhood and the intersections of gender with race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST210: Introduction to Child Life (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the profession of Child Life. Through this course students gain knowledge about the unique role of the Child Life Specialist in working with infants, children, adolescents and their families in the hospital and other health care settings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST215: Infant Development (3 hours lecture)

Students in this class explore the infant as a developing individual within the family. Theory and research in the area of human infancy are applied throughout the course. Students gain knowledge about the physical, cognitive and emotional growth of infants from pre-natal through the first two years of life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 and field experience required.

FCST216: Techniques for the Study of Child Personality (3 hours lecture)

Students practice observing and recording children's activities in order to develop skills needed to become more aware teachers. Students leave this class with skills and tools that enhance their understanding of the needs, motivations, competencies, and values of young children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214.

FCST217: Family Stress and Coping (3 hours lecture)

Families experience different types and levels of stress that could impact their daily functioning. Students will learn theories and conceptual frameworks of family stress in order to enhance their understanding of family stressors (e.g., positive and negative life transitions, economic stress, traumatic experiences, physical and mental illnesses, relationship problems within the family, violence, and substance abuse) and their effects on family life. Students will also examine theories and practice applications associated with healthy coping and crisis prevention. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST225: Exploring Family Diversity (3 hours lecture)

Through this course students examine diversity in families with respect to designations such as race, ethnicity, religion, social class and sexual orientation. Students study diverse family formation, family roles, values and traditions, as well as the ways in which diverse families have impacted and been impacted by the United States culture and policy. Previous course FCST 440 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or PSYC 101.

FCST230: Dynamics of One-To-One Communication (3 hours lecture)

Through this course students examine the dynamics of one-to-one communication through readings and experientially through the development of personal goals for optimizing personal communication. Students also establish strategies for the attainment of these goals. Previous course FCST 330 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 141.

FCST231: The Family in the Economic System (3 hours lecture)

Students learn about the family as an economic unit in society. They explore the behavior of various sub-cultures, age groups, and family patterns and the impact these various attributes have upon families. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200.

FCST240: Volunteer in the Community (3 hours lecture)

Students participate in a volunteer experience with a community agency. Through the course and volunteer experience, students explore socio-economic, civic, and educational problems facing individuals and families. Previous course FCST 301 effective through Fall 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Fieldwork required. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST241: Group Dynamics (3 hours lecture)

This course presents an overview of the theory and practice of group dynamics, to prepare students to facilitate group processes to advance group- and individual-level objectives. This course examines developmental, ecological, and systems theories in terms of their implications for how individuals interact with and influence each other in group settings. This course reviews practical approaches and develops tools for working effectively with groups in a variety of family and/or child settings, both as a group member and as a group facilitator. Distinct approaches to group processes that are appropriate for specific developmental stages are emphasized (e.g., differences between group work with children, adolescents, and adults). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 141.

FCST270: Individual and Professional Development in Family and Child Studies (3 hours lecture)

Students will have the opportunity to investigate professional and personal development strategies and apply them to their lives. Students will also explore influences on and blocks to their self management, including problem solving, professional planning, and decision making. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 100, GNED 199 and departmental approval.

FCST275: Comparative Studies of Global Families (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students learn about similarities and differences among families in different cultures and countries by gathering, reviewing, and discussing various types of data and information. They engage in analytic and self-reflective review of dynamic family issues and practices in regard to mate selection and marriage; parenting; and aging and death. Their comparative, international research on families enhances their understanding of their own families' multicultural heritages and respect for families from different cultures, countries, and contexts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105, PSYC 101 or HONP 101.

FCST300: Field Trip Experiences in Family and Child Studies

Students engage in the study of policies, problems and contributions of community organizations and agencies which relate to families and children. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200.

FCST304: Research Methods for Studying Families and Children (3 hours lecture)

Through this introductory course students develop critical reading and analyzing skills regarding current research in the field of family and child studies. Students investigate various research approaches and the role of research in society and its relationships to conditions of power and oppression. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Family and Child Studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200; and Family and Child Studies (FCST) majors only.

FCST305: Death and Bereavement in the Family (3 hours lecture)

Students examine human responses to the dying process across the lifespan as well as the social functions of grief and mourning. Students also explore perceptions of death in various social, cultural, and religious contexts as well as substantive and controversial topics related to the end of life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 or PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST308: Independent Study

Students engage in an independent study in advanced areas in Family and Child Studies not offered in the regular curriculum. Topics vary in response to student interests, faculty expertise, and current issues in the field. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission.

FCST310: Teaching Daily Living Skills to Special Needs Populations (3 hours lecture)

Students engage in analysis of daily personal management problems and their application to special needs populations. They also explore community resources, examine and develop materials and teaching strategies appropriate for teaching daily living skills to special needs populations. Previous course FCST 410 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST313: Organization and Management of Child Care Centers (3 hours lecture)

Students gain a basic understanding of principles of supervision and administration applied to developing a sound modern pre-school program. Students also learn about organization and administration of individual classrooms and the total school program as well as the relationships of the school with community services and agencies. Previous course FCST 414 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

FCST315: Field Experiences in Family and Child Services (3 hours lecture)

Students participate in a supervised field experience within selected agencies offering services for families and for children. Within the scope of this experience, students explore their own interest in the field of family and child services through a direct field experience and are exposed to the common professional roles and occupations. Students are expected to volunteer in a faculty-approved setting for 35 hours minimum during the semester. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 and PSYC 101. Thirty-five hours of field work required. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST316: Service-Learning Experiences with Families and Children (3 hours lecture)

Students engage in real-life service experience working on issues identified by the community organizations. By collaborating with community partners, students gain an understanding of civic engagement, diverse families, advocacy, program development, and the importance of reflection throughout the service experience. Students are required to provide three hours of weekly service with a community partner organization that works with families and/or children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 and PSYC 101. Thirty-five hours of field work required. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST317: Fieldwork Experience in Family and Child Studies: The Hospitalized Child (3 hours field experience)

This course is geared toward guiding and supporting prospective Child Life interns in their initial exposure to children, families, and staff in a pediatric hospital setting. Class meetings will be structured in a format that encourages class discussion and students will be expected to share experiences with the instructor and fellow peers. Students will have a planned supervised experience for a minimum of 35 hours of field work in a pediatric setting approved by the instructor. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 210. Experience for a minimum of 35 hours of field work in a pediatric setting approved by the instructor. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST318: Gender Development Across the Life Course (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore various topics regarding gender development across the life course. For example, topics will include gender roles and attitudes, interaction of nature and nurture as well as limitations and expectations that our gender roles and attitudes place on us. The course will be delivered using a mix of topical and chronological approaches. Students will investigate classic and emerging research on gender development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214.

FCST320: Parenting Skills and Resources (3 hours lecture)

Students have the opportunity to develop effective parenting skills and knowledge about human development needed for the application of these skills They also examine the impact of local, state, and national parenting resources on both parent and non-parents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST322: Play Techniques in Working with Children (3 hours lecture)

This hands-on course is designed to introduce students to the role and application of play in working with children in the fields of family services, social work, therapeutic recreation, education, and other related fields. Students examine the historical and cultural dimensions of play and explore major theories of play. Through lecture and experiential activities, students learn various play techniques used by practitioners, such as role-playing, expressive play, and storytelling. Students enhance their knowledge of the role of play in the treatment of children coping with short- and long-term family and life stressors, such as disabilities, illness, hospitalization, separation, divorce, trauma, and loss. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST325: Adult Development and Aging (3 hours lecture)

In this course students critically examine topics related to change and continuity in the psychological, emotional, and biological ways that adults develop in mid-life and later adulthood. Students analyze issues of mental health, stress and coping, personality development, changes in memory, learning, and cognitive functioning, as well as intelligence, creativity, and psychopathology in later life. They compare models of development throughout adulthood and consider cultural, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic variables that influence growth. Finally, students consider current research and contemporary issues as they pertain to adult development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 or matriculation in the Gerontology minor and departmental approval.

FCST328: Peer Counseling

This course provides the student with actual peer counseling experience. This experience takes the forms of one-to-one and group counseling. The student will experience the counseling process both as a counselor and as a client. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST329: Theories and Techniques of Group Processes

Students develop understanding of how we function in groups of all sizes, with diverse populations and with various purposes throughout life. Students gain an understanding of the underlying dynamics of groups and receive the opportunity to relate the theories of group development to the actual group process. Students explore theories and techniques useful in the positive development of entelchy groups. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 241.

FCST331: Money Management (3 hours lecture)

Students explore the role and meaning of money in individual and family living and understanding income as a means of acquiring a style of life. They also examine the effective control of income, spending, savings, credit, and how to manage resources for future needs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST332: Action Approaches to Personal Awareness

Students work towards developing awareness and skills needed to maximize individual growth in human interaction. Through the use of psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques, students have the opportunity to experience, critically evaluate and develop strategies for working through communication barriers to a more effective interaction for their personal benefit and the benefit of others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

FCST340: Aging and Social Policy (3.0 hours lecture)

Recognizing the importance of public policy as it pertains to a growing, aging population, this course will introduce students to a range of policy issues at the federal, state, and local levels. The process of policy formation will be reviewed including how political organizations, special-interest groups, and advisory groups influence policy development and implementation. The course will cover the major public programs for older adults in the U.S. that address income security, health and long-term care, and housing needs. In order to recognize the varying effects policy can have on the lives of seniors, older adults from diverse socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds will be considered. Because families often struggle with the demands of caregiving and long-term care assistance, an evaluation of national and international public policy initiatives designed to address those needs will be conducted. Finally, students will be encouraged to identify and explore contemporary public policy issues that affect older adults on a regular basis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200; or matriculation in Gerontolgy minor and departmental approval. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST342: Family Sociology (3 hours lecture)

Students learn to identify and interpret data and research relating to families and examine the interplay between family relations at the micro level and social forces at the macro level. The course will also explore the effect of social and demographic change on American families. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Not open to freshmen. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST344: Challenge of Aging (3 hours lecture)

Students examine how changes over the adult life span affect family interaction and resources in various cultural groups within the United States. Students also engage in fieldwork with agencies and elders and learn about the implications of social policy and institutions relative to an increasing aging population. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 201. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST345: Gender in a Changing World (3 hours lecture)

Gender issues that exist in our society and cross-culturally. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST348: Individual and Family Development Over the Life Span

This course provides an overview of family development over the life course in the United States and in other societies. Students explore concepts and theories related to transitions within families over the life course. This course also emphasizes the role of culture and diversity in the development and functioning of families. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST350: Immigrant Families (3 hours lecture)

This course is focused on contemporary immigrant families in the United States. The purpose is to critically examine immigrant family dynamics across generations, using classic and new acculturation theories and in the context of global migration and transnationalism. Students explore multiple topics related to immigrant families (e.g., family adaptation, changes in parent-child relationships, heritage language maintenance and loss, youth's ethnic identity development, education, intergenerational relationships, interactions with social institutions). Students analyze how such factors as ethnicity, gender, class, migration goals, legal status, human capital, country of origin, and areas of settlement shape the experiences of immigrant families. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200.

FCST360: Families in Later Life (3 hours lecture)

Applying the fields of family science and gerontology, students learn about family relationships, roles, and responsibilities in the second half of life. Students engage in discussion about later life families and the sociological and demographic implications of these families. Culturally and ethnically diverse populations are considered as well as issues of social justice. Multiple substantive topics related to aging families are examined (i.e., care giving, grandparenting, marriage and sibling relationships later life, housing, retirement, widowhood, aging parent-adult child relations, etc.). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 or PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST370: Individual and Family Problem-Solving (3 hours lecture)

Students gain insight to how to deal with daily living through increased competence in decision-making and problem solving in a variety of life styles. Students develop skills for managing individual and family needs, problem solving, setting goals, and playing a leadership role. Students also examine ways in which the planned change process can be used at the individual or family level with a focus on strengths as well as problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST400: Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar)

A capstone course which explores the integrative nature of the study of families and children and investigates the roles, conflicts and decision-making perspectives for beginning professionals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Family and Child Studies major and departmental approval.

FCST401: Advanced Research Methods in Family and Child Studies (3 hours lecture)

Through this advanced class in research methods students have the opportunity to plan and execute individual research thesis and projects, drawing on their earlier research course. Students continue to explore the research process as initiators of research projects, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students are encouraged to present their completed research in professional forums. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 304 and departmental approval.

FCST408: Workshop in Family and Child Studies

This selected topics workshop invites students and professors to critically examine, discuss, and analyze current research on issues of concern in the field of Family and Child Studies. Topics are determined prior to course offering and publicized. The course may be repeated five times for a maximum of fifteen semester hours, provided the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 and any 300-level FCST course or departmental approval. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST409: Internship

Students have the opportunity to work as an intern in a professional setting in a community organization, agency, or a service organization. The internship experience is the final step in a student's education as a Family and Child Studies (FCST) student at Montclair State University (MSU). The placement experience aims to give students on-the-job training in a setting that provides contact with people in various program related environments. This is an opportunity for students to further enhance career preparation by developing professional competencies in such areas as critical thinking, assessment techniques, problem solving behaviors, decision making processes, utilization of resources, ability to function as part of a diverse work force, and understanding of the general operation, management, and philosophies of social service agencies. Students are expected to undertake a serious professional responsibility and work with diverse client populations to better understand the roles, rights, and responsibilities of consumers who utilize social services. 6 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: Family and Child Studies major and departmental approval.

FCST411: Sibling Relationships (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students study sibling relationships and how they shape human development. They use family systems theory, sibling development principles and other frameworks to examine human behavior. They consider sibling behavior within the context of society, and give attention to the role of social location in the lives of families and children. Areas of sibling behavior explored include rivalry, support, birth order, selection of interests, personality and identity development, and abuse. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST415: Child in the Community (3 hours lecture)

Students gain knowledge about the attitudes, mores and values of family and neighborhood life as a determinant of the child's adaptation to school. They examine the impact on children of growing up in different types of families and in different types of social settings. They learn about the different types of specialists and agencies in the community. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies.

FCST418: Working with Diverse Families and Children (3 hours lecture)

Students study different approaches to working with diverse families and children in human service, community, and educational settings. A particular focus is on skill development for facilitating and leading family conferences in a variety of professional settings. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 315 or FCST 316. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST419: Special Studies in Family and Child Services (3 hours lecture)

Students utilize an ecological lens to critically examine social problems impacting youth and their families in the 21st century. Issues include substance abuse, school violence, gang involvement, teen pregnancy, and HIV/AIDS. Students leave with an understanding of various prevention-related initiatives with proven effectiveness and how they can serve to protect youth and their families. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST430: Evidence-Based Family Policy and Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Students will use research evidence to examine historical and contemporary family policies from a social justice perspective. Students will use various research and policy analysis strategies to analyze family policies, including future family policy needs. Additionally, students will learn how to use advocacy to support and strengthen family policies to meet the needs of diverse families across the life course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 and FCST 304 and an additional 6 credits from the FCST core.

FCST445: Poverty and Families (3 hours lecture)

Students examine the impact of economic structures, social conditions, gender, race and ethnicity as they affect the family system as well as various social factors that place families at risk including family structures and community conditions such as poverty, access to resources, and geographic locations. Community contact is a requirement of the course. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Family and Child Studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 304. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST448: Family Counseling (3 hours lecture)

This introductory counseling-based course focuses on the core concepts fundamental to an understanding of marital and family therapy. Students learn about typical family functioning and atypical family dysfunction as well as strategies employed by practicing family therapists. The course emphasizes a multi-cultural approach to family counseling. Students review current research on family process and treatment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 141 and FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST470: Family Management (3 hours lecture)

Students examine the many factors that influence and are influenced by the ways families use resources to maintain daily life and solve problems. They analyze different situations, considering such factors as the roles played by different family members, the goals of different family members in different situations, decision making, the use of human and nonhuman resources, and other factors influencing household management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 and FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH102: Introduction to Public Health (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the field of public health, the breadth of its scope, and the variety of scientific disciplines that inform its practice. It gives student a "taste" of public health and puts public health topics within a context of population-based issues and health. These topics include: AIDS and other emerging infectious diseases, environmental hazards, alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse, access to health care and other health disparities, and social and distributive justice. Emphasis is given to contemporary public health issues and the forces that shape them. Previous course HLTH 200 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

HLTH105: Medical Terminology (3 hours lecture)

A basic health course introducing elements of medical terminology describing body parts, systems, functions and medical procedures. Emphasis will be placed on development of medical vocabulary and communication skills. The course will provide learning episodes in formulating medical abbreviations and translating complex terminology into lay terms, that ultimately will be applicable to careers in medical writing, health care delivery and management. 3 sh.

HLTH204: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students develop knowledge and skills needed to understand health-related behaviors and health status from a social ecological perspective, considering factors at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy levels. Students learn about and apply theories of health behavior and theories of change, creating a solid foundation for the in-depth study of population health and the development and evaluation of culturally appropriate, theory-based public health interventions. By exploring multilevel determinants and correlates of health behavior and status, students develop an understanding of how social institutions and dynamics contribute to health disparities and consider multilevel approaches to eliminating such disparities. Students apply knowledge, practice skills, enhance computer literacy, and improve oral and written communication skills. Previous course HLTH 304 effective through Fall 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH208: Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Previous course HLTH 307 effective through Fall 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH215: Drug Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture)

Prepare health and physical education teachers to teach and implement drug education programs in the schools. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education and Physical Education majors only. Starting Winter 2016: HPEM 199 and Physical Education (PHED) majors only.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH222: Mental Health in the Schools (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on mental health content and teaching methodology for education K-12 in schools based on the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards. 3 sh.

HLTH240: Foundations of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture)

Prepares student to make informed decisions concerning the avoidance or elimination of disease-causing environmental exposures by providing an understanding of the scientific principles by which these exposures are identified, measured, and judged as to their acceptability. 3 sh.

HLTH245: Observation of Health Agencies. Starting Winter 2016: Introduction to Fieldwork and Professionalism (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students develop a working knowledge of applied public health by observing a wide range of community and school health programs in action. In addition to spending a minimum of 66 hours in on-site placements, students meet in the classroom to develop the skills necessary to become public health professionals. Learning about best practices within public health, students apply their knowledge by assessing strengths and challenges across different public health agency/program/organization sites. Students also compare missions, objectives and functions of a variety of agencies involved in public health education and determine which types of agencies best fit the students' own personal and professional goals related to public health. A critical part of this course is the in-class meetings where students will have the opportunity to compare experiences, apply general public health understanding to real-life settings, and gain understanding of how to prepare for a career in public health education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH295: Sexuality Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture)

Focus on sexuality content and teaching methodology for sex education K-12 in schools. Based on NJ Content Standards for Sexuality Education. 3 sh.

HLTH301: Addictions and Dependencies (2 hours lecture)

Nature and causes of drug dependencies, including study of substances capable of producing dependency. Preventive measures and various approaches to treatment and rehabilitation of drug-dependent persons. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH304: Behavioral and Social Science in Health (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students develop knowledge and skills needed to understand health-related behaviors and health status from a social ecological perspective, considering factors at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy levels. Students learn about and apply theories of health behavior and theories of change, creating a solid foundation for the in-depth study of population health and the development and evaluation of culturally appropriate, theory-based public health interventions. By exploring multilevel determinants and correlates of health behavior and status, students develop an understanding of how social institutions and dynamics contribute to health disparities and consider multilevel approaches to eliminating such disparities. Students apply knowledge, practice skills, enhance computer literacy, and improve oral and written communication skills. Offered as HLTH 304 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 204 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH328: Program Planning and Evaluation (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the process of designing, planning and implementing health education and health promotion programs, including needs assessment, developing SMART goals and objectives, utilization of program planning and behavioral theories and models, and planning for evaluation. Previous course HLTH 428 effective through Fall 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 204.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH342: Health Promotion (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of theories and models that underlie health promotion. Topics will include the history, politics, and ethics of health promotion; community development, healthy public policy, models of behavior change, and communicating risk. The course will also provide information essential to understanding factors that affect human health: health determinants, health indices, health behavior change theories, ethical issues and societal trends. The importance of evaluation and research in all aspects of health promotion will be emphasized throughout the course. Previous course HLTH 442 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 202 or HLTH 204.

HLTH347: Health Issues Forum

In-depth study of a single health issue of current public or professional concern including analysis of recent authoritative literature. Topic to be announced each semester. Course credit determined by nature and breadth of topics selected. If taken for 1.0 or 2.0 credits, the course may be repeated for a maximum of 3.0 credits with permission of the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Starting Winter 2016: Junior standing and HLTH 202.

HLTH350: Field Study in Health

Selected experiences in community health work through arrangements with various kinds of health agencies. Major projects developed under supervision of a faculty member and a qualified person in the health professions agency. 2 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 245.

HLTH355: Addressing Health Disparities Through Social Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course explores how broad social, cultural and economic inequalities in society affect health. By closely examining pressing problems in global health, the course guides the students in efforts to improve the health conditions of those overburdened by poverty, marginalization and social injustice. By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of how social forces become embodied as pathologies and how specific political, economic and historic processes influence the distribution of disease among different populations. Previous course HLTH 450 effective through Fall 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 204.

HLTH360: Health Policy and Administration (3 hours lecture)

The organization, administration and functions of health services in the United States and other major nations; the social and professional policies which determine their scope and nature. Principal methods currently employed in the U.S. for analysis and evaluation of health care systems. Offers opportunity to students to relate these general understandings to those segments of the health services system of particular professional interest to themselves. Previous course HLTH 460 effective through Fall 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 204.

HLTH365: Science of Public Health: Epidemiology (3 hours lecture)

Provides a basic understanding of the epidemiologic method of identifying disease-causing exposures. Emphasizes the generation of hypotheses based on descriptive epidemiologic data, the testing of hypotheses by analytical epidemiological research, the determination of causality, and the value of epidemiological research in developing and evaluating disease prevention strategies. Previous course HLTH 246 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 202.

HLTH374: Health Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the ability to plan, implement and evaluate a health communications program for a community health services institution. It focuses on the evolution of health communication in the United States, health communication theories and cultural differences. It provides for hands-on development of computer-based communications including newsletters, websites, and databases. Previous course HLTH 475 effective through Fall 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 204 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

HLTH375: Women's Health (3 hours lecture)

This course offers perspectives on women's health and health care, focusing predominately on the United States but with some attention to international and global issues. Students will receive an overview of the health status and major health concerns of women. Acute and chronic problems will be addressed across the lifespan. This course includes fieldwork experience. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or WMGS 102 or departmental approval.

HLTH401: The Teaching of Health (3 hours lecture)

Traces historical development of health instruction, examines characteristics of health learners, and compares different types of health education programs. Provides for use of the computer in health education. Requires demonstration of health education planning, teaching and evaluation skills. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program or departmental approval.

HLTH404: Foundations of Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of the concept and the process of measurement and evaluation in health education. Specific topics related to test selection, test construction, test administration, and analysis of test results are discussed within a broad theoretical framework and reinforced with practical experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program or departmental approval.

HLTH405: Senior Seminar/CHES. Starting Winter 2016: Culminating Reflective Seminar (2 hours seminar)

This course provides in-depth information about the profession of health education including the range of positions available, the varied job responsibilities, and the spectrum of work settings. A major emphasis of this course is placed on preparation for the Certified Health Education Specialist Examination (CHES) offered by the National Commission of Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This course provides a culmination of the material presented in the previous courses of the student's tenure in this major. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 330, junior or senior standing and Public Health concentration or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 350 and senior standing.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH425: Vital Statistics. Starting Winter 2016: Applied Statistics for Public Health (3 hours lecture)

This course covers the basic concepts in the application of statistics as they relate to health and biological problems. Emphasis is placed on the tools and techniques used to evaluate the health status of a community, including births, deaths, and illness rates. Additionally, the biological issues underlying national and local health policies are explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 109 and HLTH 365.

HLTH428: Program Planning (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the process of designing, planning and implementing health education and health promotion programs, including needs assessment, developing SMART goals and objectives, utilization of program planning and behavioral theories and models, and planning for evaluation. Previous course HLTH 325 effective through Winter 2013. Offered as HLTH 428 through Fall 2015. To become HLTJ 328 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 342.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH433: Behavioral Aspects of Diet, Activity and Health. Starting Winter 2016: Population Approaches to Diet and Activity (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of population-based dietary and physical activity patterns, their social and behavioral contexts and meanings, their relationships with chronic diseases, and public health intervention approaches. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 365 or HLTH 330 or HLTH 328.

HLTH440: Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses upon changes in aspects of health during the middle and later years of life. Includes anatomy and physiology, nutritional requirements, sensoria and those phenomena associated with aging and sexuality. Common causes of morbidity and mortality explored as they relate to the aged. Attention given to the psychosocial and economic needs of the elderly as well as to those aspects of gerontology which deal with legislation and community organization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 355.

HLTH444: Community Organization and Health Advocacy. Starting Winter 2016: Community Organizing and Health Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the context of community-based health organizations (CBHO's) and their functions. Emphasis is placed on the political and economical management of these organizations and their future role in improving health outcomes. Included is an examination of the advocacy model of community health and development of the strategies and skills necessary to become an effective health advocate. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 360 or HLTH 374.

HLTH445: Perspectives on Death (3 hours lecture)

Exploration of the personal and social meanings of death. Formulation of realistic plans for living, through education about death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval.

HLTH450: Health Disparities and Social Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course explores how broad social, cultural and economic inequalities in society affect health. By closely examining pressing problems in global health, the course guides the students in efforts to improve the health conditions of those overburdened by poverty, marginalization and social injustice. By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of how social forces become embodied as pathologies and how specific political, economic and historic processes influence the distribution of disease among different populations. Offered as HLTH 450 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 355 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval.

HLTH455: Core Concepts in the Delivery of Health Care (3 hours lecture)

Interdisciplinary analysis of patient care, supporting functions of health practitioners and human service principles underlying allied health professional-patient interactions. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Allied Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Six months of occupational experience in an allied health specialty.

HLTH458: Curriculum and Teaching in Health Occupations Education (3 hours lecture)

Application of curriculum and teaching principles in secondary and post-secondary health occupations instructional programs. First semester: classroom teaching and special instructional methods. Second semester: clinical instruction, curriculum development and coordination of health occupations programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental permission.

HLTH460: Systems of Health Services Delivery (3 hours lecture)

The organization, administration and functions of health services in the United States and other major nations; the social and professional policies which determine their scope and nature. Principal methods currently employed in the U.S. for analysis and evaluation of health care systems. Offers opportunity to students to relate these general understandings to those segments of the health services system of particular professional interest to themselves. Offered as HLTH 460 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 360 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval.

HLTH470: Patient Education (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth study of comprehensive patient education. Topics include historical development, roles and responsibilities of patient education, program planning and development, and evaluation of patient education programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: All Health Education majors only; or departmental approval.

HLTH475: Health Communication and Social Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the ability to plan, implement and evaluate a health communications program for a community health services institution. It focuses on the evolution of health communication in the United States, health communication theories and cultural differences. It provides for hands-on development of computer-based communications including newsletters, websites, and databases. Offered as HLTH 475 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 374 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental permission.

HLTH495: Writing for Publication in Health (3 hours lecture)

General aim is to analyze and develop skills in the process of writing for publication in the health field. Students analyze health writing, meet published writers, interview editors, utilize health research facilities and submit a manuscript for publication. Permission of instructor required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Public Health concentration or departmental approval.

JUST101: Criminology (3 hours lecture)

Definitions of crime, the major theories of crime, the nature and extent of criminal behavior. Analysis of different types of crime, including juvenile delinquency, corporate crime, crimes against women, and crimes by police. Institutions of social control: police, courts, prisons. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

JUST102: Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 hours lecture)

Do the three main sectors of the criminal justice system - the police, the courts, and corrections - have an impact on crime, achieve justice, and constitute a system? This course will look at the historical development of each of these sectors, their relation to broader social forces, and their internal problems and dilemmas. Topics may include current controversies (police brutality, the death penalty and other sentencing trends, community policing, plea bargaining, parole) as well as the impact of broader issues like race, gender and social class. 3 sh.

JUST103: Introduction to International Justice (3 lecture hours)

This course is an introduction to international justice. The course focuses on the origins of the international justice in the Enlightenment, and contemporary philosophical discourses on justice. The course further examines the structure of international justice, with particular emphasis on war crimes trials, truth and reconciliation commissions, and the debate about the International Criminal Court. The course provides and overview of contemporary issues in international justice which include a variety of transnational, the effects of international conflicts on women and children, and the issues of sustainable development around the world. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Non-Western Cultures requirement. 3 sh.

JUST200: Perspectives on Justice Studies I (3 hours lecture)

An examination of questions of justice based upon social behavior, group processes and individual differences. The course will explore controversies surrounding justice and injustice, including the potential for differential treatment based upon race, gender, age, sexual orientation, and physical ability. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Justice Studies. 3 sh.

JUST201: Perspectives on Justice Studies II (2 hour lecture, 2 hour other)

An introduction to the systems, processes and theories of justice in the United States: civil, criminal, juvenile and therapeutic. The course will explore the historical development of the American justice systems through an examination of relevant law and scholarly sources. By incorporating applicable law and court processes, the course will provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of US justice systems. 3 sh.

JUST202: Innovation and Evaluation in Criminal Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine current thinking in the criminal justice profession, with a focus on change and reform efforts. Its purpose will be to describe major innovations, to explore their rationale, and to examine impediments to their implementation and evaluation. After a review of the history of change in criminal justice and a review of the psychology of change, the course will take a case study approach. Successful and unsuccessful innovations in crime prevention, police instructions and practices, court practices, corrections and reentry will be examined in depth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 102 or departmental approval.

JUST209: Environmental Crime (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to explore the variety of harms committed against the environment and its inhabitants. The course examines explanations for environmental crime, the criminal justice system response, consequences of environmental offenses, crime resulting from natural disasters, and how the criminal justice system can be more responsive to issues of environmental crime. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102.

JUST210: International Justice II (3 hours lecture)

The aim of this course is to provide students with an in-depth look at theories and institutions of international justice. In this course the concept of "international justice" will be divided into three components: international economic justice, international political justice, and human rights. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 103.

JUST220: Crime in the Life Course (3 hours lecture)

In recent decades the life course paradigm has become one of the most prominent theoretical areas in criminology. This course will provide a detailed exploration of the life course paradigm, including its empirical and theoretical applications. The course will examine the foundations of life course theory including several fundamental studies and more recent scholarship, its theoretical and empirical evolution, as well as its value in understanding criminal behavior and its relationship to other theoretical paradigms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST223: Ethnography in Justice Studies (3 hours lecture)

The course will utilize case studies from justice systems settings to explore the process of doing ethnographic research from diverse theoretical perspectives. It will focus on the personal, political, ethical, moral, legal, and scientific dilemmas that researchers typically face attempting to gather fieldwork and interview data about the backstage regions of the subject's world. Specific areas to be examined include the researcher's role in the field, developing rapport and trust, emotions and fieldwork, age, race, sex, sexual orientation, and gender issues in research, the politics and ethics of research in applied and non-applied settings, and techniques of data collection in interviewing and participant observation. 3 sh.

JUST230: Family Violence (3 hours lecture)

This course will take a life-course approach in examining the complex issues of family violence. It will utilize a multidisciplinary framework in analyzing the dynamics of abuse. Students will discuss the various forms of violence as well as the prevalence and incidence of violence in different stages of the lifespan. The relationship between child abuse, sibling abuse, partner abuse and elder abuse will be examined. Students will also explore family violence from a cultural perspective. They will review current social policy as it relates to the protection and treatment of the victims of family violence. 3 sh.

JUST240: Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture)

The use of statistics to summarize data, to show relationships among variables. Evaluating research reports based on statistics. Use of the computer to analyze data. Cross-listed with Sociology, SOCI 240. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or MATH 109 or JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST250: Current Issues in Policing (3 hours lecture)

The course will examine current issues in policing from an interdisciplinary perspective. Subjects include racial and ethnic profiling, policing a multi-cultural society, police use of force, police corruption, policing domestic violence, policing emotionally disturbed people, police management of terrorist threat, hostage negotiation, policing disasters (SWAT/Emergency Service - first responders) and relevant dimensions of police psychology. 3 sh.

JUST251: Gangs in America (3 hours lecture)

This course covers important issues surrounding the study of gangs in America. In particular are discussions of the definition of "gangs," the nature and extent of the gang problem in the United States, theoretical explanations for gang activity, the role of youth in gangs, the role of adults in gangs, the role of females in gangs, gang interventions, and gang policies. The course is designed to help students gain an understanding of gang activity in the United States, and to think critically about ways to address this problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST252: Community Policing (3 hours lecture)

This course covers the relationship between police and modem communities including urban, rural, and suburban areas. The course will examine police training, the impact of training, selection, and professional socialization, the role of police in communities, as well as the effects of police discretion. Additional focuses on specific community policing initiatives such as CompStat and Intelligence-Led Policing are provided. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST300: Research Methods in Justice Studies (2 hours lecture, 1 hour lab)

Introduction to the principles of empirical research and their application in the law and justice system. Examination of sampling, experimental methods, survey methods, and qualitative fieldwork and study of strengths and weaknesses of these methods. Attention to methods for program, family, and individual evaluation. A critical approach to understanding and using "facts" about levels of adult and juvenile crime, causes of crime, public perceptions of crime and punishment, victimization, policing, the courts, and corrections. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval. Not open to freshman.

JUST310: Theoretical Issues in Justice Studies (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to explore justice-related issues of crime and punishment in both historical and contemporary settings - to examine, for instance, how and why some acts become defined as crimes and others do not, how and why these definitions change over time, and what factors (eg. race, class, and gender) influence and determine these changes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST313: Organized Crime (3 hours lecture)

Organized crime as a social phenomenon. The methods and goals of large-scale crime and its economic, political, and social costs; popular attitudes towards organized crime; efforts of enforcement and investigation agencies to deal with the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST314: Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture)

The domain of this course is the role of social inequities, especially those of class and race, in the distribution of environmental risks in societies at the local, national, and global levels and includes study of legal remedies and public policy measures that address environmental injustices. Cross listed with Sociology, SOCI 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or JUST 102 or departmental approval.

JUST315: Restorative Justice (3 hours lecture)

Study of the mediation process and its evolution. Analysis of models and applications including: court-annexed, family, municipal court, community, peer, and victim offender mediation. Student participation in role plays, research, and observations of mediation process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST316: Victimology (3 hours lecture)

Victimology is the scientific study of victims including the relationship between the victim and offender, the victim and the criminal justice system, and the victim with other societal institutions. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the subject of victimology in the context of Criminology and Women's and Gender studies. The course will be presented in three parts: Research and theory on victimization, Exploration of special topics in victimology, and Historical and Contemporary practical responses to victimization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or WMGS 301 or departmental approval.

JUST317: Race and the U.S. Legal System (3 hours lecture)

The course will examine the use of the law both to perpetuate and eradicate racial injustice in the United States from the inception and rise of slavery during the colonial period through the racial desegregation decision on the United States Supreme Court in Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954 to the present. The goals of the course are to achieve an understanding of the role of law in its social context, especially with regard to the use of legal institutions, and law in the creation and maintenance of systems of racial injustice and to examine the use of law (especially litigation) as a mechanism for social change. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST318: Animals and Justice (3 hours lecture)

The course will familiarize students with scholarship on the relationships between human and nonhuman animals from a multidisciplinary perspective including the ecological, environmental, cultural, economic, social, psychological, and health dimensions of these relationships. The course will situate nonhuman animals into a larger conception of social justice. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST319: Hate Crimes (3 hours lecture)

The course examines issues relating to how and why people hate; what constitutes a hate crime; whether and how society should legislate against hate crime; and how tolerance can be promoted in an ever-diverse and complex world. Course topics may include a historical perspective on hate; psychological and sociological theories as to why people hate hate; hate crime laws; enforcement issues relating to hate crime laws; constitutional challenges to hate laws; international hate crime; and new frontiers in hate and hate crime. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST320: Women and Prison (3 hours lecture)

This course will take a comprehensive view of the issues that bring women in contact with the criminal justice system and correctional institutions. Students will discuss the historical legacy of female incarceration in Europe and America. They will discover that the demographic intersections of gender, race, class and gender orientation play a major role in sentencing outcomes. Gender responsive programming as well as role model programs in the US, Canada and Europe will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST321: White Collar Crime (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the nature, scope, forms, and styles of occupational and business-related criminal activities in the U.S., as well as their social, political, and economic implications. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST322: Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course will deal with major theories regarding the causes of juvenile delinquency. The relationship between juvenile crime and justice and the socio-economic and institutional arrangements of the larger society will be the primary focus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST323: Serial Killers (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on Serial Killers in American society. Serial killers are those who kill at least three persons over time. Serial killers often seem to be rational and sane, planning their murders in advance. If they are less than sane, less than rational, then the implications for justice are altered, and the investigation needs to be broadened beyond the idea of punishment. The thrust of the course will be spread over these themes: crime and punishment, rationality and madness, justice and revenge. With these topics in mind, this course will concern itself with the historical, psychological, legal and cultural implications of serial killers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST324: Terrorism and Social Justice (3 hours lecture)

The goals of this course are to study terrorists and terrorism from both a criminological and social justice perspective and to contextualize the current debate regarding civil liberty-for-security tradeoffs in an age of terror. The course will familiarize students with the definitional debates surrounding terrorism, the questions regarding how to treat terrorists from a legal and law enforcement perspective, and the reactions that terrorists elicit from governments and publics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 and/or departmental permission.

JUST325: Police and Society (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine urban police organizations from diverse theoretical perspectives. Subjects include media images of the police, police discretion, police use of force, police corruption, women in policing, ethnic minorities in policing, and researching the police. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST326: Death Penalty Perspectives (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the specific legal issues inherent in capital punishment. Included will be detailed coverage of both substantive and procedural law of capital punishment as well as the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries within this legal system. This course also will focus upon empirical analyses of death penalty applications and will carefully explore its practical and philosophical underpinnings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or JUST 232 or departmental approval.

JUST327: Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide a cross-national survey of crime and criminal justice. Emphasis will be on crime rates, forms of criminality, police, courts, and corrections. Descriptive material on how select countries administer criminal justice will be analyzed and compared. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST328: Prisons and Punishment (3 hours lecture)

The course will focus on Prisons and Punishment in American society. The prison is the symbol of punishment in western society. Apart from the general and historical claims made on punishment, we will be concerned with the policy implications of the existence of prisons. We will discuss the purposes of prison, whether or not they rehabilitate, and explore the issue of alternatives to incarceration. This course will emphasize classical and contemporary sociological and historical texts, case law, inmate memoirs, and fictional accounts of prison life. As we learn to connect crime to social cohesion, cultural diversity, labor issues, and racial, ethnic and gender differences, we will discover and sample various perspectives on punishment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST329: Homeland Security (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the criminal justice roles, responsibilities and jurisdictions associated with homeland security. It will focus on the analysis of terrorism, as well as threats and challenges facing criminal justice agencies. Emphasis will be placed on the constitutional, organizational, and competency issues needed to meet criminal justice goals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST330: International Environmental Issues (3 hours lecture)

This course will familiarize students with environmental issues from a global perspective. The course will situate global environmental concerns within a larger framework of social justice and elaborate on various social, political, economic, and historical issues related to the environment and natural resources. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST331: Police Civil Liability (3 lecture hours)

This course will examine theories of police civil liability cases. It will explore relevant case law and provide an understanding of civil liability and its impact on law enforcement policies and procedures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST332: Cybercrime (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of the laws applied to technology based crimes. The course will utilize a model and method approach, which will present theory and procedure in a case problem context. It will acquaint students with the procedures utilized in the prosecution of cybercrimes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST333: Media and the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the media's impact on crime and the criminal justice system. It assists students in understanding criminal justice policy and practice and how both are portrayed by the media. The course provides a basis upon which students can critically examine the ideas and images presented by different forms of media. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST334: Technology and the Criminal Justice System (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the technological advancements brought about in the field of law enforcement. It will therefore explore devices and software that assists police officers and other law enforcement personnel in crime prevention, detection, crime control, suspect apprehension and prosecution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST340: Wrongful Convictions (3 hours lecture)

This course examines wrongful convictions from a broadly interdisciplinary perspective. This course will consider the scope and causes, the process of exonerations, and the legal, political and social responses and implications of wrongful convictions on the US Justice System as a whole. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST341: International Criminal Law and Procedure (3 hours lecture)

This course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, with a focus on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals, it will explore the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or JUST 210 or departmental approval.

JUST342: Wildlife Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The purpose of this course is to explore the variety of harms committed against wildlife populations globally. The course examines the threats to wildlife populations, impacted by the decisions of humans, development, and industries. The course overviews the theories and practices of wildlife protection, and details law enforcement's use of forensics to apprehend and prosecute wildlife traffickers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or JUST 209.

JUST349: Policing Terrorism (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an overview of some major issues involved in the policing of terrorism. It will review the changing notions of terrorism since 9/11 & some theoretical perspectives commonly applied to the study of different aspects of policing terrorism. It will go on to explore how different urban US police departments perceived & handled terrorist threat prior to 9/11 & the reorg of policing that took place after 9/11 including the expansion of counterterrorism and intelligence units & inclusion of former CIA executives in command positions, reduction in the ranks of uniformed patrol, expansion of SWAT/Emergency Service units & intro of new military & government sponsored antiterrorist training, & the internationalization of social control & surveillance of "terrorist" activities under "Interpol." This course will also analyze the increase in tension between the goals of democratic policing & those of more authoritarian policing styles common in countries in which there is little separation between the military & the state. The course will also provide a brief comparative overview of policing dissidence & terrorism in other countries including the U.K., Brazil , & Argentina, during the dirty war, & the rationalizations that are commonly used to excuse & justify torture & other extreme measures to manage perceived terrorist threat. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST351: Juries and Justice

An examination of the roots of the American jury system and the role of trials in the social construction of morality. Consideration of issues related to jury pools, selection, and representativeness. Examination of data from research on group processes within actual and mock juries, including communication and decision making in juries and juror bias. Students will conduct field studies in local courts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST352: Crime and Globalization (3 hours lecture)

The primary aim of this course is the examination of the nexus between globalization and crime. The focus of the course is on the changing nature of transnational and international crimes, their relationship to political, social, cultural and economic developments, and the challenges these present for the governance of crime. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST353: Corrections (3 hours lecture)

Traces the historical development of corrections in the United States and examines present trends. Explores the sociopolitical nature of various correctional policies, with special emphasis on current trends and controversies. Analyzes prison life from the perspectives of administrators, corrections officers, and inmates. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST354: International Prisoners' Rights (3 hours lecture)

International Prisoners' Rights concerns the laws regulating the rights of incarcerated persons. The course analyzes the breadth and limitations of the substantive rights of prisoners in a variety of countries. This course is particularly suited to students interested in the political, social, and economic contexts in which difficult issues of criminal justice and fairness present themselves. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST355: Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of global human trafficking, including extent, causes, impact, perpetrators, victims and responses. In addition to an overview of the global issues we will examine the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors, and legal and policy approaches to reducing the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 and/or departmental permission.

JUST356: Genocide (3 hours lecture)

This interdisciplinary course explores the emergence, development, underlying causes and responses to genocide. This course examines the legal entities established to address cases of genocide, and the formal and informal mechanisms of justice and redress for genocide victims and their families. This course will explore these themes through the study of particular cases such as the Holocaust, Rwanda, Armenia, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia and Darfur. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or by departmental permission.

JUST358: Crime Scene Investigation (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the theoretical foundations and practical applications of the law used to the investigation of crimes. It will acquaint students with the procedures utilized in the identification, recovery and analysis of evidence of the commission of crimes. It will also explore relevant case law. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201.

JUST359: Women and the Environment (3 hours lecture)

The course will familiarize students with the role of women in the environmental movement, currently and historically from a social justice perspective. The course will focus on the unique roles women have played in environmental protection. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 209.

JUST360: Rights, Liberties and American Justice (3 hours lecture)

An integrated approach to the study of individual rights, liberties, and American justice. The development of constitutional law in its social, political, and cultural contexts. The growth of the legal tradition and recent developments in relation to statutory law in shaping the principles of American liberty. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST390: Independent Study in Justice Studies

Guided study of a particular area of Justice Studies arranged individually between student and professor. The topic may be a more advanced treatment of a regularly offered course or the exploration of a timely and significant area of Justice Studies. This course does not replace a regular course taken on an independent study basis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or JUST 232 or departmental approval.

JUST398: Selected Topics in Justice Studies (3 hours lecture)

Exploration of a timely and significant area of Justice Studies. The specific topic will be announced each time that the course is offered. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST400: Drugs and Society (3 hours lecture)

The course will familiarize students with scholarship on the relationships between drugs and disparate treatment by race, class and gender from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course will situate drugs into a larger conception of social justice and will familiarize students with scholarship on the relationships between drugs and the larger structural elements of society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST401: Social Justice and Family Policy (3 hours lecture)

Students will examine historical and current social welfare policies within a social justice context and as they affect families through the lifecourse. They will analyze the conflicts and controversies that surround current policies and the role of the media in setting the social welfare agenda. Students will come to and understanding of the political forces and special interests that frame the rationale for social welfare policy and will decide what reforms, if any, are indicated. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST402: Sex Crimes (3 hours lecture)

The course will familiarize students with an understanding of sexual offending and offenders from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course will situate this type of crime and offender within a larger conception of social justice and will familiarize students with scholarship on the relationships between sex crimes and the larger structural elements of society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 310 or departmental approval.

JUST403: Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide an upper-level, trans-disciplinary overview of ways that gender shapes individuals' experiences with the criminal justice system as workers, offenders and victims. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of structural disadvantage, the gendered nature of criminological theoretical perspectives, and the victim/offender dichotomy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 or JUST 310 or by departmental approval.

JUST404: Corrections Management (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on the administration of the corrections system. This will include an examination of the agencies involved, and the historical and philosophical background of corrections, as well as theories of correctional management. We will discuss several issues that impact the corrections system, both on an individual institutional basis and on a system level. This will include both recruitment and retention of staff, treatment and education programs, the role of politics, technology, security, and accountability/ethics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 353 or departmental approval.

JUST406: International Civil Conflicts (3 hours seminar)

This course covers the causes, solutions to, and persistent problems involving international civil conflicts. The course will look at civil wars from many angles including those of human rights and conflict resolution. It will also explore riots, pogroms, ethnic conflicts, and violence against women. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 313 or JUST 324 or JUST 327 or JUST 329 or JUST 330 or JUST 332 or JUST 341 or JUST 342 or JUST 349 or JUST 352 or JUST 354 or JUST 355 or JUST 356, or PALG 305, or WMGS 355, or departmental approval.

JUST495: Senior Honors Seminar in Research (3 hours lecture)

This course aims to provide original research experience to advanced undergraduate students. The goal of this course is to have students conduct primary research, from the initial stages of literature exploration through to data collection and analysis. Successful completion of original research will encourage continuation to graduate school. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 300, JUST 240; 3.2 or higher GPA overall and 3.5 or higher GPA in the major.

JUST496: Peer Mentoring for Justice Studies

Advanced students serve as peer mentors in Justice Studies working with faculty and students to promote academic excellence and positive student culture. They will also solidify knowledge and gain organizational and leadership experience. This course may be repeated once for credit. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and departmental permission; Justice Studies majors only.

JUST497: Senior Seminar and Internship (2 hours seminar, 1 hour other)

Field placement experience. The required classroom seminar complements the applied component and includes discussions of organizational models, conflict resolution, confidentiality, career options and resume writing. Discussion themes incorporate a multidisciplinary perspective. May be repeated once for students who choose a second concentration. 3 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200, JUST 201, JUST 300, and JUST 310 with a minimum grade of C- in each; 18 credits in the student's concentration; Justice Studies majors only; senior status; and departmental permission.

LAWS200: Introduction to Law (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the meaning and functions of law, the powers and the jurisdiction of the courts. An exploration of traditional and evolving areas of law. A survey of the different professions and career options within the legal field. An assessment of the roles and importance of law in the lives of students and the public. Students may take LAWS 200 or JURI 210 but not both courses. Students in the Jurisprudence major should take JURI 210. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LAWS220: Conflict and Its Resolution (3 hours lecture)

A study of conflict, its management and resolution. Exploration of conflict management skills negotiation and mediation. Considerations of culture, gender, race, and age in resolving conflicts. Current developments and practical applications such as peer mediation, negotiation in the workplace, and dispute resolution in the court system. Students may take LAWS 220 or PALG 308, but not both courses. Students in the Paralegal Minor should take PALG 308. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

LAWS290: Language of the Law

This course explores the interface between language and our legal system. Students study the history of legal language up to the present day. Topics to be covered include, among others, the impact of (il)literacy on the law, the linguistic ramifications of governing bilingual societies, the functions of written laws and legal language, and the social psychological impact of language use in modern-day litigation. Cross-listed with Linguistics LNGN290. 3 sh.

LAWS302: Legal Research (3 hours lecture)

Study of principles and methods of research as applied to law and government. Exploration of the sources of law including case law, legislative process and intent, statutory law and public administration. Contrastive applications of law library research and computer-assisted legal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

LAWS362: Legal Writing (3 hours lecture)

Application of legal research, method, and analysis to legal writing. Students are required to perform various kinds of legal writing assignments and to demonstrate ability to identify legal problems, analyze them based upon the related law and theory, and solve problems with resulting written work product. Utilization of computer-assisted legal research. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 302.

LAWS388: Advocacy and Persuasion (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this class involves the study of substantive and procedural legal issues with the added dimension of combining the arts of persuasion and advocacy and their application to trial strategies. Students learn techniques of communicating evidence, both oral and demonstrative, to advocate effectively a client's case and persuade a jury. Students are exposed to the rules of evidence and trial procedure culminating in putting theory into practice by applying classroom study to a legal problem in the format of a mock trial including witness and attorney roles. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or POLS 320.

LAWS390: Independent Study in Law

Guided study of a particular area of law arranged individually between student and professor. The topic may be a more advanced treatment of a regularly offered course or the exploration of a timely and significant area of law. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

LAWS391: Women and the Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to and evaluation of the changing patterns of gender-based laws in the United States in terms of the preferences they reflect and the rationales used to justify them. Emphasis on issues which impact upon women's rights, relevant case law which impacts upon the roles and rights of women, and legislation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 102.

LAWS460: Advanced Legal Research and Writing (3 hours lecture)

Refinement of principles and methods of legal research in working with statutes, case law, and other legal sources. Application of legal research techniques to practical legal problems. Preparation of more complex legal research projects. Utilization of computer-assisted legal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 302 and LAWS 362.

LAWS473: Seminar in Law and Literature (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the "Law and Literature" movement, an area of study developed within the legal field over the past several decades. The course is devoted to a thematic exploration and examination of the application of the concepts of law and literature and underscores areas of mutual illumination of the two vast bodies of text: legal opinions and works of literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or departmental approval.

LAWS497: Pre-Law Internship

Field work experience in the legal setting to provide pre-law students who have acquired basic skills through introductory courses with the opportunity to utilize those skills and further explore the field of law. Required classroom seminar supplements experiential component and includes discussion of field work experience and ethical considerations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 302 with a grade of "B" or better; and LAWS 200 or JURI 210; and open only to juniors and seniors.

LAWS499: Selected Topics in Law (3 hours lecture)

Exploration of a timely and significant area of law. The specific topic will be announced each time that the course is offered. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Vary according to the topic offered.

PALG210: Law and Litigation (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the legal system with a focus on the New Jersey court system. Review of substantive areas of law and application of procedural concepts from initiation of a civil lawsuit through entry of judgment. The unique role and function of attorney and paralegal in the process of client interviewing, ethical considerations, investigation and preparation for trial. Drafting of pleadings and other documents used in litigation and trial. 3 sh.

PALG301: Criminal Law and Procedure (3 hours lecture)

Legal concepts of criminal law and their application to criminal procedure. Contrast between civil law and criminal law. Study of crimes against persons, property and the public. Searches and seizure, arrest and interrogation. Students may take PALG 301 or POLS 321 but not both courses as part of the Paralegal minor, the Political Science major or the Criminal Justice minor. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG304: Real Estate Law (3 hours lecture)

Principles of real estate law and transactions. Contracts, mortgages, surveys, title, RESPA. Conveyances of real property from the standpoint of seller and purchaser. Landlord-tenant relations. Forms and documents utilized by paralegals in real estate law. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG305: Immigration Law (3 hours lecture)

Basic overview of Immigration and Nationality Act, including historical and sociological perspectives of United States immigration. Practice and procedure of immigration law as it pertains to both administrative agency processing and consular processing. Non-immigrant visas, family-based immigration, employment-based immigration, naturalization, removal, asylum and refugee practice. Recent developments in this continually evolving area of law and practice. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG306: Contract Law (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations and practical applications of contract law in the common law tradition as modified by the Uniform Commercial Code. Drafting of contracts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG308: Negotiation, Mediation and Arbitration (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of complimentary forms of dispute resolution as compared and contrasted with the traditional judicial system. Students study the theoretical background and receive training in mediation, negotiation and arbitration. Students may take LAWS 220 or PALG 308 but not both courses. Students in the Paralegal Studies Program should take PALG 308. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG310: Fundamentals of Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law (3 hours lecture)

Substantive principles of patent, trademark and copyright law including categories and standards of patentability, categories of trademarks and categories of copyrightable subject matter. Assignment and licensing of such proprietary rights. Litigation involving acts of infringement including related areas of anti-trust law and unfair competition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG312: Research and Writing for Paralegals (3 hours lecture)

Study of principles, methods and applications of research and writing as utilized by paralegals in the legal environment. Students will be required to use the library as well as conduct computer-assisted research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG316: Skills for Bilingual Legal Personnel (3 hours lecture)

Translating, interpreting and cultural fluency as applied to the legal field and in particular to the role of bilingual paralegals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Fluency in Spanish required.

PALG317: Evidence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the basic principles and rules governing trial advocacy in federal and state (NJ) cases. Areas to be examined include: the hearsay rule and its exceptions, examination of witnesses (lay and expert), impeachment, privileges, real and demonstrative evidence, inference, judicial notice and presumptions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG318: Computer-Assisted Research in the Legal Environment (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of computer-based research in the legal environment. Areas to be covered in computer-assisted legal research include government legal databases and private legal databases such as Westlaw and Lexis. Factual investigation and other law-related internet reserarch will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG320: Bankruptcy Law (3 hours lecture)

This course prepares paralegal students to assist attorneys representing debtors and creditors in bankruptcy matters. The course emphasizes procedures and their practical applications, including interviewing clients, preparing and reviewing schedules and preparing claims and motions. The course reviews the new Federal bankruptcy code. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG322: Wills, Trusts and Probate Law (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts, practice, and procedures in wills, probate, and trusts. Includes will drafting, estate planning, probate procedures and estate administration. Forms and questionnaires utilized by paralegals in these areas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG330: Family Law (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of family law practice. Study of ceremonial and common-law marriage. Dissolution of marriage and annulment. Financial consequences, including alimony and property distribution. Child custody, adoption, illegitimacy, paternity, and surrogacy. Domestic violence. Familiarization with New Jersey procedures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG331: Administrative Law and Procedure (3 hours lecture)

This course will employ an integrated approach to the study of administrative law. Students will explore the importance of administrative agencies in the development and implementation of public policies as well as the pervasive ways in which agency actions affect the public. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG332: Personal Injury Law (3 hours lecture)

Legal concepts and terminology of personal injury law, both substantive and procedural. Negligence, medical malpractice, products liability. Drafting of pleadings and other documents utilized by paralegals in personal injury practice. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG336: Corporations and Partnerships (3 hours lecture)

Legal characteristics and tax aspects related to sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited partnerships and corporations. Formation, operation and dissolution of the corporate entity. Drafting of legal forms utilized by paralegals in these areas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG339: Computer Applications in the Legal Environment (3 hours lecture)

Applications of computer software and hardware in the legal environment. Legal applications of word processing, databases,and spreadsheets. Legal software for document generation, document management, financial management, time billing, time and document management, computer-assisted legal research and information management in the workflow process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG360:

3 sh.

PALG378: Employment Law (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of employment law as it has developed and been applied in the United States. The course will utilize a model and method approach which will present theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course will acquaint students with various human resource and compliance procedures in the modern legal environment. Processes such as policy creation and procedural application of modern employment law including wrongful discharge, whistleblower statutes, age discrimination, handicap discrimination, sex discrimination and harassment, race, and religion will be explored as well. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the use of ADR and CDR prior to disputes manifest before federal and state agencies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG390: Independent Study in Paralegal Studies

Guided study of a particular area of Paralegal Studies arranged individually between student and professor. The topic may be a more advanced treatment of a regularly offered course or the exploration of a timely and significant area of Paralegal Studies. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG398: Selected Topics in Paralegal Studies (3 hours lecture)

Exploration of a timely and significant area of Paralegal Studies such as administrative law, bankruptcy, environmental law as well as new and evolving legal areas. The specific topic will be announced each time that the course is offered. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG411: Advanced Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law (3 hours lecture)

Procedural principles of patent, trademark and copyright law including prosecution of patent and trademark applications in the United States Patent and Trademark Office, preparation and filing of trademark applications and preparation of applications to register claims to copyright in the United States Copyright Office. Litigation procedures for acts of infringement relating to such proprietary rights. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG412: Consumer Law (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of Consumer Law. The course utilizes a model and method approach, which presents theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course acquaints students with various traditional legal theories and compares and contrasts them with law as it has evolved to meet new changes in society. Areas to be covered include compulsory disclosure of information, consumer claims and defenses, abusive collective practice, state and federal regulation of the cost of credit and alternative dispute resolution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG413: Elder Law (3 hours lecture)

This course presents basic Elder Law concepts, practices and procedures. This course is a "service-learning course" requiring students to participate in an organized service activity that addresses an identified community need in this case, that of the elderly. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG420: Civil Trial Preparation (3 hours lecture)

Refinement of substantive and procedural principles relating to all stages of a civil law suit from commencement of suit through judgment and appeal as applied in New Jersey. Theoretical foundations and practical applications in the state court system contrasted with the federal court system. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 and PALG 312 or departmental approval.

PALG437: Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of entertainment law. The course will utilize a model and method approach, which will present theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course will acquaint students with various traditional legal theories and compare and contrast them with entertainment law as it has evolved to meet the changes in society. Areas to be covered include representing minors, contract preparation, copyright infringement, publishing, theatrical and musical performance, film and television. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG438: Trademark Law (3 hours lecture)

Comprehensive study of procedural and substantive aspects of trademark selection, registration, use, and protection within the context of intellectual property. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG440: Criminal Trial Preparation (3 hours lecture)

This course presents a comprehensive overview of the criminal trial process. Preparation and trial of a criminal case as studied through case law, procedures, techniques and strategies. Contrast of New Jersey and Federal criminal procedure. Study of crime scene investigation, motion practice, grand jury, discovery, voir dire, evidentiary problems, testimonial evidence and summations. Extensive use of simulation exercises. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102; and PALG 210 and PALG 301.

PALG450: Law Office Management and Technology (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations and practical applications of law office management and technology. Hands-on and theoretical problems dealing with work product, human resources, and workflow in assembly, case management, database management, human resource management, and technological interfaces with traditional processes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 210 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

PALG497: Paralegal Seminar and Internship (3 hours seminar, 3 hours other)

Field work experience of 90 hours in a private sector law office, corporation, bank or public sector agency. Required classroom seminar supplements experiential component and includes discussion of field work experience, ethical considerations and career options. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 312 with a minimum grade of C-, PALG 210, two legal specialty courses, and departmental approval. Prerequisites or corequisites: two legal specialty courses selected from courses approved within the Paralegal Studies Program or from the approved departmental list.

PALG498: Cooperative Education: Paralegal Studies

Academic study integrated with supervised paid employment situation in the legal environment outside of the formal classroom setting. Part-time (20 hours per week) or full-time (40 hours per week). Required classroom seminar supplements experiential component and includes discussion of field work experience, ethical considerations and career options. 4 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: PALG 312 with a minimum grade of C-, PALG 210, two legal specialty courses, and departmental approval. Prerequisites or corequisites: two legal specialty courses selected from courses approved within the Paralegal Studies Program or from the approved departmental list.

POLS100: Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,)

This course analyzes politics from the four main vantage points of the discipline of political science, that is, political theory, comparative politics, international relations and American government. Of special concern is the U.S. Constitution, its classical and English roots, and its development to the present. This course is required for Political Science Majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS101: American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the basic institutions and processes of American politics, and will do so, in part, through a focus on current policy issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS199: Freshman Seminar in Political Science and Law (1 hour lecture)

An experience for Political Science, Jurisprudence and Pre-Law freshmen that will help them succeed as Political Science and/or Jurisprudence majors by learning study skills and becoming acquainted with the culture of higher education. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - New Student Seminar. 1 sh.

POLS201: Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture)

Constitutional principles, governmental institutions and political processes of selected contemporary states. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Political Science. 3 sh.

POLS202: International Relations (3 hours lecture)

Recent and contemporary world politics and the foreign relations and policies of selected states. 3 sh.

POLS203: International Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, need, evolution, principles, achievements and functioning of major international organizations, with emphasis upon the United Nations and selected regional organizations. 3 sh.

POLS204: Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture)

The salient characteristics of government and politics in the independent black African states, and the way these impinge on developmental efforts therein, are examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS205: Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture)

Literature and developments in the field of public administration; the federal bureaucracy in the policy-making process. 3 sh.

POLS206: Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, institutions, and practices in contemporary China-Japan. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS207: American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture)

A consideration and analysis of the goals that the nation's foreign policy officials seek to attain abroad, the values that give rise to those objectives, and the means or instruments through with they are pursued. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS214: Women in Politics (3 hours lecture)

The role of women in the functioning of the American political system. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS215: Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

The political behavior of American ethnic groups from the Puritans to the Puerto Ricans. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS216: Urban Politics (3 hours lecture)

The policies, processes, inter-relationships and organization of governments in heavily populated areas of the United States. 3 sh.

POLS300: Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major ideas that shape politics and political science as a discipline. Blending both historical and conceptual approaches to the development of political ideas, this class will also introduce fundamental concepts in political science as a whole. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course.

POLS301: American Party System (3 hours lecture)

Organization, function and practice of political parties in the U.S.; campaign functions, membership problems, political finance and policy-formation practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS302: Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture)

The nature and development of public opinion and pressure groups in the United States and their influence on public policy and political process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS303: Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture)

The major contemporary schools of political modernization and development theory; inter-relationship among political, social and economic variables. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201.

POLS304: State and Local Government (3 hours lecture)

State political sub-systems, including their administrative and local sub-systems, federal-state relations, political institutions and groups in the states and in New Jersey. This course helps students understand lawmaking and enforcement as functions of state and local government. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS306: Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course is taught in election years and provides the student with field experience at the local precinct or party level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101.

POLS307: American Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introduction to the main strands of American political thought from the founding of the American colonies to the present day. Our goal will be to come to grips with the major questions that have driven our politics throughout the nation's history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or JURI 300.

POLS310: Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture)

The problems and processes in the U.S. of public personnel administration at the state and local level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS311: Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture)

The budgetary process in governmental agencies from the perspective of political demands and influences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS312: Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

Black participation in the American political system from the colonial period to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS313: The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces undergraduates to the intersection of the Internet and politics called "new media." Students will study various aspects of government and politics through a range of technologies from websites to blogs and social networking sites, exploring how these technologies impact the political landscape. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course or departmental approval.

POLS314: Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar)

Seminar in Campaign Politics provides an introduction to the history and theory surrounding elections in the United States and complements students practicums in POLS 306. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS315: Urban Administration (3 hours lecture)

Problems and policy-making in the larger urban or metropolitan complexes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS317: The American Congress (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the United States Congress. It will allow students to explore in depth one of the key American political institutions introduced to them in POLS 101, American Government and Politics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS318: The American Presidency (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the American presidency. It will allow students who were introduced to the presidency in POLS 101, American Government and Politics, to explore in depth one of the key institutions of the American political system. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS319: Politics and Film (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to film and politics. Films and assigned readings on a particular topic will familiarize students with particular aspects of government or politics, including but not limited to institutions, processes, movements, and the media. Students will attempt to reconcile portrayal of politics in films with scholarly work. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course or departmental approval.

POLS320: Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the American civil legal system as it affects a variety of our social institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS321: Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduces the student to institutions, processes, and social functions of criminal law. Students may take POLS 321 or PALG 301 but not both courses as part of the Political Science Major, the Paralegal Studies Minor or the Criminal Justice Minor. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS322: American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of supreme court decisions in the areas of the distribution of power within the national government and between the national government and the states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101.

POLS323: American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture)

The development of the constitution and the Supreme Court of the United States illustrated through reference to court opinions in civil rights and liberties. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS324: American Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the methods used to analyze public policy and an examination of current public policy issues. Special attention is given to the use of comparative analysis in analyzing American public policies. This course deals with issues such as crime, punishment, social welfare, drug abuse, child abuse, equality, health, education and the environment. It focuses on public policy responses to these issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS327: Food and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a global and interdisciplinary approach to studying the phenomenon of Food and Politics. It explores questions ranging from how is food produced to how effective is food regulation? Through a comparative approach this course explores various social movements including the organic, local and slow food movements and policy areas ranging from hunger to obesity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or POLS 202 or POLS 300 or departmental approval.

POLS329: Narco-Terrorism (3 hours lecture)

This course will be an in-depth examination into the nexus between terrorism and drug trafficking. Students will explore topics such as U.S. law, policy, and strategy in regards to targeting terrorist organizations involved in the drug trade, as well as an overview of the most infamous narco-terrorists in history and the present day. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215 or POLS 216.

POLS331: Animal Rights: Law, Politics and Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course seeks to provide students with an understanding of how human-animal relations have been affected by politics and the rule of law. It will generate debate about the treatment of animals in a multitude of contexts, including agricultural food production, product development, wild fauna, and domestic pets. Students will develop an understanding of the political nature of human-animal relations. Students will analyze the individual and group efforts to exercise power over and on behalf of animals. Also, students will analyze the efforts to grant political power to animals themselves. Students will seek to understand the values and interests that vie for control of collective decision-making, institutions, and public policy regarding animals. Students will analyze the interests for and against animal protection laws and the nature of such laws. Throughout the course, students will develop their critical reading, writing, and analytical reasoning abilities. Also, students will increase their knowledge of human-animal relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215, POLS 216 or JURI 210.

POLS332: U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the interrelationships among the legal, political and societal factors in major legislative enactments of U.S. immigration and nationality law as they relate to government institutions and affected populations. The course examines the law and politics of restrictive immigration since the founding of our nation, including exclusion laws of the nineteenth century, quota systems of the twentieth century, and key legislative acts of the later 20th and early 21st centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS333: Topics in Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course allows instructors to develop a new course not regularly offered in the area of political thought. Texts and topics will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit up to four times as long as the titles differ. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300.

POLS334: Politics of Science Fiction (3 hours lecture)

This class will use prominent science fiction novels and some classics of political thought and political science to investigate some ways that the imagined worlds of science fiction in the last century resonate with and amplify our understanding of important political concepts such as citizenship, the nature of power, the relationship between choice and fate, and the evolution of social order. The course will also explore important belief systems such as anarchism, libertarianism, classic republicanism, and liberal constitutionalism, which will bring the class discussion to bear on today's political dilemmas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300.

POLS335: Theories of Political Economy (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students an understanding of the fundamental notions in political economy. By engaging with the practical and moral ideas that drive different understandings of politics and the economy, students will acquire an understanding of the forces that shape modern societies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215 or POLS 216.

POLS339: Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics of Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Institutions, parties, ideologies and interest groups. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS340: Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture)

The political experiences and institutions of the Indian subcontinent since 1947: The Republic of India, Pakistan, Ceylon and Bangladesh. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS341: Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, organization and practices in the states of Central America and South America. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS342: Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics in the Arab states, Turkey, Israel and Iran. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS343: Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture)

The political and institutional organizations of the countries of the former Soviet Union; contemporary political issues; party and governmental structures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS344: Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture)

The political and governmental organizations of the Communist countries of Eastern and Central Europe (exclusive of the former U.S.S.R.);institutions, processes and problems, including inter-regional relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS351: Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture)

This seminar explores the legal and political traditions giving rise to contemporary Israeli and American legal systems. This encompasses such aspects as democratic process with its origins and influences, governmental institutions within each legal system, the role of religion and the protection of minority rights. Comparative perspectives provide an understanding of each legal system within its national context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or POLS 202 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or JAST 201 or permission of department.

POLS353: Intelligence and National Security (3 hours lecture)

This course primarily examines the role of the U.S. intelligence community in national security but will also engage with issues of international espionage. Students will learn about the collection, analysis, dissemination, and use of intelligence products. Students will also discuss the moral and political questions intelligence work and covert action raises both for leaders and citizens in a liberal democracy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215 or POLS 216.

POLS362: International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture)

This course explores and debates some of the key questions facing the U.S. and other countries in Asia, including Japan, China, the Koreas and Russia. Students will study the concepts, institutions and cooperative frameworks in Asia that enable the countries in the region to address their common economic and security concerns. The course addresses three current conflicts (Taiwan-China relations, North Korea's nuclear program, war in Afghanistan) and looks at the costs and benefits of globalization for Asia. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS363: Politics and Morality of War (3 hours lecture)

This course aims at giving students an understanding of how thinkers and practitioners try to limit the violence of armed conflict. To accomplish this, the class will engage with the major elements of the just war tradition and its realist, militarists, and pacifist critics. The course ends with an intensive examination of the moral issues presented by recent conflicts such as assassination, terrorism, counterinsurgency, occupation, and nation-building. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 and POLS 300.

POLS364: War and International Security (3 hours lecture)

This course aims at giving students an understanding of basic concepts in grand strategy, war, and diplomacy. By studying the concepts and practices at the hard edge of international politics, students will acquire an understanding of the forces that shape global peace and conflict. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS365: Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to the politics of global environmental issues. Students will begin by studying the key actors, concepts, forms of governance and debates that are central to the field. The course then will address important questions in international relations such as the relationship between environmental protection and trade, the achievement of sustainable development, the connection between environmental change and security, and differing perspectives on the environment among different types of states and social groups. The last section will involve case studies which highlight the state and human security consequences of particular environmental problems and explore the forms of governance designed to address them. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS410: Directed Study

Juniors and seniors may elect three to six credits of independent study under the direction of a member of the Political Science staff. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS416: Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture)

This course allows the instructor to select a political problem which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS420: Seminar and Internship in Political Science

In this course students will work as interns for one semester in the office of a N.J. State Legislator, U.S. Congressperson or Senator, or state or federal executive. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 and departmental approval.

POLS425: Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture)

In-depth examination of the federal bureaucracy in relationship with national, state and local agencies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS426: Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I

A one semester public administration field experience in local government. Application must be made directly to the instructor in preceding semester. 4 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS427: Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II

A one semester public administration field experience in local government. Application must be made directly to the instructor in preceding semester. 4 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS429: Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture)

The main goal of this course will be to familiarize students with various polling methods used in political science research with the aim of giving them the ability to evaluate and criticize such research. A variety of polling techniques will be covered including simple descriptive statistics, tracking polls, and quota polls. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS430: International Law (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, evolution, subjects, sources, principles, role and substance of international law in the international system of nation-states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or POLS 203 or departmental approval.

POLS431: Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture)

After reviewing debates on globalization, this course covers its impact on global security through an examination of key issues such as crime, terrorism, migration, environment, and health, and a detailed case study of the Bosnian War. The course includes evaluation of the role of the international community and civil society in addressing these new security challenges. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or permission of instructor.

POLS436: Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship

In this course students intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty, and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Political Science and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 436. 1 - 7 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS497: Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar)

The course will involve intensive research in a seminar setting for junior and senior political science majors. Students will conduct original research and present reports to meetings of the seminar. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Open only to junior and senior majors with at least a 3.2 cumulative grade point average in Political Science.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

PSYC109: The Human Environment (3 hours lecture)

An interdisciplinary course which explains the human impact, as social groups and individuals, on the natural environment. It explores the relationships and interconnectedness between natural processes and social, economic, cultural, technological, and political culture. Critical environmental issues are discussed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Requirements - Social Science. 3 sh.

PSYC120: Psychology of Leadership for Emerging Leaders: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture)

This course is for Emerging Leaders Learning Community students only. This course allows students to begin to develop their own leadership styles. While receiving a grounding in historical and contemporary psychological theories on leadership, they will practice leadership through community service and assess themselves based on theories, assessment instruments, and behaviors. This is a service-learning course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. Previous course PSYC 194 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Emerging Leaders Learning Community members only.

PSYC200: Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Required for teaching. Covers child and adolescent development; fundamentals of learning theory as applied to classroom situations, learning inhibition and academic non-achievement, personal-social adjustment, measuring and evaluating teaching-learning, creativity. Course may not be taken by Psychology majors for major credit effective Fall 1995. 3 sh.

PSYC201: Child Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers growth, development and behavior of children. Physical, intellectual, social and emotional development and their interaction. Scientific method exemplified through the literature and intensive study of individual children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC202: Adolescent Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers biological, psychological and social factors that shape the transition from childhood to adulthood: Normal and deviant patterns of development in morals, intellect, emotions and judgment; problems of adolescents with practical application to oneself and others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC203: Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to different methods of psychological research including survey, correlational and experimental methods. Introductory descriptive statistics and correlational analysis will be covered. Basic aspects of sound scientific writing, including conducting a literature search and writing a scientific manuscript following American Psychological Association guidelines, will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC220: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to basic statistical methods in the behavioral sciences. The course begins with a review of descriptive statistics. The main course emphasis will be on probability theory and inferential statistics and their application to psychological research. This includes such methods as z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and nonparametric statistics. Laboratory sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply concepts from class using computers, particularly statistical software packages. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC224: Children's Rights and Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

Explores the review and evaluation of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of young citizens (preschool through adolescence); the process and goals of advocacy; the community services available to and lacking for the optimum development to maturity of young citizens. Psychology, education, sociology, mental health, law enforcement, medicine are domains of study and investigation. 3 sh.

PSYC225: Psychology of Adjustment (3 hours lecture)

Discusses individual and social adjustment; typical varieties of adjustive behavior illustrated by practical examples; factors which facilitate or impede people's adaptation to life situations such as work, marriage, disability, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC227: Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Topics include: Behavior and attitudes influenced by basic sexuality; widening perspectives to aid in decision-making; developmental periods and sexual relationships; connections between psychological theory and sexual mores; genetic understandings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC230: Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers the influence of the physical environment on the behavior of organisms: population growth and regulation; crowding; sensory experience, enrichment and deprivation; motivational force of environmental stimulation; adaptation to environment as a function of prolonged exposure; salutary effects of aesthetically pleasing stimulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC231: Psychology of Aggression (3 hours lecture)

The root causes of violence in America will be examined through case studies, (the protest-movement of the 1960's, sexual and physical abuse, violent-criminal activity, etc.) and familiarization with biochemical, psychological and socio-cultural research into causes and effects of aggression and violence. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC235: Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth (3 hours lecture)

Surveys, current practices and problems of exceptional children and youth. Explores the unique needs of individuals with handicaps that involve intellectual, sensory, motor, neurological, social and emotional origins. Utilizes analysis of case materials for theoretical and practical applications to the psychology of exceptionality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC245: Hispanic/Latino Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on the personal, social, institutional and cultural forces that affect the psychology of Hispanic/Latino Americans. The course will cover issues such as the measurement of psychological functions, bilingualism, personal values and belief systems, the dynamics of the family and acculturation. A midterm and a final exam as well as a research paper will be required from students. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC246: Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture)

Covers the historical impact of scientific and institutional racism on the psychological study of blacks. Survey and critical analysis of traditional European approaches with non-traditional methods for comparison. Future development and advancement of a black psychology considered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC248: Psychology and Law (3 hours lecture)

Law and psychology share a common focus: the understanding, prediction and regulation of human behavior. Despite this commonality of interest, different emphasis on these elements and a different mandate have frequently hindered active communication and collaboration between the disciplines. The purpose of this course is to present the common ground of law and psychology, and show how they contribute to each other. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC265: Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture)

The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC268: Psychological Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture)

Overview of later maturity and aging. Emphasis on psychological, physiological and sociological aspects. Aging and the cognitive process. Mental health, death, adjustment problems, needs, issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288 and Philosophy and Religion PHIL 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CSIT 111 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

PSYC294: Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture)

This is a service learning course that allows students to develop a sophisticated understanding of leadership from both a theoretical and practical point of view. Students receive in depth information on historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership. They participate in assessments of their own leadership competencies and capabilities based on theory and research. They then learn to apply, assess, compare, and critically evaluate theory, research, and assessment tools through a multi-week project with a community partner in which they have a chance to observe and practice leadership. Students combine theory and practice through a series of critical reflections that result in students articulating their learnings about leadership, the practice of leadership in the civic environment, and themselves as leaders. This course is not recommended for students who successfully completed PSYC 120. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or CMST 101 or HONP 100.

PSYC300: The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Students in this course will simultaneously learn concepts in teaching psychology, and work with a Psychology professor who will mentor them as the student acts as a teacher's assistant. Students will engage in a critical examination of the teaching of psychology. The course will run as a seminar where issues of curriculum development, teaching techniques, and ethical aspects will be discussed based on journal articles. The work as an assistant includes anonymous record keeping, leading study groups and providing a brief lecture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; Psychology majors only; departmental permission.

PSYC301: Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introduction to laboratory methods of research in areas such as motivation, perception and learning. Emphasis is on design and execution of exploratory investigations. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 and PSYC 220;or PSYC 220 and PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC302: Health Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The theoretical, empirical and clinical aspects of health psychology will be presented. The relation of health psychology with other areas of psychology and other scientific disciplines will be discussed. The historical developments of the field, its research methodologies, theoretical models and exemplary interventions will be described. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC303: Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Application of psychological principles and practices in business and industry. Problems of communication, group dynamics, man-machine relations, employee attitudes, accident prevention, industrial job selection techniques, motivation, executive leadership. Commonly used selection tests will be evaluated. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC304: Social Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on social behavior of the individual and the group, social perception, motivation, and learning; attitudes and values; development and dynamics of social groups; inter-group tension and prejudice; mass phenomena; psychological approaches to social issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC305: Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Anatomical, neural and biochemical bases of behavior are studied. Topics include localization of function, neuro-hormonal interaction, sensory and motor functioning, emotions, the relationship of neurophysiological processes and personality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC306: Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will address psychological issues involved in personnel decision making (e.g., job interviewing decisions, hiring decisions). Students will learn about aligning organizational and human resource strategy, and learn about tools and techniques in personnel psychology including job analysis, equal employment opportunity law, performance management, employee selection, and organizational training and development. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about important personnel functions and then apply the knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will learn about measurement and assessment of job applicant and how this assessment must be conducted to be fair and successful. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC307: Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will address individual, social and group interactions in work organizations. Students will learn about how social factors such as roles, norms, groups, stereotypes, and culture, influence individual and organizational behavior. Students will study theories and practices in organizations to assess and improve job attitudes, work stress, work motivation, leadership, and organizational functioning. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about the different social factors that influence organizational function, and then apply this knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will gain a better understanding of their own work experiences as a result of this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC308: Perception (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the theory and procedure of perceptual research. Theoretical approaches; modern psychophysical and perceptual research; traditional problems of perception, constancies of size and color brightness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC310: Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture)

Tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement and personality; principles of psychological testing; approaches to test construction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC313: Cognition (3 hours lecture)

The study of the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge, utilizing behavioral, observational, and computer modeling methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC314: Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how human beings make decisions and judgments. It reviews how personal values, uncertainty and cognitive, social, and neurological processes affect decision making. This course draws upon a wide range of examples from many fields including psychology, economics, criminology, and medicine. Students will also learn strategies and techniques to enhance judgment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC320: Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys human psychological development from the prenatal period to adolescence. The interacting forces of heredity, environment and physical, cognitive, emotional and socio-cultural factors are reviewed in the light of current research and theory in these areas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC324: Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of current topics in the field of child advocacy. The impact of Megan's Law, advocacy for adopted children, child right-to-life movement, and repressed memory syndrome are among the possible issues to be explored. A multi-disciplinary focus will be used to enhance student understanding and learning. Previous course PSYC 430 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior Psychology or Justice Studies majors only.

PSYC330: Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the interaction between psychology and the legal system. Emphasis placed on the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathic behavior, court-mandated evaluations and the role of the psychologist as expert witness. The application of psychological knowledge within the criminal justice context. Ethical guidelines in forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or JUST 300 or LAWS 302.

PSYC332: Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture)

Explores current approaches and theories of personality development and organization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC340: Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture)

Covers research, language and methods of learning theory. Classical and operant conditioning, complex habits, remembering and forgetting, transfer of training, cognition and behavior modification. Review of animal research but primary emphasis is on people. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture)

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC353: Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture)

The student will explore experimental and field studies of behavior in a few selected animal species with particular reference to the behavior of vertebrates. The course will involve detailed study of instinctive behavior and imprinting, respondent and operant behavior with emphasis upon the procedures and variables concerned with the acquisition of new forms of behavior. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC354: Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an understanding of the basic tenets of the field of clinical psychology. The relation of clinical psychology with other areas of psychology and other disciplines will be discussed. The course will cover clinical psychology's past and present, assessment and intervention, approaches to practicing clinical psychology, multicultural issues in clinical psychology, and the future of the field. Fulfills Category "4 Social/Applied" in Advanced Elective list. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC355: Motivation (3 hours lecture)

The concepts of instincts, homeostasis, drive, reinforcement, arousal and inception are analyzed with reference to data drawn from many areas of experimentation. The primary emphasis is on the experimental, rather than the theoretical literature: motivational concepts relevant to human and animal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC358: Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture)

Major theoretical problems and theories of learning are considered. Includes experimental analysis of basic phenomena of conditioning and learning, studied primarily through experimental studies of infra-human organisms. Students may study selected topics more extensively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC360: History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the historical development of psychology, comparative analysis of the major schools of contemporary psychology, and new trends and movements in psychological theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC365: Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Topics include an overview of psychopathological processes: neuroses, psychoses, and characterological disorders; feeling, thinking and behavioral aspects during the life span; diagnostic and treatment procedures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC366: Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture)

The course will present psychological contributions to interventions designed to promote health, prevent illness and avert further disability. Appropriate techniques to assess, plan, and implement programs at the community level will be discussed. The multidisciplinary, multilevel nature of community programs will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC375: Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines behavior from a Darwinian perspective attempting to understand how our behaviors have evolved throughout time. By examining behavior in terms of natural selection, this course provides a new and insightful perspective to all areas of psychology, including cognitive, social, developmental, and neuropsychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC402: Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture)

An overview of classical and contemporary systems of psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on understanding each system in terms of its underlying theory of personality, psychopathology and therapeutic impact. Studies of therapeutic efficacy are also covered. Other issues include such topics as the training of psychotherapists and the ethical issues involved in psychotherapy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 354 or PSYC 365 or departmental approval.

PSYC405: Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Transcultural focus on the inter-related nature of culture and human behavior. Team taught interdisciplinary course with emphasis on mutual dependencies of psychological and anthropological theory and method. Students work with bicultural informants. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 405. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ANTH 100; PSYC 301 must be taken by Psychology majors.

PSYC420: Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology (1 hour lecture)

A detailed review on the use of a computer package for the purpose of doing statistical analyses of psychological data. The instructor will select one such package for presentation and choose among SSPS, EcStatic, BMD, SAS, and others. Instruction will be provided on coding, data entry, menu selection, score transformation, and exporting. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC459: Special Topics in Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in a specific area of psychology. The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor. The course permits the instructor and students to examine psychological issues which are either not covered in the curriculum or which deserve more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as part of major degree requirements in psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301.

PSYC488: Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar)

Seminar discussion of foundation works and contemporary research articles in Cognitive Science. With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of Cognitive Science for comprehensive in-depth review of research and write a literature review. Professional issues in Cognitive Science are discussed. Cross listed with Linguistics LNGN 488. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288 or PSYC 288.

PSYC491: Independent Study I: Research

Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC492: Independent Study II: Research

Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC495: Psychology Honors I (4 hours lecture)

With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of psychology for a comprehensive, in-depth review of research; generate research questions and hypotheses; delineate appropriate design, methodology and statistical analyses to answer these questions and test these hypotheses; collect and analyze preliminary data; and write an Honors Thesis Proposal. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; departmental approval; overall GPA of 3.5.

PSYC496: Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture)

This course constitutes the second semester of Psychology Honors. Students are expected to gather, analyze and interpret the data for their honors project, write the analysis and discussion chapters, and submit their completed honors thesis. Students who successfully complete this course will graduate with honors in psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 495 with a grade of A or A-.

SOCI100: The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the study of human groups, from peer groups to families to societies. How and why culture, social structure, and group processes arise. Consequences of social forces for individuals. 3 sh.

SOCI102: Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture)

The social meaning of race and ethnicity. The social, psychological and structural sources of racism; the consequences of this phenomenon to groups; situation and comparative data. Meets General Education 2002 - Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course SOCI 202 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

SOCI104: Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of "official" and "unofficial" (single parent, gay/lesbian) family relationships; compare current U.S. family forms with those of other historical periods and societies; examine trends in contemporary societies affecting family forms, such as changing work role of women, changed sexual norms in courtship and recent changes in divorce rate; analyze issues in the "politics of the family." Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. Previous course SOCI 204 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

SOCI105: Black Family (3 hours lecture)

The black family in American society; historical perspectives and contemporary conflicts surrounding the black family. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course SOCI 205 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

SOCI106: Individual and Society (3 hours lecture)

The relationship between culture, social structure, various institutions and the individual's social perceptions, sense of self and self-presentation are explored in this course. The structure of small groups is also discussed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course SOCI 206 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

SOCI112: Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the sociology of sports and leisure from diverse theoretical perspectives. Activities explored include recreational and competitive sports (baseball, basketball, swimming, football, hockey, gymnastics) among children, high school, college, and adult age groups; youth and adult games (cops and robbers, power rangers, cards, etc.); sex; drinking; gambling; mushroom collecting; and T.V. (football games and soap operas). Topics discussed include the role of leisure and sport activities in character development, gender activity, and social relationships; the effect of leisure and sport activities on education and occupational mobility; risk and injury in leisure and sports; and the political, economic, and ideological role of leisure and sports activity in the reproduction of society. 3 sh.

SOCI113: Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

How social structure and social institutions are related to problems such as discrimination, environmental pollution, violence, and poverty. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

SOCI201: Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to the methods and theory of sociological inquiry. Topics include: comparisons of dominant paradigms of sociological thought, critical analysis of basic concepts in the field, logic and rhetoric of sociological analysis, and ethical and value issues in the practice of sociology. Emphasis will also be placed upon writing sociology: documentation, literature search, organization and style. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Sociology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219.

SOCI207: Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture)

Empirical materials on social structure. Inter-institutional relations as the form of the broad, general structure of American society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113.

SOCI208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201.

SOCI209: Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture)

Poverty and welfare institutions as social phenomena. The meaning of poverty, absolute and relative deprivation, the functions of social welfare institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI212: Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture)

Social processes affecting technological innovation and the forms in which an innovation is institutionalized or abandoned. The social consequences and assessment of technological innovations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219.

SOCI215: Sociology of Sports (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the major theoretical and substantive writings on the sociology of amateur and professional sports. Topics to be explored from conflict, functionalist and symbolic interactionist perspectives include socialization and athletic identity, women in sports, race and class in sports, gender relations and sport participation, sport risk and injury, education and sports participation, sports in the media, sport and the reproduction of society, and fieldwork among college and professional athletes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI219: Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture)

With a shift in America's population toward an older society, it becomes important to understand the aging process and its implications for various social institutions. This course examines demographic characteristics which influence the aging process; various theories to explain the process; and specific policies, nationally and locally, to address it. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI220: Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture)

This course deals with the disparity in standards of living among the nations of the world today as well as with the strategies social scientists and social planners have formulated to eradicate poverty where it occurs. This course focuses on the historical, political, economic, cultural, and sociological relationships that have contributed to the current division of labor in the world and world inequalities. Furthermore, it focuses on specific social problems faced by poor nations while comparing social institutions in Western societies with their counterpart in non-Western societies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI230: Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture)

Types of conflict and violence including war, crime, family and sexual violence, class and ethnic violence, and genocide; biological determinist and cultural explanations of violence; theories of nonviolent social change. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113 or departmental approval.

SOCI240: Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture)

The use of statistics to summarize data, to show relationships among variables. Evaluating research reports based on statistics. Use of the computer to analyze data. Cross-listed with Justice Studies, JUST 240. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or MATH 109 or JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI301: Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture)

Introduction to primary methods of gathering sociological data: experimentation, survey research, participant observation, etc. Use of computers to analyze data. The formulation of hypotheses, survey design, participant observation and the use of elementary statistics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201.

SOCI302: Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture)

The formulation of hypotheses, survey design, participant observation and the use of elementary statistics; certain broad problems in the philosophy of social science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301.

SOCI303: Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The structure and functions of bureaucracy in modern society; the life cycle of large organizations and their methods of operation; selected contemporary problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI304: Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture)

The development of modern forms of work; the shift from manufacturing to service occupations; and problems of work alienation; current models of labor management relations in the U.S. compared to Western Europe and Japan; the effects of new technology on skill, employment levels, and on labor management relations; conceptions of the professions and their role in society; the process of an occupation becoming a profession. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI309: Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this course is on the relationship between society and health with a special emphasis on the role of culture and social structure. Health inequalities and the sociology of disability will be central concerns. Other topics will include social and cultural definitions of health and illness, the social role of the "sick", comparative medical beliefs and practices and medical institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or FCST 200 or departmental approval.

SOCI310: Directed Independent Research

Research and report under faculty direction. The student selects for investigation an area of sociological concern with the approval of a faculty supervisor. Multiple semester selection permitted with approval. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 - 9 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI311: Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture)

Processes of urbanization and suburbanization; nature of urban social relations, including racial and ethnic relations; urban ecological patterns and demographic conditions. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI312: Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The role of sociology in understanding and analyzing the environment, environmental issues and problems, and the sociocultural sources and structure of environmentalism and environmental movements. Various perspectives and approaches to explaining the relationship between society and the environment are explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI313: Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A comparison of important theories on key themes in sociology; the nature of social interaction, the definition of power, stratification, social control and deviance, alienation and anomie, social structure and function, social bases of knowledge and belief, and social conflict and change. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI314: Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture)

The domain of this course is the role of social inequities, especially those of class and race, in the distribution of environmental risks in societies at the local, national, and global levels and includes study of legal remedies and public policy measures that address environmental injustices. Cross listed with Justice Studies, JUST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI315: Social Inequality (3 hours lecture)

The inequalities of social ranking systems in societies. Theoretical and empirical approaches to stratification delineating the variables of power, power elites, class consciousness, alienation and class mobility. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI316: Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture)

The school as an institution of social control and social change. The social organization of schools: social roles of students, teachers and other school personnel. (Not to be used for teacher certification.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100, SOCI 113, SOCI 201, SOCI 204 or departmental approval.

SOCI318: Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture)

Problems of population and demographic change; social foundations and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration. Population and socio-economic development. The uses of demographic data in planning, policy making, and social research. Previous course SOCI 218 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 104, SOCI 201, SOCI 220 or departmental approval.

SOCI330: Political Sociology (3 hours lecture)

This course will endeavor to give the student a relatively complete understanding of the social dynamics of political actions on various levels. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI334: Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Comparative sociological schemes; the analytical blocks of total society; kinship, family and marriage; policy and bureaucracy; social stratification and mobility; industrialization and urbanization; belief systems and value orientations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI336: Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the social functions, determinants, and consequences of helping professions such as social work, and helping institutions such as public welfare. Particular emphasis is placed on the relations of helping professions and institutions with their socio-political environment and with their clients. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI340: Social Change in a Global World (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the ways in which people's food production and consumption patterns are affected by and related to other aspects of their social organization. The interrelationship between food production/consumption patterns, political life, stratification systems, and demography will be examined. The main focus will be a comparison between different forms of social organization with respect to the management of food and population issues. Previous course SOCI 216 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI390: Cooperative Education in Sociology

The cooperative education option integrates academic study with a supervised employment experience outside the formal classroom environment. The co-op term is a semester off-campus, during which a student is supervised by a faculty coordinator and the office of Cooperative Education and is responsible for completing the terms of a learning contract. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI400: Senior Project

This course prepares students to design and complete a major project. This will involve the gathering, presentation, and analysis of evidence relevant to a particular theoretical or applied problem, using the relevant and appropriate sociological concepts. Since different faculty members emphasize different types of projects, students are urged to review individual syllabi prior to registering for the course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 and SOCI 240.

SOCI401: Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture)

Humans have a unique capacity to experience a large variety of emotions. This course examines how cultures label, shape, and guide their members' emotional experience. It also explores the interplay between social-structural arrangements (e.g., family and economic systems) and emotion, illustrating links between macro-social patterns. Students will conduct original research on social factors related to emotionality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI402: Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture)

Social conceptions of mental health and illness; social factors in the causes and treatment of mental illness. Mental institutions--their structures and ideologies. Comparative psychotherapies in social context; mental health personnel and professional ideologies; social movements and mental health and illness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 309 or SOCI 336.

SOCI404: Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture)

The social bases of religious belief and activity; religious movements, denominationalism, sectarianism, secularization, pluralism, the social bases of belief and unbelief, and cross-cultural and historical comparisons. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI405: Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical perspectives on human deviance. The social organization of specific types of deviance and of formal and informal social control. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI407: Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture)

A sociological analysis and cultural critique of various mass media with an emphasis on radio, television, newspapers, and the internet. The course will examine their function and their relationship with constituent audiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI408: Social Movements (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the study of concerted collective behavior for social change, or social movements. Various approaches to the understanding of social movements, including the natural history, case study, and analytical models, will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on relating theoretical work to contemporary empirical examples of social movement activity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI411: Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor each semester. The course may be selected more than once with approval. Limited to only the general areas of sociological theory, research methodology, problems of institutional processes, and application of methodology and theory to social situations or community issues and problems. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI416: Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other)

The course will explore qualitative research from diverse theoretical perspectives. It will examine the personal, political, and scientific dilemmas that researchers typically face attempting to gather objective data about the "backstage regions" of the subjects' world. Topics may include the researcher's role in the field; developing rapport and trust; emotions and fieldwork; age, race, sex, and gender issues in research; politics and ethics in fieldwork; researching "high risk" settings; and techniques of data collecting in interviewing and fieldwork. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI420: Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture)

The impact of the social usages of law on all levels of operation as an instrument of social policy, social control and social regulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI426: Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

The course examines theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of sexuality. It seeks to understand the social foundations of sexual behavior and sexual identity. It explores the relationship between sexuality and politics, focusing on current as well as historical conflicts over sexual behavior and ideologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI430: Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture)

The social determinants of differences between women and men and the effect of sex role differentiation in the social institutions of marriage and family, the economy and work situation, formal education, health, mass media, and religion; special emphasis is placed on the impact of social change on sex roles in contemporary society. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

WMGS101: Introduction to Women's Studies (3 hours lecture)

A team of two or more faculty members from various disciplines, employing scientific, sociological, historical, and artistic insights, methods and data examines the sources and meanings of different treatments of women in this and other human societies. 3 sh.

WMGS102: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces the student to the broad and interdisciplinary field known as Women's and Gender Studies. It is designed to make students aware of the new discoveries in feminist and gender studies research and to focus on many aspects of the female experience and the social construction of gendered identities. The course is designed to help students understand different theories and methodologies in diverse disciplines and to treat areas such as literature, history, psychology and the arts through an issue-oriented approach. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

WMGS200: Transnational Feminisms (3 hours lecture)

This course will interrogate the concept and practice of feminism from various locations outside of the U.S. Students will examine the political, cultural and socio-economic structures that promote or inhibit activism on women's lives and issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - K2 Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course WMGS 303 effective through Winter 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102.

WMGS201: Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture)

How did feminism begin in Europe and America? This course studies the birth of feminism as an international political movement and explores its growth in response to Western social developments from 1750 to the mid-twentieth century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102.

WMGS208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 206.

WMGS301: Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a wide variety of feminist theories which illustrate the many ways in which issues of gender can be interpreted. Recognizing that gendered identities are molded by such factors as class, race, sexual orientation and national identity, this course explores the issues of difference among women and the role of theory in conceptualizing such differences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 200 or WMGS 201 or WMGS 208 or SOCI 208.

WMGS302: Selected Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of a topic related to Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in an existing course. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated two times (as long as the topic is different) for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 200 or WMGS 201 or WMGS 208 or SOCI 208.

WMGS308: Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature (3 hours lecture)

A study of Asian American literature and film through the lenses of gender and sexuality. Topics addressed will include major issues in Asian American literary studies, such as orientalism, intersections of race and gender, changing gender roles, the invention of "tradition," bachelor societies, queer sexuality, family, intergenerational issues, war, and colonialism and empire. Ethnic groups addressed might include Chinese American, Filipino American, Hmong American, Japanese American, Korean American, South Asian American, and Vietnamese American, among others. Cross-listed with English, ENGL 308. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 207 or ENFL 208 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274 or ENWR 220.

WMGS314: Women and Migration (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on female migrants from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on historical studies, it considers issues of work, family, sexuality, and identity formation for migrant women past and present. Questions to explore include: what distinguishes the experiences of migration for women; what are the continuities and differences for women across time, ethnicity, and geography; how do historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and others, as well as the migrants themselves, understand female migration; what do women gain and lose through migration, and why a gendered approach to migration studies is crucial. Cross listed with History, HIST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102; or HIST 100 and HIST 117 or 118.

WMGS316: Victimology (3 hours lecture)

Victimology is the scientific study of victims including the relationship between the victim and offender, the victim and the criminal justice system, and the victim with other societal institutions. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the subject of victimology in the context of Criminology and Women's and Gender Studies. The course will be presented in three parts: Research and theory on victimization, Exploration of special topics in victimology, and Historical and Contemporary practical responses to victimization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or WMGS 301 or departmental approval.

WMGS345: Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture)

This course explores representations of medieval and early modern women, gender, and sexuality in literary, artistic, and musical media that were produced in continental Europe. Paying particular attention to works - e.g., manuscript illuminations, songs, texts - produced by, for, and about women this course transcends disciplinary boundaries and draws on a range of methodological approaches. 3 hours lecture. Cross-listed with GHNU 345. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or WMGS 201; or departmental approval.

WMGS350: Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture)

This course exposes students to writing-as-social-action through intensive study of the topic of sexual violence against women. Students will gain a broad-based understanding of community literacy and the role of writing outside school walls in order to fully explore how writing can function as an activist tool for the prevention of sexual violence. We will read broadly on the issue of sexual violence against women-analyzing depictions of rape in popular language, exploring how rape has been discussed in feminist theory and scholarship, and researching community-based and activist responses to rape and its prevention-in order to strengthen our own literacy practices towards prevention and awareness-raising. Students will be familiar with local, national, and international agencies that work to protect women from sexual violence and advocate for rape survivors. Students will develop activist writing projects that work to serve and further these existing efforts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 300, ENJR 210, ENJR 211, ENWR 204, ENWR 205, ENWR 206, ENWR 207, ENWR 250, or WMGS 201.

WMGS355: Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of global human trafficking, including extent, causes, impact, perpetrators, victims and responses. In addition to an overview of the global issues we will examine the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors, and legal and policy approaches to reducing the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 201 or WMGS 200 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental permission.

WMGS376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and JURI 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

WMGS401: Independent Study: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

This course involves advanced research on a topic of particular interest to the students that goes beyond the scope of available courses in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies. Students are required to hand in an extensive paper documenting the results of their research. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 and approval of the WMGS Director.

WMGS402: Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Each participant completes an individual project that is either (a) research on an approved topic or (b) description and analysis of a long-term field experience. With faculty facilitator, students discuss research strategies, issues, and work in progress. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102, WMGS 201, WMGS 301 and 6 additional hours in the major.

WMGS403: Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide an upper-level, trans-disciplinary overview of ways that gender shapes individuals' experiences with the criminal justice system as workers, offenders and victims. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of structural disadvantage, the gendered nature of criminological theoretical perspectives, and the victim/offender dichotomy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 or JUST 310 or by departmental approval.

WMGS410: Cooperative Education: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Academic study integrated with supervised internship in an organization, agency, or business that addresses women's issues or issues of gender or sexuality. Part-time (20 hours per week). Required individual meetings with faculty advisor supplement experiential component, and include discussion of field work experience, connection between feminist/gender studies theories and practice, issues of access and diversity, civic responsibility, and career options. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102, WMGS 301 and at least one other WMGS course; minimum GPA of 3.0; approval of WMGS director.

WMGS436: Washington, D.C. Internship

In this course students will intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Women's and Gender Studies and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Political Science, POLS 436. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102 plus two Women's and Gender Studies electives relevant to the intended placement (subject to the Women's and Gender Studies director's approval) and a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. in the major or minor.

WMGS481: The Legal Rights of Women (3 hours lecture)

This course will include some historical background for clearer understanding of what the changes in laws mean for women and men. Discussion and study of the effect of affirmative action, civil rights legislation and titles VI and IX will be included. Legal rights in the areas of education, employment, finances and credit, property ownership, marriage and divorce, health care, pensions and criminal law will be covered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course COUN 481 effective through Summer 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.