Nutrition and Food Science Major, Applied Nutrition Concentration (B.S.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

Coordinator: Dr. Meena Mahadevan
Office: University Hall, Room 4173
Phone: (973) 655-7574
Email: mahadevanm@mail.montclair.edu

In 2008, more than half of all graduates in nutrition were employed in hospitals, nursing care facilities, or offices of physicians or other health practitioners. Today, roughly 63% of nutritionist positions are specifically situated in local and state health departments, schools, public or private health agencies, and other community-based organizations that provide nutrition education, monitoring, and other supportive health care services for their target audiences.  According to the National Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for graduates with a strong background in community health and nutrition education is expected to increase 20 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.

The B.S. in Nutrition with a concentration in Applied Nutrition is ideal for those individuals who are interested in working in the field of nutrition in non-clinical settings.  The curriculum gives students the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills in nutritional assessment and support techniques that target groups of people within a community and not just individuals.  Graduates are prepared to develop, manage and coordinate group-based nutrition education programs for a wide variety of federal-, state-, or privately-funded community-based services.

Students also have the unique opportunity to combine their coursework in nutrition with courses for other disciplines by building a minor into their major program.  Minors such as Public Health, Communication Studies, Journalism, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology allow graduates to apply their knowledge of nutrition in a tangential but specialized field such as weight loss consulting, nutrition communication, public health policy and regulations, social services, elder care health services, or food retail, to name a few.

The specific objectives of the program are:

·      To prepare practitioners with skills in performing group-level nutritional needs assessments in the community.

·      To prepare practitioners with skills in analyzing gaps in existing policies and planning appropriate population-based nutrition education initiatives.

·      To prepare practitioners who are committed to social justice and the elimination of health disparities in their community using advanced-level critical thinking and problem solving skills.

·      To contribute to a diverse student body representing multiple cultural, educational and other professional backgrounds.

·      To collaborate with other professionals in the field and work together to advance the standing of the applied nutrition profession.

 



APPLIED NUTRITION CONCENTRATION

Complete 85 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. NUTRITION AND FOOD SCIENCE CORE

    Complete 10 courses for 25 semester hours:

    NUFD 130 Introduction to Nutrition and Food Science Profession (1 hour lecture) 1
    NUFD 150 Food Composition and Scientific Preparation (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 153 Dynamics of Food and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 192 Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    NUFD 240 Sanitation Management and Food Microbiology: Certification (1 hour lecture) 1
    NUFD 282 Applied Nutrition in the Lifecycle (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 304 Introduction to Research (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 352 Organization and Management of Foodservice Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 357 Experimental Food Science (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 490 Nutrition and Food Science Professional Seminar (l hour seminar) 1
  2. APPLIED NUTRITION CONC REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. Complete 5 courses for 15 semester hours:

      NUFD 110 International Cuisine (2 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab) 3
      NUFD 285 Nutrition in Chronic Disease Prevention (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 395 Applied Nutrition for Populations (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 412 Nutrition Education Techniques (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 482 Nutrition Counseling (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following for 4 semester hours:

      COED 401 Cooperative Education Experience I 3-8
      NUFD 409 Internship in Nutrition and Food Science (4 - 8 hours other) 4-8
    3. Complete 1 course from the following:

      NUFD 384 Nutrition in Developing Countries (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 392 Food Systems and Agribusineses Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 456 Research in Foods (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
  3. COLLATERAL COURSES

    Complete 6 courses for 20 semester hours:

    BIOL 111 Emerging Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
    CHEM 113 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 4
    CHEM 130 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    ECON 101 Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 102 Introduction to Public Health (3 hours lecture) 3
    MATH 109 Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. REQUIRED MINOR

    Complete 1 of the following required minors:

    1. COMMUNICATION STUDIES MINOR

      Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete the following 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

        CMDA 110 Introduction to Communication and Media Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMDA 210 Theorizing Communication and Media Arts (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMDA 220 Writing for the Media (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours from the following list

        CMST 130 Public Relations Principles (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 160 Introduction to Health Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 170 Organizational Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 202 Listening (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 215 Media History and Form (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 225 New Media and Participatory Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 245 Communication, Media and Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 246 Interpersonal Communication I (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 273 Democracy and Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 275 Building Bridges through Dialogue (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 322 Intercultural Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 362 Nonverbal Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
        CMST 435 Communication and Media Arts Activity (1 hours lecture) 1-3
    2. JOURNALISM MINOR

      Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete the following 3 courses:

        JOUR 210 News Reporting: Print and Online (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 216 History of Journalism in America (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 313 Editing (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 9 semester hours from the following:

        JOUR 211 Advanced News Reporting: Field Experience (2 hours lecture, l hour other) 4
        JOUR 300 Meet the Press (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 314 Advanced Editing (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 315 Magazine Journalism (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 316 Reporting of Public Affairs (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 317 Feature Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
        JOUR 416 Interpretive Journalism (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. GERONTOLOGY MINOR

      Complete 2 requirement(s) for 18 semester hours:

      1. GERONTOLOGY MINOR REQUIRED COURSES

        Complete 5 courses for 15 semester hours:

        FCST 201 Social Gerontology: The Study of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 305 Death and Bereavement in the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 325 Adult Development and Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 340 Aging and Social Policy (3.0 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 360 Families in Later Life (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course from the following list.

        HLTH 440 Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
        PEMJ 340 Fitness and the Aging Process (3 hours lecture) 3
        SOCI 309 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture) 3
    4. POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR

      Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

        1. Complete 1 course from the following:

          POLS 100 Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,) 3
          POLS 101 American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course from the following:

          POLS 201 Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 202 International Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
        3. Complete the following 1 course:

          POLS 300 Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. ELECTIVES FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR

        Complete 9 semester hours from the following:

        JURI 210 Perspectives on Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 203 International Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 204 Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 205 Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 206 Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 207 American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 214 Women in Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 215 Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 216 Urban Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 301 American Party System (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 302 Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 303 Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 304 State and Local Government (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 306 Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 310 Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 311 Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 312 Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 313 The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 314 Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar) 3
        POLS 315 Urban Administration (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 317 The American Congress (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 318 The American Presidency (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 319 Politics and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 320 Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 321 Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 322 American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 323 American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 327 Food and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 331 Animal Rights: Law, Politics and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 332 U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 333 Topics in Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 334 Politics of Science Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 335 Theories of Political Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 339 Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 340 Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 341 Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 342 Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 343 Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 344 Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 351 Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 353 Intelligence and National Security (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 362 International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 363 Politics and Morality of War (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 364 War and International Security (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 365 Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 410 Directed Study 3-6
        POLS 416 Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 420 Seminar and Internship in Political Science 4
        POLS 425 Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 426 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I 4-6
        POLS 427 Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II 4-6
        POLS 429 Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 430 International Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 431 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 436 Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship 1-7
        POLS 497 Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar) 3
    5. PSYCHOLOGY MINOR

      Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete the following 2 courses:

        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 203 Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 12 semester hours from the following:

        PSYC 200 Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 201 Child Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 202 Adolescent Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 220 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture) 4
        PSYC 224 Children's Rights and Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 225 Psychology of Adjustment (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 227 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 230 Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 231 Psychology of Aggression (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 235 Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 245 Hispanic/Latino Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 246 Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 248 Psychology and Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 265 Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 268 Psychological Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 294 Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 300 The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 301 Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        PSYC 302 Health Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 303 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 304 Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 305 Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 306 Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 307 Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 308 Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 310 Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 313 Cognition (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 314 Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 320 Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 324 Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 330 Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 332 Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 340 Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 353 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 354 Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 355 Motivation (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 358 Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 360 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 365 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 366 Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 375 Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 402 Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 405 Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 420 Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology (1 hour lecture) 1
        PSYC 459 Special Topics in Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 488 Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        PSYC 491 Independent Study I: Research 1-3
        PSYC 492 Independent Study II: Research 1-3
        PSYC 495 Psychology Honors I (4 hours lecture) 4
        PSYC 496 Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture) 4
    6. PUBLIC HEALTH MINOR

      Complete 18 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. REQUIRED COURSES

        1. Complete the following for 6 semester hours:

          HLTH 102 Introduction to Public Health (3 hours lecture) 3
          HLTH 365 Science of Public Health: Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete 1 course from the following: .

          HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
          HLTH 342 Health Promotion (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. ELECTIVES

        Complete 3 courses from the following: .

        HLTH 105 Medical Terminology (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 240 Foundations of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 375 Women's Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 433 Behavioral Aspects of Diet, Activity and Health. Starting Winter 2016: Population Approaches to Diet and Activity (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 440 Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 444 Community Organization and Health Advocacy. Starting Winter 2016: Community Organizing and Health Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 450 Health Disparities and Social Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 475 Health Communication and Social Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
    7. SOCIOLOGY MINOR

      Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete .

        SOCI 100 The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete a total of 15 semester hours from the following:

        1. 0 semester hours - 9 semester hours from:

          1.  

            SOCI 102 Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 104 Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 105 Black Family (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 106 Individual and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 112 Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 113 Social Problems (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 201 Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture) 4
            SOCI 207 Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 209 Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 212 Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 215 Sociology of Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 219 Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 220 Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 230 Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
            SOCI 240 Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture) 4
          2. 1 course from the following may also be taken:

            SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
            WMGS 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. 6 semester hours - 15 semester hours from the following list.

          SOCI 301 Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture) 4
          SOCI 302 Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 303 Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 304 Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 309 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 310 Directed Independent Research 3-9
          SOCI 311 Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 312 Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 313 Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 314 Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 315 Social Inequality (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 316 Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 318 Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 330 Political Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 334 Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 336 Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 340 Social Change in a Global World (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 390 Cooperative Education in Sociology 3-4
          SOCI 400 Senior Project 3
          SOCI 401 Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 402 Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 404 Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 405 Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 407 Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 408 Social Movements (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 411 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 416 Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other) 3
          SOCI 420 Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL111: Emerging Diseases (3 hours lecture)

This course employs topics in physiology and biology as foundation and forum to probe contemporary health and social issues for which an educated assessment and response requires an understanding of the science behind the issue. Specific topics will be discussed which demonstrate the importance of emerging diseases and how these diseases are affected by the environment, human development and international political events. These topics will include the emergence of new viral diseases, diseases related to diet and diseases related to aging. 3 sh.

CHEM113: Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)

A one semester introductory lecture and laboratory course in the fundamental concepts of chemistry. This course is suitable for students who have no prior background in chemistry. It is intended for students majoring in Food and Nutrition and other non-science majors. Some aspects of the course are quantitative, and a background in algebra is assumed. This course prepares students to proceed to CHEM 130 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry 4 sh.

CHEM130: Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Survey of organic chemistry covering all major classes, nomenclature, and characteristic class reactions. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 113 with a grade of C- or better.

CMDA110: Introduction to Communication and Media Arts (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the crucial role media play in contemporary society and surveys the technological, social, cultural, economic, and political impact of communication codes, media, and their convergence. Topics include the histories of varied media (print, electronic, digital), media narratives and genres, the interplay between media products/industries and identity, and the evolving significance of emerging technologies. Previous course SPCM 172 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CMDA210: Theorizing Communication and Media Arts (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces major theoretical perspectives and debates in the interdisciplinary fields of communication and media and provides key concepts used in the criticism of different types of media and texts. Theoretical approaches include political economy, semiotics, visual aesthetics, psychoanalysis, effects and reception, feminism, cultural studies, Marxism, and postmodernism which are then applied to a wide range of texts and structures (radio, film, television, music, advertising, news, the Internet, etc). Previous course SPCM 201 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media majors only.

CMDA220: Writing for the Media (3 hours lecture)

This course covers the basic principles of writing for print, electronic, and on line media and provides hands-on writing experience. Students develop an understanding of industry standards of writing by communication and media professionals. They also build their skills in creating a variety of media texts, including news packages, documentary and fiction programs, press releases, speeches, Web pages and blogs, public service announcements and advertisements. Previous course BDCS 140 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite; School of Communication and Media majors only.

CMST130: Public Relations Principles (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices in the field of public relations. Students will learn about the public relations function within organizations, its impact on publics, and its function in society. Topics of this course involve the evolution of the field, the range of roles and responsibilities that public relations practitioners assume in a variety of settings, and the significant issues and trends that have shaped the practice. The course will also address the ethics of public relations practice and how values shape an organization's ability to build successful relationships with its publics. Previous course SPCM 222 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media majors only.

CMST160: Introduction to Health Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to familiarize you with the prominent theories, issues, and topics in the field of health communication. This course will expose you to diverse health communication perspectives as they relate to a range of health communication topics, including illness and health, historical and contemporary issues, patient and provider experiences, cultural differences in health, public awareness/prevention/intervention campaigns, and the role of media and relationships in health communication. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media majors only.

CMST170: Organizational Communication (3 hours lecture)

This introduces students to the field of organizational communication by surveying fundamental topics and theories pertaining to organizations' structures (relational ordering) and processes. Topics include comparative structural approaches; system, cultural, and critical perspectives for understanding relationships and networks; assimilation of new members; organizational change; cultural diversity; technology and media; and globalization. Previous course SPCM 274 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media majors only.

CMST202: Listening (3 hours lecture)

The development of critical, discriminative, appreciative and empathic listening skills; emphasis on listening theory/concept exploration, listening skill building, and experiential learning through theory application. Previous course SPCM 230 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media (SCMD) majors only.

CMST215: Media History and Form (3 hours lecture)

The course offers an in depth analysis of a specific medium (e.g. television, radio, film, magazines). It examines this medium's development and cultural impact from both the aesthetic and historical perspectives. Previous course SPCM 104 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media (SCMD) majors only.

CMST225: New Media and Participatory Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on new media technologies, their relationship with society, and the issues they present, both practical and theoretical, for participation in contemporary culture. This course looks at broad concepts - e.g., mediation, cultural power, representation, and social geography - as they relate to specific objects of inquiry like blogs, mobile devices, technocultures, and virtual reality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media (SCMD) majors only.

CMST245: Communication, Media and Gender (3 hours lecture)

This course offers a critical examination of how communication processes of socialization and media forms produce and circulate shared knowledge, representations, and expectations about gender. Various contemporary relational contexts and media artifacts are used to explore the social construction of gendered identities and power relations and the implications for professional, political, and cultural participation. Previous course SPCM 290 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media (SCMD) majors only.

CMST246: Interpersonal Communication I (3 hours lecture)

Basic theory of interpersonal communication and its practical applications in friendships and intimate relationships; personal communication patterns as they affect self perception and other perception; emphasis on the effect this process has on our interactions with others; strategies are offered as a means of change, growth and potential in effective interpersonal communication. Previous course SPCM 271 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 110; School of Communication and Media (SCMD) majors only.

CMST273: Democracy and Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course explores conceptual and practical issues of communication in democratic bodies of various sizes and functions, spanning small groups, organizations, and societies. Topics include shared leadership; dialogue; deliberation; cultural pluralism; representational mechanisms; political partisanship and campaigns; lobbying; public policymaking; and journalism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Major in School of Communication and Media and CMDA 110; OR Minor in Leadership Development Through Civic Engagement and PSYC 120 or PSYC 294.

CMST275: Building Bridges through Dialogue (3 hours lecture)

This course provides conceptual bases and practical strategies for recognizing, understanding, and bridging chasms that exist in our interpersonal, cultural, organizational, and civic relationships. Coursework culminates in a hands-on project in which class members devise and implement a public event or program that promotes "bridge-building" communication among people with seemingly incommensurate beliefs, values, and identities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Major in School of Communication and Media and CMDA 110; OR Minor in Leadership Development Through Civic Engagement and PSYC 120 or PSYC 294.

CMST322: Intercultural Communication (3 hours lecture)

Survey of cultural approaches to communication, including theory and methodology. Will examine the underlying principles and concepts of communication within individuals and across cultures to better understand effective human communication. Previous course SPCM 250 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 210.

CMST362: Nonverbal Communication (3 hours lecture)

Introduces nonverbal communication theory to promote a better awareness of its dynamics and influence in the communication process; an awareness of how people reveal and define themselves; a development of skills for encoding and decoding nonverbally ; creating slide shows. Previous course SPCM 375 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 210.

CMST435: Communication and Media Arts Activity (1 hours lecture)

Supervised communication and media arts activity focused on specific topics of relevance. May be repeated without limit. Previous course SPCM 435 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CMDA 320.

COED401: Cooperative Education Experience I

Cooperative Education is an internship program that integrates academic study and classroom theory with on-the-job experiences. It involves an educational partnership among Montclair State, business and non-profit organizations for the profesional development of students. Academic faculty assess the learning and award credits and a supervisor/employer evaluates progress. Students may not exceed 16 credits through enrollment in multiple co-op courses. 3 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Determined by individual academic departments.

ECON101: Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces undergraduate students to the macro economy of the United States of America. Students learn how to apply the mechanism needed for the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long-term growth. In addition, they learn to analyze the macroeconomic data and the implications of fiscal and monetary policies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Requirements - Social Science. 3 sh.

FCST201: Social Gerontology: The Study of Aging (3 hours lecture)

In this course students examine issues related to aging in America from an individual and family perspective. They gain an understanding of biological, physiological, and cognitive changes related to aging and their impact upon families and daily life. Students also develop knowledge of the field of gerontology, utilizing a variety of perspectives including biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging and how personal values, attitudes, beliefs, race, ethnicity, and rituals affect the aging experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST305: Death and Bereavement in the Family (3 hours lecture)

Students examine human responses to the dying process across the lifespan as well as the social functions of grief and mourning. Students also explore perceptions of death in various social, cultural, and religious contexts as well as substantive and controversial topics related to the end of life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 or PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FCST325: Adult Development and Aging (3 hours lecture)

In this course students critically examine topics related to change and continuity in the psychological, emotional, and biological ways that adults develop in mid-life and later adulthood. Students analyze issues of mental health, stress and coping, personality development, changes in memory, learning, and cognitive functioning, as well as intelligence, creativity, and psychopathology in later life. They compare models of development throughout adulthood and consider cultural, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic variables that influence growth. Finally, students consider current research and contemporary issues as they pertain to adult development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 or matriculation in the Gerontology minor and departmental approval.

FCST340: Aging and Social Policy (3.0 hours lecture)

Recognizing the importance of public policy as it pertains to a growing, aging population, this course will introduce students to a range of policy issues at the federal, state, and local levels. The process of policy formation will be reviewed including how political organizations, special-interest groups, and advisory groups influence policy development and implementation. The course will cover the major public programs for older adults in the U.S. that address income security, health and long-term care, and housing needs. In order to recognize the varying effects policy can have on the lives of seniors, older adults from diverse socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds will be considered. Because families often struggle with the demands of caregiving and long-term care assistance, an evaluation of national and international public policy initiatives designed to address those needs will be conducted. Finally, students will be encouraged to identify and explore contemporary public policy issues that affect older adults on a regular basis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200; or matriculation in Gerontolgy minor and departmental approval. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department.

FCST360: Families in Later Life (3 hours lecture)

Applying the fields of family science and gerontology, students learn about family relationships, roles, and responsibilities in the second half of life. Students engage in discussion about later life families and the sociological and demographic implications of these families. Culturally and ethnically diverse populations are considered as well as issues of social justice. Multiple substantive topics related to aging families are examined (i.e., care giving, grandparenting, marriage and sibling relationships later life, housing, retirement, widowhood, aging parent-adult child relations, etc.). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200 or PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

HLTH102: Introduction to Public Health (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the field of public health, the breadth of its scope, and the variety of scientific disciplines that inform its practice. It gives student a "taste" of public health and puts public health topics within a context of population-based issues and health. These topics include: AIDS and other emerging infectious diseases, environmental hazards, alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse, access to health care and other health disparities, and social and distributive justice. Emphasis is given to contemporary public health issues and the forces that shape them. Previous course HLTH 200 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

HLTH105: Medical Terminology (3 hours lecture)

A basic health course introducing elements of medical terminology describing body parts, systems, functions and medical procedures. Emphasis will be placed on development of medical vocabulary and communication skills. The course will provide learning episodes in formulating medical abbreviations and translating complex terminology into lay terms, that ultimately will be applicable to careers in medical writing, health care delivery and management. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH240: Foundations of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture)

Prepares student to make informed decisions concerning the avoidance or elimination of disease-causing environmental exposures by providing an understanding of the scientific principles by which these exposures are identified, measured, and judged as to their acceptability. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH342: Health Promotion (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of theories and models that underlie health promotion. Topics will include the history, politics, and ethics of health promotion; community development, healthy public policy, models of behavior change, and communicating risk. The course will also provide information essential to understanding factors that affect human health: health determinants, health indices, health behavior change theories, ethical issues and societal trends. The importance of evaluation and research in all aspects of health promotion will be emphasized throughout the course. Previous course HLTH 442 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 202 or HLTH 204.

HLTH365: Science of Public Health: Epidemiology (3 hours lecture)

Provides a basic understanding of the epidemiologic method of identifying disease-causing exposures. Emphasizes the generation of hypotheses based on descriptive epidemiologic data, the testing of hypotheses by analytical epidemiological research, the determination of causality, and the value of epidemiological research in developing and evaluating disease prevention strategies. Previous course HLTH 246 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 102. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 202.

HLTH375: Women's Health (3 hours lecture)

This course offers perspectives on women's health and health care, focusing predominately on the United States but with some attention to international and global issues. Students will receive an overview of the health status and major health concerns of women. Acute and chronic problems will be addressed across the lifespan. This course includes fieldwork experience. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or WMGS 102 or departmental approval.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH433: Behavioral Aspects of Diet, Activity and Health. Starting Winter 2016: Population Approaches to Diet and Activity (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of population-based dietary and physical activity patterns, their social and behavioral contexts and meanings, their relationships with chronic diseases, and public health intervention approaches. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 365 or HLTH 330 or HLTH 328.

HLTH440: Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses upon changes in aspects of health during the middle and later years of life. Includes anatomy and physiology, nutritional requirements, sensoria and those phenomena associated with aging and sexuality. Common causes of morbidity and mortality explored as they relate to the aged. Attention given to the psychosocial and economic needs of the elderly as well as to those aspects of gerontology which deal with legislation and community organization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 355.

HLTH444: Community Organization and Health Advocacy. Starting Winter 2016: Community Organizing and Health Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the context of community-based health organizations (CBHO's) and their functions. Emphasis is placed on the political and economical management of these organizations and their future role in improving health outcomes. Included is an examination of the advocacy model of community health and development of the strategies and skills necessary to become an effective health advocate. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 360 or HLTH 374.

HLTH450: Health Disparities and Social Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course explores how broad social, cultural and economic inequalities in society affect health. By closely examining pressing problems in global health, the course guides the students in efforts to improve the health conditions of those overburdened by poverty, marginalization and social injustice. By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of how social forces become embodied as pathologies and how specific political, economic and historic processes influence the distribution of disease among different populations. Offered as HLTH 450 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 355 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval.

HLTH475: Health Communication and Social Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with the ability to plan, implement and evaluate a health communications program for a community health services institution. It focuses on the evolution of health communication in the United States, health communication theories and cultural differences. It provides for hands-on development of computer-based communications including newsletters, websites, and databases. Offered as HLTH 475 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 374 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental permission.

JOUR210: News Reporting: Print and Online (3 hours lecture)

Writing news articles according to contemporary practices, for multiple platforms. Interviewing techniques are explored as well as a respect for facts, impartiality and fairness. Previous course ENJR 210 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

JOUR211: Advanced News Reporting: Field Experience (2 hours lecture, l hour other)

Combines classroom instruction with extensive off-campus (often evening) fieldwork. Students will have their own reporter "beats" covering various municipalities near Montclair State University on a weekly basis. "Beats" will include town council, city boards and agencies, police, courts, etc. Breaking news stories written to tight deadlines, as well as major analytical pieces. Intense discussion of actual reporting problems encountered in the field: making contacts, using unnamed sources, dealing with officials, canvassing neighborhoods, etc. Emphasis on students' initiative working on their own, and relentless follow-through. Previous course ENJR 211 effective through Spring 2015. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210.

JOUR216: History of Journalism in America (3 hours lecture)

Evolution of the American press is examined through research and discussion of significant periods, individuals and issues from 1600 to the present. Previous course ENJR 216 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

JOUR300: Meet the Press (3 hours lecture)

Study of issues and problems in modern journalism through lectures and by writings of working journalists. Previous course ENJR 300 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210.

JOUR313: Editing (3 hours lecture)

Copy editing, proofreading and basic editorial skills. Articles are analyzed for accuracy, libel, precise diction and tightening. Previous course ENJR 313 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210.

JOUR314: Advanced Editing (3 hours lecture)

Techniques learned in editing are reinforced. Layout, headlines and production are explored. Rewriting and fitting articles are worked on extensively. Previous course ENJR 314 effective through Spring 2015 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 313.

JOUR315: Magazine Journalism (3 hours lecture)

Researching, writing and placing feature stories in mass circulation magazines. Previous course ENJR 315 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210 or permission of the instructor.

JOUR316: Reporting of Public Affairs (3 hours lecture)

News articles on the activities of government at the local level, including writing reports on the proceedings of civil and criminal court and city/county executive councils. Previous course ENJR 316 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210.

JOUR317: Feature Writing (3 hours lecture)

All aspects of writing personality profiles and of writing critical reviews, columns and/or sports features. Previous course ENJR 317 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210.

JOUR416: Interpretive Journalism (3 hours lecture)

Studying and writing columns, editorials and news articles. Students will compare different styles of interpretive reporting and develop their own skills in this area. Previous course ENJR 416 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JOUR 210 and JOUR 314.

JURI210: Perspectives on Law (3 hours lecture)

This course provides the theoretical foundations and practical applications of legislative and judicial areas in United States legal systems. Integrating readings from theorists, scholars and jurists, the course introduces students to methodologies for resolving legal problems within the evolving United States system of law. Students may take LAWS 200 or JURI 210 but not both courses. Students in the Jurisprudence and/or Political Science majors should take JURI 210, not LAWS 200. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

MATH109: Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the use of statistics in the real world. Topics include: analysis and presentation of data, variability and uncertainty in data, techniques of statistical inference and decision-making. Computer assisted including lecture, individual and small group tutoring in Mathematics Computer Laboratory. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Mathematics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 051 or MATH 061 or MATH 071 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT). Not for majors in Mathematics (MATH), Mathematics with Applied Math concentration (MAAM) or Mathematics-Teacher Education (MTED).

NUFD110: International Cuisine (2 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

Introductory course for the study of cooking styles associated with the development of ethnic and international cuisine. The course will primarily focus on a particular culinary region to be determined, giving students a holistic understanding of how ingredients and food customs develop into a cuisine. The lessons learned will enable students to research and prepare complete menus reflective of the culture and food goods of a region with emphasis on local ingredients and authentic preparation methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Food Systems (NUSY) and Applied Nutrition (NUFA).

NUFD130: Introduction to Nutrition and Food Science Profession (1 hour lecture)

An introductory course which provides general information about nutrition and food science fields and acquaints students with professional requirements and opportunities. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentration in Food Management (NUFM), Dietetics (NUFD), Food Systems (NUSY), Applied Nutrition (NUFA) or General (NUFG); or Nutrition and Food Science (NUFS) minors. Starting Winter 2016: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentration in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Systems (NUSY), Applied Nutrition (NUFA) or Food Science (NUFC); or Nutrition and Food Science minors (NUFS).

NUFD150: Food Composition and Scientific Preparation (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

An introduction to food science, nutrition and food preparation with emphasis on scientific principles involved in the characteristics of acceptable standardized products and product evaluation. 3 sh.

NUFD153: Dynamics of Food and Society (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore issues of food consumption through a study of: basic nutrition requirements; social/psychological factors influencing food behaviors; food acquisition through history as compared to contemporary situations; the impact on the ecological system in the quest for food; and the social, economical, and political aspects of the world food situation and potential means of alleviating the problems of hunger and nutrient deficiencies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

NUFD192: Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the components of the food we eat and the nutrients necessary for life. The functions of nutrients, their interrelationships, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients are discussed. The factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, physical activity, and environmental factors, which influence food intake and requirements of nutrients, are covered. Students learn to measure and evaluate their nutritional status and body composition using equipment used in laboratory and analyze their diets using computer software. They plan meals considering individual's nutritional requirements in the laboratory. Historical, national, and international issues regarding food and nutrition are presented. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Management (NUFM), or General (NUFG), Business Administration majors with a concentration in Hospitality Management (BAHM), Food Systems (NUSY), Applied Nutrition (NUFA) and American Dietetic Association Certificate Program students (ADA). Starting Winter 2016: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Applied Nutrition (NUFA), Food Systems (NUSY) or Food Science (NUFC); and Business Administration majors with a concentration in Hospitality Management (BAHM); and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certificate Program students (ADA).

NUFD240: Sanitation Management and Food Microbiology: Certification (1 hour lecture)

Food safety for effective food service management. Understanding of Sanitation Risk Management, microbial food contaminants, and food safety regulations. Students will be entitled to take the "ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification" examination. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 130 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite) and; NUFD 150 or HOSP 250 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite). Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 150 (maybe taken as prerequisite or corequisite) or HOSP 250 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite).

NUFD282: Applied Nutrition in the Lifecycle (3 hours lecture)

The application of basic nutrition knowledge to individuals in various life stages. Analysis of the physiological, biochemical, psychological and social factors that affect nutrient needs throughout the lifecycle. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 130 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite); and NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD285: Nutrition in Chronic Disease Prevention (3 hours lecture)

This course uses a systems approach to understand the role of nutrition in influencing chronic disease outcomes among adults. The course focuses on five specific organ systems (immune, circulatory, skeletal, endocrine, and excretory) and their role in influencing risks to diseases such as cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis, overweight/obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The functions and metabolism of the major nutrients related to these diseases will be discussed in detail. Finally, the course will use an applied format (case studies) to help students demonstrate a basic knowledge of how reliable nutrition information is derived from scientific research, and be able to discern facts from fallacy in diet-related issues. Utilizing this knowledge, they will be able to work with community-based agencies in developing initiatives that help various population groups make healthier food choices and prevent chronic disease risks more effectively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD304: Introduction to Research (3 hours lecture)

A study of the basic concepts, principles and methodologies of scientific research and their application to the investigation of research problems in health, nutrition, and food science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 109; and NUFD 282 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD352: Organization and Management of Foodservice Systems (3 hours lecture)

Principles of management, organizational structure, policy and decision-making. The menu in management, budgeting and cost control, sanitation and safety, personnel policies and management. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Nutrition and Food Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 240 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 282 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD357: Experimental Food Science (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Study of the theory and applications of the chemical and physical changes involved in food processing, storage and preparation through objective and subjective analytical techniques. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 113; NUFD 240 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD384: Nutrition in Developing Countries (3 hours lecture)

Nutritional problems; factors which contribute to malnutrition; effect of under-nutrition and malnutrition; methods of assessing nutrition status of a population and application of measures for improvement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 282.

NUFD392: Food Systems and Agribusineses Issues (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an introductory examination of the systems of production, processes, and distribution of food throughout the food chain. The course places particular critical emphasis on the current agribusiness model through the examination of the role and impact of government and politics in food processes and distribution. Text, required readings, current events, guest speakers, and current journal articles are utilized in the course as the means to explore and evaluate the current agribusiness model, alternatives, and regulatory and policy influences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BSLW 235. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 282.

NUFD395: Applied Nutrition for Populations (3 hours lecture)

This course is a comprehensive overview of the concepts and principles of nutrition, especially as it relates to using a population-based approach to preventing and managing chronic disease in the community. In this course, an emphasis is placed on the distinct chronic disease states of overweight/obesity, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. Students learn about the socio-ecological model and the various personal, social, environmental, and policy-related factors that influence prevalence rates of these diseases among diverse population groups. Through this course, students also learn to apply their knowledge of nutritional principles, make important and practical connections between diet and disease in the community, and improve their oral and written communication skills. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192 or NUFD 282 or HLTH 240. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192; and HLTH 102; and HLTH 240 or NUFD 282.

NUFD409: Internship in Nutrition and Food Science (4 - 8 hours other)

Opportunity to work as an intern in a professional setting related to food management, nutrition or dietetics related profession. Application available from advisor. 4 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Senior standing or minimum of 24 credits in major. Nutrition and Food Science majors only, 2.67 GPA required. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 352 and senior standing or minimum of 24 credits in the major. Nutrition and Food Science majors only. 2.67 GPA required.

NUFD412: Nutrition Education Techniques (3 hours lecture)

Procedures and techniques for developing programs and teaching nutrition to a variety of target populations. Individual and group methods emphasize innovation. Field studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 282; and NUFD 304 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD456: Research in Foods (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Scientific method in the design and execution of experimental food studies and in the interpretation and evaluation of results. Independent laboratory research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 357.

NUFD482: Nutrition Counseling (3 hours lecture)

This course offers practical experience dealing with the principles of marketing, adult learning, helping skills, assessment, documentation, and evaluation as related to weight control and the role of food in promotion of a healthy lifestyle. Six hours of clinical experience is required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 304; and NUFD 412 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD490: Nutrition and Food Science Professional Seminar (l hour seminar)

A capstone course which provides skills necessary for beginning professionals in nutrition and food science fields. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 130 and NUFD 304; Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Management (NUFM), or General (NUFG), Food Systems (NUSY) or Applied Nutrition (NUFA). Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 130 and NUFD 304; Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Systems (NUSY), Food Science (NUSC), or Applied Nutrition (NUFA).

PEMJ340: Fitness and the Aging Process (3 hours lecture)

The anatomic, physiologic and social changes experienced by the older adult as he/she ages. The students will learn the bases for selection of appropriate activities and techniques for communicating with this specialized population. Field experiences involving older adults in fitness settings will be included in this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PEMJ 320. Starting Winter 2016: PEMJ 320 or departmental approval.

POLS100: Introduction to Politics (3 hours lecture,)

This course analyzes politics from the four main vantage points of the discipline of political science, that is, political theory, comparative politics, international relations and American government. Of special concern is the U.S. Constitution, its classical and English roots, and its development to the present. This course is required for Political Science Majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS101: American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the basic institutions and processes of American politics, and will do so, in part, through a focus on current policy issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS201: Comparative Politics (3 hours lecture)

Constitutional principles, governmental institutions and political processes of selected contemporary states. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Political Science. 3 sh.

POLS202: International Relations (3 hours lecture)

Recent and contemporary world politics and the foreign relations and policies of selected states. 3 sh.

POLS203: International Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, need, evolution, principles, achievements and functioning of major international organizations, with emphasis upon the United Nations and selected regional organizations. 3 sh.

POLS204: Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture)

The salient characteristics of government and politics in the independent black African states, and the way these impinge on developmental efforts therein, are examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS205: Introduction to Public Administration (3 hours lecture)

Literature and developments in the field of public administration; the federal bureaucracy in the policy-making process. 3 sh.

POLS206: Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, institutions, and practices in contemporary China-Japan. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS207: American Foreign Policy (3 hours lecture)

A consideration and analysis of the goals that the nation's foreign policy officials seek to attain abroad, the values that give rise to those objectives, and the means or instruments through with they are pursued. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS214: Women in Politics (3 hours lecture)

The role of women in the functioning of the American political system. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS215: Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

The political behavior of American ethnic groups from the Puritans to the Puerto Ricans. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS216: Urban Politics (3 hours lecture)

The policies, processes, inter-relationships and organization of governments in heavily populated areas of the United States. 3 sh.

POLS300: Essentials of Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major ideas that shape politics and political science as a discipline. Blending both historical and conceptual approaches to the development of political ideas, this class will also introduce fundamental concepts in political science as a whole. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course.

POLS301: American Party System (3 hours lecture)

Organization, function and practice of political parties in the U.S.; campaign functions, membership problems, political finance and policy-formation practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS302: Public Opinion and Pressure Groups (3 hours lecture)

The nature and development of public opinion and pressure groups in the United States and their influence on public policy and political process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS303: Politics of Development and Modernization (3 hours lecture)

The major contemporary schools of political modernization and development theory; inter-relationship among political, social and economic variables. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201.

POLS304: State and Local Government (3 hours lecture)

State political sub-systems, including their administrative and local sub-systems, federal-state relations, political institutions and groups in the states and in New Jersey. This course helps students understand lawmaking and enforcement as functions of state and local government. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS306: Campaign Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course is taught in election years and provides the student with field experience at the local precinct or party level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101.

POLS307: American Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introduction to the main strands of American political thought from the founding of the American colonies to the present day. Our goal will be to come to grips with the major questions that have driven our politics throughout the nation's history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or JURI 300.

POLS310: Public Personnel Administration (3 hours lecture)

The problems and processes in the U.S. of public personnel administration at the state and local level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS311: Governmental Budgeting (3 hours lecture)

The budgetary process in governmental agencies from the perspective of political demands and influences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS312: Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

Black participation in the American political system from the colonial period to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS313: The Internet, Politics & Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces undergraduates to the intersection of the Internet and politics called "new media." Students will study various aspects of government and politics through a range of technologies from websites to blogs and social networking sites, exploring how these technologies impact the political landscape. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course or departmental approval.

POLS314: Seminar in Campaign Politics (3 hours seminar)

Seminar in Campaign Politics provides an introduction to the history and theory surrounding elections in the United States and complements students practicums in POLS 306. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS315: Urban Administration (3 hours lecture)

Problems and policy-making in the larger urban or metropolitan complexes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or POLS 205 or departmental approval.

POLS317: The American Congress (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the United States Congress. It will allow students to explore in depth one of the key American political institutions introduced to them in POLS 101, American Government and Politics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS318: The American Presidency (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the American presidency. It will allow students who were introduced to the presidency in POLS 101, American Government and Politics, to explore in depth one of the key institutions of the American political system. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS319: Politics and Film (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to introduce undergraduates to film and politics. Films and assigned readings on a particular topic will familiarize students with particular aspects of government or politics, including but not limited to institutions, processes, movements, and the media. Students will attempt to reconcile portrayal of politics in films with scholarly work. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any POLS 200-level course or departmental approval.

POLS320: Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the American civil legal system as it affects a variety of our social institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS321: Law in Society: Criminal Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduces the student to institutions, processes, and social functions of criminal law. Students may take POLS 321 or PALG 301 but not both courses as part of the Political Science Major, the Paralegal Studies Minor or the Criminal Justice Minor. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS322: American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of supreme court decisions in the areas of the distribution of power within the national government and between the national government and the states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101.

POLS323: American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture)

The development of the constitution and the Supreme Court of the United States illustrated through reference to court opinions in civil rights and liberties. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS324: American Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the methods used to analyze public policy and an examination of current public policy issues. Special attention is given to the use of comparative analysis in analyzing American public policies. This course deals with issues such as crime, punishment, social welfare, drug abuse, child abuse, equality, health, education and the environment. It focuses on public policy responses to these issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS327: Food and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a global and interdisciplinary approach to studying the phenomenon of Food and Politics. It explores questions ranging from how is food produced to how effective is food regulation? Through a comparative approach this course explores various social movements including the organic, local and slow food movements and policy areas ranging from hunger to obesity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or POLS 202 or POLS 300 or departmental approval.

POLS331: Animal Rights: Law, Politics and Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course seeks to provide students with an understanding of how human-animal relations have been affected by politics and the rule of law. It will generate debate about the treatment of animals in a multitude of contexts, including agricultural food production, product development, wild fauna, and domestic pets. Students will develop an understanding of the political nature of human-animal relations. Students will analyze the individual and group efforts to exercise power over and on behalf of animals. Also, students will analyze the efforts to grant political power to animals themselves. Students will seek to understand the values and interests that vie for control of collective decision-making, institutions, and public policy regarding animals. Students will analyze the interests for and against animal protection laws and the nature of such laws. Throughout the course, students will develop their critical reading, writing, and analytical reasoning abilities. Also, students will increase their knowledge of human-animal relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215, POLS 216 or JURI 210.

POLS332: U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the interrelationships among the legal, political and societal factors in major legislative enactments of U.S. immigration and nationality law as they relate to government institutions and affected populations. The course examines the law and politics of restrictive immigration since the founding of our nation, including exclusion laws of the nineteenth century, quota systems of the twentieth century, and key legislative acts of the later 20th and early 21st centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS333: Topics in Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course allows instructors to develop a new course not regularly offered in the area of political thought. Texts and topics will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit up to four times as long as the titles differ. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300.

POLS334: Politics of Science Fiction (3 hours lecture)

This class will use prominent science fiction novels and some classics of political thought and political science to investigate some ways that the imagined worlds of science fiction in the last century resonate with and amplify our understanding of important political concepts such as citizenship, the nature of power, the relationship between choice and fate, and the evolution of social order. The course will also explore important belief systems such as anarchism, libertarianism, classic republicanism, and liberal constitutionalism, which will bring the class discussion to bear on today's political dilemmas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300.

POLS335: Theories of Political Economy (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students an understanding of the fundamental notions in political economy. By engaging with the practical and moral ideas that drive different understandings of politics and the economy, students will acquire an understanding of the forces that shape modern societies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215 or POLS 216.

POLS339: Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics of Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Institutions, parties, ideologies and interest groups. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS340: Government and Politics of India and South Asia (3 hours lecture)

The political experiences and institutions of the Indian subcontinent since 1947: The Republic of India, Pakistan, Ceylon and Bangladesh. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS341: Government and Politics of Latin America (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, organization and practices in the states of Central America and South America. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS342: Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics in the Arab states, Turkey, Israel and Iran. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS343: Government and Politics in the Post-Soviet States (3 hours lecture)

The political and institutional organizations of the countries of the former Soviet Union; contemporary political issues; party and governmental structures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS344: Government and Politics in the East European States (3 hours lecture)

The political and governmental organizations of the Communist countries of Eastern and Central Europe (exclusive of the former U.S.S.R.);institutions, processes and problems, including inter-regional relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS351: Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture)

This seminar explores the legal and political traditions giving rise to contemporary Israeli and American legal systems. This encompasses such aspects as democratic process with its origins and influences, governmental institutions within each legal system, the role of religion and the protection of minority rights. Comparative perspectives provide an understanding of each legal system within its national context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or POLS 202 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or JAST 201 or permission of department.

POLS353: Intelligence and National Security (3 hours lecture)

This course primarily examines the role of the U.S. intelligence community in national security but will also engage with issues of international espionage. Students will learn about the collection, analysis, dissemination, and use of intelligence products. Students will also discuss the moral and political questions intelligence work and covert action raises both for leaders and citizens in a liberal democracy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215 or POLS 216.

POLS362: International Relations in Asia (3 hours lecture)

This course explores and debates some of the key questions facing the U.S. and other countries in Asia, including Japan, China, the Koreas and Russia. Students will study the concepts, institutions and cooperative frameworks in Asia that enable the countries in the region to address their common economic and security concerns. The course addresses three current conflicts (Taiwan-China relations, North Korea's nuclear program, war in Afghanistan) and looks at the costs and benefits of globalization for Asia. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS363: Politics and Morality of War (3 hours lecture)

This course aims at giving students an understanding of how thinkers and practitioners try to limit the violence of armed conflict. To accomplish this, the class will engage with the major elements of the just war tradition and its realist, militarists, and pacifist critics. The course ends with an intensive examination of the moral issues presented by recent conflicts such as assassination, terrorism, counterinsurgency, occupation, and nation-building. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 and POLS 300.

POLS364: War and International Security (3 hours lecture)

This course aims at giving students an understanding of basic concepts in grand strategy, war, and diplomacy. By studying the concepts and practices at the hard edge of international politics, students will acquire an understanding of the forces that shape global peace and conflict. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS365: Global Environmental Politics (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to the politics of global environmental issues. Students will begin by studying the key actors, concepts, forms of governance and debates that are central to the field. The course then will address important questions in international relations such as the relationship between environmental protection and trade, the achievement of sustainable development, the connection between environmental change and security, and differing perspectives on the environment among different types of states and social groups. The last section will involve case studies which highlight the state and human security consequences of particular environmental problems and explore the forms of governance designed to address them. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202.

POLS410: Directed Study

Juniors and seniors may elect three to six credits of independent study under the direction of a member of the Political Science staff. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS416: Selected Topics in Political Science (3 hours lecture)

This course allows the instructor to select a political problem which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 100 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS420: Seminar and Internship in Political Science

In this course students will work as interns for one semester in the office of a N.J. State Legislator, U.S. Congressperson or Senator, or state or federal executive. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 and departmental approval.

POLS425: Politics of Federal Bureaucracy (3 hours lecture)

In-depth examination of the federal bureaucracy in relationship with national, state and local agencies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS426: Seminar and Internship in Public Administration I

A one semester public administration field experience in local government. Application must be made directly to the instructor in preceding semester. 4 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS427: Seminar and Internship in Public Administration II

A one semester public administration field experience in local government. Application must be made directly to the instructor in preceding semester. 4 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS429: Polling in the U.S (3 hours lecture)

The main goal of this course will be to familiarize students with various polling methods used in political science research with the aim of giving them the ability to evaluate and criticize such research. A variety of polling techniques will be covered including simple descriptive statistics, tracking polls, and quota polls. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS430: International Law (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, evolution, subjects, sources, principles, role and substance of international law in the international system of nation-states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or POLS 203 or departmental approval.

POLS431: Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture)

After reviewing debates on globalization, this course covers its impact on global security through an examination of key issues such as crime, terrorism, migration, environment, and health, and a detailed case study of the Bosnian War. The course includes evaluation of the role of the international community and civil society in addressing these new security challenges. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or permission of instructor.

POLS436: Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship

In this course students intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty, and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Political Science and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 436. 1 - 7 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS497: Honors Seminar-Political Science (3 hours seminar)

The course will involve intensive research in a seminar setting for junior and senior political science majors. Students will conduct original research and present reports to meetings of the seminar. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Open only to junior and senior majors with at least a 3.2 cumulative grade point average in Political Science.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

PSYC200: Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Required for teaching. Covers child and adolescent development; fundamentals of learning theory as applied to classroom situations, learning inhibition and academic non-achievement, personal-social adjustment, measuring and evaluating teaching-learning, creativity. Course may not be taken by Psychology majors for major credit effective Fall 1995. 3 sh.

PSYC201: Child Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers growth, development and behavior of children. Physical, intellectual, social and emotional development and their interaction. Scientific method exemplified through the literature and intensive study of individual children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC202: Adolescent Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers biological, psychological and social factors that shape the transition from childhood to adulthood: Normal and deviant patterns of development in morals, intellect, emotions and judgment; problems of adolescents with practical application to oneself and others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC203: Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to different methods of psychological research including survey, correlational and experimental methods. Introductory descriptive statistics and correlational analysis will be covered. Basic aspects of sound scientific writing, including conducting a literature search and writing a scientific manuscript following American Psychological Association guidelines, will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC220: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to basic statistical methods in the behavioral sciences. The course begins with a review of descriptive statistics. The main course emphasis will be on probability theory and inferential statistics and their application to psychological research. This includes such methods as z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and nonparametric statistics. Laboratory sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply concepts from class using computers, particularly statistical software packages. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC224: Children's Rights and Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

Explores the review and evaluation of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of young citizens (preschool through adolescence); the process and goals of advocacy; the community services available to and lacking for the optimum development to maturity of young citizens. Psychology, education, sociology, mental health, law enforcement, medicine are domains of study and investigation. 3 sh.

PSYC225: Psychology of Adjustment (3 hours lecture)

Discusses individual and social adjustment; typical varieties of adjustive behavior illustrated by practical examples; factors which facilitate or impede people's adaptation to life situations such as work, marriage, disability, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC227: Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Topics include: Behavior and attitudes influenced by basic sexuality; widening perspectives to aid in decision-making; developmental periods and sexual relationships; connections between psychological theory and sexual mores; genetic understandings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC230: Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers the influence of the physical environment on the behavior of organisms: population growth and regulation; crowding; sensory experience, enrichment and deprivation; motivational force of environmental stimulation; adaptation to environment as a function of prolonged exposure; salutary effects of aesthetically pleasing stimulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC231: Psychology of Aggression (3 hours lecture)

The root causes of violence in America will be examined through case studies, (the protest-movement of the 1960's, sexual and physical abuse, violent-criminal activity, etc.) and familiarization with biochemical, psychological and socio-cultural research into causes and effects of aggression and violence. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC235: Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth (3 hours lecture)

Surveys, current practices and problems of exceptional children and youth. Explores the unique needs of individuals with handicaps that involve intellectual, sensory, motor, neurological, social and emotional origins. Utilizes analysis of case materials for theoretical and practical applications to the psychology of exceptionality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC245: Hispanic/Latino Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on the personal, social, institutional and cultural forces that affect the psychology of Hispanic/Latino Americans. The course will cover issues such as the measurement of psychological functions, bilingualism, personal values and belief systems, the dynamics of the family and acculturation. A midterm and a final exam as well as a research paper will be required from students. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC246: Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture)

Covers the historical impact of scientific and institutional racism on the psychological study of blacks. Survey and critical analysis of traditional European approaches with non-traditional methods for comparison. Future development and advancement of a black psychology considered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC248: Psychology and Law (3 hours lecture)

Law and psychology share a common focus: the understanding, prediction and regulation of human behavior. Despite this commonality of interest, different emphasis on these elements and a different mandate have frequently hindered active communication and collaboration between the disciplines. The purpose of this course is to present the common ground of law and psychology, and show how they contribute to each other. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC265: Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture)

The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC268: Psychological Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture)

Overview of later maturity and aging. Emphasis on psychological, physiological and sociological aspects. Aging and the cognitive process. Mental health, death, adjustment problems, needs, issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288 and Philosophy and Religion PHIL 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CSIT 111 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

PSYC294: Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture)

This is a service learning course that allows students to develop a sophisticated understanding of leadership from both a theoretical and practical point of view. Students receive in depth information on historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership. They participate in assessments of their own leadership competencies and capabilities based on theory and research. They then learn to apply, assess, compare, and critically evaluate theory, research, and assessment tools through a multi-week project with a community partner in which they have a chance to observe and practice leadership. Students combine theory and practice through a series of critical reflections that result in students articulating their learnings about leadership, the practice of leadership in the civic environment, and themselves as leaders. This course is not recommended for students who successfully completed PSYC 120. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or CMST 101 or HONP 100.

PSYC300: The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Students in this course will simultaneously learn concepts in teaching psychology, and work with a Psychology professor who will mentor them as the student acts as a teacher's assistant. Students will engage in a critical examination of the teaching of psychology. The course will run as a seminar where issues of curriculum development, teaching techniques, and ethical aspects will be discussed based on journal articles. The work as an assistant includes anonymous record keeping, leading study groups and providing a brief lecture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; Psychology majors only; departmental permission.

PSYC301: Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introduction to laboratory methods of research in areas such as motivation, perception and learning. Emphasis is on design and execution of exploratory investigations. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 and PSYC 220;or PSYC 220 and PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC302: Health Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The theoretical, empirical and clinical aspects of health psychology will be presented. The relation of health psychology with other areas of psychology and other scientific disciplines will be discussed. The historical developments of the field, its research methodologies, theoretical models and exemplary interventions will be described. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC303: Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Application of psychological principles and practices in business and industry. Problems of communication, group dynamics, man-machine relations, employee attitudes, accident prevention, industrial job selection techniques, motivation, executive leadership. Commonly used selection tests will be evaluated. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC304: Social Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on social behavior of the individual and the group, social perception, motivation, and learning; attitudes and values; development and dynamics of social groups; inter-group tension and prejudice; mass phenomena; psychological approaches to social issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC305: Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Anatomical, neural and biochemical bases of behavior are studied. Topics include localization of function, neuro-hormonal interaction, sensory and motor functioning, emotions, the relationship of neurophysiological processes and personality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC306: Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will address psychological issues involved in personnel decision making (e.g., job interviewing decisions, hiring decisions). Students will learn about aligning organizational and human resource strategy, and learn about tools and techniques in personnel psychology including job analysis, equal employment opportunity law, performance management, employee selection, and organizational training and development. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about important personnel functions and then apply the knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will learn about measurement and assessment of job applicant and how this assessment must be conducted to be fair and successful. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC307: Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will address individual, social and group interactions in work organizations. Students will learn about how social factors such as roles, norms, groups, stereotypes, and culture, influence individual and organizational behavior. Students will study theories and practices in organizations to assess and improve job attitudes, work stress, work motivation, leadership, and organizational functioning. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about the different social factors that influence organizational function, and then apply this knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will gain a better understanding of their own work experiences as a result of this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC308: Perception (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the theory and procedure of perceptual research. Theoretical approaches; modern psychophysical and perceptual research; traditional problems of perception, constancies of size and color brightness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC310: Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture)

Tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement and personality; principles of psychological testing; approaches to test construction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC313: Cognition (3 hours lecture)

The study of the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge, utilizing behavioral, observational, and computer modeling methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC314: Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how human beings make decisions and judgments. It reviews how personal values, uncertainty and cognitive, social, and neurological processes affect decision making. This course draws upon a wide range of examples from many fields including psychology, economics, criminology, and medicine. Students will also learn strategies and techniques to enhance judgment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC320: Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys human psychological development from the prenatal period to adolescence. The interacting forces of heredity, environment and physical, cognitive, emotional and socio-cultural factors are reviewed in the light of current research and theory in these areas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC324: Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of current topics in the field of child advocacy. The impact of Megan's Law, advocacy for adopted children, child right-to-life movement, and repressed memory syndrome are among the possible issues to be explored. A multi-disciplinary focus will be used to enhance student understanding and learning. Previous course PSYC 430 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior Psychology or Justice Studies majors only.

PSYC330: Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the interaction between psychology and the legal system. Emphasis placed on the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathic behavior, court-mandated evaluations and the role of the psychologist as expert witness. The application of psychological knowledge within the criminal justice context. Ethical guidelines in forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or JUST 300 or LAWS 302.

PSYC332: Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture)

Explores current approaches and theories of personality development and organization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC340: Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture)

Covers research, language and methods of learning theory. Classical and operant conditioning, complex habits, remembering and forgetting, transfer of training, cognition and behavior modification. Review of animal research but primary emphasis is on people. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture)

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC353: Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture)

The student will explore experimental and field studies of behavior in a few selected animal species with particular reference to the behavior of vertebrates. The course will involve detailed study of instinctive behavior and imprinting, respondent and operant behavior with emphasis upon the procedures and variables concerned with the acquisition of new forms of behavior. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC354: Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an understanding of the basic tenets of the field of clinical psychology. The relation of clinical psychology with other areas of psychology and other disciplines will be discussed. The course will cover clinical psychology's past and present, assessment and intervention, approaches to practicing clinical psychology, multicultural issues in clinical psychology, and the future of the field. Fulfills Category "4 Social/Applied" in Advanced Elective list. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC355: Motivation (3 hours lecture)

The concepts of instincts, homeostasis, drive, reinforcement, arousal and inception are analyzed with reference to data drawn from many areas of experimentation. The primary emphasis is on the experimental, rather than the theoretical literature: motivational concepts relevant to human and animal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC358: Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture)

Major theoretical problems and theories of learning are considered. Includes experimental analysis of basic phenomena of conditioning and learning, studied primarily through experimental studies of infra-human organisms. Students may study selected topics more extensively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC360: History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the historical development of psychology, comparative analysis of the major schools of contemporary psychology, and new trends and movements in psychological theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC365: Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Topics include an overview of psychopathological processes: neuroses, psychoses, and characterological disorders; feeling, thinking and behavioral aspects during the life span; diagnostic and treatment procedures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC366: Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture)

The course will present psychological contributions to interventions designed to promote health, prevent illness and avert further disability. Appropriate techniques to assess, plan, and implement programs at the community level will be discussed. The multidisciplinary, multilevel nature of community programs will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC375: Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines behavior from a Darwinian perspective attempting to understand how our behaviors have evolved throughout time. By examining behavior in terms of natural selection, this course provides a new and insightful perspective to all areas of psychology, including cognitive, social, developmental, and neuropsychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC402: Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture)

An overview of classical and contemporary systems of psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on understanding each system in terms of its underlying theory of personality, psychopathology and therapeutic impact. Studies of therapeutic efficacy are also covered. Other issues include such topics as the training of psychotherapists and the ethical issues involved in psychotherapy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 354 or PSYC 365 or departmental approval.

PSYC405: Psychological Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Transcultural focus on the inter-related nature of culture and human behavior. Team taught interdisciplinary course with emphasis on mutual dependencies of psychological and anthropological theory and method. Students work with bicultural informants. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 405. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ANTH 100; PSYC 301 must be taken by Psychology majors.

PSYC420: Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology (1 hour lecture)

A detailed review on the use of a computer package for the purpose of doing statistical analyses of psychological data. The instructor will select one such package for presentation and choose among SSPS, EcStatic, BMD, SAS, and others. Instruction will be provided on coding, data entry, menu selection, score transformation, and exporting. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC459: Special Topics in Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in a specific area of psychology. The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor. The course permits the instructor and students to examine psychological issues which are either not covered in the curriculum or which deserve more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as part of major degree requirements in psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301.

PSYC488: Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar)

Seminar discussion of foundation works and contemporary research articles in Cognitive Science. With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of Cognitive Science for comprehensive in-depth review of research and write a literature review. Professional issues in Cognitive Science are discussed. Cross listed with Linguistics LNGN 488. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288 or PSYC 288.

PSYC491: Independent Study I: Research

Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC492: Independent Study II: Research

Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC495: Psychology Honors I (4 hours lecture)

With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of psychology for a comprehensive, in-depth review of research; generate research questions and hypotheses; delineate appropriate design, methodology and statistical analyses to answer these questions and test these hypotheses; collect and analyze preliminary data; and write an Honors Thesis Proposal. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; departmental approval; overall GPA of 3.5.

PSYC496: Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture)

This course constitutes the second semester of Psychology Honors. Students are expected to gather, analyze and interpret the data for their honors project, write the analysis and discussion chapters, and submit their completed honors thesis. Students who successfully complete this course will graduate with honors in psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 495 with a grade of A or A-.

SOCI100: The Sociological Perspective (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the study of human groups, from peer groups to families to societies. How and why culture, social structure, and group processes arise. Consequences of social forces for individuals. 3 sh.

SOCI102: Racial and Ethnic Relations (3 hours lecture)

The social meaning of race and ethnicity. The social, psychological and structural sources of racism; the consequences of this phenomenon to groups; situation and comparative data. Meets General Education 2002 - Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course SOCI 202 effective through Winter 2012. 3 sh.

SOCI104: Sociology of the Family (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of "official" and "unofficial" (single parent, gay/lesbian) family relationships; compare current U.S. family forms with those of other historical periods and societies; examine trends in contemporary societies affecting family forms, such as changing work role of women, changed sexual norms in courtship and recent changes in divorce rate; analyze issues in the "politics of the family." Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. Previous course SOCI 204 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

SOCI105: Black Family (3 hours lecture)

The black family in American society; historical perspectives and contemporary conflicts surrounding the black family. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course SOCI 205 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

SOCI106: Individual and Society (3 hours lecture)

The relationship between culture, social structure, various institutions and the individual's social perceptions, sense of self and self-presentation are explored in this course. The structure of small groups is also discussed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course SOCI 206 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

SOCI112: Sociology of Leisure (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the sociology of sports and leisure from diverse theoretical perspectives. Activities explored include recreational and competitive sports (baseball, basketball, swimming, football, hockey, gymnastics) among children, high school, college, and adult age groups; youth and adult games (cops and robbers, power rangers, cards, etc.); sex; drinking; gambling; mushroom collecting; and T.V. (football games and soap operas). Topics discussed include the role of leisure and sport activities in character development, gender activity, and social relationships; the effect of leisure and sport activities on education and occupational mobility; risk and injury in leisure and sports; and the political, economic, and ideological role of leisure and sports activity in the reproduction of society. 3 sh.

SOCI113: Social Problems (3 hours lecture)

How social structure and social institutions are related to problems such as discrimination, environmental pollution, violence, and poverty. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

SOCI201: Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to the methods and theory of sociological inquiry. Topics include: comparisons of dominant paradigms of sociological thought, critical analysis of basic concepts in the field, logic and rhetoric of sociological analysis, and ethical and value issues in the practice of sociology. Emphasis will also be placed upon writing sociology: documentation, literature search, organization and style. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Sociology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219.

SOCI207: Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture)

Empirical materials on social structure. Inter-institutional relations as the form of the broad, general structure of American society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113.

SOCI208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201.

SOCI209: Sociology of Poverty and Welfare (3 hours lecture)

Poverty and welfare institutions as social phenomena. The meaning of poverty, absolute and relative deprivation, the functions of social welfare institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI212: Sociology of Technology (3 hours lecture)

Social processes affecting technological innovation and the forms in which an innovation is institutionalized or abandoned. The social consequences and assessment of technological innovations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219.

SOCI215: Sociology of Sports (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the major theoretical and substantive writings on the sociology of amateur and professional sports. Topics to be explored from conflict, functionalist and symbolic interactionist perspectives include socialization and athletic identity, women in sports, race and class in sports, gender relations and sport participation, sport risk and injury, education and sports participation, sports in the media, sport and the reproduction of society, and fieldwork among college and professional athletes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI219: Sociology of Aging (3 hours lecture)

With a shift in America's population toward an older society, it becomes important to understand the aging process and its implications for various social institutions. This course examines demographic characteristics which influence the aging process; various theories to explain the process; and specific policies, nationally and locally, to address it. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI220: Sociology of Rich and Poor Nations (3 hours lecture)

This course deals with the disparity in standards of living among the nations of the world today as well as with the strategies social scientists and social planners have formulated to eradicate poverty where it occurs. This course focuses on the historical, political, economic, cultural, and sociological relationships that have contributed to the current division of labor in the world and world inequalities. Furthermore, it focuses on specific social problems faced by poor nations while comparing social institutions in Western societies with their counterpart in non-Western societies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or HONP 100 or HONP 101 or SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI230: Sociology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture)

Types of conflict and violence including war, crime, family and sexual violence, class and ethnic violence, and genocide; biological determinist and cultural explanations of violence; theories of nonviolent social change. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113 or departmental approval.

SOCI240: Statistics for Social Research (4 hours lecture)

The use of statistics to summarize data, to show relationships among variables. Evaluating research reports based on statistics. Use of the computer to analyze data. Cross-listed with Justice Studies, JUST 240. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or MATH 109 or JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI301: Sociological Research Methods I (4 hours lecture)

Introduction to primary methods of gathering sociological data: experimentation, survey research, participant observation, etc. Use of computers to analyze data. The formulation of hypotheses, survey design, participant observation and the use of elementary statistics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201.

SOCI302: Sociological Research Methods II (3 hours lecture)

The formulation of hypotheses, survey design, participant observation and the use of elementary statistics; certain broad problems in the philosophy of social science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301.

SOCI303: Large Scale Organizations (3 hours lecture)

The structure and functions of bureaucracy in modern society; the life cycle of large organizations and their methods of operation; selected contemporary problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI304: Sociology of Work and Professions (3 hours lecture)

The development of modern forms of work; the shift from manufacturing to service occupations; and problems of work alienation; current models of labor management relations in the U.S. compared to Western Europe and Japan; the effects of new technology on skill, employment levels, and on labor management relations; conceptions of the professions and their role in society; the process of an occupation becoming a profession. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI309: Sociology of Health and Illness (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this course is on the relationship between society and health with a special emphasis on the role of culture and social structure. Health inequalities and the sociology of disability will be central concerns. Other topics will include social and cultural definitions of health and illness, the social role of the "sick", comparative medical beliefs and practices and medical institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or FCST 200 or departmental approval.

SOCI310: Directed Independent Research

Research and report under faculty direction. The student selects for investigation an area of sociological concern with the approval of a faculty supervisor. Multiple semester selection permitted with approval. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 - 9 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI311: Urban Sociology (3 hours lecture)

Processes of urbanization and suburbanization; nature of urban social relations, including racial and ethnic relations; urban ecological patterns and demographic conditions. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI312: Environmental Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The role of sociology in understanding and analyzing the environment, environmental issues and problems, and the sociocultural sources and structure of environmentalism and environmental movements. Various perspectives and approaches to explaining the relationship between society and the environment are explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 205 or SOCI 206 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 or departmental approval.

SOCI313: Sociological Theory: A Critical Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A comparison of important theories on key themes in sociology; the nature of social interaction, the definition of power, stratification, social control and deviance, alienation and anomie, social structure and function, social bases of knowledge and belief, and social conflict and change. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or departmental approval.

SOCI314: Environmental Justice (3 hours lecture)

The domain of this course is the role of social inequities, especially those of class and race, in the distribution of environmental risks in societies at the local, national, and global levels and includes study of legal remedies and public policy measures that address environmental injustices. Cross listed with Justice Studies, JUST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI315: Social Inequality (3 hours lecture)

The inequalities of social ranking systems in societies. Theoretical and empirical approaches to stratification delineating the variables of power, power elites, class consciousness, alienation and class mobility. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI316: Sociology of Education (3 hours lecture)

The school as an institution of social control and social change. The social organization of schools: social roles of students, teachers and other school personnel. (Not to be used for teacher certification.) 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100, SOCI 113, SOCI 201, SOCI 204 or departmental approval.

SOCI318: Sociology of Population (3 hours lecture)

Problems of population and demographic change; social foundations and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration. Population and socio-economic development. The uses of demographic data in planning, policy making, and social research. Previous course SOCI 218 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 104, SOCI 201, SOCI 220 or departmental approval.

SOCI330: Political Sociology (3 hours lecture)

This course will endeavor to give the student a relatively complete understanding of the social dynamics of political actions on various levels. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI334: Comparative Social Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Comparative sociological schemes; the analytical blocks of total society; kinship, family and marriage; policy and bureaucracy; social stratification and mobility; industrialization and urbanization; belief systems and value orientations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI336: Sociology and Social Work (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the social functions, determinants, and consequences of helping professions such as social work, and helping institutions such as public welfare. Particular emphasis is placed on the relations of helping professions and institutions with their socio-political environment and with their clients. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI340: Social Change in a Global World (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the ways in which people's food production and consumption patterns are affected by and related to other aspects of their social organization. The interrelationship between food production/consumption patterns, political life, stratification systems, and demography will be examined. The main focus will be a comparison between different forms of social organization with respect to the management of food and population issues. Previous course SOCI 216 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 201 or SOCI 207 or SOCI 208 or SOCI 209 or SOCI 212 or SOCI 215 or SOCI 219 or SOCI 220 or SOCI 240 or departmental approval.

SOCI390: Cooperative Education in Sociology

The cooperative education option integrates academic study with a supervised employment experience outside the formal classroom environment. The co-op term is a semester off-campus, during which a student is supervised by a faculty coordinator and the office of Cooperative Education and is responsible for completing the terms of a learning contract. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

SOCI400: Senior Project

This course prepares students to design and complete a major project. This will involve the gathering, presentation, and analysis of evidence relevant to a particular theoretical or applied problem, using the relevant and appropriate sociological concepts. Since different faculty members emphasize different types of projects, students are urged to review individual syllabi prior to registering for the course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 and SOCI 240.

SOCI401: Sociology of Emotions (3 hours lecture)

Humans have a unique capacity to experience a large variety of emotions. This course examines how cultures label, shape, and guide their members' emotional experience. It also explores the interplay between social-structural arrangements (e.g., family and economic systems) and emotion, illustrating links between macro-social patterns. Students will conduct original research on social factors related to emotionality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI402: Social Contexts of Mental Illness and Treatment (3 hours lecture)

Social conceptions of mental health and illness; social factors in the causes and treatment of mental illness. Mental institutions--their structures and ideologies. Comparative psychotherapies in social context; mental health personnel and professional ideologies; social movements and mental health and illness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 309 or SOCI 336.

SOCI404: Sociology of Religion (3 hours lecture)

The social bases of religious belief and activity; religious movements, denominationalism, sectarianism, secularization, pluralism, the social bases of belief and unbelief, and cross-cultural and historical comparisons. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI405: Deviance and Social Control (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical perspectives on human deviance. The social organization of specific types of deviance and of formal and informal social control. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI407: Sociology of the Mass Media (3 hours lecture)

A sociological analysis and cultural critique of various mass media with an emphasis on radio, television, newspapers, and the internet. The course will examine their function and their relationship with constituent audiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI408: Social Movements (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the study of concerted collective behavior for social change, or social movements. Various approaches to the understanding of social movements, including the natural history, case study, and analytical models, will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on relating theoretical work to contemporary empirical examples of social movement activity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI411: Selected Topics in Sociology (3 hours lecture)

The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor each semester. The course may be selected more than once with approval. Limited to only the general areas of sociological theory, research methodology, problems of institutional processes, and application of methodology and theory to social situations or community issues and problems. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI416: Qualitative Research in Sociology (1 hour lecture, 2 hours other)

The course will explore qualitative research from diverse theoretical perspectives. It will examine the personal, political, and scientific dilemmas that researchers typically face attempting to gather objective data about the "backstage regions" of the subjects' world. Topics may include the researcher's role in the field; developing rapport and trust; emotions and fieldwork; age, race, sex, and gender issues in research; politics and ethics in fieldwork; researching "high risk" settings; and techniques of data collecting in interviewing and fieldwork. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI420: Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture)

The impact of the social usages of law on all levels of operation as an instrument of social policy, social control and social regulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI426: Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

The course examines theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of sexuality. It seeks to understand the social foundations of sexual behavior and sexual identity. It explores the relationship between sexuality and politics, focusing on current as well as historical conflicts over sexual behavior and ideologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI430: Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture)

The social determinants of differences between women and men and the effect of sex role differentiation in the social institutions of marriage and family, the economy and work situation, formal education, health, mass media, and religion; special emphasis is placed on the impact of social change on sex roles in contemporary society. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

WMGS208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 206.