Nutrition and Food Science Major, Dietetics Concentration (B.S.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

Director: Dr. Yeon Bai
Office: University Hall, Room 4026
Phone: (973) 655-3220
Email: baiy@mail.montclair.edu

Accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the B.S. in Nutrition and Food Science with a concentration in Dietetics prepares students for careers in a variety of clinical, community and wellness settings.  As part of the program, students complete a series of courses called the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) and, when they graduate, receive, not only the baccalaureate degree, but also an ACEND Verification Statement which enables them to apply to a post-graduate Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) Dietetic Internship, the completion of which is the final prerequisite to taking the Registration Examination to become a Registered Dietitian (RD).  

 

Incoming freshmen and transfer students who are interested in becoming Registered Dietitians must start their course of study in one of the other three concentrations in the B.S. in Nutrition and Food Science Program:  Applied Nutrition, Food Systems, or Food Science.  Students in those concentrations who wish to be admitted to the Dietetics concentration must apply after having completed the following four courses:  NUFD192 (Nutrition with Lab), NUFD150 (Food Composition and Scientific Preparation), MATH109 (Statistics), and CHEM113 (Fundamentals of Chemistry) or their equivalents.  In order to be accepted into the Dietetics concentration, students must have obtained an overall GPA of at least 3.2 at Montclair State with no grades lower than a “C” (2.0).  Applications are accepted and evaluated every May, after grades from the Spring semester are posted.  Because of other General Education requirements they must complete, freshman may not be able to apply until the end of their sophomore year.  Students can apply for admittance to the Dietetics concentration as many times as they would like.

 

The Second Bachelor’s Degree in Nutrition and Food Science with a concentration in Dietetics

Individuals who have already earned a Bachelor of Arts or Sciences, but who wish to become Registered Dietitians may complete a 2nd Bachelor’s in Nutrition and Food Science with a concentration in Dietetics.  There are no prerequisites required, regardless of a students previous field of study; however, incoming 2nd Bachelor’s students will also have to begin their course of study in one of the other three concentrations in Nutrition and Food Science and then apply for admission to the Dietetics concentration (see above for Dietetics concentration admission requirements).  Students earning their 2nd Bachelor’s in Nutrition and Food Science will not be required to complete the General Education or World Languages and Cultures requirements and will be given credit for equivalent major core, required, and collateral courses they have taken elsewhere.  They will, however, be required to meet the residency requirement, which demands that students complete a minimum of 32 credits at Montclair State University.  Because of this, students considering applying to earn a second Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition and Food Science should weigh their options very carefully.  The Department also offers a post-graduate Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) certificate, through which students can take the same undergraduate courses required for completion of the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) and issuance of the ACEND Verification Statement.  Students in the 2nd Bachelor’s program pay undergraduate tuition to take the DPD courses; students in the AND certificate program pay graduate tuition to take these same courses, but are not required to complete a minimum of 32 credits.  Students should determine whether to choose the 2nd Bachelor’s in Nutrition or the post-graduate AND certificate based on the number of DPD courses they have left to complete and the cost of graduate vs. undergraduate tuition.  Those interested in applying to the AND Certificate program should contact The Graduate School.

DIETETICS CONCENTRATION

Complete 83 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. NUTRITION AND FOOD SCIENCE CORE

    Complete the following 10 courses:

    NUFD 130 Introduction to Nutrition and Food Science Profession (1 hour lecture) 1
    NUFD 150 Food Composition and Scientific Preparation (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 153 Dynamics of Food and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 192 Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    NUFD 240 Sanitation Management and Food Microbiology: Certification (1 hour lecture) 1
    NUFD 282 Applied Nutrition in the Lifecycle (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 304 Introduction to Research (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 352 Organization and Management of Foodservice Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 357 Experimental Food Science (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 490 Nutrition and Food Science Professional Seminar (l hour seminar) 1
  2. DIETETICS CONCENTRATION REQUIRED COURSES

    1. Complete the following 8 courses:

      NUFD 253 Quantity Food Purchasing and Production (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 255 Meal Design and Management (3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab) 4
      NUFD 350 Quantity Food Applications (4 hours lab) 3
      NUFD 382 Advanced Nutrition (4 hours lecture) 4
      NUFD 412 Nutrition Education Techniques (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 482 Nutrition Counseling (3 hours lecture) 3
      NUFD 488 Medical Nutrition Therapy (4 hours lecture) 4
      NUFD 499 Medical Nutrition Applications (2 hours lecture) 2
    2. Complete the following 1 course for 3 semester hours:

      NUFD 292 Applied Community Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. DIETETICS COLLATERALS

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete the following for 26 semester hours:

      BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 254 Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      CHEM 113 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 4
      CHEM 130 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      CHEM 270 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 5
      MATH 109 Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      ECON 101 Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 102 Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL254: Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Microbiological concepts and techniques applicable to food and dairy processing, health and disease, water, waste and other environmental problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

CHEM113: Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)

A one semester introductory lecture and laboratory course in the fundamental concepts of chemistry. This course is suitable for students who have no prior background in chemistry. It is intended for students majoring in Food and Nutrition and other non-science majors. Some aspects of the course are quantitative, and a background in algebra is assumed. This course prepares students to proceed to CHEM 130 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry 4 sh.

CHEM130: Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Survey of organic chemistry covering all major classes, nomenclature, and characteristic class reactions. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 113 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM270: Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Structure and function of the biomolecules and the metabolic interrelationships in the cell. Primarily for foods and nutrition majors. 5 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130 with a grade of C- or better.

ECON101: Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces undergraduate students to the macro economy of the United States of America. Students learn how to apply the mechanism needed for the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long-term growth. In addition, they learn to analyze the macroeconomic data and the implications of fiscal and monetary policies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Requirements - Social Science. 3 sh.

ECON102: Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture)

In this course, undergraduate students will learn about the organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Students learn the mechanism behind the pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. In addition, they learn to analyze microeconomic data and apply the abstract theoretical models into real life situations. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Requirements - Social Science. 3 sh.

MATH109: Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the use of statistics in the real world. Topics include: analysis and presentation of data, variability and uncertainty in data, techniques of statistical inference and decision-making. Computer assisted including lecture, individual and small group tutoring in Mathematics Computer Laboratory. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Mathematics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 051 or MATH 061 or MATH 071 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT). Not for majors in Mathematics (MATH), Mathematics with Applied Math concentration (MAAM) or Mathematics-Teacher Education (MTED).

NUFD130: Introduction to Nutrition and Food Science Profession (1 hour lecture)

An introductory course which provides general information about nutrition and food science fields and acquaints students with professional requirements and opportunities. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentration in Food Management (NUFM), Dietetics (NUFD), Food Systems (NUSY), Applied Nutrition (NUFA) or General (NUFG); or Nutrition and Food Science (NUFS) minors. Starting Winter 2016: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentration in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Systems (NUSY), Applied Nutrition (NUFA) or Food Science (NUFC); or Nutrition and Food Science minors (NUFS).

NUFD150: Food Composition and Scientific Preparation (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

An introduction to food science, nutrition and food preparation with emphasis on scientific principles involved in the characteristics of acceptable standardized products and product evaluation. 3 sh.

NUFD153: Dynamics of Food and Society (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore issues of food consumption through a study of: basic nutrition requirements; social/psychological factors influencing food behaviors; food acquisition through history as compared to contemporary situations; the impact on the ecological system in the quest for food; and the social, economical, and political aspects of the world food situation and potential means of alleviating the problems of hunger and nutrient deficiencies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

NUFD192: Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the components of the food we eat and the nutrients necessary for life. The functions of nutrients, their interrelationships, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients are discussed. The factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, physical activity, and environmental factors, which influence food intake and requirements of nutrients, are covered. Students learn to measure and evaluate their nutritional status and body composition using equipment used in laboratory and analyze their diets using computer software. They plan meals considering individual's nutritional requirements in the laboratory. Historical, national, and international issues regarding food and nutrition are presented. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Management (NUFM), or General (NUFG), Business Administration majors with a concentration in Hospitality Management (BAHM), Food Systems (NUSY), Applied Nutrition (NUFA) and American Dietetic Association Certificate Program students (ADA). Starting Winter 2016: Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Applied Nutrition (NUFA), Food Systems (NUSY) or Food Science (NUFC); and Business Administration majors with a concentration in Hospitality Management (BAHM); and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certificate Program students (ADA).

NUFD240: Sanitation Management and Food Microbiology: Certification (1 hour lecture)

Food safety for effective food service management. Understanding of Sanitation Risk Management, microbial food contaminants, and food safety regulations. Students will be entitled to take the "ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification" examination. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 130 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite) and; NUFD 150 or HOSP 250 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite). Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 150 (maybe taken as prerequisite or corequisite) or HOSP 250 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite).

NUFD253: Quantity Food Purchasing and Production (3 hours lecture)

Determining needs, purchasing, storing, preparing and serving food in large volume. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD255: Meal Design and Management (3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

In this course, students learn about the design and analysis of meals for individuals and families, giving special emphasis to therapeutic nutrition and economic needs balanced with current lifestyles. Students also learn about principles involved in meal management and practice those in class labs. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 150; and either NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. Current health insurance and negative PPD test required.

NUFD282: Applied Nutrition in the Lifecycle (3 hours lecture)

The application of basic nutrition knowledge to individuals in various life stages. Analysis of the physiological, biochemical, psychological and social factors that affect nutrient needs throughout the lifecycle. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 130 (may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite); and NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD292: Applied Community Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the impact of federal and state legislation on community nutrition service, dietetics practice, and health care within the United States. Students learn about the Nutrition Care Process, which is a systematic approach to providing quality nutrition care consisting of four distinct, interrelated steps entailing nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation. The course demonstrates the application of this process. Nutrition informatics-the intersection of information, nutrition, and technology-is also presented. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 192.

NUFD304: Introduction to Research (3 hours lecture)

A study of the basic concepts, principles and methodologies of scientific research and their application to the investigation of research problems in health, nutrition, and food science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 109; and NUFD 282 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD350: Quantity Food Applications (4 hours lab)

Capstone lecture and laboratory experiences to support basic concepts of quantity food purchasing and production. Students will learn hands-on skills to produce culinary products in large quantities. Laboratory assignments in the MSU Food Management laboratory and in functioning food service facilities off campus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 253 or HOSP 390; and junior or senior standing. Students must provide proof of current health insurance coverage and a negative PPD test.

NUFD352: Organization and Management of Foodservice Systems (3 hours lecture)

Principles of management, organizational structure, policy and decision-making. The menu in management, budgeting and cost control, sanitation and safety, personnel policies and management. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Nutrition and Food Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 240 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 282 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD357: Experimental Food Science (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Study of the theory and applications of the chemical and physical changes involved in food processing, storage and preparation through objective and subjective analytical techniques. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 113; NUFD 240 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD382: Advanced Nutrition (4 hours lecture)

The physiological and chemical bases for nutrient needs, mechanisms through which nutrients meet the biological needs of humans, evaluation and interpretation of research findings. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 270 and NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. BIOL 243 may be taken as a prerequisite or a corequisite.

NUFD412: Nutrition Education Techniques (3 hours lecture)

Procedures and techniques for developing programs and teaching nutrition to a variety of target populations. Individual and group methods emphasize innovation. Field studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 282; and NUFD 304 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD482: Nutrition Counseling (3 hours lecture)

This course offers practical experience dealing with the principles of marketing, adult learning, helping skills, assessment, documentation, and evaluation as related to weight control and the role of food in promotion of a healthy lifestyle. Six hours of clinical experience is required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 304; and NUFD 412 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD488: Medical Nutrition Therapy (4 hours lecture)

This course enables students to apply nutrition science to the prevention and treatment of human diseases and medical conditions. Nutrition assessment, diet modification, and specialized nutrition support, such as enteral and parenteral feeding, are covered. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or 192 and NUFD 382 and BIOL 243 and CHEM 270.

NUFD490: Nutrition and Food Science Professional Seminar (l hour seminar)

A capstone course which provides skills necessary for beginning professionals in nutrition and food science fields. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 130 and NUFD 304; Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Management (NUFM), or General (NUFG), Food Systems (NUSY) or Applied Nutrition (NUFA). Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 130 and NUFD 304; Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Systems (NUSY), Food Science (NUSC), or Applied Nutrition (NUFA).

NUFD499: Medical Nutrition Applications (2 hours lecture)

Provides an overview of the concepts, principles and methodology for nutrition assessment. Emphasis is placed on practical application and case models. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 382; and NUFD 488 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.