English, Instructional Certification: Teacher Certification in Elementary School with Subject Matter Specialization: Language Arts/Literacy Grades 5-8 - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog


ELEM SCH w/SUBJ MTR SPEC:LANG ARTS 5-8

Complete 18 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. INITIAL INSTRUCTIONAL CERTIFICATION

    An Elementary School certificate is required in order to be eligible for this endorsement.

  2. CORE REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 2 requirement(s) for 12 semester hours:

    1. Complete 1 course from the following:

      FCST 515 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 561 Developmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 563 Theories of Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete the following 3 courses:

      ENGL 305 Young Adult Literature (3 hour lecture) 3
      ENWR 583 Teaching Writing Through Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENWR 586 Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing (3 lecture hours) 3
  3. ELECTIVES

    Complete 2 courses from the following:

    ENGL 206 World Literature: The Coming of Age Theme (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENGL 207 World Literature: Voices of Tradition and Challenge (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENGL 210 Myth and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENGL 238 Black Writers in the United States: A Survey (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENGL 260 Art of Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENGL 262 Art of Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENGL 263 Art of Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENLT 378 Science Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
    READ 503 Literature for Adolescents (3 hours lecture) 3
    READ 524 Teaching Multiethnic Literature in P-8 Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

ENGL206: World Literature: The Coming of Age Theme (3 hours lecture)

This course combines Western with non-Western works to approximate an approach to a "global perspective" on literature. It is designed to introduce the student to major works of world literature; to foster an international literary sensibility; to present a variety of cultural perspectives in a context which demonstrates how they are interrelated: to present students with assignments that will direct them toward developing skills of literary analysis and interpretation; and to guide students in deepening their awareness of the connections between national literatures and their cultural contexts. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Previous course ENLT 206 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENGL207: World Literature: Voices of Tradition and Challenge (3 hours lecture)

Organized around the premise that writers have two fundamental ways of responding to the challenge of their culture, conformity or dissent, this course will present literary works in pairs that represent opposing ways of responding to the same subject. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Previous course ENLT 207 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENGL210: Myth and Literature (3 hours lecture)

Myth and the myth-making process: the origins, meanings and major archetypes and motifs of Occidental and Oriental myths. Previous course ENLT 260 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL238: Black Writers in the United States: A Survey (3 hours lecture)

Black writers in the United States from Colonial times to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL260: Art of Poetry (3 hours lecture)

An introductory course in reading, interpreting, and evaluating poetry. Attention is paid to style, form, and poetic convention. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL262: Art of Fiction (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to form and techniques in fiction through close reading and discussion of representative texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL263: Art of Drama (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the major forms, features, eras, and writers of world drama from ancient times to the present. Selections of plays explore ways in which cultural issues are performed. By examining a wide variety of such performances in their historical and political contexts, students will gain a broad appreciation for theater and a deep understanding of the many ways in which it expresses the tragedy and comedy of the human condition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL305: Young Adult Literature (3 hour lecture)

Students will read a broad representation of Young Adult fiction and concomitant theoretical essays and critical articles. Students will explore the issues surrounding what youths read, the books taught in our nation's schools, the constructs these texts espouse to their intended audiences and what such works reveal about the socio-cultural contexts within which they were produced. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 206 or ENGL 207 or ENGL 210 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 240 or ENGL 241 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274 or ENGL 275 or ENGL 294 or ENGL 300 or ENGL 333.

ENLT378: Science Fiction (3 hours lecture)

Fiction of the future that speculates and extrapolates from the physical and social sciences, selected from both the classics and contemporary writings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENWR583: Teaching Writing Through Literature (3 hours lecture)

The course considers the best theories and practices for teaching writing through literature. Students will also examine the social and historical intersection of literary studies and writing pedagogy. 3 sh.

ENWR586: Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing (3 lecture hours)

This course explores the social, educational, and linguistic foundations of writing instruction, including various models of composing and approaches to writing pedagogy. Students will learn how to respond to writing, identifying strengths and strategies for improvement, and explore ways to encourage revision. Practicing and prospective teachers will examine the theory, research, and practice of writing instruction through a process of inquiry, workshops, and analysis of their own writing. 3 sh.

FCST515: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

Students utilize developmental and ecological approaches to study physical, cognitive, and social development of adolescents (11-18 years) in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Students also examine how family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural factors, and politics can have an influence on adolescents. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status in adolescent development are likewise examined. Students also engage in out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as develop an APA style research literature review or proposal paper. 3 sh.

PSYC560: Advanced Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children and other topics. 3 sh.

PSYC561: Developmental Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Philosophical, conceptual, theoretical and research issues pertinent to human development from prenatal life to adulthood are presented. The core conceptual issues of development, such as the nature-nurture controversy, the continuity-discontinuity issue, and the issue of stability-instability, are discussed, and their relationships to the major theories in developmental psychology are examined. 3 sh.

PSYC563: Theories of Learning (3 hours lecture)

The aim of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of modern learning theory, its historical context, theoretical ideas, research, and applications. To this end, the theoretical ideas of the major schools of learning--behaviorism, gestalt, cognitivism, and information-processing--are reviewed. 3 sh.

READ503: Literature for Adolescents (3 hours lecture)

Offers background for the development of recreational reading programs in middle schools and high schools. Literature written for students, as well as literature intended to be read widely by adolescents, criteria for book selection, censorship, role of mass media, minority group identification through books, bibliotherapy, bibliographic tools, and the importance of the librarian. 3 sh.

READ524: Teaching Multiethnic Literature in P-8 Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Students examine multiethnic children's literature as aesthetic forms and pedagogical tools. Students analyze the social, political, and education implications of this literature and its use in P-8 classrooms. Students are encouraged to introduce powerful, well-written and illustrated, and engaging literature into their classroom teaching across a range of subject areas as they explore important topics, such as race, ethnicity, and democracy; processes such as critical thinking and critical media analysis; and issues of power and privilege. Students learn to use this literature effectively and confidently within a range of curriculum and assessment structures. 3 sh.