Industrial Design Major (B.F.A.) - Undergraduate - 2010 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2010 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Program Overview

The Industrial Design Major focuses on the design and development of consumer products reflecting virtually all areas of human activity. It is an intensive program emphasizing critical thinking and problem-solving skills and a solid grounding in all aspects of the design process.

For further information: Art & Design webpage

Curriculum Requirements

All university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree (for further information, click here.)  In addition, students pursuing Industrial Design (B.F.A.) must complete the requirements below.


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAJOR

Complete 94 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. CORE REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 7 courses for 21 semester hours:

    ARFD 121 Foundations I: Concept, Process and Application 3
    ARFD 122 Foundations II: 2D Design 3
    ARFD 123 Foundations III: Visual Organization - 3D Design 3
    ARFD 124 Foundations IV: Figure Drawing 3
    ARFD 125 Foundations V: Color, Light and Time 3
    ARHS 105 Art in Western Civilization: Ancient and Medieval 3
    ARHS 106 Art in Western Civilization: Renaissance to Modern 3
  2. ART & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN HISTORY

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s) for a total of 9 semester hours:

    1. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours:

      ARHS 370 History of Industrial Design 3
    2. Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours from the following:

      ARHS 215 Ancient Art 3
      ARHS 216 Renaissance Art in Italy: The Fifteenth Century 3
      ARHS 217 Selected Masterpieces of World Art 3
      ARHS 220 Art in Non-Western Societies 3
      ARHS 223 Shelter Form as Art 3
      ARHS 230 History of the Print 3
      ARHS 250 Modern Philosophies of Art 3
      ARHS 275 Afro-American Art 3
      ARHS 276 History of Textiles: Focus on the Americas 3
      ARHS 322 Early Christian-Byzantine Art 3
      ARHS 323 Medieval Art 3
      ARHS 324 Northern Renaissance Painting 3
      ARHS 325 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art 3
      ARHS 326 The Critical Approach 3
      ARHS 327 History of Oriental Art 3
      ARHS 328 Survey of Greek Art 3
      ARHS 329 American Art 3
      ARHS 331 Modern Art 3
      ARHS 332 Ancient Art of Europe 3
      ARHS 337 Public Art and the Community 3
      ARHS 341 History of City Planning 3
      ARHS 370 History of Industrial Design 3
      ARHS 450 Modern Architecture 3
      ARHS 451 Contemporary Art 3
      ARHS 452 Renaissance Art in Italy: The Sixteenth Century 3
      ARHS 455 Selected Problems in Art History 3
      ARHS 457 Pre-Columbian, Oceanic and African Art 3
      ARHS 458 African Art: Sub-Saharan 3
      ARHS 459 Art of the Nineteenth Century 3
      ARHS 460 Nineteenth Century American Architecture 3
      ARHS 461 Nineteenth Century American Painting 3
      ARHS 462 Senior Seminar 3
      ARHS 469 Art of the Twentieth Century 3
      ARHS 477 History of Photography 3
      ARHS 478 Art in Public Places 3
      ARHS 479 Independent Study in Urban Cultural Development 2-8
      ARHS 480 Field Trip in Art History 2-6
      ARHS 483 Independent Study in Art History 2-8
      ARHS 484 Independent Study: Senior Thesis (BA Art HIstory) 3
      ARHS 485 Ancient Art In Italy: Etruscan and Roman Art 3
  3. INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAJOR STUDIO

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s) for a total of 52 semester hours:

    1. REQUIRED STUDIO COURSES

      Complete the following 15 courses for 45 semester hours:

      ARID 100 Visualization and Illustration Techniques for Industrial Designers 3
      ARID 101 Advanced Techniques in Design Delineation 3
      ARID 111 Model Making and Prototype 3
      ARID 120 Human Factors in Engineering 3
      ARID 201 Industrial Design and Problem Solving 3
      ARID 202 Industrial Design Studio, Beginning 3
      ARID 210 Materials Processing Studio I 3
      ARID 211 Materials Processing Studio II 3
      ARID 220 Introduction to Computer Aided Solid Modeling Representation 3
      ARID 221 Surface Modeling Techniques 3
      ARID 302 Industrial Design Studio, Intermediate 3
      ARID 303 Industrial Design Studio, Advanced 3
      ARID 360 Professional Practices in Industrial Design 3
      ARID 410 Project Design Development I 3
      ARID 411 Project Design Development II 3
    2. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

      Complete for 7 semester hours.

      COED 401 Cooperative Education Experience I 3-8
  4. COLLATERAL COURSES

    Complete the following 4 courses for 12 semester hours: .

    ARGD 211 Fundamentals of Adobe Creative Suite - Mac 3
    ARMJ 200 Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning I 3
    MKTG 240 Introduction to Marketing 3
    MKTG 344 Advertising Theory and Techniques 3

Course Descriptions:

ARFD121: Foundations I: Concept, Process and Application

Students will be challenged and guided in the development of their critical and conceptualizing skills as they apply to art and design processes. Foundations I is a problem-solving course in which the student investigates the dynamic visual forces involved in composing in a variety of media. Students explore the interrelationships of composition, process, perception, and intent. Through the understanding of concepts, processes, and visual language, students broaden their skills in idea development, research strategies, and technical application. This course advocates and utilizes the model of a learning community to effectively introduce students to ideas, issues, and practices in contemporary art and design. Foundations I further connects creative research and practice to socio-political and cultural ideology, allowing students opportunities for integration of ideas outside the disciplines of art. This will be accomplished through lectures, exercises, student team assignments, discussion, and exploration in and outside of the classroom. This course is required during the first semester for all freshman and undergraduate transfer students majoring in BA Studio and BFA Studio. 3 sh.

ARFD122: Foundations II: 2D Design

Foundations II introduces students to the principles of 2-dimensional design in a variety of media. Major principles covered include composition, line, shape, volume, movement, value, rhythm, repetition, variation, scale, size, perspective, proportion, texture, balance, unity, harmony, and contrast. The course content consists of a variety of projects focusing on critical, theory-based problem solving, together with lectures and demonstrations. 3 sh.

ARFD123: Foundations III: Visual Organization - 3D Design

An introduction to the 3rd dimension of the world that we inhabit ("made" things, natural forms, and the occupation of space). Three-dimensional sensibility is progressively developed when basic components are manipulated by the effective use of direction, balance, axis, orientation, and relationship; in other words, organization (composition). Assignments in light, shape, shadow, depth, form, and movement are examined in a natural progression from 2D knowledge to 3D. Activities include lectures, conceptualization, observation, creation, discussion, and critical analysis for each project. The aesthetic consideration of materials and tools in this context add to the expressive output of three-dimensional study. The process may begin with concept, material or observation; it continues by way of lecture, demonstration, critical analysis and class discussion until each project is crafted to completion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARFD124: Foundations IV: Figure Drawing

An introduction to drawing the human figure. Students in this course will spend the majority of their time drawing from live models in a studio setting. Most classes will follow the traditional figure drawing format of beginning with quick gesture drawings, with poses gradually increasing in length of time, and ending with a single sustained pose of an hour or more. The students will be introduced to a wide range of ideas, concepts, strategems, and materials related to the drawing of the human figure. Ideas and drawing approaches will be illustrated by looking at the visual examples of artworks by both past and present figurative artists. A brief historical overview of various visions of the human image will be presented, as will an introduction of human anatomy for artists. Concurrent with ideas about proportion, foreshortening, scale, and anatomical construct, ideas about line quality, chiaroscuro, and the figure in differing spatial constructs will be explored. Although weekly thematic ideas will be presented, most classes will include an interweaving and repetition of a wide range of concepts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARFD125: Foundations V: Color, Light and Time

Color functions in many ways - as a visual phenomenon of light, as a perceptual occurrence, as a pigment with specific mixing properties, and as an element with powerful expressive and symbolic potential. It is important that artists and designers understand the principles and properties of color for use in their work in any medium. This course introduces students to the history, theory, and interdisciplinary use of color and color systems via lectures, demonstrations, and exercises. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARFD 121.

ARGD211: Fundamentals of Adobe Creative Suite - Mac

A project and exercise-based approach to learning the programs used by graphic designers on Macintosh computers, covering the fundamentals of the latest versions of the Adobe Creative Suite series: Adobe Illustrator CS, InDesign CS, and Adobe Photoshop CS. These programs are prerequisite for all those interested in working within the design and publishing industries. The use of scanners for importing both art and text will also be investigated. Instruction in the course is tutorial-based, with supplemental lectures and demonstrations. 3 sh.

ARHS105: Art in Western Civilization: Ancient and Medieval

The history of Western art and architecture from Prehistoric Europe through the Middle Ages. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, Greece and Rome, then Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic art. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for Fine Arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. Meets the University Writing Requirement for ANIL, FAAH, FAED, FASF, FASH, FASI, FASL, FAST and GRDN majors. 3 sh.

ARHS106: Art in Western Civilization: Renaissance to Modern

The history of Western art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present. Included are the arts of the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romantic, Impressionist and Modern periods. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for fine arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. Meets the University Writing Requirement for FAAH, FAED, FASF, FASH, FASI, FASL and FAST majors. 3 sh.

ARHS215: Ancient Art

The origins of art and the civilizations of the ancient world; Paleolithic man and the Sumerian, Hittite, Assyrian, Phoenician and Egyptian civilizations. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

ARHS216: Renaissance Art in Italy: The Fifteenth Century

The formation of Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture during the Quattrocento; Masaccio, Mantegna, Donatello, Brunelleschi, and Alberti emphasized. 3 sh.

ARHS217: Selected Masterpieces of World Art

An introduction to key works of art representing prehistoric cultures, the ancient world, the East, the Renaissance, and the Modern period; museum and gallery trips, reading and discussion. For non-art majors. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

ARHS220: Art in Non-Western Societies

A consideration of the role of art in traditional non-western societies. The course includes an introduction to the geographic setting, and an examination of the integration of art into society as a whole - the economics, social order, politics, history, religion and philosophy. The role art plays in social change and how it is affected by social change. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ARHS223: Shelter Form as Art

The concepts and forms of shelter; the ways in which men and animals have housed themselves from primitive times to the present; interior spacial qualities and utilization and the role of adornment, decoration and exterior configurations. Projects include model making. 3 sh.

ARHS230: History of the Print

The principal types of prints from their beginnings to today. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

ARHS250: Modern Philosophies of Art

The work of major writers about art in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the nature of the creative experience, the function of art in the life of the individual and of society, the nature of the creative process, the rise of new materials and institutions; the development of sentiments and attitudes affecting thinking in the field. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. 3 sh.

ARHS275: Afro-American Art

Afro-American art in the United States from colonial times to the present. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ARHS276: History of Textiles: Focus on the Americas

A study of some of the great textile traditions of the world with an emphasis on the Americas. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

ARHS322: Early Christian-Byzantine Art

The emergence and development of early Christian art from its classical and late classical antecedents and its development up to Byzantine art. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS323: Medieval Art

Painting, sculpture and architecture in the Romanesque and Gothic periods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS324: Northern Renaissance Painting

Fifteenth and sixteenth century painting in northern Europe with particular attention to Flanders and Holland; emphasis on Jan Van Eyck, Van Der Weyden, Bosch, Peter Bruegel and Matthias Gruenewald. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS325: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Western Europe from 1600 to 1800; Baroque and Rococo styles with emphasis on El Greco, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Poussin and Watteau. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS326: The Critical Approach

Historical criticism, criteria in art criticism, and an analysis of the critical process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS327: History of Oriental Art

The factors that shaped oriental society; the art of China, Korea, Japan, India, Southeast Asia and the neighboring Islamic world. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS328: Survey of Greek Art

Greek art including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS329: American Art

Art in the United States from the colonial period through the nineteenth century; the development of an American style in the light of its relationship to and dependence upon European art. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS331: Modern Art

Movements, personalities and styles from the late nineteenth century masters to Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism and other schools that shaped the modern movement. Lectures, readings, museum visits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS332: Ancient Art of Europe

The non-classical traditions in prehistoric and early Medieval Europe; the continuity of native, anti-classical artistic trends from the cave art of Paleolithic Europe to the migration arts of the early Middle Ages; the arts of the builders of Stonehenge, the Scythians, Huns, Celts, Goths and Vikings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS337: Public Art and the Community

Art as a functional part of the contemporary community; reactions between people and the city environment; the visual potential of science and technology and its application to problems of visual form in relation to architectural and urban environment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS341: History of City Planning

Conceptual and esthetic planning of city form from primitive village patterns and the ancient towns of India and Egypt to schemes for the future; the significance of squares and public spaces; the question of scale and the ways in which forms and spaces are experienced. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS370: History of Industrial Design

The history of industrial design is traced from the industrial revolution to the latter part of the twentieth century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS450: Modern Architecture

Major contributions to the development of modern architecture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the development of styles, structural innovations and theories of design. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Fine and Performing Arts: Art Appreciation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS451: Contemporary Art

The work of major artists of the twentieth century with particular reference to the dominant ideas of the period; readings, museum trips, discussion of contemporary writing and criticism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS452: Renaissance Art in Italy: The Sixteenth Century

The great masters of the Cinquecento: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione and Titian; the emergence of Mannerist art and architecture in Rome, Venice, Florence and Bologna. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS455: Selected Problems in Art History

A seminar in topics like the works of an individual artist or a particular theme in art history (e.g. the human figure) or a particular technique (e.g. sculpture); lectures, reports, museum and studio visits, discussion. May be repeated seven times for a maximum of 24.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS457: Pre-Columbian, Oceanic and African Art

The major styles of Oceania, Africa, South and Central America before Columbus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS458: African Art: Sub-Saharan

The painting, sculpture and minor arts of the cultures of Africa; prehistoric remains and art traditions of the more recent past in the context of stylistic groupings; relation to ceremony and to daily life; symbolism and relations to the arts of other cultures. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS459: Art of the Nineteenth Century

The major movements of the nineteenth century: Classicism, Romanticism and Realism; the salon at mid-century; Impressionism; Post-Impressionism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS460: Nineteenth Century American Architecture

Building in the United States during the nineteenth century; social, economic and political forces as determinants of architectural form; interior design and decoration. Works by Latrobe, A. J. Downing, Ithiel Towne, H. H. Richardson and Louis Sullivan emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS461: Nineteenth Century American Painting

Painting in the United States during the nineteenth century; portrait, landscape and genre traditions; the Hudson River school, the genre painters, the expatriates and the independents; folk and naif paintings. Some knowledge of European painting is desirable. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS462: Senior Seminar

Seminar in selected artistic problems of historic, social and philosophical nature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100; BFA students or departmental approval.

ARHS469: Art of the Twentieth Century

From Picasso to today; scientific and social forces transforming the artist's vision, including the theories of Freud and Bergson. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS477: History of Photography

The roots of photography, its practitioners and the social and historical circumstances surrounding its creation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS478: Art in Public Places

A studio concerned with urban areas defined by man's art and used by the public; problems of using art work to achieve the desired ambience. Especially recommended for students of painting, sculpture, theater, music, dance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHS479: Independent Study in Urban Cultural Development

Topics for investigation selected with the approval of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 2 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHS 105 and departmental approval.

ARHS480: Field Trip in Art History

Travel courses to art sources in the United States and foreign countries not to exceed twelve undergraduate credits. First-hand contact with the historic art forms of the places visited and study of their monuments and works in their museums and galleries. Subject(s) defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. 2 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHS 105 and departmental approval.

ARHS483: Independent Study in Art History

Independent study. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. 2 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHS 105 and departmental approval.

ARHS484: Independent Study: Senior Thesis (BA Art HIstory)

With art history faculty advisement, each senior student will conduct a course of research in art history and complete a scholarly paper. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHS 200 and departmental approval.

ARHS485: Ancient Art In Italy: Etruscan and Roman Art

The arts of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARID100: Visualization and Illustration Techniques for Industrial Designers

This studio course concentrates on fundamental conventional drafting and illustration skills that enable the communication of design ideas in technical terms for purposes of understanding industrial fabrication. 3 sh.

ARID101: Advanced Techniques in Design Delineation

This studio course concentrates on extending the student's technical appreciation, knowledge and skill level in the production of industrial product drawings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 100.

ARID111: Model Making and Prototype

The design and construction of scale models as a visualization and prototyping tool for designers and artists. 3 sh.

ARID120: Human Factors in Engineering

The study of information and guidelines related to the design of systems, facilities, equipment and products for human use and consumption. Basic concepts and principals of ergonomics related to the field of industrial design are emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 100, ARID 111.

ARID201: Industrial Design and Problem Solving

Students are introduced to processes and techniques by which design problems are analyzed, researched, prototyped and solved. Problem solving models and their application provide the focus within the scope and framework of all coursework. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 101 and ARID 120.

ARID202: Industrial Design Studio, Beginning

A laboratory-based learning experience for industrial designers that focuses on the evolution of consumer products from initial specifications to pre-production prototypes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 120 and ARID 201.

ARID210: Materials Processing Studio I

A comprehensive introduction to various methods for producing metallic, polymeric, cellulose-based and ceramic materials. Content is organized around the major families or processes; casting, molding, forming, separating, chip removal, conditioning, assembling and finishing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 111.

ARID211: Materials Processing Studio II

Study of hand and machine processing utilizing layout, handwork, machining, and precision control systems. Includes an introduction to CNC machining. Laboratory activities are applied to prototyping and manufacturing processes appropriate for industrial designers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 210.

ARID220: Introduction to Computer Aided Solid Modeling Representation

Beginning course enabling students to build conceptual and performance skills required to create and visualize three dimensional objects on a computer. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 100 and ARID 101.

ARID221: Surface Modeling Techniques

Application of computer graphics to visualize problems associated with product design relating to form, space, color and factors of human interaction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 220.

ARID302: Industrial Design Studio, Intermediate

To provide industrial design students opportunities to build on skills and attitudes developed in ARID 202 by collectively developing industrial design projects in small group sizes and producing a presentation quality prototype. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 202.

ARID303: Industrial Design Studio, Advanced

An advanced level industrial design laboratory course enabling the student to identify a significant design project requiring sophisticated materials processing techniques to develop a pre-production prototype consumer product. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 302.

ARID360: Professional Practices in Industrial Design

Examination of myriad of issues facing industrial designers. Highlighted are legal, political, contractual and professional ethics and an introduction to professional organizations and career development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 201.

ARID410: Project Design Development I

Students will develop projects based on their own interests, and working in conjunction with both faculty and/or actual clients, manage their projects through a complete design and prototyping cycle. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 303.

ARID411: Project Design Development II

An opportunity for students to focus independently on specific themes or interests. This is the second part of a two-part course sequence (with ARID 410) in preparing students to experience methods of solving complex industrial design issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARID 410.

ARMJ200: Metalwork and Jewelry, Beginning I

Introduction to metal working and jewelry techniques traditionally used in the shaping of useful articles. 3 sh.

COED401: Cooperative Education Experience I

Cooperative Education is an internship program that integrates academic study and classroom theory with on-the-job experiences. It involves an educational partnership among Montclair State, business and non-profit organizations for the profesional development of students. Academic faculty assess the learning and award credits and a supervisor/employer evaluates progress. Students may not exceed 16 credits through enrollment in multiple co-op courses. 3 - 8 sh.

Prerequisites: Determined by individual academic departments.

MKTG240: Introduction to Marketing

This introductory course is designed to expose the student to the basic areas that comprise marketing as a discipline. Marketing is viewed as a process that must be integrated with all other business functions. The basic theories, concepts, language and tools of marketing are introduced, and illustrations of their applicability to the business as well as non-profit sectors of the national economy with increasing stress on the global realities which affect the marketing function are addressed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

MKTG344: Advertising Theory and Techniques

A broad introduction to advertising, promotion and marketing communications: historical roots of advertising; advertising from the viewpoint of clients, ad agencies and media; and both the marketing aspects (strategy development; account management) and creative aspects (copywriting; art direction; production and editing) of advertising. Covers all forms of advertising: print, broadcast; out-of home; and the latest advertising media such as direct mail and response; cable TV; and internet/interactive. In addition to traditional lectures, guest lectures are provided by the advertising professionals. Students also have a practical opportunity to create ads and commercials. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240.