Digital Archaeology and Dark Tourism: A Mixed Methods Approach to Social Justice in Rosewood, Florida

by

Edward Gonzalez-Tennant

Department of Anthropology, Monmouth University

Thursday, February 6, 2014, 7:00 P.M., Cohen Lounge, Dickson Hall, Montclair State University*

In Honor of Black History Month.

Rosewood, a prosperous African American community in Florida, was attacked and burned to the ground by a white mob in January, 1923, during the height of the Jim Crow era in the American South, following reports of an assault on a white woman.  The inhabitants of the town who were able to escape never returned.  This talk discusses how a mixed methods approach (e.g., history, archaeology, GIS) to studying Rosewood's development and demise is directly connected to understanding modern social inequality.

Dr. Edward Gonza?lez-Tennant is a historical archaeologist actively working in the American Southeast and Caribbean. His research combines archaeological and ethnohistorical data to investigate specific episodes of culture contact. He utilizes geographic information systems (GIS) to contextualize these data and reveal deeper patterns related to social structure and change. This diachronic approach supports research into the changing relationships between minority and majority groups, factors leading to instances of forced displacement such as race riots, and two and a half centuries of social change as revealed at a British fort in the Caribbean. His recent work views the interaction between the past and present as a form of contact, and he regularly experiments with various approaches and technologies supporting the public engagement with archaeology and the past. Dr. Gonza?lez-Tennant is also completing a manuscript based on his dissertation titled "An Archaeology of Intersectional Violence: The 1923 Rosewood Pogrom in Historical Perspective" to be published with the University of Florida Press.

*Parking available in Red Hawk Deck. Exit to Dickson from Level Five.