Fall 2011

English Department Graduate Courses
Fall 2011

Core

ENGL 605

Seminar in Literary Research

Liebler

M

6:30

American #1

ENGL 601

Sem: 19th C. American Women Writers

Elbert

W

5:30

American #2

ENGL 560

Modern American Fiction

Greenberg

T

8:15

British #1

ENGL 600

Seminar: Modern Irish Drama

McDiarmid

T

5:30

International #1

ENLT 577

Film Studies: Documentary Film

Lykidis

W

5:30

International #2

ENLT 602

Seminar: Early Christian Literature

Behlman

W

8:15

Writing #1

ENWR 600

Seminar: Community-Based Writing

Restaino

R

8:15

Writing #2

ENWR 586

Teaching Writing & the Basic Writer

Knight

R

5:30

CORE COURSES (departmental approval required)
ENGL 605: Seminar in Literary Research
Prof. Liebler           Mon. 6:30-9:00
This course offers a foundation for research and scholarly writing in literary study across specializations. Students will learn to distinguish literary theory, criticism, and analysis, and will sharpen their ability to participate in the scholarly conversations of the profession. We will explore ways to identify and produce arguments that matter and persuade, supported by engagement with current and traditional scholarship. Research methodologies, MLA documentation formats, clear and effective academic writing, and the creation of informative scholarly discourse form the backbone of this course.

AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL 601: Seminar in American Literature: 19th Century American Women Writers
Prof. Elbert            Wed. 5:30-8:00

The goals of this course are: (1) To introduce you to one of the most fertile periods of American literature, the nineteenth century, this time not through a study of traditionally canonical works (Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau) but through a study of the women writers of the period, who most often outshone their male counterparts in terms of popularity and book sales! ;
(2) to help you understand how these writers developed their own distinct brand of American literature, which scholars have chosen to ignore for a very long time (why is it that these women were just recently permitted to enter the canon?);to see if/how these women established their own American traditions of writing and thinking;
(3) to introduce you to current historicist, feminist, and gender theory in the study of American literature; and
(4) to assist you in answering the question, are nineteenth-century women writers so different from nineteenth-century male writers (doesn't the same culture inform their works, after all?) and ultimately to help you in coming to some conclusions about the universal question, do men and women write, think, feel differently?  Is woman's experience so different from man's?  If so, why?  Should we read/analyze/critique women's work differently?

Authors may include such writers as Lydia Maria Child, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Maria Cummins, Fanny Fern, E.D.E.N. Southworth, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, Alice Cary, Louisa May Alcott, Harriet Prescott Spofford, Elizabeth Stoddard, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Kate Chopin, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary Austin, and Pauline Hopkins.  Recent scholarly essays about these writers' texts and about women's history will be assigned, too. Recommended: Elaine Showalter's A Jury of Her Peers: Celebrating American Women Writers from Anne Bradstreet to Annie Proulx. The reading list will be sent to students by late June.

ENGL 560: Modern American Fiction
Prof. Greenberg     Tue. 8:15-10:45

This semester we will look at satire in American fiction in a survey of the modern that spans the 20th century, beginning with Sinclair Lewis’s 1922 portrayal of a typical American businessman in Babbitt and running through Don DeLillo’s dissection of postmodernity in White Noise, and, if time permits, beyond.  We will include important satiric voices of women writers (Dawn Powell, Mary McCarthy). African Americans (George Schuyler, Ishmael Reed) and American Jews (Nathanael West, Joseph Heller). We will look at many facets of satire: its potential for social and political commentary; its use of ridicule, wit, invective, and exaggeration; its sociological function as a marker of cultural distinction; its status as what Judith Butler has called “excitable speech”; its continuity with Freud’s notion of the tendentious joke; its deployment of what Mikhail Bakhtin called speech genres and double-voiced discourse.  Critical readings may include appropriate selections from Bergson, Freud, Butler, Jameson, Bourdieu, Bakhtin, Booth, Frye and others.

BRITISH LITERATURE
ENGL 600: Seminar in British Literature: Modern Irish Drama
Prof. McDiarmid    Tues. 5:30-8:00

Modern Irish Drama is a significantly contextualized study of plays by Irish playwrights from the early days of the Abbey Theatre through the end of the twentieth century.   Our close readings will be enriched by materials from Irish folklore, cultural and political history, and poetry. The syllabus will include Kathleen ni Houlihan and other plays by W. B. Yeats and by Lady Gregory; Playboy of the Western World and other plays by J. M. Synge;  Bernard Shaw's John Bull's Other Island; Sean O'Casey's Plough and the Stars; Translations by Brian Friel, Bailegangaire by Tom Murphy, and one or two later plays; readings in the debates and controversies generated by these plays; and readings in criticism and theory (post-coloniality, gender, material culture, theatre history, biography).   At the beginning of the semester we will read several aislingi, poems addressed to a fertile young woman who is "Ireland herself," as background for understanding the gendered nation present in the most of the texts we consider. In addition to the readings, required work  includes regular participation in discussion, several one-page papers, an oral report (also handed in as a paper), and a final long paper of approximately 5,000 words.

INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE
ENLT 577: Film Studies: Documentary Film Theory Prof. Lykidis          Wed. 5:30-8:00 This course is an introduction to documentary film theory. What social and political impulses motivate documentary filmmaking? How is film language deployed differently in documentary films than it is in fiction films? What makes documentaries seem truthful, authoritative or objective? What ethical issues are raised by documentary practice? In order to answer these questions, we will consider the historical development, aesthetic parameters and ideological implications of eight types of documentary film: expository, poetic, observational, interactive, autobiographical, reflexive, performative and essayistic. The course will engage with the work of documentary filmmakers such as Luis Buñuel, Albert and David Maysles, Agnes Varda, Werner Herzog, and Marlon Riggs.

ENLT 602: Seminar in International Literature: Early Christian Literature

Prof. Behlman        Wed 8:15-10:45

This course will address the New Testament and other early Christian writings up to about 450 A.D., texts that are essential for an adequate understanding of Medieval, Renaissance, and later Anglophone literatures.  The first half of the course will deal with the New Testament and its literary and cultural backgrounds. During this time, we’ll read not only from the New Testament itself but also from its chief influence, the Hebrew Bible. The latter two thirds of the course will include readings from Gnostic and other non-canonical gospels, lives of male and female saints, documents from the early Christian debates about the nature of Christ, and a good deal of contemporary critical writing about the formal and thematic properties of these writings.

Along the way, we’ll examine such fascinating matters as the authorship of the New Testament, the history of its compilation as a text, the Jewishness of Jesus and of early Christianity in general, the extraordinarily diversity of beliefs that were in play in early Christianity, and the crucial adoption of Christianity as the state religion of the later Roman Empire.  Ancient authors we will read include Tertullian, Origen, Clement of Alexandria, Athanasius, Eusebius, and Jerome. The semester will culminate with a reading of Augustine’s great spiritual autobiography, The Confessions.  While the course will in part be about religion, it will not be taught from a religious perspective; the approach will be literary, cultural, and historical. It is open to people of all faiths or of no faith whatsoever, and prior knowledge of the Bible or of early Christianity is not expected.

WRITING STUDIES
ENWR 586:  Teaching Writing and the Basic Writer
Prof. Knight           Thurs. 5:30-8:00

This course explores the social, educational, and linguistic foundations of writing instruction, with special attention to the needs of the basic writer.  We will review various models of composing and approaches to writing pedagogy. We will experiment with how to respond to student work, identifying strengths and strategies for improvement, and we will also explore ways to encourage revision. Our learning will also be shaped by a consideration of the larger influences on student performance, such as issues of second-language writing, socioeconomics, and previous education.  Practicing and prospective teachers will examine the theory, research, and practice of writing instruction through a process of inquiry, workshops, and analysis of their own writing.

 

ENWR 600: Seminar in Writing Studies: Community-Based and Activist Writing
Prof. Restaino       Thurs. 8:15-10:45

This seminar will explore the ways in which writing exists beyond the boundaries of what we’ve come to know as “writing for school.”  As we learn about the manifestations and purposes of writing outside of school, we will ultimately reflect on traditional ideas about school writing in order to think about potential relationships between these contexts.  Ultimately, we will explore writing practices that extend beyond academic discourse alone and into alternate genres that can mobilize communities. This writing can take on many different forms: oral history projects; community-based creative writing collections; political manifestos; grant proposals; awareness-raising pamphlets and newsletters; and more.  We will work as researchers and program builders in order to put theoretical concepts into practical shape.

Core

ENGL 605

Seminar in Literary Research

Liebler

M

6:30

American #1

ENGL 601

Sem: 19th C. American Women Writers

Elbert

W

5:30

American #2

ENGL 560

Modern American Fiction

Greenberg

T

8:15

British #1

ENGL 600

Seminar: Modern Irish Drama

McDiarmid

T

5:30

International #1

ENLT 577

Film Studies: Documentary Film

Lykidis

W

5:30

International #2

ENLT 602

Seminar: Early Christian Literature

Behlman

W

8:15

Writing #1

ENWR 600

Seminar: Community-Based Writing

Restaino

R

8:15

Writing #2

ENWR 586

Teaching Writing & the Basic Writer

Knight

R

5:30

CORE COURSES (departmental approval required)
ENGL 605: Seminar in Literary Research
Prof. Liebler           Mon. 6:30-9:00
This course offers a foundation for research and scholarly writing in literary study across specializations. Students will learn to distinguish literary theory, criticism, and analysis, and will sharpen their ability to participate in the scholarly conversations of the profession. We will explore ways to identify and produce arguments that matter and persuade, supported by engagement with current and traditional scholarship. Research methodologies, MLA documentation formats, clear and effective academic writing, and the creation of informative scholarly discourse form the backbone of this course.

AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL 601: Seminar in American Literature: 19th Century American Women Writers
Prof. Elbert            Wed. 5:30-8:00

The goals of this course are: (1) To introduce you to one of the most fertile periods of American literature, the nineteenth century, this time not through a study of traditionally canonical works (Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau) but through a study of the women writers of the period, who most often outshone their male counterparts in terms of popularity and book sales! ;
(2) to help you understand how these writers developed their own distinct brand of American literature, which scholars have chosen to ignore for a very long time (why is it that these women were just recently permitted to enter the canon?);to see if/how these women established their own American traditions of writing and thinking;
(3) to introduce you to current historicist, feminist, and gender theory in the study of American literature; and
(4) to assist you in answering the question, are nineteenth-century women writers so different from nineteenth-century male writers (doesn't the same culture inform their works, after all?) and ultimately to help you in coming to some conclusions about the universal question, do men and women write, think, feel differently?  Is woman's experience so different from man's?  If so, why?  Should we read/analyze/critique women's work differently?

Authors may include such writers as Lydia Maria Child, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Maria Cummins, Fanny Fern, E.D.E.N. Southworth, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, Alice Cary, Louisa May Alcott, Harriet Prescott Spofford, Elizabeth Stoddard, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Kate Chopin, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary Austin, and Pauline Hopkins.  Recent scholarly essays about these writers' texts and about women's history will be assigned, too. Recommended: Elaine Showalter's A Jury of Her Peers: Celebrating American Women Writers from Anne Bradstreet to Annie Proulx. The reading list will be sent to students by late June.

ENGL 560: Modern American Fiction
Prof. Greenberg     Tue. 8:15-10:45

This semester we will look at satire in American fiction in a survey of the modern that spans the 20th century, beginning with Sinclair Lewis’s 1922 portrayal of a typical American businessman in Babbitt and running through Don DeLillo’s dissection of postmodernity in White Noise, and, if time permits, beyond.  We will include important satiric voices of women writers (Dawn Powell, Mary McCarthy). African Americans (George Schuyler, Ishmael Reed) and American Jews (Nathanael West, Joseph Heller). We will look at many facets of satire: its potential for social and political commentary; its use of ridicule, wit, invective, and exaggeration; its sociological function as a marker of cultural distinction; its status as what Judith Butler has called “excitable speech”; its continuity with Freud’s notion of the tendentious joke; its deployment of what Mikhail Bakhtin called speech genres and double-voiced discourse.  Critical readings may include appropriate selections from Bergson, Freud, Butler, Jameson, Bourdieu, Bakhtin, Booth, Frye and others.

BRITISH LITERATURE
ENGL 600: Seminar in British Literature: Modern Irish Drama
Prof. McDiarmid    Tues. 5:30-8:00

Modern Irish Drama is a significantly contextualized study of plays by Irish playwrights from the early days of the Abbey Theatre through the end of the twentieth century.   Our close readings will be enriched by materials from Irish folklore, cultural and political history, and poetry. The syllabus will include Kathleen ni Houlihan and other plays by W. B. Yeats and by Lady Gregory; Playboy of the Western World and other plays by J. M. Synge;  Bernard Shaw's John Bull's Other Island; Sean O'Casey's Plough and the Stars; Translations by Brian Friel, Bailegangaire by Tom Murphy, and one or two later plays; readings in the debates and controversies generated by these plays; and readings in criticism and theory (post-coloniality, gender, material culture, theatre history, biography).   At the beginning of the semester we will read several aislingi, poems addressed to a fertile young woman who is "Ireland herself," as background for understanding the gendered nation present in the most of the texts we consider. In addition to the readings, required work  includes regular participation in discussion, several one-page papers, an oral report (also handed in as a paper), and a final long paper of approximately 5,000 words.

INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE
ENLT 577: Film Studies: Documentary Film Theory Prof. Lykidis          Wed. 5:30-8:00 This course is an introduction to documentary film theory. What social and political impulses motivate documentary filmmaking? How is film language deployed differently in documentary films than it is in fiction films? What makes documentaries seem truthful, authoritative or objective? What ethical issues are raised by documentary practice? In order to answer these questions, we will consider the historical development, aesthetic parameters and ideological implications of eight types of documentary film: expository, poetic, observational, interactive, autobiographical, reflexive, performative and essayistic. The course will engage with the work of documentary filmmakers such as Luis Buñuel, Albert and David Maysles, Agnes Varda, Werner Herzog, and Marlon Riggs.

ENLT 602: Seminar in International Literature: Early Christian Literature

Prof. Behlman        Wed 8:15-10:45

This course will address the New Testament and other early Christian writings up to about 450 A.D., texts that are essential for an adequate understanding of Medieval, Renaissance, and later Anglophone literatures.  The first half of the course will deal with the New Testament and its literary and cultural backgrounds. During this time, we’ll read not only from the New Testament itself but also from its chief influence, the Hebrew Bible. The latter two thirds of the course will include readings from Gnostic and other non-canonical gospels, lives of male and female saints, documents from the early Christian debates about the nature of Christ, and a good deal of contemporary critical writing about the formal and thematic properties of these writings.

Along the way, we’ll examine such fascinating matters as the authorship of the New Testament, the history of its compilation as a text, the Jewishness of Jesus and of early Christianity in general, the extraordinarily diversity of beliefs that were in play in early Christianity, and the crucial adoption of Christianity as the state religion of the later Roman Empire.  Ancient authors we will read include Tertullian, Origen, Clement of Alexandria, Athanasius, Eusebius, and Jerome. The semester will culminate with a reading of Augustine’s great spiritual autobiography, The Confessions.  While the course will in part be about religion, it will not be taught from a religious perspective; the approach will be literary, cultural, and historical. It is open to people of all faiths or of no faith whatsoever, and prior knowledge of the Bible or of early Christianity is not expected.

WRITING STUDIES
ENWR 586:  Teaching Writing and the Basic Writer
Prof. Knight           Thurs. 5:30-8:00

This course explores the social, educational, and linguistic foundations of writing instruction, with special attention to the needs of the basic writer.  We will review various models of composing and approaches to writing pedagogy. We will experiment with how to respond to student work, identifying strengths and strategies for improvement, and we will also explore ways to encourage revision. Our learning will also be shaped by a consideration of the larger influences on student performance, such as issues of second-language writing, socioeconomics, and previous education.  Practicing and prospective teachers will examine the theory, research, and practice of writing instruction through a process of inquiry, workshops, and analysis of their own writing.

 

ENWR 600: Seminar in Writing Studies: Community-Based and Activist Writing
Prof. Restaino       Thurs. 8:15-10:45

This seminar will explore the ways in which writing exists beyond the boundaries of what we’ve come to know as “writing for school.”  As we learn about the manifestations and purposes of writing outside of school, we will ultimately reflect on traditional ideas about school writing in order to think about potential relationships between these contexts.  Ultimately, we will explore writing practices that extend beyond academic discourse alone and into alternate genres that can mobilize communities. This writing can take on many different forms: oral history projects; community-based creative writing collections; political manifestos; grant proposals; awareness-raising pamphlets and newsletters; and more.  We will work as researchers and program builders in order to put theoretical concepts into practical shape.