Italian Professor/Inserra Chair invited to Georgetown U and NYU Conferences (Oct. and Nov. 2017)

Teresa Fiore, Associate Professor of Italian and Inserra Chair in Italian and Italian American Studies, has been invited to be part of a round table in the context of the prestigious Italian Language and Culture Conference “Innovation in Italian Programs and Pedagogy” at Georgetown University in Washington D.C., on Sat. Oct. 21, 2017 (click here for the full program). Dr. Fiore will present the newly launched and completed projects in Italian Studies offered to students of Italian at Montclair State, such as the Summer Italian Immersion Course for College Credit, the Italian and Business Initiatives and the Italian Translation Curriculum and Internship Project. The conference will provide a venue for educators to share innovative approaches and pedagogical strategies that have been successfully tested and adopted at both a course and program level in the high school and college classroom and it will feature presentations by professors from Georgetown U, Columbia U, Brown U, Cornell U, among others, as well as representatives of the Italian institutions such the University of Perugia.

On Thur. Nov. 2, Dr. Fiore will give a presentation titled “Former Empire and Current Migration” at an international conference on The Crisis of Mediterranean Migration at NYU that will feature presenters from NYU, Columbia U, The New School, Rutgers, the University of Chicago as well as a journalist from the New York Times. This international group of specialists and practitioners from the academic and public sectors will discuss a range of issues concerning Mediterranean migration, including both the longer history of the Mediterranean as a maritime region of population movement, the hardening of the maritime frontiers in relation to the EU Schengen borders, the humanitarian emergency symbolized by Lampedusa, and the tri-continental Mediterranean migrant movements involving Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. The conference is organized by NYU's Center for European and Mediterranean Studies (CEMS) with the support of the The Remarque Institute at NYU and Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union.