Photo of University Hall

View Profile Page

Faculty/Staff Login:

Vanessa Domine

Professor, School of Communication and Media

Office:
Morehead Hall 103
Email:
dominev@mail.montclair.edu
Phone:
973-655-6850
Degrees:
BA, San Jose State University
MA, San Jose State University
PhD, New York University
vCard:
Download vCard

Profile

Dr. Domine is a full professor in the School of Communication and Media in the College of the Arts. She is also the former chairperson of the Department of Secondary and Special Education in the College of Education at Montclair State University. Dr. Domine earned her BA and MA in Communication Studies from the California State University system and her PhD in Media Ecology from New York University. She worked as a media educator and technology consultant in the New York City Schools, which served as the basis of her first book, "Rethinking Technology in Schools" (Peter Lang, 2009). Her early research and scholarship focused on the uses of technology to renew schooling and promote democratic practices particularly through media literacy education and teacher preparation. In 2016, Dr. D. joined the faculty in the School of Communication and Media at Montclair State U. teaching courses, including "The Language of Television" (TVDM 201), "Doing Media Literacy through the Wonderful Worlds of Disney" (CMST 435) and "Food Media Literacy" (CMST 435). In 2013 she was honored with the Meritorious Service award from the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) for her service as their Vice President of the Board of Directors, co-editor of the Journal of Media Literacy Education, and chronic conference program chair. She currently serves on numerous editorial boards for education, media, and technology-related academic journals. Her most recent book is "Healthy Teens, Healthy Schools: How Media Literacy Education Can Renew Education in the United States" (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015). She is currently working on a Disney-inspired book tentatively titled, "The Wonderful World of Media Literacy." You can follow her on Twitter @vanessadomine and view more of her work at http://www.vanessadomine.com.

Specialization

Dr. D.'s current research intersects the fields of communication, education and technology with a particular emphasis on media literacy education. Broadly speaking, she is interested in how media technologies can support communicative and communal experiences among all learners (but especially adolescent learners). Dr. Domine was interviewed on PBS for the "After Newton, What Next: Violence in the Media" (see below). She is also currently exploring the intersection of health and media literacies.

Resume/CV

Office Hours

Fall

Wednesday
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Friday
9:00 am - 10:00 am

Links

Research Projects

Healthy Teens, Healthy Schools

Widespread obesity, poor nutrition, sleep-deprivation, and highly digital and sedentary lifestyles are just a few of the many challenges facing young people in the United States. Although U.S. public schools have the potential for meeting these challenges on a mass scale, they are slow to respond. The emphasis on discrete subject areas and standardized test performance offers little in the way of authentic learning and may in reality impede health. Healthy Teens, Healthy Schools: How Media Literacy Education can Renew Education in the United States reframes health education as a complex terrain that resides within a larger ecosystem of historical, social, political, and global economic forces. It calls for a media literate pedagogy that empowers students to be critical consumers, creative producers, and responsible citizens. I call for a holistic public education model through school-community initiatives and innovative partnerships that successfully magnify all curriculum subjects and their associated teaching practices. Teachers, teacher educators, school administrators, community organizers, public health professionals, and policy makers must work together in a transmediated and transdisciplinary approach to adolescent health. This will ultimately demonstrate how our collective focus on cultivating healthy teens will in turn yield healthy schools.