Nicole Panorkou

Faculty/Staff Login:

Assistant Professor, Mathematical Sciences

Office:
Richardson Hall 207
EMail:
panorkoun@mail.montclair.edu
Phone:
973-655-6684
Fax:
Degrees:
BA, University of Cyprus
MA, University of Warwick
PhD, University of London
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Profile

Nicole Panorkou, an Assistant Professor in the department of Mathematical Sciences, completed her PhD in Mathematics Education at the Institute of Education (University of London). Nicole's thesis was a phenomenographic study of students' experiences of dimension in geometry. After earning her PhD, Nicole was awarded a Fulbright scholarship and worked as a post-doctoral researcher in multiple NSF-funded projects as part of the GISMO team at North Carolina State University. She contributed to the development of the resource TurnOnCCMath.net that maps the CCSS-M into learning trajectories, and she was also one of the instructors of the MOOC-Ed (Massive Open Online Courses for Educators) on learning trajectories and the CCSS-M.


Specialization

Nicole's research interests include development and validation of learning trajectories for K-8 mathematics; student learning of geometry, algebra and rational number reasoning; and a focus on the ways that technology and modeling can foster the utility of mathematical concepts.


Resume/CV


Office Hours

Fall

  • Monday 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  • Tuesday 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Links


Research Projects

The DYME project: Developing Students’ Thinking of Dynamic Measurement

This project is a design study exploring a dynamic approach to teaching and learning measurement, which seems to be a promising approach to developing conceptual images of area and volume formulas. Dynamic measurement (DYME) involves engaging students in dynamic experiences of generating 2D surfaces and 3D shapes by iteratively composing lower-dimensional objects. The project is exploring a) the nature of tasks and tools that may be used for developing students’ DYME reasoning, b) the forms of DYME reasoning that can be seen to develop as students engage with these tasks, c) how students’ DYME thinking may support the development of meanings for the area and volume formulas, and d) how DYME can be integrated into the existing teaching and learning of measurement.