Michael P. Weinstein

Faculty/Staff Login:

Part-Time Employee, College of Science and Mathematics

Office:
Mallory Hall 116E
E-Mail:
Phone:
973 655-3037
Fax:
973 655-6810
vCard:
Download vCard File

Profile

Michael P. Weinstein has conducted extensive research in the areas of coastal ecology, sustainability science, fisheries science, wetland ecology, and restoration ecology, primarily in salt marshes, sea grass meadows, and mangrove habitats. The recipient of many awards, he has served on numerous National Research Council Committees, an NCEAS Working Group, the US-Japan CEST Panel, SDWA Audit Panel, and the US-China Initiative in Sustainable Development. He was a member of the National Working Group for preparing the Nationwide Strategy for Coastal Habitat Restoration. He authored more than 200 journal articles, abstracts, books, chapters and monographs. His most recent text, Sustainability Science: The Emerging Paradigm and the Urban Environment has had international impact on the direction of Sustainability Science research and practice.

Specialization

Research Interests

Coastal and salt marsh ecology, sustainability science, finfish early life history, secondary production, restoration ecology, ecotoxicology

Resume/CV


Links


Documents


Research Projects

The Availability and Bioaccumulation of Sedimentary 2,3,7,8-TCDD and Other Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxic Compounds in the Lower Passaic River

Hudson River Foundation Grant Drs. Weinstein and Lohmann (University of Rhode Island), Co-Principal Investigators, have been awarded a $209,000 Hudson River Foundation Grant, The Availability and Bioaccumulation of Sedimentary 2,3,7,8-TCDD and Other Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxic Compounds in the Lower Passaic River. The main objectives of the proposed research are to better understand the availability, cycling and bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants, with a focus on 2,3,7,8-TCDD, in the lower Passaic River. Passive samplers will be deployed along the lower Passaic River to directly measure the freely dissolved pollutants in water, atmosphere and porewater. Various biota (blue crabs and fish) will also be sampled along a salinity gradient covering the lower Passaic River to determine bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for PCBs, PCDD/Fs and emerging PBTs relative to dissolved concentrations in the water column. A trophodynamic and stable isotope approach will be adopted to predict concentrations in individual components of the foodweb based on life history and feeding strategies.