Drug-Free Schools and Campuses

Drugs and Alcohol Policies

Drugs
The University prohibits the possession, use and sale of illegal drugs. The possession, use and sale of illegal drugs and controlled substances is a violation of University policy, the Student Code of Conduct, and Federal and New Jersey law. Individuals engaging in this activity are referred to University Police for criminal prosecution. In addition, students and employees engaged in this activity will be subject to discipline. Illegal drugs or controlled substances refers to those defined as illegal under federal, state, and/or local laws and include, but are not limited to, all forms of narcotics, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, or other drugs whose use, possession, or transfer is restricted or prohibited by law (except for drugs prescribed by a physician or dentist and used according to instructions for the purpose for which they were prescribed).

When such activity occurs on campus, Montclair State University shall initiate appropriate measures, which may include disciplinary action. When such activity occurs off campus, Montclair State nevertheless may consider initiating disciplinary action if the University determines that the activity has a substantial adverse effect upon the University or upon individuals of the University community. In addition, such matters may be reported by the University to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.

A federal or state drug conviction (but not a local or municipal conviction) can disqualify a student for FSA funds. Convictions only count against a student for aid eligibility purposes (FAFSA question 23c) if they were for an offense that occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid.

Since involvement with drugs may be associated with medical and psychological problems, students and others with drug problems may be referred to Psychological Services. Students should be aware that Montclair State continually develops and offers programs and courses on drug education and prevention. Individual and group counseling is also available on campus and off-campus at rates determined on a sliding scale, based on ability to pay.

Alcohol
The University prohibits the possession, use and sale of alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age. The possession, use and sale of alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age is a violation of University policy, the Student Code of Conduct, and New Jersey law. Individuals engaging in this activity are referred to University Police for criminal prosecution. In addition, students and employees engaged in this activity will be subject to discipline.

University policy related to possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages grows out of two principles: (1) the laws of the State of New Jersey must be strictly enforced and (2) any consumption must occur within a social framework wherein beverages are not the focus of the event.

Students and others with alcohol abuse problems should be aware that they may be referred to Psychological Services for referral and/or counseling information. In addition, a series of programs and courses on alcohol are offered by the University. Individual and group counseling is also available on campus and off-campus at rates determined on a sliding scale, based upon ability to pay.

All applicable state and municipal penalties will be imposed by the appropriate municipal, county or State court. In addition to Municipal and State penalties, there are Montclair State penalties for offenses committed. The Dean of Students or designee will be notified of all offenses and will initiate action as outlined in the Non-Academic Disciplinary Procedures of the Student Handbook. A copy of the campus guidelines concerning alcohol consumption may be obtained in the Dean of Students' Office.

New Jersey Laws Prohibiting Sale, Possession, Distribution, and Consumption of Alcohol
In New Jersey the sale of alcoholic beverages to individuals under age 21 is prohibited. Furthermore, the sale of alcoholic beverages is prohibited unless under the authority of a license or permit. Sale of alcoholic beverages on the Montclair State University campus is permitted to individuals who are 21 years of age or older, and restricted to the University Hall Conference Center or other college premises eligible for Alcoholic Beverage Commission Special Permits. Because a majority of Montclair State University students are under the age of 21, the sale and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages is permitted only in those areas and at those times when special permission has been obtained from the appropriate administrative office on campus.

Residence Halls and Hawk Crossings Apartments
No alcohol will be permitted in any of the residence halls, or Hawk Crossings Apartments, including residents' rooms and common areas such as lounges and recreation rooms. Residents are held directly responsible for the conduct of their guests.

The University promotes an alcohol-free residence hall community as part of a strong academic environment. Because the majority of campus residents are under age and due to the challenges of alcohol abuse, alcohol is prohibited in the residence halls. Possession of alcohol, or empty alcohol cans, bottles, etc., constitutes a violation and may result in strict disciplinary action and/or dismissal from the residence community. Students may be asked to reveal the contents of bags, boxes, etc., if reasonable suspicion of possible alcohol possession exists.

The Village at Little Falls
Alcohol possession and consumption are permitted only in the Village apartments where all residents are of legal drinking age and where there are no guests who are not of legal drinking age and only inside the apartments.

In keeping with NJ laws regarding alcohol, and the University's own philosophy regarding substance use and abuse, only Village residents 21 years of age or older may possess and consume alcohol inside their apartments and only under the following conditions: 1) no alcohol deliveries are permitted to the apartments, 2) no alcohol is permitted outside the buildings or in hallways/stairwells, or other common areas outside of apartments and 3) no alcohol is given to individuals under 21 years of age. In addition, quantities of alcohol are limited based on the guidelines outlined in the Department of Residential Education and Services handbook.

Criminal Offenses and Penalties under New Jersey Law Pertaining to Abuse of Alcohol
N.J.S.A 33:1-2 makes it unlawful to directly or indirectly sell alcoholic beverages to any person of any age without a license or special permit issued by the New Jersey Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission. Sale is construed to include admission charges, the sale of cups, the sale of tickets, and/or the acceptance of donations.

N.J.S.A 2C:33-17 states any alcoholic beverage available to a person under the legal drinking age, in public or private, without an adult parent or guardian present and consenting, is punishable by a fine of $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail.

Note: It is NOT A DEFENSE to any of the above charges that the accused believed the person to be of legal drinking age, EVEN if that belief was reasonable. The only available defense is based on the presentation of a photographic identification card or driver license, issued by a state.

N.J.S.A 2C:33-15 provides for MINIMUM fine of $500, suspension of driving privileges for six months and requires participation in an Alcohol Education Program for any person under the legal drinking age to possess, in any public place, any alcoholic beverage, regardless of whether or not the container is sealed.

N.J.S.A 39:4-50 provides for a MINIMUM $200 fine for any operator or passenger in a motor vehicle found to be in possession of any open container of an alcoholic beverage, regardless of his/her age.

N.J.S.A 33:1-81 makes it an offense, punishable as outlined below, for:
1) a person under the legal drinking age to enter a licensed premise with the intent to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages;
2) a person under the legal drinking age to purchase or consume alcoholic beverage on a licensed premise;
3) a person of legal drinking age to purchase an alcoholic beverage FOR a person under the legal drinking age;
4) a person under the legal drinking age to misrepresent or misstate his/her age in connection with the sale or service of any alcoholic beverage.

A person convicted of a violation of any of these provisions is subject to the following penalties for EACH violation: a MINIMUM fine of $100 AND a MANDATORY one year loss of driving privilege, AND court ordered participation in an Alcoholic Education Program.

N.J.S.A 39:4-50 et. seq. provides penalties for any person convicted of operating a motor vehicle anywhere within this State, on public or private property, while under the influence of an alcoholic beverage or any drug (including lawful drugs if the operator's ability to safely operate a motor vehicle is impaired thereby).

New Jersey Laws Pertaining to Illegal Use of Drugs:

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10. Possession, Use or Being under the Influence
a.  a. It is unlawful for any person, knowingly or purposely, to obtain, or to possess, actually or constructively, a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog, unless the substance was obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order form from a practitioner, while acting in the course of his professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by P.L.1970, c.226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.). Any person who violates this section with respect to:
(1)  A controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, classified in Schedule I, II, III or IV other than those specifically covered in this section, is guilty of a crime of the third degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $35,000.00 may be imposed;
(2)  Any controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, classified in Schedule V, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $15,000.00 may be imposed;
(3)  Possession of more than 50 grams of marijuana, including any adulterants or dilutants, or more than five grams of hashish is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $25,000.00 may be imposed; or
(4)  Possession of 50 grams or less of marijuana, including any adulterants or dilutants, or five grams or less of hashish is a disorderly person.

Any person who commits any offense defined in this section while on any property used for school purposes which is owned by or leased to any elementary or secondary school or school board, or within 1,000 feet of any such school property or a school bus, or while on any school bus, and who is not sentenced to a term of imprisonment, shall, in addition to any other sentence which the court may impose, be required to perform not less than 100 hours of community service.

b. Any person who uses or who is under the influence of any controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, for a purpose other than the treatment of sickness or injury as lawfully prescribed or administered by a physician is a disorderly person.

c.  c.Any person who knowingly obtains or possesses a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog in violation of subsection a. of this section and who fails to voluntarily deliver the substance to the nearest law enforcement officer is guilty of a disorderly persons offense. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to preclude a prosecution or conviction for any other offense defined in this title or any other statute.

 2C:35-5.  Manufacturing, distributing or dispensing

2C:35-5.  Manufacturing, Distributing or Dispensing.  a.  Except as authorized by P.L.1970, c.226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.), it shall be unlawful for any person knowingly or purposely:
(1)  To manufacture, distribute or dispense, or to possess or have under his control with intent to manufacture, distribute or dispense, a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or
(2)  To create, distribute, or possess or have under his control with intent to distribute, a counterfeit controlled dangerous substance.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-5.3a. Manufacturing, Distribution or Possessing CDS (Bath Salts)
a. Except as authorized by P.L.1970, c. 226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.), it is unlawful for any person knowingly or purposely to manufacture, distribute or dispense, or to possess or have under his control with intent to manufacture, distribute or dispense flunitrazepam.
b. A person who violates subsection a. of this section with respect to flunitrazepam in a quantity of one gram or more is guilty of a crime of the first degree and, notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S.2C:43-3 or any other law, a fine of up to $250,000.00 may be imposed upon the person.
c. A person who violates subsection a. of this section with respect to flunitrazepam in a quantity of less than one gram is guilty of a crime of the second degree and, notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S.2C:43-3 or any other law, a fine of up to $150,000.00 may be imposed upon the person.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-9 Strict Liability for Drug Induced Deaths
a. Any person who manufactures, distributes or dispenses methamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, phencyclidine or any other controlled dangerous substance classified in Schedules I or II, or any controlled substance analog thereof, in violation of subsection a. of N.J.S. 2C:35-5, is strictly liable for a death which results from the injection, inhalation or ingestion of that substance, and is guilty of a crime of the first degree.
b. The provisions of N.J.S. 2C:2-3 (governing the causal relationship between conduct and result) shall not apply in a prosecution under this section. For purposes of this offense, the defendant's act of manufacturing, distributing or dispensing a substance is the cause of a death when:
(1) The injection, inhalation or ingestion of the substance is an antecedent but for which the death would not have occurred; and
(2) The death was not:
(a) too remote in its occurrence as to have a just bearing on the defendant's liability; or
(b) too dependent upon conduct of another person which was unrelated to the injection, inhalation or ingestion of the substance or its effect as to have a just bearing on the defendant's liability.
c. It shall not be a defense to a prosecution under this section that the decedent contributed to his own death by his purposeful, knowing, reckless or negligent injection, inhalation or ingestion of the substance, or by his consenting to the administration of the substance by another.
d. Nothing in this section shall be construed to preclude or limit any prosecution for homicide. Notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S. 2C:1-8 or any other provision of law, a conviction arising under this section shall not merge with a conviction for leader of narcotics trafficking network, maintaining or operating a controlled dangerous substance production facility, or for unlawfully manufacturing, distributing, dispensing or possessing with intent to manufacture, distribute or dispense the controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog which resulted in the death.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10.2. Obtaining or possessing gamma hydroxybutyrate without a prescription
a. It is a crime of the third degree for any person, knowingly or purposely, to obtain, or to possess, gamma hydroxybutyrate unless the substance was obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order form from a practitioner, while acting in the course of his professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by P.L.1970, c. 226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.).
b. Notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S.2C:43-3 or any other law, a fine of up to $100,000.00 may be imposed upon a person who violates this section.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10.3. Obtaining or possession flunitrazepam without a prescription
a. It is a crime of the third degree for any person, knowingly or purposely, to obtain, or to possess, flunitrazepam, unless the substance was obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order form from a practitioner, while acting in the course of his professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by P.L.1970, c. 226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.).
b. Notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S.2C:43-3 or any other law, a fine of up to $100,000.00 may be imposed upon a person who violates this section.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10.3a Unlawful Possession of CDS (Bath Salts)
a. It is a crime for any person, knowingly or purposely, to obtain, or to possess, substances containing: 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone, 4-MMC); 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV); 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone, MDMC), 4-methoxymethcathinone (methedrone, bk-PMMA, PMMC); 3-fluoromethcathinone (3-FMC); or 4-fluoromethcathinone (flephedrone, 4-FMC).
b. A person who violates subsection a. of this section where the quantity involved is one ounce or more is guilty of a crime of the third degree.
c. A person who violates subsection a. of this section where the quantity involved is less than one ounce is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-11 Possession of Imitation CDS with Intent to Distribute and Distribution of CDS
a. It is unlawful for any person to distribute or to possess or have under his control with intent to distribute any substance which is not a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog:
(1) Upon the express or implied representation to the recipient that the substance is a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or
(2) Upon the express or implied representation to the recipient that the substance is of such nature, appearance or effect that the recipient will be able to distribute or use the substance as a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or
(3) Under circumstances which would lead a reasonable person to believe that the substance is a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog.
Any of the following shall constitute prima facie evidence of such circumstances:
(a) The substance was packaged in a manner normally used for the unlawful distribution of controlled dangerous substances or controlled substance analogs.
(b) The distribution or attempted distribution of the substance was accompanied by an exchange of or demand for money or other thing as consideration for the substance, and the value of the consideration exceeded the reasonable value of the substance.
(c) The physical appearance of the substance is substantially the same as that of a specific controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog.
b. It is unlawful for any person to manufacture, compound, encapsulate, package or imprint any substance which is not a controlled dangerous substance, controlled substance analog or any combination of such substances, other than a prescription drug, with the purpose that it resemble or duplicate the physical appearance of the finished form, package, label or imprint of a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog.
c. In any prosecution under this section, it shall not be a defense that the defendant mistakenly believed a substance to be a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog.
d. A violation of this section is a crime of the third degree, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $200,000.00 may be imposed.
e. The provisions of this section shall not be applicable to (1) practitioners or agents, servants and employees of practitioners dispensing or administering non-controlled substances to patients on behalf of practitioners in the normal course of their business or professional practice; and (2) persons who manufacture, process, package, distribute or sell noncontrolled substances to practitioners for use as placebos in the normal course of their business, professional practice or research or for use in Federal Food and Drug Administration investigational new drug trials.

N.J.S.A. 2C:35-13 Obtaining CDS by Fraud
It shall be unlawful for any person to acquire or obtain possession of a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog by misrepresentation, fraud, forgery, deception or subterfuge. It shall be unlawful for any person to acquire or obtain possession of a forged or fraudulent certificate of destruction required pursuant to N.J.S.2C:35-21. A violation of this section shall be a crime of the third degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $50,000.00 may be imposed. Nothing in this section shall be deemed to preclude or limit a prosecution for theft as defined in chapter 20 of this title.

N.J.S.A. 2C36-2 Use or possession with intent to use; disorderly persons offense
It shall be unlawful for any person to use, or to possess with intent to use, drug paraphernalia to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, ingest, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled dangerous substance , controlled substance analog or toxic chemical in violation of the provisions of chapter 35 of this title. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a disorderly persons offense.

N.J.S.A. 2C:36-3. Distribute, dispense or possess or manufacture with intent to distribute or dispense; crime of fourth degree
It shall be unlawful for any person to distribute or dispense, or possess with intent to distribute or dispense, or manufacture with intent to distribute or dispense, drug paraphernalia, knowing that it will be used to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, ingest, inhale or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled dangerous substance , controlled substance analog or toxic chemical in violation of the provisions of chapter 35 of this title. Any person who violates this section commits a crime of the fourth degree.

Criminal Penalties for Illegal Drug Use

Individuals who have been charged with a drug related offense that is not a first or second degree crime, will be transferred to Drug Court where they will be placed on probation up to 5 years and submit to drug rehabilitation treatment and intensive court supervision.

If an individual is convicted of a first degree crime, they are subject to imprisonment from 10 to 20 years, and a fine up to $200,000.

If an individual is convicted of a second degree crime, they are subject to imprisonment from 5 to 10 years, and a fine up to $150,000.

If an individual is convicted of a third degree crime, they are subject to imprisonment from 3 to 5 years, and a fine up to $15,000.

If an individual is convicted of a fourth degree crime, they are subject to imprisonment up to 18 months and a fine up to $10,000.

If an individual is convicted of a disorderly persons offense, they are subject to imprisonment up to 6 months and a fine up to $1,000.

If an individual is convicted of a petty disorderly persons offense, they are subject to imprisonment up to 30 days and a fine up to $500.

Individuals who are charged with a disorderly persons offense or petty disorderly persons offense, may be eligible for a conditional discharge subject to probation and supervisory treatment.

Individuals convicted of drug offenses may also be subject to mandatory loss of driving privileges of 6 months to 2 years unless the Court finds compelling circumstances that warrant an exception.

Applicable University, State and Federal Regulations

Drugs
Montclair State does not condone the medically unsupervised use, possession, sale, manufacture, or distribution of drugs that are illegal.

When such activity occurs on campus, Montclair State University shall initiate appropriate measures, which may include disciplinary action. When such activity occurs off campus, Montclair State nevertheless may consider initiating disciplinary action if the University determines that the activity has a substantial adverse effect upon the University or upon individuals of the University community. In addition, such matters may be reported by the University to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.

A federal or state drug conviction (but not a local or municipal conviction) can disqualify a student for FSA funds.  Convictions only count against a student for aid eligibility purposes (FAFSA question 23c) if they were for an offense that occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid. 

Since involvement with drugs may be associated with medical and psychological problems, students and others with drug problems may be referred to Psychological Services. Students should be aware that Montclair State continually develops and offers programs and courses on drug education and prevention. Individual and group counseling is also available on campus and off-campus at rates determined on a sliding scale, based on ability to pay.

Alcohol
University policy related to possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages grows out of two principles: (1) the laws of the State of New Jersey must be strictly enforced and (2) any consumption must occur within a social framework wherein beverages are not the focus of the event.

Students and others with alcohol abuse problems should be aware that they may be referred to Psychological Services for referral and/or counseling information. In addition, a series of programs and courses on alcohol are offered by the University. Individual and group counseling is also available on campus and off-campus at rates determined on a sliding scale, based upon ability to pay.

All applicable state and municipal penalties will be imposed by the appropriate municipal county of State court in addition to Municipal and State penalties, there are Montclair State Penalties for offenses committed. The Dean of Students will be notified of all offenses and will initiate action as outlined in the Non-Academic Disciplinary Procedures of the Student Handbook.

Sale, Possession, Distribution, and Consumption
In New Jersey the sale of alcoholic beverages is expressly forbidden to individuals under age 21. Furthermore, sale is prohibited unless under the authority of a license or permit. Sale of alcoholic beverages on the Montclair State University campus will be limited to those of legal age, and further restricted to those university premises so licensed by the state of New Jersey or eligible for Alcoholic Beverage Commission Special Permits.

Because a majority of Montclair State University students cannot legally consume alcohol, the sale and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages is permitted only in those areas and at those times when special permission has been obtained from the appropriate administrative office on campus and the state of New Jersey.

Residence Halls and Hawk Crossings Apartments
No alcohol will be permitted in any of the residence halls or Hawk Crossings Apartments, including residents' rooms and common areas such as lounges and recreation rooms. Residents are held directly responsible for the conduct of their guests.

The Village at Little Falls Apartments
Alcohol possession and consumption is permitted only in the Village at Little Falls apartments where all residents are of legal drinking age and where there are no guests who are not of legal drinking age and only inside the apartments. No deliveries of alcohol (including kegs) are permitted at the Village at Little Falls Apartments. Residents are held directly responsible for the conduct of their guests.

Summation of State Laws Pertaining to Alcohol
N.J.S. 33:1-2 makes it unlawful to directly or indirectly sell alcoholic beverages to any person of any age without a license or special permit issued by the New Jersey Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission. Sale is construed to include admission charges, the sale of cups, the sale of tickets, and/or the acceptance of donations.
N.J.S. 2C:33-17 Making any alcoholic beverage available to a person under the legal drinking age, in public or private, without an adult parent or guardian present and consenting, is punishable by a fine of $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail.
Note: It is NOT A DEFENSE to any of the above charges that the accused believed the person to be of legal drinking age, EVEN if that belief was reasonable. The only available defense is based on the presentation of a photographic identification card or driver license, issued by a state.
N.J.S. 2C:33-15 provides for MINIMUM fine of $500, suspends or postpones driving privileges for six months and requires participation in an Alcohol Education Program for any person under the legal drinking age to possess, in any public place, any alcoholic beverage, regardless of whether or not the container is sealed.
N.J.S. 39:4-50 provides for a MINIMUM $200 fine for any operator or passenger in a motor vehicle found to be in possession of any open container of an alcoholic beverage, regardless of his/her age.
N.J.S. 33:1-81 makes it an offense, punishable as outlined below, for:
1) a person under the legal drinking age to enter a licensed premise with the intent to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages;
2) a person under the legal drinking age to purchase or consume alcoholic beverage on a licensed premise;
3) a person of legal drinking age to purchase an alcoholic beverage FOR a person under the legal drinking age;
4) a person under the legal drinking age to misrepresent or misstate his/her age in connection with the sale or service of anyalcoholic beverage.
A person convicted of a violation of any of these provisions is subject to the following penalties for EACH violation: a MINIMUM fine of $100 AND a MANDATORY one year loss of driving privilege, AND court ordered participation in an Alcoholic Education Program.
N.J.S. 39:4-50 et. seq. provides for penalties for any person convicted of operating a motor vehicle anywhere within this state, on public or private property, while under the influence of an alcoholic beverage or any drug (including lawful drugs if the operator's ability to safely operate a motor vehicle is impaired thereby).

Summation of State Laws Pertaining to Illegal Drugs:

2C:35-10  Possession, use or being under the influence, or failure to make lawful disposition

2C:35-10.  Possession, Use or Being Under the Influence, or Failure to Make Lawful Disposition.
a.  It is unlawful for any person, knowingly or purposely, to obtain, or to possess, actually or constructively, a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog, unless the substance was obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order form from a practitioner, while acting in the course of his professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by P.L.1970, c.226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.).  Any person who violates this section with respect to:
(1)  A controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, classified in Schedule I, II, III or IV other than those specifically covered in this section, is guilty of a crime of the third degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $35,000.00 may be imposed;
(2)  Any controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, classified in Schedule V, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $15,000.00 may be imposed;
(3)  Possession of more than 50 grams of marijuana, including any adulterants or dilutants, or more than five grams of hashish is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $25,000.00 may be imposed; or
(4)  Possession of 50 grams or less of marijuana, including any adulterants or dilutants, or five grams or less of hashish is a disorderly person.
Any person who commits any offense defined in this section while on any property used for school purposes which is owned by or leased to any elementary or secondary school or school board, or within 1,000 feet of any such school property or a school bus, or while on any school bus, and who is not sentenced to a term of imprisonment, shall, in addition to any other sentence which the court may impose, be required to perform not less than 100 hours of community service.
b.  Any person who uses or who is under the influence of any controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, for a purpose other than the treatment of sickness or injury as lawfully prescribed or administered by a physician is a disorderly person.
c.  Any person who knowingly obtains or possesses a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog in violation of subsection a. of this section and who fails to voluntarily deliver the substance to the nearest law enforcement officer is guilty of a disorderly persons offense. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to preclude a prosecution or conviction for any other offense defined in this title or any other statute.
Amended 1988, c.44, s.5; 1997, c.181, s.6.

 2C:35-5.  Manufacturing, distributing or dispensing

2C:35-5.  Manufacturing, Distributing or Dispensing.  a.  Except as authorized by P.L.1970, c.226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.), it shall be unlawful for any person knowingly or purposely:
(1)  To manufacture, distribute or dispense, or to possess or have under his control with intent to manufacture, distribute or dispense, a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or
(2)  To create, distribute, or possess or have under his control with intent to distribute, a counterfeit controlled dangerous substance.

Selected Punishments:

  • Marijuana in a quantity of 25 pounds or more including any adulterants or dilutants, or 50 or more marijuana plants, regardless of weight, or hashish in a quantity of five pounds or more including any adulterants or dilutants, is guilty of a crime of the first degree.  Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection a. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $300,000.00 may be imposed;

(b)  Marijuana in a quantity of five pounds or more but less than 25 pounds including any adulterants or dilutants, or 10 or more but fewer than 50 marijuana plants, regardless of weight, or hashish in a quantity of one pound or more but less than five pounds, including any adulterants and dilutants, is guilty of a crime of the second degree;
(c)  Marijuana in a quantity of one ounce or more but less than five pounds including any adulterants or dilutants, or hashish in a quantity of five grams or more but less than one pound including any adulterants or dilutants, is guilty of a crime of the third degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of  N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $25,000.00 may be imposed;
(d)  Marijuana in a quantity of less than one ounce including any adulterants or dilutants, or hashish in a quantity of less than five grams including any adulterants or dilutants, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree;
(e)  Any other controlled dangerous substance classified in Schedule I, II, III or IV, or its analog, is guilty of a crime of the third degree, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $25,000.00 may be imposed; or
(f)  Any Schedule V substance, or its analog, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S.2C:43-3, a fine of up to $25,000.00 may be imposed.

University Code of Conduct Excerpts Regarding Alcohol and Drugs

The members of the Montclair State University community recognize that the development of responsible student behavior and conduct is fostered by example, counseling, guidance, admonition and by adherence to University policies and regulations.

Montclair State University is committed to the overall educational and personal growth of its students. In order to facilitate this growth most effectively, it is essential to maintain an appropriate environment.

Thus the University requires the cooperation of all members of the campus community, both in and out of the classroom. To that end, the University establishes this set of policies, standards of behavior, regulations, procedures, sanctions and appeals processes. It is intended to prevent, limit and correct actions that may impede, obstruct or damage the educational environment, and threaten the maintenance of order.

While it is the goal of the disciplinary process to educate students as to the purpose and importance of abiding by prescribed codes of conduct, the University will also issue sanctions as are appropriate and necessary to ensure continued and/or future adherence to these codes, and to protect the general population from disruptive behavior.

This document and supporting materials have been developed to guarantee procedural fairness to students when there has been an alleged failure to abide by Montclair State's policies and regulations. Procedures may vary in formality given the gravity and nature of the offense and the sanctions that may be applied. Terms and prohibited conduct not specifically defined here shall be defined with reference to New Jersey Statutes.

A general principle in all matters of student discipline will be that Montclair State University may base its determinations on a preponderance of the evidence. In cases of misconduct where a major penalty may be assessed, or in which a student so requests, the student will be informed in writing of the allegations and charges, will be given an opportunity to refute them, and will be afforded an avenue to appeal an adverse decision.

Montclair State University does not attempt to regulate the lives or activities of students except to assure its ability to accomplish its educational mission and to protect the health, safety and security of members of our community. Rules and regulations promulgated by the University, or by other agencies with applicability to the campus or its members shall be enforced, and students are expected to comply with them.

TThe code of student conduct applies to incidents which occur on the Montclair State Campus, at any Montclair State University-related facility, at any Montclair State University event, and to incidents which utilize computer or other equipment located on the Montclair State campus or at Montclair State-related facilities. Montclair State events include all athletic, academic and social events sponsored by any Montclair State-related organization, whether on or off campus.

A. Alcohol Violations

The standards of conduct that prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol by students are set forth in the Student Code of Conduct. Specifically, the Student Code of Conduct states the following conduct by a student involving alcohol shall be subject to discipline:

Drinking or being in possession of any alcoholic beverage in public areas of university premises not approved for such activity; and possession and/or consumption by a minor; public intoxication; and driving while intoxicated. Minimum sanction: Warning; Maximum sanction: Expulsion.

1. Common Sources/Bulk Containers: Possessing, furnishing, or serving from a common source of alcohol (i.e. kegs, mini-kegs, beer balls, punch bowls, or other approximate equivalent number of servings) is prohibited. Bulk containers and/or mass quantities of any alcohol (including 30-packs and any other quantity above one case of beer and the hard liquor equivalencies) are not permitted in apartments, suites, and/or individual rooms. Sanctions apply to all students (residents and non-residents) present at the time of the infraction and/or to all students (residents and non-residents) who were involved in any way in planning or hosting an event at which a common source or bulk container is provided. In addition, empty kegs, mini-kegs, or beer balls and any tapping devices are not permitted in any apartment, suite, or individual room and cannot be used as decorations or furnishings. Minimum sanction: Probation; Maximum sanction: Expulsion

2. Rapid Consumption: Objects and drinking apparatuses used to facilitate rapid consumption of alcohol, which include, but are not limited to, funnels and beer bongs, are prohibited. All residents present at the time of the infraction may be charged for a policy violation.

The discipline imposed by the University against a student for an alcohol violation shall be, at a minimum, a warning, and at a maximum, expulsion. In addition, the student may be subject to criminal penalties arising from a conviction for underage consumption, sale of alcohol to a minor, and the unlawful sale of alcohol.

B. Drug Violations

The University’s student Code of Conduct states the following conduct by a student involving illegal drugs shall be subject to discipline:

1. The distribution or sale of drugs, narcotics, barbiturates, hallucinogens, marijuana and amphetamines is prohibited.

2. The possession or use of controlled dangerous substances, marijuana, or narcotics, including, but not limited to, opium (morphine, codeine, heroin) and every other substance not chemically distinguishable from them on campus or in any Montclair State-related premises is prohibited.

The discipline imposed by the University against a student for a drug violation shall be, at a minimum, probation, and at a maximum, expulsion from the University. In addition, the student may be subject to criminal penalties arising from a conviction for the possession, sale and use of illegal narcotics. Students convicted of crimes arising out of illegal drug use may also be declared ineligible for Federal financial aid for a period of time.

Health Risks

Alcohol goes directly into the bloodstream, physically affecting the whole body. Some illnesses and health problems caused by alcohol include:

Alcohol Withdrawal: More commonly known as a "hangover" causes fatigue, thirst, headaches, nausea, aches and pains, sensitivity to light, difficulty concentrating, shakiness, irritability, depression, poor quality sleep, and bloodshot eyes.

Weight gain: Use of alcohol can cause weight gain as most alcoholic beverages contain at least 100 calories per serving.

High blood pressure: Consuming more than three drinks in a sitting can increase your blood pressure temporarily, but repeated incidents of binge drinking can have long lasting effects on blood pressure.

Sexual Function: Binge drinking can have short term effect on both male and female sexual function. Chronic binge drinking can lead to long term sexual dysfunction.

Depressed immune system: Binge drinking (as well as other substance use) impairs immune system function leaving individual more vulnerable to the common cold and other viruses.

Liver disease: Heavy drinking can cause fatty liver, hepatitis, cirrhosis and cancer of the liver. The liver breaks down alcohol at the rate of only one drink per hour.

Alcohol poisoning: Drinking large amounts can result in alcohol poisoning.  Vomiting related to alcohol consumption is a sure sign that an individual has alcohol poisoning and needs immediate medical attention. 

Heart or respiratory failure: Excessive drinking can have serious results including increasing one’s heart rate, as well as heart or respiratory failure (which can lead to death).

Excessive alcohol use increases the risk for health problemsAlcohol Can Be Used Responsibly.  If excessive drinking becomes a problem treatment is usually necessary. Alcoholism is a disease that cannot be cured, but can be treated.

Health Effects of Drug Use

Cannabis (Marijuana) - Greenish-gray mixture of the dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and/or flowers of Cannabis sativa or cannabis indica—the hemp plant

Health Effects

  • Acute: Drowsiness/relaxation; Impaired short term memory; Impaired judgment, attention, coordination and balance; Increased heart rate and appetite
  • Long Term: Addiction; Mental disorders: May be a causal factor in schizophreniform disorders; Associated with depression and anxiety; Chronic cough; Bronchitis

Cocaine - White crystalline powder that can be snorted, injected or smoked

Health Effects

  • Acute: Dilated pupils; Increased body temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure; Nausea; Increased energy and alertness; Decreased appetite; Insomnia; In high doses: erratic and violent behavior, panic attacks
  • Long Term: Addiction; Restlessness; Anxiety; Irritability; Paranoia; Panic attacks; Mood disturbances; Insomnia; Nasal damage and difficulty swallowing from snorting ; GI problems; HIV

Prescription Stimulants - Amphetamine (Dexedrine, Adderall), Methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta)

Health Effects

  • Acute: Increased alertness, attention, and energy; Irregular heartbeat; Dangerously high body temperature; Potential for cardiovascular failure or seizures
  • Long Term: In high doses especially: anxiety, hostility, paranoia, psychosis; Addiction

Methamphetamine - White, odorless, bitter-tasting crystalline powder that is easily dissolved in water or alcohol; can be ingested orally, intranasally, injected, or smoked

Health Effects

  • Acute: Enhanced mood; Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, energy and activity; Decreased appetite; Dry mouth; Increased sexuality; Jaw-clenching
  • Long Term: Addiction; Memory loss; Weight loss; Impaired cognition; Insomnia; Anxiety; Irritability; Confusion; Paranoia; Aggression; Mood disturbances; Hallucinations; Violent behavior; Liver, kidney, and lung damage; Severe dental problems; Cardiac and neurological damage; HIV, hepatitis

Inhalants- Volatile solvents, Aerosols, Gases, Nitrites (Poppers). Effects depend on the properties of the chemical, but inhalation is the common route of abuse  

Health Effects

  • Acute: Confusion; nausea; slurred speech; lack of coordination; euphoria; dizziness; drowsiness; disinhibition, lightheadedness, hallucinations/ delusions; headaches; suffocation; convulsions/seizures; hypoxia; heart failure; coma; sudden sniffing death (butane, propane, and other chemicals in aerosols)
  • Long Term: Myelin break down leading to muscle spasms, tremors and possible permanent motor impairment; liver/kidney damage; addiction

Prescription Sedatives, sleeping pills, or anxiolytics (Abuse) - Central nervous system depressants include barbiturates (e.g., Nembutal) and benzodiazepines (e.g., Valium, Xanax)

Health Effects

  • Acute: Drowsiness, relaxation; overdose
  • Long Term: Tolerance, physical dependence, addiction

Health Effects of Hallucinogens - LSD, PCP, Psilocybin, Salvia, Ketamine

LSD

  • Acute: Elation, depression, arousal, paranoia or panic; impulsive behavior, rapid shifts in emotions; distortions in perception. Increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; nausea; loss of appetite; sweating; dry mouth; jaw-clenching; numbness; sleeplessness; dizziness, weakness, tremors. High doses:  Panic, paranoia, feelings of despair, fear of insanity and death.
  • Long Term: Tolerance; Frightening flashbacks, Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD).

Psilocybin

  • Acute: Low doses: Relaxation; altered sensory perception; increased energy, heart rate; decreased appetite. High doses: Effects similar to LSD, including visual hallucinations, altered perceptions;  nervousness, confusion, panic, paranoia.
  • Long Term: Low addictive potential, however may produce tolerance

Salvia

  • Acute: Short-lived, but intense hallucinations, altered visual perception, mood, body sensations; emotional swings, feelings of detachment from one’s body; highly modified perception of external reality and self; sweating 
  • Long Term: Unknown addictive potential

PCP

  • Acute: Shallow, rapid breathing, increase in heart rate and blood pressure; nausea, blurred vision, dizziness; numbness; slurred speech; confusion; loss of coordination; muscle contractions; analgesia; altered perceptions; feelings of being separated from one’s body
  • Long Term: Unknown addictive potential

Ketamine

  • Acute: Anxiety; agitation; insomnia; slurred speech; blurred vision; irregular heartbeat, nausea; hallucinations; memory problems
  • Long Term: Cognitive impairment, including verbal and short-term memory; blurred vision; loss of coordination

MDMA (Ecstacy) - A synthetic drug that has stimulant and psychoactive properties. It is taken orally as a capsule or tablet.

Health Effects

  • Acute: Euphoria; increased energy, alertness, and tactile sensitivity; decreased fear; increased/irregular heartbeat; dehydration; chills; sweating; impaired cognition and motor function; reduced appetite; muscle cramping; teeth grinding/clenching; hyperthermia, muscle breakdown, and death.
  • Long Term: Impulsiveness; irritability; sleep disturbances; anxiety; addiction

Heroin, Opium (Street Opioids) - Processed from poppy plants; a white or brownish powder or black sticky substance known as “black tar heroin.” Usually smoked or injected, could be taken orally (opium).

Health Effects

  • Acute: Euphoria; warm flushing of skin; dry mouth; heavy feeling in extremities; clouded thinking; alternate wakeful and drowsy states; itching; nausea; depressed respiration
  • Long Term: Addiction; physical dependence; collapsed veins; abscesses; infection of heart lining and valves; arthritis/other rheumatologic problems; HIV; Hepatitis C.

Prescription Opioid Abuse - Hydrocodone, Oxycodone, Codeine

Health Effects

  • Acute: Pain relief, drowsiness, nausea, constipation. When injected or snorted: Increased risk of depressed respiration leading to coma or death
  • Long Term: Tolerance, addiction

Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Abuse - Synthetic substances related to testosterone. Promote growth of skeletal muscle (anabolic) and the development of male sexual characteristics (androgenic) Taken orally, or by injection in doses much higher than would be prescribed.

Health Effects

  • Acute: Headaches, acne; fluid retention, gastrointestinal irritation, diarrhea, stomach pains, oily skin, jaundice, and hypertension.  Infections can develop at the injection site.
  • Long Term: Liver damage; Cardiovascular Disease;  high blood pressure; increases in LDL (“bad” cholesterol); and decreases in HDL (“good” cholesterol). Cardiac hypertrophy; atherosclerosis; addiction.

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Retrieved from:

 http://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/commonly-abused-drugs/health-effects

Employee Policies and Regulations

Drug- and Alcohol-Free Workplace Policy
Montclair State University is committed to providing a safe and productive work environment for all employees. To achieve this goal and to comply with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, employees are prohibited from possessing, distributing, manufacturing, consuming, or being under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, or controlled substances while on University premises.

Employees who appear to be under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs, or controlled substances shall not be permitted to work, particularly when the University has reasonable cause to suspect that their business judgment, personal safety, work performance, or the safety of others may be impaired.

For purposes of this policy, "illegal drugs or controlled substances" refer to those defined as illegal under federal, state, and/or local laws. They include, but are not limited to, all forms of narcotics, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, or other drugs whose use, possession, or transfer is restricted or prohibited by law (except for drugs prescribed by a physician or dentist and used according to instructions for the purpose for which they were prescribed).

If there is reasonable cause to suspect that an employee is in possession of illegal drugs or controlled substances, the University reserves the right to conduct searches of its property, vehicles, and facilities, including work areas, desks, and lockers assigned to employees, at any time. In addition, it reserves the right to search an employee's person and/or personal property, such as but not limited to lunch boxes or bags, pocketbooks, or briefcases if such property is brought onto University premises or into University vehicles. University Police shall conduct such searches when there is reasonable cause to believe that an employee may be in possession of alcohol, illegal drugs and/or controlled substances and/or if an employee's business judgment, job performance, or the safety of others may be affected by the use of drugs or alcohol.

The University recognizes that drug abuse and/or dependency are medical/behavioral conditions that may be successfully treated. Employees with drug and/or alcohol problems are encouraged to request assistance from the Employee Advisory Program (EAP). The EAP is a confidential counseling service to help state employees and their families who are experiencing problems with job performance because of drugs, alcohol, compulsive gambling, family and marital conflicts, stress, depression, interpersonal conflicts, and anxiety. Participation in the EAP is voluntary and confidential; however, a request for assistance or participation in the EAP does not excuse an employee from charges of violation of this policy. The only exception to the EAP confidentiality provision occurs when the University refers an employee to the EAP provider as set forth in this policy.

Employees in violation of this policy are subject to appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

Guidelines
Employees are required to report to work and remain at work in condition to perform assigned duties free from the effects of alcohol or drugs.

Off-the-job illegal drug activity or alcohol abuse that could have an adverse effect on an employee's job performance or that could jeopardize the safety of other employees, the public, University equipment, or the University's relations with the public constitutes a violation of this policy and will not be tolerated.

In addition to disciplinary action up to and including termination, an employee who is involved with the use, sale, or personal possession (e.g., on the person or in a desk or vehicle) of illegal drugs while on the job, including rest periods and meal periods, or on University property may also be subject to criminal prosecution. Any illegal drugs found shall be turned over to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Alcohol consumption is generally prohibited during the workday, including rest periods and meal periods, except at authorized University-sponsored events where alcohol is served. The use, sale, or personal possession (e.g., on the person or in a desk or vehicle) of alcohol during work time or on University property shall result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

Safety Risks from the Abuse of Alcohol and Drugs

[Adapted from the Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies]

Alcohol and other drugs interfere with messages to your brain and alter your perceptions, emotions, vision, hearing, and coordination. Alcohol and drugs affect your judgment and can lead to dangerous behavior that puts you at risk for:

Accidental injuries: More than half of all drownings and fatal falls are alcohol or drug-related. 45% of emergency room visits are alcohol-related. 80% of patients in special units like burn centers have injuries related to alcohol use. Half of all physical injuries sustained on college campuses stem from alcohol use.

Car crashes: Even small amounts of alcohol make driving unsafe. Drunk driving is not only unsafe, it's illegal. Even a blood alcohol level of .05% (below the legal limit for driving in most states) makes you twice as likely to have a car crash. Almost half of all fatal auto crashes are alcohol- or drug- related. Drinking and boating can be a dangerous combination as well. One-third of boating fatalities are alcohol related, and drunk boating is just as illegal as drunk driving.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) including AIDS: You are more likely to ignore safety precautions such as condoms if you are under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

Unwanted pregnancy: For the same reasons that alcohol and other drugs put people at greater risk for STDs, it also makes pregnancy a risk of substance abuse.

Sexual assault: When you're intoxicated, impaired judgment can stop you from noticing dangerous situations and people. Slowed thinking and reaction time makes you more vulnerable to being forced into sexual activity. It also makes people less likely to notice when they are hurting others. Alcohol is involved in many acquaintance rapes. Either party being drunk is not a legal excuse for assault.

Fights: Barroom brawls don't just happen in movies. Not only can you get hurt, you can get arrested. Two-thirds of violent behavior on college campuses involves alcohol.

Trouble with the law: Illegal drugs, underage drinking, drunk driving, public consumption--even giving guests alcohol--can get you into legal trouble.

Alcohol and Drug Counseling and Prevention Services

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) along with Health Promotion believe that best preventive medicine is knowledge. We provide outreach activities and educational workshops on health and wellness issues. Topics are wide-ranging and uncompromising in nature. CAPS is located on campus in Russ Hall.

Education and counseling is provided so that students can reduce their risk for personal health issues. Counseling and Psychological Services and the office of Health Promotion both provide a nonjudgmental and confidential place for information, conversation and referrals about health and wellness related topics. The primary objective is to keep students well in all aspects of their life at Montclair State University so that they can perform optimally in this academic environment as well as achieve necessary life skills to stay well in the future.

A. Counseling and Psychological Services

Alcohol and Other Drug Program

The cornerstone of AOD treatment services at CAPS is the Exploring Change and Healthy Options or "ECHO" program.

The ECHO program provides students a non-judgmental environment to explore their alcohol and other drug use to help make informed decisions about their use of substances. Students who participate in the ECHO program receive an individualized feedback to facilitate an understanding of the role substances have in their lives.

The ECHO program includes three primary components:

  • Initial assessment and review of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use
  • Personalized assessment and feedback of current AOD use patterns
  • Assignments designed to assist the student in making educated decisions about future use of alcohol and illicit substances

Typically the ECHO program involves 2 sessions (including an individual and group session).

People participate in ECHO for a variety of reasons including:

People may also participate in ECHO for one of the following reasons:

  1. Self-Assessment – Those students who are interested in learning about how their alcohol and other drug use impacts their lives are encouraged to complete the ECHO program. Students are not required to stop using alcohol or other drugs; rather, they are asked to share honestly in a confidential and non-judgmental environment so that they can learn more about the role that alcohol and other drugs play in their lives.
  2. Alternate Sanctioning Program (ASP) – ECHO is offered as a voluntary program to students who have been found responsible for violating Montclair State University's alcohol and other drug policy. It is used to capitalize on the "teachable moments" that present themselves when students are in violation of Montclair State University's alcohol and other drug policy.

**To schedule an ECHO, please call CAPS at 973-655-5211**

Drug/Alcohol Resources Available to Students

CAPS provides programs for drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, rehabilitation and re-entry to students. CAPS is located in Russ Hall on the University campus and may be reached at 973/655-5211. The following is a summary of the programs made available through CAPS:

Individual Counseling

Treatment for alcohol and other drug concerns takes a non-judgmental, brief motivational approach designed to increase a student's desire to make positive changes regarding his or her alcohol and/or drug use. This approach emphasizes a student's choice and motivation to change. Treatment often involves once-a-week meetings, which can be supplemented by weekly groups on campus or off campus.

Due to the short-term treatment model at CAPS, some students will be provided with off-campus referrals for more extensive support when that treatment is deemed most appropriate.

Group Counseling

CAPS offers a group for students who are contemplating making a change in their current use of alcohol,marijuana, or other drugs. A commitment to self-exploration and a willingness to discuss their relationship with alcohol, marijuana, or other drugs are required to be eligible to participate in this group.

Recovery Coaching

Recovery Coaching provides a supportive environment to learn how to create a healthy relationship with peers, family and community, while cultivating a meaningful personal and professional life.

Recovery Room

The Recovery Room is an informal and confidential group for students to explore their alcohol and drug use, self-identify as recovering from alcohol and other drugs, or those seeking recovery resources, to network and support one another in a safe environment. This group is only open to Montclair State University students who are currently in recovery from alcohol or other drugs, actively seeking recovery resources or interested in exploring how alcohol and other drugs impact their lives. The Recovery Room meets on Tuesdays from 3-4:30 p.m. during the fall and spring semesters in the Drop In Center.

Referrals

CAPS provides referrals for students who are in need of treatment services not provided by CAPS. Referrals for treatment would include (but are not limited to) long term therapy services, couples counseling, family therapy, detoxification services, intensive outpatient treatment, and alcohol and drug rehabilitation services. Please call CAPS at (973) 655-5211 if you need assistance with a referral off campus.

CAPS Alcohol Library and Resource Center

CAPS has a growing collection of self-help information and professional books related to alcohol and other drug abuse. Additionally, CAPS houses an array of brochures and handouts on the topic of chemical dependency.


Additional AOD information

The information provided is for educational purposes only and it should not substitute consultation with a trained professional

The information provided is for educational purposes only and it should not substitute consultation with a trained professional

B. Health Promotion

Coordinated by the office of Health Promotion, Montclair State University’s Alcohol and other Drug Prevention Project is a comprehensive, evidence-informed practice designed to implement and evaluate campus and community based strategies to prevent high-risk drinking and substance use/abuse among college students. It is a collaborative effort involving Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Student Conduct Officer and many campus and community partners. Some initiatives of this project include:

Advisory Committee on Alcohol and other Drugs (ACAD): The Advisory Committee on Alcohol and other Drugs at Montclair State University is a coalition of campus and community members who collaborate on issues relating to substance use and abuse educational efforts within the campus. The Advisory Committee is responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating educational and environmental approaches aimed at reducing risk related to alcohol and other drug use. With the use of evidence-based educational programs, policy recommendations and on-going research, the Advisory Committee strives to provide members of the University community tools for making informed decisions that will foster academic success, personal development and a healthy balanced lifestyle.

Montclair Social Norms Project (MSNP): Current literature indicates that students tend to overestimate the amount of alcohol consumed and the amount of intoxicated behaviors exhibited by their peers. This misperception creates a "false norm." Studies conducted at Montclair State University indicate that most students have 0-4 drinks when they go out (2003-2011). The MSNP is a social marketing strategy that promotes healthier choices.

Educational harm reduction interventions: These initiatives are designed to empower students to make healthier and responsible choices. Among these programs are e-CHUG and e-Toke, which are online intervention programs.

  • e-CHUG The electronic Check-Up to Go, is a brief, self-assessment that provides you with accurate, detailed and personalized feedback on your use of alcohol, and specific information and helpful resources in the Montclair State University community. e-CHUG
  • e-TOKE The electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience is a brief, self-assessment that provides you with accurate, detailed and personalized feedback on your use of marijuana, and specific information and helpful resources in the Montclair State University community. Link to: e-TOKE

Substance Free Activities: Montclair State University provides a healthy and stable support structure for students in addition to their regular academic routine. There are hundreds of programs offered by various departments and student organizations that promote health and wellness and are substance free. For a list of programs and events check out the University Web Calendar.

For additional information and resources link to montclair.edu/hp