Business Administration Major, Sports, Events and Tourism Marketing Concentration (B.S.) - Undergraduate - 2012 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2012 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

The new Sports, Events, and Tourism Marketing program will provide students the knowledge and skill sets to be successful in the growing workforce of the sports, events, and tourism sector. This program incorporates marketing concepts along with management skills to provide students with a diversified and competitive edge.

If you enjoy working with people in a fast paced and growing industry, then consider a concentration in Sports, Events, and Tourism Marketing.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree (for further information, see General Education Requirements).


SPORTS, EVENTS & TOURISM MARKETING CONC

Complete 72 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR

    Complete 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete the following 10 courses for 30 semester hours:

      ACCT 201 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
      ACCT 202 Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
      BSLW 264 Legal, Ethical and Global Environment of Business. Starting Spring 2013: Legal, Ethical and Global Environment of Business for Business Majors (3 hours lecture) 3
      FINC 321 Fundamentals of Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
      INBS 246 Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      INFO 290 Management Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      INFO 375 Operations Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 231 Management Processes (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 439 Strategic Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 240 Introduction to Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following for 3 semester hours:

      INFO 270 Statistics for Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 270 Statistics for Business (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. SPORTS, EVENTS & TOURISM MARKETING CONC

    Complete the following 2 requirements:

    1. Complete 7 courses for 21 semester hours:

      MKTG 307 Retail Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 310 Services Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 315 International Tourism Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 320 Sports Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 321 Event Marketing and Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 355 Sports, Events and Tourism Marketing Internship (3 hours cooperative education) 3
      MKTG 445 Marketing Strategies in Sports, Event and Tourism Industries (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 2 courses from the following:

      ECON 221 Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
      HOSP 390 Food and Beverage Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MGMT 436 Project Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 309 Buying and Distribution Strategies (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 345 Service and Nonprofit Marketing (3 hours lecture) 3
      MKTG 492 Independent Study in Marketing 1-3
      PEMJ 227 Social Problems in Sports (3 hours lecture) 3
      PEMJ 353 Psychology of Sport (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 215 Sociology of Sports (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
  3. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COLLATERALS

    Complete the following for 12 semester hours:

    ECON 101 Principles of Economics: Macro (3 hours lecture) 3
    ECON 102 Principles of Economics: Micro (3 hours lecture) 3
    INFO 173 Introduction to Computers in Business (3 hours lecture) 3
    MATH 114 Mathematics for Business II: Calculus (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

ACCT201: Fundamentals of Financial Accounting (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory course in financial accounting from a user's perspective. The theoretical foundation and basic accounting terminology are addressed. The basic financial statements consisting of the balance sheet, income statement, statement of stockholder's equity and the statement of cash flows are presented and discussed. Financial statement analysis including ratios analysis will help students to make sound decisions as investors, creditors, and managers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ACCT202: Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces basic concepts of management accounting including cost classifications, product costing, cost-volume profit analysis, variable costing, operating budgeting, standards and performance evaluation, balance score card and non-routine decisions. The course will illustrate the use of accounting information by managers for internal decision-making purposes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 201.

BSLW264: Legal, Ethical and Global Environment of Business. Starting Spring 2013: Legal, Ethical and Global Environment of Business for Business Majors (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the interrelationship of social policies, the legal system, and global business practices in society, with emphasis on the rapidly changing business-legal environment. The relationship among governmental, ethical, social, and business issues will also be examined. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Spring 2013: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ECON101: Principles of Economics: Macro (3 hours lecture)

A study of the American economy, analytically and institutionally; the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long term growth. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

ECON102: Principles of Economics: Micro (3 hours lecture)

Organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. Resource allocation, price determination and behavior of the firm in the determination of quantity of output and the hiring of factors of production. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

ECON221: Economics of Professional Sports (3 hours lecture)

This course applies economic analysis to the professional sports industry under alternative institutional structures. The course addresses the structure and conduct of various sports markets in terms of the relationship between economic theory and evolving public policy alternatives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. Major within School of Business.

FINC321: Fundamentals of Finance (3 hours lecture)

Financial statements and financial forecasting. Introduction to risk, return, and value. Introduction to working capital management, capital budgeting, optimum capital structure, and dividend policy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 270 or INFO 271; and ECON 101; and ACCT 201; and major within the School of Business.

HOSP390: Food and Beverage Management (3 hours lecture)

This is an advanced course providing mechanisms and techniques to manage food and beverage provisions in various sectors of the hospitality industry, such as restaurant, bar or beverage operaton, club, contracted or institutional foodservice. In addition, food and beverage functions within various lodging settings (hotel, resort, casino hotel and cruise line) are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HOSP 250 and MGMT 231. Major within School of Business.

INBS246: Introduction to International Business (3 hours lecture)

The course is designed to introduce business majors to the dynamics of global economy, trade and development and its linkage with the U.S. economy. Business students will get acquainted with the fundamentals of international economics, foreign exchange, monetary systems and financial markets, international trade and investment, the role of international organizations and agencies international marketing, international accounting systems and taxation, cultural challenge, management styles and practices across the nations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or ECON 202.

INFO173: Introduction to Computers in Business (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an introduction to the use of computers within a broad global business environment through an introduction to the skills, concepts, and capabilities necessary to effectively use information technology in organizations. Strong emphasis of the course is on building competencies in industry-approved software programs, such as Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Office Professional Suite, including Word, PowerPoint, Excel and Access. 3 sh.

INFO270: Statistics for Business (3 hours lecture)

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the application of modern statistical methods. Topics covered include: descriptive statistical methods of data analysis; an introduction to probability theory; an introduction to discrete and continuous probability distributions and mathematical expectation; classical statistical inference - sampling distributions, confidence interval estimation, and hypothesis testing for means and proportions; regression and correlation; and an introduction to time series analysis. Spreadsheet software is integrated in all topics. Cross listed with Mathematical Sciences, MATH 270. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 114. May not be taken for graduation credit by College of Science and Mathematics majors.

INFO290: Management Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

This course is an inquiry into business information systems and information technology management in digital firms. Analysis of information from the management point of view with respect to information needs in organizations, strategic roles of information systems, information technology infrastructure, information systems supporting organizations and management, and business value of information systems will be covered. This course is skill building in the definition and analysis of systems problems and the provision of solutions to them. The computer as a tool for supporting business functions, management, decision-making and policy-setting is emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 173 or passing SBUS Computer Proficiency Exam or CSIT 110.

INFO375: Operations Analysis (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to managerial concepts and quantitative tools required in the design, operation, and control of business systems. This course incorporates mathematical and statistical methods in the analysis of specific business systems and industrial production activities, inventory control, production planning and scheduling, and capital management. Computers are used to solve problems involving complex systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: INFO 270 or INFO 271; Business Administration majors.

MATH114: Mathematics for Business II: Calculus (3 hours lecture)

The general aim of this course is to introduce the students to the basic skills of differentiation, integration, maxima-minima problems and several of the other applications of calculus, including modeling, especially models in business and economics. Computer assisted including lecture, individual and small group tutoring in Mathematics Computer Laboratory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Business Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Business Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH270: Statistics for Business (3 hours lecture)

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the application of modern statistical methods. Topics covered include descriptive statistical methods of data analysis; an introduction to probability theory; an introduction to discrete and continuous probablitlity distributions and mathematical expectation; classical statistical inference - sampling distributions, confidence interval estimation, and hypothesis testing for means and proportions; regression and correlation; and an introduction to time series analysis. Spreadsheet software is integrated in all topics. Cross listed with Information and Decision Sciences, INFO 270. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 114. May not be taken for graduation credit by College of Science and Mathematics majors.

MGMT231: Management Processes (3 hours lecture)

To provide undergraduate students a review of classical and modern approaches to the managerial process as it relates to the manager's functions of planning, organizing, communication, motivation, leading, controlling, and managing change. Emphasizing new forces in the managerial environment such as workplace diversity and economic globalization, these reviews will be tied to the open-system model and the contingency approach as overall frameworks for understanding organizations and management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

MGMT436: Project Management (3 hours lecture)

This course prepares students to develop a project management plan, develop schedules, estimate personnel requirements and estimate costs and delays for typical project management problems in business. This course may be repeated once for a total of six credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MGMT 231, MGMT 316 and INFO 375. Major within School of Business.

MGMT439: Strategic Management (3 hours lecture)

This is the capstone course in the business curriculum which requires students to integrate and build on the knowledge and skills acquired in the business core courses. The course emphasizes the use of business skills in the formulation and implementation of strategy through processes such as industry analysis, value chain analysis, SWOT analysis, and analysis of strategic success including financial performance. To accomplish this, a semester-long computer simulation is used in all classes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ACCT 202, FINC 321, MGMT 231, MKTG 240, INBS 246; senior standing; School of Business majors only.

MKTG240: Introduction to Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This introductory course is designed to expose the student to the basic areas that comprise marketing as a discipline. Marketing is viewed as a process that must be integrated with all other business functions. The basic theories, concepts, language and tools of marketing are introduced, and illustrations of their applicability to the business as well as non-profit sectors of the national economy with increasing stress on the global realities which affect the marketing function are addressed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

MKTG307: Retail Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an overview of the field of retailing. Major retail institutions, e.g., department stores, specialty stores, discount stores, the components of the retail mix and the functional areas of retailing are examined. The marketing strategies of major retail companies as well as the trends that shape them, e.g., globalization, technology, electronic commerce, are analyzed. The course stresses an understanding of the retail customer and the importance of customer service and relationship management. Issues in the management of retail employees are also explored. The concepts in this course are useful for students interested in careers in consumer products and services marketing as well as retailing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240, major within the School of Business, Recreation Profession major (RECR), Fashion Studies major (FASH) or Nutrition and Food Science major with concentration in Food Management (NUFM).

MKTG309: Buying and Distribution Strategies (3 hours lecture)

Buying practices that have changed since the development of giant retail organizations (Wal-Mart and Home Depot) are studied and the effect it has had on "traditional" buying. Other areas covered are the functions of the merchandise division and the job challenges today. Micro-retailing, the buying and merchandise problems of today's stores are covered. Physical handling, comparison shopping, planning the buyer's budget and the six-month buying plans are also important topics. Buying for fashion vs. staple merchandise is compared as are the different problems of buying for a large or small retail firm. Resident buying offices and foreign buying are important topics in this buying course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG310: Services Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course builds on basic marketing concepts to focus on the role of service as a primary source of competitive advantage for both service and non-service organizations in a predominantly service economy. The course examines the marketing and managerial implications of the differences between goods and services. The course discusses many service marketing concepts, including the relationship between the service provider and customer, the service profit chain, the real-time process experience of services, customer satisfaction and service quality. Specific applications for service sectors such as retail, sports, events, tourism, financial services, healthcare, and professional services will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; Major within the School of Business.

MKTG315: International Tourism Marketing (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on marketing practice and strategy within the context of global and international tourism markets, which include, but are not limited to, destination resorts/lodging, amusement parks and tourist attractions, festivals and fairs, cruise ships, ski resorts, sports venues, and event, meeting, and conference delivery. It evaluates cultural differences as well as encourages students to apply marketing strategy and skills to the tourism industry. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; Major within the School of Business.

MKTG320: Sports Marketing and Management (3 hours lecture)

The sports industry is examined from a leisure and tourism perspective applying marketing and management theories. An interdisciplinary approach is applied in developing the ability to address the array of problems faced by sports marketers. Some of the topics include: sport consumers; promotions (advertising, sponsorship, endorsements); venue management; crowd and safety control; and licensing. The course provides a foundation for entry into middle level marketing and management positions in sports-related industries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240 and MGMT 231. Major within School of Business. Starting Spring 2013: MKTG 310 and MKTG 315; School of Business major only.

MKTG321: Event Marketing and Planning (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how successful events are created and marketed. It explores the structure of the events industry; the unique challenges of planning and executing an event; and how marketing theory can be applied to increase an event's success. Best practices related to event safety, event sponsorship and promotion and market analysis are also discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; major within the School of Business. Starting Spring 2013: MKTG 310 and MKTG 315; School of Business major only.

MKTG345: Service and Nonprofit Marketing (3 hours lecture)

While noting the increasingly blurred distinguishment between the manufacturing and service sectors in today's post industrial economies, the first half of this course focuses on the problems and issues surrounding the effective marketing of the intangible aspects of a product service offering. Current methods for researching and analyzing service markets are taught and then applied by students in marketing plan formulation and case analyses with particular stress placed on translating the intangible aspects of a service into more measurable (and therefore, tangible) characteristics aimed at enhancing customer satisfaction and retention. The second part of the course focuses on the nonprofit marketing, i.e., public and private nonprofit organizations. Students learn how to manage organizations such as government, religious, charitable, political, educational, and fund raising, institutions as well as marketing their endeavors more effectively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240. Major within School of Business.

MKTG355: Sports, Events and Tourism Marketing Internship (3 hours cooperative education)

Students are required to accumulate 200 hours of marketing experience (approximately 15 - 20 hours/per week) working for a sport, events or tourism organization. In addition, students complete assignments designed to enhance their understanding of marketing strategies and tactics used by the employing organization, industry trends, career opportunities, and the attitudes and skills necessary for advancement. Job performance is assessed via progress reports submitted by the cooperating employer and a site visit by a member of the Sports Events and Tourism Marketing faculty. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 240; Major within the School of Business; departmental approval.

MKTG445: Marketing Strategies in Sports, Event and Tourism Industries (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the marketing planning process in relationship to overall corporate strategic planning framework is presented from theoretical and practical perspectives in the field of sports, events and tourism industries. An increased understanding of the many variables involved in marketing decision-making and an awareness of current and sophisticated techniques used in the problem-solving process are analyzed. This capstone course integrates materials from the curriculum in an applied format utilizing group case analysis, marketing simulations and sport, event and tourism market/business plan production. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 320, MKTG 321 and MKTG 307; Major within the School of Business.

MKTG492: Independent Study in Marketing

An opportunity for a student to study or engage in a topic currently not covered in existing course selections or to take a required course normally given, but unavailable in conventional format. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MKTG 341; departmental approval; SBUS majors only.

PEMJ227: Social Problems in Sports (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to analyze a number of important and controversial issues in sports in American society. Through the use of an issues-oriented approach, students will become aware of the relationship between sports in American society and social problems in a number of areas including economics, education, ethics and politics. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

PEMJ353: Psychology of Sport (3 hours lecture)

Psychology related to physical activity on emotional, attitudinal and personality aspects, motivation, cultural and sociological problems of athletes, spectator response and deportment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and PHED, PEAF or ATTR major.

SOCI215: Sociology of Sports (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course will examine the major theoretical and substantive writings on the sociology of amateur and professional sports. Topics to be explored from conflict, functionalist and symbolic interactionist perspectives include socialization and athletic identity, women in sports, race and class in sports, gender relations and sport participation, sport risk and injury, education and sports participation, sports in the media, sport and the reproduction of society, and fieldwork among college and professional athletes. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or departmental approval.