Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certificate Program - Graduate - 2013 University Catalog

You are viewing the 2013 University Catalog. Please see the newest version of the University Catalog for the most current version of this program's requirements.

Coordinator: Ms. Donna Verney
Office: University Hall, Room 2105
Phone Number: (973) 655-5363
Email: verneyd@mail.montclair.edu

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) Certificate Program is designed for the individual who has already earned a Bachelor of Arts or Sciences degree in another field, but who wishes to change careers and become a Registered Dietitian. There are no prerequisites for this program, regardless of a student's previous field of study.

Earning the AND Certificate involves completion of an undergraduate curriculum known as the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) (see below).  The DPD is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetics Association).  Once the DPD is completed, students receive an ACEND Verification Statement which enables them to apply to an accredited Dietetic Internship, the completion of which is the final prerequisite to taking the national registration exam to obtain the status of Registered Dietitian.

Students can also complete the DPD by earning a Second Bachelor's degree in Nutrition and Food Science-Dietetics  http://www.montclair.edu/cehs/academics/departments/hns/academic-programs/nfs-dietetics/ .  Typically, students who earn the AND Certificate, as opposed to the Second Bachelor's degree, are simultaneously enrolled in the Master's in Nutrition and Food Science program (since courses from the Master's program can be substituted for some courses in the AND Certificate program).  For students who are not also enrolled in the Master's program, the Second Bachelor's degree is usually a better option.

Careful advisement is recommended for students in either the AND Certificate program or the Second Bachelor's program since courses from a student's previous Bachelor's program can often be substituted for courses in the DPD.  Students are encouraged to meet with the AND Coordinator, Ms. Donna Verney, as soon as they are accepted so that she can evaluate previous transcripts and help to make a plan for timely completion.




AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOC CERTIFICATE

Complete 84 semester hours with a minimum GPA of 2.50. (To meet DPD requirements each course must show a grade of 'C' or better)

  1. PHYSICAL & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Complete 5 courses for 20 semester hours: . (Biochemistry must have been completed within the past 10 years).

    BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
    BIOL 254 Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    CHEM 113 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory) 4
    CHEM 130 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    CHEM 270 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 5
  2. BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES

    1. Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours:

      NUFD 153 Dynamics of Food and Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

      ECON 100 Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 101 Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECON 102 Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. FOOD

    Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours: (NUFD 357 must be taken at MSU)

    NUFD 150 Food Composition and Scientific Preparation (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 255 Meal Design and Management (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 357 Experimental Food Science (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
  4. NUTRITION

    Complete 6 courses for 19 semester hours: (NUFD 382 and NUFD 488 must be taken at MSU)

    NUFD 192 Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    NUFD 282 Applied Nutrition in the Lifecycle (4 hours lecture) 4
    NUFD 382 Advanced Nutrition (4 hours lecture) 4
    NUFD 488 Medical Nutrition Therapy (4 hours lecture) 4
    NUFD 490 Nutrition and Food Science Professional Seminar (l hour seminar) 1
    NUFD 499 Nutrition Assessment and Support (2 hours lab) 2
  5. COMMUNICATION

    Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

    CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
    ENWR 105 College Writing I: Intellectual Prose (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 482 Nutrition Counseling (3 hours lecture) 3
  6. LEARNING THEORY

    Complete to for 3 semester hours. (Must be taken at MSU)

    NUFD 412 Nutrition Education Techniques (3 hours lecture) 3
  7. MATH & DATA PROCESSING/EVALUATION

    Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours:

    MATH 109 Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 304 Introduction to Research (3 hours lecture) 3
  8. FOOD SERVICE SYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours: (NUFD 352 must be taken at MSU)

    NUFD 253 Quantity Food Purchasing and Production (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 350 Quantity Food Applications (4 hours lab) 3
    NUFD 352 Organization and Management of Foodservice Systems (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL254: Applied Microbiology (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Microbiological concepts and techniques applicable to food and dairy processing, health and disease, water, waste and other environmental problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

CHEM113: Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory)

A one semester introductory lecture and laboratory course in the fundamental concepts of chemistry. This course is suitable for students who have no prior background in chemistry. It is intended for students majoring in Food and Nutrition and other non-science majors. It is also suitable for science majors who want a basic introduction to Chemistry before proceeding to General Chemistry I. Some aspects of the course are quantitative, and a bakground in algebra is assumed. This course prepares students to proceed to CHEM 130 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry. 4 sh.

CHEM130: Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Survey of organic chemistry covering all major classes, nomenclature, and characteristic class reactions. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 113 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM270: Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Structure and function of the biomolecules and the metabolic interrelationships in the cell. Primarily for foods and nutrition majors. 5 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130 with a grade of C- or better.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECON100: Introduction to Economics (3 hours lecture)

Major objectives and features of the American economy, including operations of a market economy, structure and function of business, money and banking, government and business relations. For non-majors only. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not open to Economics majors; may not be taken after ECON 101 and/or ECON 102.

ECON101: Applied Macroeconomics (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces undergraduate students to the macro economy of the United States of America. Students learn how to apply the mechanism needed for the achievement of an optimal allocation of resources, price stability, full employment level of national income and long-term growth. In addition, they learn to analyze the macroeconomic data and the implications of fiscal and monetary policies. 3 sh.

ECON102: Applied Microeconomics (3 hours lecture)

In this course, undergraduate students will learn about the organization and operation of the American economy for the production and distribution of goods and services. Students learn the mechanism behind the pricing of products and factors of production in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. In addition, they learn to analyze microeconomic data and apply the abstract theoretical models into real life situations. 3 sh.

ENWR105: College Writing I: Intellectual Prose (3 hours lecture)

Expository writing. A workshop course to develop thinking and writing abilities through frequent writing assignments based on critical response to intellectually challenging questions. Emphasis is on the writing process--prewriting, drafting, revising, using peer and teacher critique, editing, and proofreading. A minimum of five essays is required, including an extensive documented essay that requires research. Evaluation is partly based on a portfolio of revised writing. With ENWR 106, meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Writing/Literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Passing score on the MSU Basic Skills Test or successful completion of ENWR 100.

MATH109: Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the use of statistics in the real world. Topics include: analysis and presentation of data, variability and uncertainty in data, techniques of statistical inference and decision-making. Computer assisted including lecture, individual and small group tutoring in Mathematics Computer Laboratory. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Mathematics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 051 or MATH 061 or MATH 071 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT). Not for majors in Mathematics (MATH), Mathematics with Applied Math concentration (MAAM) or Mathematics-Teacher Education (MTED).

NUFD150: Food Composition and Scientific Preparation (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

An introduction to food science, nutrition and food preparation with emphasis on scientific principles involved in the characteristics of acceptable standardized products and product evaluation. 3 sh.

NUFD153: Dynamics of Food and Society (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore issues of food consumption through a study of: basic nutrition requirements; social/psychological factors influencing food behaviors; food acquisition through history as compared to contemporary situations; the impact on the ecological system in the quest for food; and the social, economical, and political aspects of the world food situation and potential means of alleviating the problems of hunger and nutrient deficiencies. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

NUFD192: Nutrition with Laboratory (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the components of the food we eat and the nutrients necessary for life. The functions of nutrients, their interrelationships, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients are discussed. The factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, physical activity, and environmental factors, which influence food intake and requirements of nutrients, are covered. Students learn to measure and evaluate their nutritional status and body composition using equipment used in laboratory and analyze their diets using computer software. They plan meals considering individual's nutritional requirements in the laboratory. Historical, national, and international issues regarding food and nutrition are presented. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentrations in Dietetics (NUFD), Food Management (NUFM), or General (NUFG), Business Administration majors with a concentration in Hospitality Management (BAHM), and American Dietetic Association Certificate Program students (ADA).

NUFD253: Quantity Food Purchasing and Production (3 hours lecture)

Determining needs, purchasing, storing, preparing and serving food in large volume. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD255: Meal Design and Management (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

A course designed to include the design and delivery of meals for individuals and families. Special emphasis on nutrition and economic needs balanced with current lifestyles. Principles involved in meal management will be practiced and illustrated through class labs. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Nutrition and Food Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 150 and either NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. Current health insurance and negative PPD test required.

NUFD282: Applied Nutrition in the Lifecycle (4 hours lecture)

The application of basic nutrition knowledge to individuals and community agencies. Assessing nutrition problems in community settings and planning and evaluating programs to deal with those problems. Analysis of the physiological, biochemical, psychological and sociological factors that affect nutrient needs throughout the life cycle. Field studies. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD304: Introduction to Research (3 hours lecture)

A study of the basic concepts, principles and methodologies of scientific research and their application to the investigation of research problems in health, nutrition, and food science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Nutrition major or departmental permission.

NUFD350: Quantity Food Applications (4 hours lab)

Capstone lecture and laboratory experiences to support basic concepts of quantity food purchasing and production. Students will learn hands-on skills to produce culinary products in large quantities. Laboratory assignments in the MSU Food Management laboratory and in functioning food service facilities off campus. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 253; HOSP 411 or HOSP 390; and junior or senior standing. Students must provide proof of current health insurance coverage and a negative PPD test.

NUFD352: Organization and Management of Foodservice Systems (3 hours lecture)

Principles of management, organizational structure, policy and decision-making. The menu in management, budgeting and cost control, sanitation and safety, personnel policies and management. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 350 and MGMT 231.

NUFD357: Experimental Food Science (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

Study of the theory and applications of the chemical and physical changes involved in food processing, storage and preparation through objective and subjective analytical techniques. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 150 and CHEM 130.

NUFD382: Advanced Nutrition (4 hours lecture)

The physiological and chemical bases for nutrient needs, mechanisms through which nutrients meet the biological needs of humans, evaluation and interpretation of research findings. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 270 and NUFD 182 or NUFD 192. BIOL 243 may be taken as a prerequisite or a corequisite.

NUFD412: Nutrition Education Techniques (3 hours lecture)

Procedures and techniques for developing programs and teaching nutrition to a variety of target populations. Individual and group methods emphasize innovation. Field studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 282; and NUFD 182 or NUFD 192.

NUFD482: Nutrition Counseling (3 hours lecture)

This course offers practical experience dealing with the principles of marketing, adult learning, helping skills, assessment, documentation, and evaluation as related to weight control and the role of food in promotion of a healthy lifestyle. Six hours of clinical experience is required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 412 or departmental approval.

NUFD488: Medical Nutrition Therapy (4 hours lecture)

This course enables students to apply nutrition science to the prevention and treatment of human diseases and medical conditions. Nutrition assessment, diet modification, and specialized nutrition support, such as enteral and parenteral feeding, are covered. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or 192 and NUFD 382 and BIOL 243 and CHEM 270.

NUFD490: Nutrition and Food Science Professional Seminar (l hour seminar)

A capstone course which provides skills necessary for beginning professionals in nutrition and food science fields. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 130 and at least one 300-level NUFD course. Nutrition and Food Science majors with concentration in Food Management, Dietetics, or General.

NUFD499: Nutrition Assessment and Support (2 hours lab)

Provides an overview of the concepts, principles and methodology for nutrition assessment. Emphasis is placed on practical application and case models. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 488.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.