Geoscience Major (B.S.) - Undergraduate (Combined B.S./M.A.T. with Teacher Certification in Earth Science (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities) - 2015 University Catalog

The Dual Degree Dual Certification program is a 5-year program that leads to teacher certification in Earth Science (grades P-12), teacher certification in Teacher of Students with Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one-year master’s portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education Program website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.

GEOSCIENCE MAJOR (BS/MAT)

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 63 semester hours including the following 6 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete the following 7 courses for 27 semester hours:

      EAES 105 Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 220 Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 240 Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 302 Structural Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      EAES 320 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 342 Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      EAES 441 Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    2. COLLATERAL CHEMISTRY COURSES

      Complete the following 2 courses for 8 semester hours:

      CHEM 120 General Chemistry I (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      CHEM 121 General Chemistry II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
    3. COLLATERAL MATH COURSES

      Complete 1 of the following sequences:

      1. MATH SEQUENCE A

        1. Complete 1 course from the following:

          MATH 111 Applied Precalculus (4 hours lecture) 4
          MATH 112 Precalculus Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete .

          MATH 116 Calculus A (4 hours lecture) 4
      2. MATH SEQUENCE B

        Complete the following 2 courses for 8 semester hours:

        MATH 122 Calculus I (4 hours lecture) 4
        MATH 221 Calculus II (4 hours lecture) 4
    4. COLLATERAL PHYSICS COURSES

      Complete 1 of the following sequences:

      1. PHYSICS SEQUENCE A

        Complete the following 2 courses for 8 semester hours:

        PHYS 191 University Physics I (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        PHYS 192 University Physics II (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      2. PHYSICS SEQUENCE B

        Complete the following 2 courses for 8 semester hours:

        PHYS 193 College Physics I (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        PHYS 194 College Physics II (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    5. COLLATERAL BIOLOGY COURSES

      Complete 1 course from the following for 4 semester hours:

      BIOL 112 Principles of Biology I (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 4
      BIOL 113 Principles of Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 4
    6. MAJOR ELECTIVES

      Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

      1. METEOROLOGY

        Complete .

        EAES 201 Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      2. ASTRONOMY

        Complete 1 course from the following:

        PHYS 180 Descriptive Astronomy (3 hours lecture) 3
        PHYS 280 Astronomy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        PHYS 380 Observational Astronomy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      3. OCEANOGRAPHY

        Complete 1 course from the following:

        EAES 150 General Oceanography (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
  2. BS/MAT PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE (UG) GOBM

    1. TEACHER ED PRE-REQUISITE REQUIREMENTS

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. SPEECH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete the following:

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. ADDITIONAL TEACHER ED PRE-REQUISITES

        Complete the following 3 requirements:

        1. Complete 1 course from the following: .

          EDFD 200 Psychological Foundations of Education (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 200 Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete the following 2 courses: .

          EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 221 Historical Foundations of American Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        3. Complete 1 course from the following: .

          EDFD 210 Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
          READ 210 Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
          SASE 210 Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE I

      Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

      1. Complete 1 course from:

        ECEL 279 Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 279 Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course from:

        EDFD 312 Educating English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
        READ 312 Educating English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
        SASE 312 Educating English Language Learners (1 hour lecture) 1
      3. Complete 1 course from:

        EDFD 305 Teaching for Equity & Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 305 Teaching for Equity & Diversity (3 hour lecture) 3
        SASE 305 Teaching for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE II

      Complete the following 2 courses:

      READ 411 Language & Literacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPED 367 Language-Based Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms (3 hour lecture) 3
    4. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE III

      Complete the following 2 courses:

      SPED 469 Inclusive Methods for Middle and Secondary Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPED 488 Promoting Prosocial Behaviors in Inclusive Settings (3 hours lecture) 3
    5. GRADUATE COURSES

      Complete 2 requirement(s). These courses will also count toward the MAT portion of this program.

      1. Complete 2 courses: (Courses will also count toward graduate portion of this program).

        SASE 520 Inclusive iSTEM for the Adolescent Learner I (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 584 Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom 2-3
      2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following list.

        BIOL 570 Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 505 Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 507 Tectonics (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 508 Field Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 509 Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 510 Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 511 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 524 Igneous and Metamorphic Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 525 X-ray Microanalysis (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 526 Geochemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 527 Organic Geoghemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 528 Environmental Forensics (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 529 Instrumental Environmental Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 531 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 532 Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 533 Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 535 Geophysics (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 541 Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 550 Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 551 Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 586 Urban Contamination (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 592 Pro Seminar (1-4 hours seminar) 1-4
        EAES 599 Special Problems in Earth and Environmental Studies 1-4
        EAES 610 Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 611 Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 662 Energy and the Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
        EAES 700 Earth Systems Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        PHYS 519 Special Topics in Physics (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL112: Principles of Biology I (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)

Principles of Biology I involves the study of life from molecule to multicellular organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, and the ways in which these processes shape higher levels of biological organization. This course is designed to fulfill the first core course requirement of the biology major. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 with a grade of C- or higher or a satisfactory score on the Math department's precalculus readiness test.

BIOL113: Principles of Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)

Principles of Biology II will provide an introductory level study of biodiversity and the origins of life, phylogenetic relationships among organisms, genetics, developmental biology, reproduction, the biology of populations and communities, and ecosystem processes. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 with a grade of C- or higher or a satisfactory score on the Math department's precalculus readiness test.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

BIOL570: Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Basic ecological principles and concepts. Habitat approach to field exercises in fresh water and terrestrial ecology. Intra and interspecific relationships with all living members of the ecosystem, problems in plant and animal biology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and zoology.

CHEM120: General Chemistry I (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introductory lecture and laboratory course for science majors, prerequisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Introduction to atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory stresses techniques and data treatment and their use in examining chemical systems. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the Mathematics readiness test OR a grade of C- or better in MATH 100 or MATH 111 or MATH 112 or MATH 116 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or MATH 222 OR concurrent enrollment in MATH 100. Satisfactory score on the Chemistry readiness test OR a grade of C- or better in CHEM 105 or CHEM 106.

CHEM121: General Chemistry II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introductory lecture and laboratory course for science majors, prerequisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Introduction to thermochemistry, kinetics; general acid base, precipitation, redox equilibria, electrochemistry and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory stresses techniques and data treatment and their use in examining chemical systems. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or better.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES105: Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Materials of the earth; landforms and structures; the processes and agents responsible for their formation and modification. Modern tectonic concepts. Topographic and geologic maps. Required field trips. Not open to students who have had Principles of Geology. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 112 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES150: General Oceanography (3 hours lecture)

A general study of the oceans and methods of modern oceanography including the physical, chemical, geological, and biological aspects of the oceans and their interrelationships. This course is designed for non-science majors. Previous course GEOS 162 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES201: Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Presents a basic understanding of the dynamic atmosphere and explores the impacts that weather and climate have on humans and the biosphere. Basic physical laws of energy and motion are employed to explain temperature, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, storms, and how climates vary regionally. Connections are made toward management of weather hazards, air pollution, impacts on agriculture and economy, and environmental and social implications of climate change. Lectures are supplemented by current events discussions and hands-on exercises in lab sections. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 257 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES220: Mineralogy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Crystallography, internal structure, origin, occurrence, and properties of minerals, laboratory study of common minerals. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 443 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 101, EAES 105 or EAES 107; and CHEM 120 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES240: Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Geological history of the earth; the evolution of North America in terms of the changing geography, climate, and plant and animal life as interpreted from the rock and fossil record. Required field trips. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 114 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107 or EAES 250.

EAES250: Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A general study of the marine sciences, including origin and evolution of the oceans, physical and chemical properties of seawater, marine life, oceanic circulation, atmospheric-ocean exchange and other processes that take place in the oceans. This course also deals with marine resources and human interaction with the marine environment. Field trips required. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 250. Previous course PHMS 210 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES302: Structural Geology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Recognition and interpretation of primary and tectonic rock structures laboratory work emphasizes the analysis of faults, joints, folds and foliation. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 472 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 200, EAES 220 or EAES 240.

EAES320: Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Description, identification, classification, origin and occurrence of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks. Laboratory study of the common rocks. Required field trips. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geoscience. Previous course GEOS 444 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220.

EAES342: Invertebrate Paleobiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Invertebrate fossils-their classification, morphology, evolution, stratigraphic distribution and paleoecology. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 431 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 240, BIOL 213 or BIMS 220.

EAES441: Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Stratigraphic principles and their application. Case studies of selected regions. Local stratigraphy interpreted through field studies. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Geoscience. Previous course GEOS 434 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 220 and EAES 302 or EAES 340.

EAES505: Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of the relationships between man and the physical environment of atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Particular attention to problems of mineral resource and fossil-fuel depletion; pollution of air, water and soils and waste disposal and recycling, simple computer modeling of environmental situations. Previous course GEOS 525 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES507: Tectonics (3 hours lecture)

The study of the major structures of the earth, the principle of isostasy, mountain-building, continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and possible causes of tectonism in the earth. Discussion will include the methods of study, results obtained, interpretation of the data, and the latest theories of tectonism. Previous course GEOS 572 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program or departmental approval.

EAES508: Field Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The principles and techniques of geologic field work. Independent and team mapping of local areas of geologic interest using modern field methods and instruments. Previous course GEOS 580 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience; and equivalent of EAES 302; and EAES 320 or EAES 441 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 404.

EAES509: Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Overview of current issues in sustainability science and the challenges confronting society's transition to global sustainability: sustainable use of natural resources; social learning; engaging scientists at the science-policy interface; and the application of systems science to better predict the consequences of human actions and forecast outcomes of the multiple interacting stresses on the life support systems around us. Previous course ENVR 533 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES510: Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

Provides graduate students who have finished any introductory GIS courses or equivalents an opportunity to advance both the practical skills and theoretical understanding of GIS. The course will focus on application of GIS to urban planning, locational analysis, public health, crime analysis, resource and land use management, transportation planning, environmental management etc. In the meantime, specific topics such as geovisualization, geographic database design, GIS modeling and management will be treated as an integrated part during the applications. Previous course EUGS 570 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES 210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 310.

EAES511: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture)

This course affords graduate students who have completed introductory courses or equivalents the opportunity to advance both practical skills in and theoretical understanding of remote sensing. The course covers a wide range of applications and promotes facility in image processing and visualization, integration with Geographic Information Systems, and spatial modeling techniques. Industry-standard software is used for demonstration and laboratory exercises. A semester project must be completed that demonstrates an application of remote sensing to a real-world environmental problem. Students are required to submit a term paper, an oral presentation, and a poster related to this project. Previous courses ENVR 555 and GEOS 555 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES311.

EAES524: Igneous and Metamorphic Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The interpretive study of igneous and metamorphic rocks in detail with the aim of properly identifying and naming the rocks and interpreting their history: rock suites from classical areas. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 578 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience (GEOS) and equivalent of EAES 220 Mineralogy and EAES 320 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology or departmental approval.

EAES525: X-ray Microanalysis (3 hours lecture)

Students will learn energy dispersive spectroscopy, qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis, and x-ray mapping. Previous course GEOS 547 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 220, CHEM 410, PHYS 470 or BIOL 504 or departmental approval.

EAES526: Geochemistry (3 hours lecture)

Chemical laws and principles applied to the earth, chemical composition of the earth, distribution and relative abundance of the elements. Radioactive materials, atmospheric precipitation of geochemicals, the geochemistry of polluted water (including solid and liquid wastes) study of meteorites. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 575 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES527: Organic Geoghemistry (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory graduate course in organic geochemistry, covering the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks, emphasizing fossil fuels and environmental contaminants. Previous course GEOS 576 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: CHEM 230, EAES 322, EAES 441 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 427.

EAES528: Environmental Forensics (3 hours lecture)

Environmental Forensics seeks to answer the questions: "How did environmental contamination occur?" and "Who/what caused it?" It involves the use of analytical (geo)chemistry, field geology and biology, remote sensing, integrated with law and policy. This course will focus primarily on the methods and applications of chemical fingerprinting, using petroleum biomarkers, polycyclic aromatic compounds, isotopes, and heavy metals. Previous course GEOS 577 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of EAES 427 or EAES 527 or departmental approval.

EAES529: Instrumental Environmental Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A survey of instrumentation and methods for quantitative environmental analysis of inorganic earth materials (e.g., waters, soils, sediments). Hands-on analytical techniques will typically include, but are not limited to, pH and conductivity measurements, ion chromatography, UV-Vis and optical ICP spectrometry, ICP mass spectrometry, and SEM-EDS depending on expertise of the instructor(s). Previous course GEOS 579 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program and equivalent of one of the following: EAES 322, CHEM 410, EAES 526, EAES 527 or departmental approval.

EAES531: Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture)

Climatology emphasizing moisture as one of the fundamental factors in climatic analysis: processes and problems of classification and variability. Examines energy and water balance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES201, EAES230, or EAES301 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES332.

EAES532: Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduction to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling, using a variety of current software packages. Saturated and unsaturated media will be considered. Emphasis is on application of models to the solution of common problems encountered in hydrology industry and research. Previous course GEOS 552 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) graduate program and equivalent of EAES 331; and MATH 116 or MATH 122 or departmental approval.

EAES533: Water Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

The spatial patterns of the water resource both as surface water and ground-water. Processes affecting availability and techniques of estimation are stressed. Previous course GEOS 509 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES535: Geophysics (3 hours lecture)

Theory and application of conventional geophysical methods: seismology, magnetism, electricity and gravity. Laboratory includes the collection and interpretation of geophysical data. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 571 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program.

EAES541: Stratigraphy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Stratigraphic principles and their application. Case studies of selected regions. Local stratigraphy interpreted through field studies. Previous course GEOS 534 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program or departmental approval.

EAES550: Advanced Marine Geology (3 hours lecture)

Development and evolution of the ocean basins; marine sedimentation; shoreline development and classification; submarine topography; mineral resources of the sea. Laboratory analysis of marine sediments and fossil assemblages. Required field trips. Previous course GEOS 560 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program or department approval.

EAES551: Coastal Geomorphology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Coastlines and their evolution; processes and materials of the coastal zone; shore zone hydrodynamics and sedimentation: beach and barrier systems with special emphasis on the New Jersey shoreline. Offered at the site of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 551. Previous course PHMS 581 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES or MS Biology graduate program and equivalent of EAES 200 or departmental approval.

EAES586: Urban Contamination (3 hours lecture)

This course uses examples from the published peer-reviewed literature to introduce the basic concepts of environmental contamination and the fundamental principles of environmental assessment. This is an introductory course at the graduate level and suitable for the students who are pursuing their graduate degree study and career in environmental education, science and management. The course will focus on environmental topics that are of current public concern and interest. 3 sh.

EAES592: Pro Seminar (1-4 hours seminar)

Research on selected problems which will vary according to instructor. May be repeated once for a maximum of eight semester hours as long as the topic is different each time. Previous course EUGS 504 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

EAES599: Special Problems in Earth and Environmental Studies

Independent research project to be performed by the student under the guidance of the faculty. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 10.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Previous course GEOS 592 effective through Spring 2012. 1 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an EAES graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES610: Spatial Analysis (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to techniques for the analysis of spatial data. The course will heavily utilize GIS and Remote Sensing data with particular attention to applications and manipulation techniques. Topics include characterizing spatial data, data sampling, visualization, data modeling, point pattern analysis, and spatial data interaction. Previous course EUGS 680 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) program and equivalent of EAES 510 or departmental approval.

EAES611: Advanced Environmental Remote Sensing and Image Processing (3 hours lecture)

This course provides a forum to explore cutting edge advances in remote sensing of the environment afforded by new satellite and aircraft based imaging platforms and to provide facility with image processing (IP) and geographic information systems (GIS) software. Topics covered include multispectral, hyperspectral and multiangular reflectance data, very high resolution panchromatic imagery, active radar and lidar systems, microwave imagery, advanced spatial and statistical raster analysis, and interfaces to GIS. Previous course ENVR 655 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES311 or EAES511 or departmental approval.

EAES662: Energy and the Environment (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of present-day energy sources, the impact of their extraction and utilization on Earth's environment, and future options. Topics include physics of energy, carbon cycle, greenhouse effect, origin and production of fossil fuels, hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"), consequences of fossil fuel combustion, nuclear energy, renewable energy sources (including biomass, waste-to-energy, solar, hydro, wind, tidal), as well as the technical and sociopolitical aspects of energy utilization, efficiency, and conservation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in one of the following programs: MA in Environmental Studies (ESED, ESES or ESEM), MS in Geoscience (GEOS), MS in Sustainability Science (SSCI or SSBM), PSM in Sustainability Science w/concentration in Applied Sustainability Science (SSAS), PhD in Environmental Management (ENVM).

EAES700: Earth Systems Science (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates geosystems. In studying processes within the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere, the course provides a holistic understanding of earth's historical, present, and future systems. Current techniques and tools for data collection and analysis, such as field methods, GIS, Remote Sensing, are included in the course. Previous course ENVR 770 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) graduate program or departmental approval.

ECEL279: Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the historical and ideological trends that impact the education of children in inclusive settings. Students explore the historical, political and legal foundations of inclusive education; principles of inclusive planning, consultation, and collaboration; resources and services for effective inclusion and inclusive transition programs; characteristics of high and low-incidence disabilities; and implications for students with and without disabilities. This course includes a field experience in which students engage in reflective observation of inclusive classrooms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

EDFD200: Psychological Foundations of Education (3 hours lecture)

The psychological foundations of education enable students to understand and apply essential topics in teaching and learning including development, motivation, diversity and assessment. Through relating theoretical frameworks to empirical research and applying them to classroom settings, students will be better able to understand their own experience as learners and conceptualize their future practice as teachers. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

EDFD210: Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the public purposes of education in our social and political democracy. Students inquire into the role of schools in fostering the development of democratic principles and practices and examine various curriculum designs and pedagogical strategies. Students also explore the main issues stemming from the efforts to teach democratically in public educational institutions. Students complete 30 hours of fieldwork in an assigned high-performing urban school, which provides a context for these explorations. They examine and analyze successful practices of instruction and classroom management. Attendance at the first class is required to verify field expectations. This course is pre-requisite for admission into the teacher education program. Cross-listed with SASE 210 and READ 210. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Sophomore level or higher and ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

EDFD221: Historical Foundations of American Education (3 hours lecture)

This course offers students the crucial sequence of ideas that constitute one of the central themes in American society and culture. Since its beginnings, American thinkers have seen education as the key to an informed citizenry. Major themes in American education will be looked at through the reading of primary and secondary sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

EDFD305: Teaching for Equity & Diversity (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the qualities of teachers, teaching, and schooling that foster the learning of students from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways in which socialization experiences shape perceptions. They reflect on their own beliefs, assumptions, and perceptions about sociocultural identity and how their own socialization has shaped their perceptions of themselves and other people. Students also examine the nature and impact of the increasing social and cultural diversity in K-12 schools in the United States. They learn ways of teaching all children well and to develop positive relationships among teachers, parents and children. Cross-listed with READ 305 and SASE 305. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, EDFD 210, or READ 210; and admission to Teacher Education Program.

EDFD312: Educating English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course module exposes students to the central issues in the education of English language learners in US schools and helps them learn about best practices in education through hands-on experience creating and adjusting lessons and instruction to benefit the academic performance of English language learners as well as of all students. Issues addressed include sociocultural, legal, and political influences on the education of English language learners; principles of second language acquisition; and explicit practice in planning academic content instruction for English language learners. Cross listed with READ 312 and SASE 312. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, EDFD 210 or READ 210; and admission to the Teacher Education program.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

MATH111: Applied Precalculus (4 hours lecture)

This course covers topics, including trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and polynomial functions, that are basic to success in the calculus sequence. Includes applications to Biology, Molecular Biology, and other empirical sciences. Uses graphics calculators extensively. May be substituted for MATH 112 (Precalculus Mathematics). 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Precalculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Precalculus Readiness Test.)

MATH112: Precalculus Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Binomial theorem, relations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, right triangle trigonometry, circular functions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Precalculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Precalculus Readiness Test.)

MATH116: Calculus A (4 hours lecture)

Differentiation and integration of functions, including trigonometric functions. Applications to biology and geoscience. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 112 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH122: Calculus I (4 hours lecture)

Limits, continuity; derivative and differentiation; applications of the derivative, maxima, minima, and extreme considerations; antiderivatives; Riemann integral. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 112 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH221: Calculus II (4 hours lecture)

Riemann integral applications, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, L'Hospital's rule, infinite series. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with grade of C- or better.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PHYS180: Descriptive Astronomy (3 hours lecture)

For the general student -- a discussion of our place in the universe from ancient ideas to modern data on the moon, planets, comets, stars, galaxies and quasars. The formation and evolution of planets, stars, black holes and the universe as a whole reveal our place in time. 3 sh.

PHYS191: University Physics I (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This one-semester calculus-based course including laboratory is a study of the principles of physics and some applications to society's problems. Topics covered include mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, and harmonic motion. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 is prerequisite or co-requisite.

PHYS192: University Physics II (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Calculus-based course. Study of some principles of physics and some applications to society's problems. Topics include: wave motion, sound and noise pollution, optics, electricity, lasers, nuclear theory, radiation, nuclear reactors, waste disposal. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221 is prerequisite or corequisite.

PHYS193: College Physics I (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This one-semester course including laboratory is a study of the principles and applications of classical physics. Topics covered include mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion and sound, as well as societal applications of physical principles. Calculus is not used, but familiarity with some algebra and trigonometry is required. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100.

PHYS194: College Physics II (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This one-semester course including laboratory is a study of the principles and applications of classical physics. Topics covered include optics, electricity and magnetism, and an introduction to modern and nuclear physics, as well as societal applications of physical principles. Calculus is not used, but familiarity with some algebra and trigonometry is required. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PHYS 193; and MATH 100 or MATH 111 or MATH 112.

PHYS280: Astronomy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Application of physical laws to the earth as a planet; nature of the other planets; orbital motion and space flight; origin of the solar system; the birth, life and death of a star galactic structure; and cosmology. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Physics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PHYS 191, 192 or PHYS 193, 194.

PHYS380: Observational Astronomy (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Observational techniques for the Moon, planets, satellites of other planets, asteroids, comets, stars, star clusters, and galaxies. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PHYS 191, PHYS 192 or PHYS 193, PHYS 194.

PHYS519: Special Topics in Physics (3 hours lecture)

Designed to acquaint the student with recent developments in physics and applications of physics. Examples of topic areas are astrophysics, laser applications, applications of quantum theory, solid state applications, radiation safety, nuclear waste disposal, and medical physics. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: At least 12 semester hours in physics and permission of Physics certification program coordinator.

PSYC200: Educational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Required for teaching. Covers child and adolescent development; fundamentals of learning theory as applied to classroom situations, learning inhibition and academic non-achievement, personal-social adjustment, measuring and evaluating teaching-learning, creativity. Course may not be taken by Psychology majors for major credit effective Fall 1995. 3 sh.

READ210: Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the public purposes of education in our social and political democracy. Students inquire into the role of schools in fostering the development of democratic principles and practices and examine various curriculum designs and pedagogical strategies. Students also explore the main issues stemming from the efforts to teach democratically in public educational institutions. Students complete 30 hours of fieldwork in an assigned high-performing urban school, which provides a context for these explorations. They examine and analyze successful practices of instruction and classroom management. Attendance at the first class is required to verify field expectations. This course is pre-requisite for admission into the teacher education program. Cross-listed with SASE 210 and EDFD 210. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Sophomore level or higher and ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

READ305: Teaching for Equity & Diversity (3 hour lecture)

This course examines the qualities of teachers, teaching, and schooling that foster the learning of students from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways in which socialization experiences shape perceptions. They reflect on their own beliefs, assumptions, and perceptions about sociocultural identity and how their own socialization has shaped their perceptions of themselves and other people. Students also examine the nature and impact of the increasing social and cultural diversity in K-12 schools in the United States. They learn ways of teaching all children well and to develop positive relationships among teachers, parents and children. Cross listed with EDFD 305 and SASE 305. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, READ 210, or EDFD 210; and admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ312: Educating English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course module exposes students to the central issues in the education of English language learners in US schools and helps them learn about best practices in education through hands-on experience creating and adjusting lessons and instruction to benefit the academic performance of English language learners as well as of all students. Issues addressed include sociocultural, legal, and political influences on the education of English language learners; principles of second language acquisition; and explicit practice in planning academic content instruction for English language learners. Cross-listed with SASE 312 and EDFD 312. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, READ 210, or EDFD 210; and admission to the Teacher Education program.

READ411: Language & Literacy (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to assist pre-service middle and secondary school teachers across majors in understanding the nature of language and literacy teaching and learning in their content areas. Students review basic components of reading, social and cultural aspects of literacy practice, and the specifics of language and literacy in different disciplines (e.g., distinct vocabulary, particular writing and reading demands). Students learn to develop a repertoire of teaching/learning literacy strategies that enhance comprehension. Students conduct sample assessments and content-area lessons with middle and high school students. Through observation in a content classroom, students learn ways of integrating literacy learning into their lessons as well as ways of organizing and managing the classroom to extend literacy learning. Fieldwork or service-learning experience is required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, READ 210, or EDFD 210; SASE 305, READ 305, or EDFD 305; and admission to Teacher Education Program.

SASE210: Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the public purposes of education in our social and political democracy. Students inquire into the role of schools in fostering the development of democratic principles and practices and examine various curriculum designs and pedagogical strategies. Students also explore the main issues stemming from the efforts to teach democratically in public educational institutions. Students complete 30 hours of fieldwork in an assigned high-performing urban school, which provides a context for these explorations. They examine and analyze successful practices of instruction and classroom management. Attendance at the first class is required to verify field expectations. This course is pre-requisite for admission into the teacher education program. Cross-listed with READ 210 and EDFD 210. Previous course CURR 210 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Sophomore level or higher and ENWR105 or HONP100.

SASE305: Teaching for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the qualities of teachers, teaching, and schooling that foster the learning of students from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students explore the ways in which socialization experiences shape perceptions. They reflect on their own beliefs, assumptions and perceptions about sociocultural identity and how their own socialization has shaped their perceptions of themselves and other people. Students also examine the nature and impact of the increasing social and cultural diversity in K-12 schools in the United States. They learn ways of teaching all children well and to develop positive relationships among teachers, parents and children. Cross listed with SASE 305 and READ 305. Previous course CURR 305 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, EDFD 210, or READ 210.

SASE312: Educating English Language Learners (1 hour lecture)

This course module exposes students to the central issues in the education of English language learners in US schools and helps them learn about best practices in education through hands-on experience creating and adjusting lessons and instruction to benefit the academic performance of English language learners as well as of all students. Issues addressed include sociocultural, legal, and political influences on the education of English language learners; principles of second language acquisition; and explicit practice in planning academic content instruction for English language learners. Cross listed with READ 312 and EDFD 312. Previous course CURR 312 effective through Spring 2014. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 210, EDFD 210, or READ 210; and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

SASE520: Inclusive iSTEM for the Adolescent Learner I (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an introduction to integrative STEM education (e.g., Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) as a tool to advance student learning in the STEM content areas, creativity, and innovation. Teachers today have a strong commitment to teaching the subject matter as listed in their content-area standards. However, given the changing trends in education and the push for technology integration, teachers and students are facing rapid change. This course addresses the essential question, "How do you inspire learning and creativity in all students according to the standards while maintaining balance in your core curriculum?" Through exploration of "big ideas" in invention and innovation, teacher candidates will begin to answer this question. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579 and SPED 568.

SPED279: Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the historical and ideological trends that impact the education of children in inclusive settings. Students explore the historical, political, and legal foundations of inclusive education; principles of inclusive planning, consultation, and collaboration; resources and services for effective inclusion and inclusive transition programs; characteristics of high and low-incidence disabilities; and implications for students with and without disabilities. This course includes a field experience in which students engage in reflective observation of inclusive classrooms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

SPED367: Language-Based Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms (3 hour lecture)

This course focuses on research-based instructional practices for inclusive education. In this course, students explore approaches to reading and writing instruction for students with diverse learning needs and consolidate these into a repertoire of instructional strategies that can be used to meet the needs of students with disabilities at various stages of skill mastery. Procedures addressed in this course are applicable in inclusive as well as more restrictive settings, and address the needs of students from a broad array of cultural, linguistic, and economic backgrounds. Students explore such issues as: special education identification and why large numbers of students fail; the importance of explicit instruction for students with learning problems; lesson planning for multiple learning environments; characteristics of students with mild-to-moderate disabilities in reading, writing, and spelling; components of research-based instruction in reading, written expression,, and spelling; modifications, accommodations, and materials for teaching students with disabilities in inclusive settings; and professional standards, including New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (NJCCCS) and New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 279 or ECEL 279.

SPED469: Inclusive Methods for Middle and Secondary Schools (3 hours lecture)

This course enhances the ability of future educators to provide access to the curriculum for students with disabilities in middle and secondary schools. Educators learn how to apply principles of developmentally appropriate practice and curriculum design to improve the learning of students who exhibit abilities across a wide range. The emphasis is on research-based and practical techniques and strategies that can be utilized in the certification area in an inclusive setting, focusing mainly on the Strategies Intervention Model. Students explore resources for adapting content area curriculum. This course requires a field experience working in schools tutoring students who are experiencing academic or basic skills difficulties. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED367

SPED488: Promoting Prosocial Behaviors in Inclusive Settings (3 hours lecture)

In this course, future teachers develop knowledge of theory and skills of practice related to the development of appropriate prosocial behaviors for students with disabilities within inclusive classroom settings. This course focuses on social behavior and the developmental and environmental factors that influence its expression. Students learn how to conduct a functional analysis of behavior, promote appropriate behavior, and develop a classroom setting that fosters prosocial behaviors. They explore principles of social/emotional learning, social skills development, data collection processes, schedules of reinforcement, monitoring of progress, social problem solving, and the promotion of a positive behavior plan. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED279 or ECEL279.

SPED584: Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom

This course is designed to be an introduction for pre-service teachers in the field of Special Education assessment and accountability. The course will introduce students to elements of traditional assessment, including record keeping, grading, objective and essay testing, theories of validity as well as authentic, performance, and portfolio assessment. The keeping of anecdotal records, inclusion, heterogeneous groups, and accommodations will also be components of this course. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).