Teaching, with Teacher Certification in Biological Science (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities (M.A.T.) Graduate (Combined B.S./M.A.T. - 2015 University Catalog

The Bachelor's/MAT Dual-Certification Inclusive Education Program provides students with the opportunity to receive both a bachelor's and Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree with teacher certification in both general education and special education.  The program is designed to help teachers develop competencies needed to teach students who have disabilities along with those who do not.

In this program, students complete general education and major requirements and an initial set of coursework in education as undergraduates. As graduate students, they will complete the coursework in education and conduct their fieldwork and student teaching.

TEACHING (Tchr Biol Sci P-12 & TSWD)

Complete 37 semester hours including the following 5 requirement(s):

  1. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE PART I

    Complete 2 courses:

    SASE 521 Inclusive iSTeM for the Adolescent Learner II (3 hours lecture) 3
    SPED 586 Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE PART II

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete .

      BIOL 503 Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (4 hours lecture) 4
    2. Complete 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete the following 2 courses:

        SASE 526 Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture) 3
        SASE 527 Fieldwork (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course from the following:

        ECEL 691 Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        SPED 691 Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE PART III

    Complete the following 2 courses:

    SASE 529 Student Teaching (6 hours lab) 6
    SASE 543 Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. ADDITIONAL GRADUATE COURSES

    The following coursework is completed as part of the undergraduate component.

    1. Complete 2 courses:

      SASE 520 Inclusive iSTEM for the Adolescent Learner I (3 hours lecture) 3
      SPED 584 Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom 2-3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following with advisor approval:

      BIOL 505 Experimental Cell Culture (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 512 Topics in Modern Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 513 Instrumentation and Techniques for Biological Science (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 515 Population Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 520 Plant Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 521 Field Studies of Flowering Plants (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 522 Plant Pathology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 529 Advanced Herpetology (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 532 Advanced Entomology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 533 Advanced Cell Biology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 540 Mammalian Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 542 Advanced Endocrinology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 543 Advances in Immunology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 544 Advanced Comparative Animal Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      BIOL 545 Experimental Endocrinology (1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 546 Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 547 Molecular Biology I (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 548 Molecular Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 549 Topics in Developmental Biology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 550 Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 551 Intermediary Metabolism I (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 552 Biology of Lipids (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 554 Microbial Physiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 555 Medical Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 556 Molecular Biology of Proteins (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 557 Virology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 558 Microbial Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 560 Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 561 Genomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 562 Short Topics in Molecular Biology (1 hour lecture) 1
      BIOL 563 Statistical Genomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 564 Proteomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 565 Advanced Plant Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 566 Bioinformatics (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 568 Advanced Neuroscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 570 Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 571 Physiological Plant Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 572 Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 573 Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 574 Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 575 Avian Biology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
      BIOL 576 Biology of Extreme Habitats (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 579 Physiological Ecology of Animals (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 586 Selected Avanced Topics in Biology 3-4
      BIOL 587 Selected Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3-4
      BIOL 588 Selected Advanced Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3-4
      BIOL 589 Selected Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3-4
      BIOL 593 Molecular Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 594 Signal Transduction (3 hours lecture) 3
      BIOL 595 Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
  5. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

    In the term that you will sit for exam, register for - which matches your major & advisor. Successfully pass exam.

    GRAD CMP Comprehensive Examination 0

Course Descriptions:

BIOL503: Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (4 hours lecture)

This course is designed for pre-service teachers and considers the standards-based objectives, curricula, planning, instructional strategies, materials, assessment, health and safety, and legal responsibilities in the secondary science program. The use of technology in the science program will be emphasized. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Teachers Education program for P-12 science certification.

BIOL505: Experimental Cell Culture (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This graduate course will provide theoretical and practical experience working on living cells. Provides understanding, observation, and hands-on experiences in tissue and organ culture techniques, primary cell culturing, cell differentiation, and techniques in toxicity and mutagenicity assays, plant callus and protopast experimentation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 380, or similar Genetics course with passing grade and a previous Microbiology course or experience.

BIOL512: Topics in Modern Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Seminar course. Selected topics from current development in genetic research, including chromosome and gene fine structure, extra chromosomal genetic elements, genetic engineering, and aspects of biomedical genetic research. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in genetics.

BIOL513: Instrumentation and Techniques for Biological Science (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

This course is designed to acquaint students with modern analytical and research techniques in biology, including manometry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, microbial batch growth and assay techniques, immunotechniques and evaluation of experimental design and data. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: 24 semester hours in biology.

BIOL515: Population Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Detailed survey of the theory and application of the genetics of popoulations. Topics to be covered include Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and Evolution, Natural and Artificial Selection, Migration, Mutation, Bottlenecks, Random Genetic Drift, and Genetic Variation. Students will learn population genetic principles and the mathematical theory behind those principles. Students will be required to write a literature paper on a topic of their choice related to Population Genetics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or permission of instructor.

BIOL520: Plant Physiology (3 hours lecture)

Investigation of physiology of plants. Plant growth, development and reproduction as well as the new advances in plant physiology. Water relations of plants, mineral nutrition, physiological significance of soil and soil moisture, photosynthesis, respiration, plant biosynthesis and dynamics of growth. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

BIOL521: Field Studies of Flowering Plants (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

The taxonomy, evolutionary trends and ecological adaptations of the gymnosperms and angiosperms. A variety of habitats will be visited and analyzed. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and field course in biology.

BIOL522: Plant Pathology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Causes, symptoms, and control of plant diseases. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and microbiology.

BIOL529: Advanced Herpetology (3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab)

Biology of the extant ectothermic tetrapods (amphibians and non-avian reptiles), including field identification, systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, reproduction, and ecology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 113.

BIOL532: Advanced Entomology (3 hours lecture)

Examination of insects as model systems for biological inquiry. Topics include an integrative treatment of insect molecular biology, genetics, physiology, behavior, evolution and ecology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in M.S. Biology program or permission of instructor.

BIOL533: Advanced Cell Biology (3 hours lecture)

Detailed analysis of cellular structure and function. Topics to be covered include the role of subcellular organelles in maintaining cell viability, analysis of cytoskeletal components, structure and function of the plasma membrane and cellular defects that lead to cancer and other disease states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in the biology master's program or permission of professor.

BIOL540: Mammalian Physiology (3 hours lecture)

A broad survey of the physiology of mammalian systems aimed at graduate students who lack an upper-level background in physiology at the undergraduate level. The principles of homeostatis mechanisms as they apply to various organ systems will be stressed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, but not open to students who have completed undergraduate upper division Mammalian/Human Physiology classes.

BIOL542: Advanced Endocrinology (3 hours lecture)

A study of the physiology of the mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on hormonal control of homeostasis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Endocrinology and cell biology.

BIOL543: Advances in Immunology (3 hours lecture)

To study in detail selected topics in immunology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Immunology.

BIOL544: Advanced Comparative Animal Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

The physiological mechanisms involved in the varied responses of both vertebrates and invertebrates to critical fluctuations of their physico-chemical environment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in Biology or permission of instructor. Students who have previously completed BIOL 451 may not enroll.

BIOL545: Experimental Endocrinology (1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab)

A seminar and laboratory course in endocrinology in which the various endocrine glands will be surgically removed or chemically destroyed and the morphologic and physiologic effects measured and observed. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Endocrinology.

BIOL546: Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture)

To give the student an in-depth understanding of a specific area of physiology in which there is a rapidly expanding body of knowledge. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: An undergraduate or graduate course in Physiology and permission of the department.

BIOL547: Molecular Biology I (3 hours lecture)

Central concepts at the cellular level will be emphasized. Contemporary viewpoints in the areas of biomolecules, energy yielding and energy requiring processes and transfer of genetic information. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Cell biology, and one year organic chemistry.

BIOL548: Molecular Biology II (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Central concepts at the cellular level will be emphasized. Contemporary viewpoints in the areas of biomolecules, energy yielding and energy requiring processes and transfer of genetic information. The laboratory will deal with up-to-date investigative procedures via selected experiments. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL549: Topics in Developmental Biology (3 hours lecture)

Seminar in the regulation of developmental events, including both classical morphogenesis and recent advances using techniques of cell and molecular biology. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Genetics and developmental embryology.

BIOL550: Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture)

Coverage of selected topics such as the microbial genetics, antibiotic action, bacteriophage, virus, cancer and microbial metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications of modern research in specific areas. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL551: Intermediary Metabolism I (3 hours lecture)

Discussion of interrelationships of catabolic and anabolic paths. Primary emphasis is placed on the metabolism of nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and proteins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry and cell biology.

BIOL552: Biology of Lipids (3 hours lecture)

Biological cycles, unity and diversity in metabolic paths, metabolic evolution, metabolic control mechanisms and other special topics. Primary emphasis is placed on the metabolism of lipids. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Cell biology and organic chemistry.

BIOL554: Microbial Physiology (3 hours lecture)

A study of microorganisms in terms of their morphology and metabolism. The significance of metabolic diversity and secondary metabolic products of various microorganisms will be explored through lecture topics. The economic significance of microbial metabolism in relation to industry and pathogenic diseases will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL555: Medical Genetics (3 hours lecture)

A detailed study and analysis of human genetics, inborn genetic diseases, genomics, gene therapy, and the Human Genome Project. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A genetics course or permission of instructor.

BIOL556: Molecular Biology of Proteins (3 hours lecture)

Study of the molecular biology of biomolecules, including proteins. The course will examine how changes in the three dimensional structure of biomolecules affect their biological function. Protein engineering, enzyme catalysis, and site-directed mutagenesis will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission into the graduate biology program or permission of department.

BIOL557: Virology (3 hours lecture)

This course will develop the fundamental principles of modern virology and examine the connection between viruses and disease. It will examine the molecular biology of virus replication, infection, gene expression, the structure of virus particles and genomes, pathogenesis, classification of viruses, and contemporary viral research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of a Cell & Molecular Biology course or permission of instructor.

BIOL558: Microbial Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Microbial Genetics provides students with an understanding of the basis for genetic processes in microorganisms and the implication for higher organisms. The focus of the course will be on prokaryotes, particularly E.coli, and viruses, primarily bacteriophages. Current developments in microbial genetics, such as bioinformatics and genomics, will be presented. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 350.

BIOL560: Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture)

A course that will focus on biological research problems that are being addressed in eucaryotic systems from a molecular genetics viewpoint. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 with a grade of "B" or better.

BIOL561: Genomics (3 hours lecture)

Describes the entire DNA sequence of organisms. Faciltates the understanding of the function of the genomes. Specific topics include comparative genomics, functional genomics and bioinformantics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 380 or permission of instructor.

BIOL562: Short Topics in Molecular Biology (1 hour lecture)

Focus on specific topics in molecular biology including the development induced pleuripotent cells, advances in RNA interference and recent innovations in understanding transcriptional regulation. Emphasis will be placed on providing the most up to date information on these topics. May be taken for up to 6 credits as long as the topics are different. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL563: Statistical Genomics (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the statistical problems arising recently in gene mapping, high throughputomic data analysis, phylogenetics and sequence analysis by integrating of both statistics and genomics. To learn the statistical methods and concepts that are of particular use in analyzing genetics and genomic data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 and STAT 401 or equivalent Statistics course as determined by department.

BIOL564: Proteomics (3 hours lecture)

Proteomics is the study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by a genome. This course will describe the structure of the proteins in the proteome and the functional interaction between the proteins and cover the development of large-scale technologies for protein separation, isolation, detection and quantitation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL565: Advanced Plant Molecular Genetics (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on plant molecular biology and genetics and how plant systems differ from other eucaryotic systems at a cellular level. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547, minimum grade of B.

BIOL566: Bioinformatics (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Describes the computational analysis of gene sequences, protein structures, and expression datasets on a large scale. Provides a way in which to manage and store huge amounts of data, and to create statistical tools for analyzing it. Specific topics include biological database search tools, DNA sequence alignment and comparison, analysis of protein structure, and phylogenetics analysis, as well as topics of current interest. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL568: Advanced Neuroscience (3 hours lecture)

The students will achieve an understanding of current concepts of nervous system function at the cellular level and at the level of higher systems and brain. The students will learn about the state of the art methods in modern neuroscience research and their applications. They will summarize and critique primary research papers and develop research proposals based on the acquired knowledge and their vision of future progress in neuroscience. A particular attention will be given to the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neurological diseases, and to current scientific approaches to treatment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or departmental approval.

BIOL570: Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Basic ecological principles and concepts. Habitat approach to field exercises in fresh water and terrestrial ecology. Intra and interspecific relationships with all living members of the ecosystem, problems in plant and animal biology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and zoology.

BIOL571: Physiological Plant Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

The effects of soil, light, and water on plant growth, as well as, toxic effects of metals and salinity are measured using growth chamber and greenhouse facilities. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany and one course in field biology.

BIOL572: Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Important biotic, chemical and physical parameters of New Jersey's estuaries. Evolution and successional trends of estuarine communities. Ecology of individual communities studied by field trips to Delaware Bay shore and to some Atlantic coast bays, marshes and offshore barrier islands. Also offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL573: Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Community structure, trophic dynamics, species diversity and distribution of bottom dwelling organisms in relationship to their environment; lectures, laboratory work and field investigations of the marine benthos. Also offered at NJ Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL574: Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture)

This seminar course explains the ecological consequences of animal behavior, viewed within the context of how behavior evolves and how populations adapt to their environments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Field biology and zoology.

BIOL575: Avian Biology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

An in-depth examination of the biology and life histories of birds, including their anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and systematics. Laboratory includes field trips on a varying schedule. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 570 or permission of instructor.

BIOL576: Biology of Extreme Habitats (3 hours lecture)

The course will describe the adaptations that allow the survival of plants and animals, as well as microorganisms, in a variety of extreme habitats. Some of these habitats include: deserts, arctic, grassland, estuaries. 3 sh.

BIOL579: Physiological Ecology of Animals (3 hours lecture)

A variety of different animals, ranging from protists to mammals, will be examined and compared to demonstrate the physiological adaptations they have evolved to successfully survive and reproduce. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Biology or permission of instructor.

BIOL586: Selected Avanced Topics in Biology

This course is designed to provide advanced biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in ecology, physiology, molecular biology, embryology and bioinformatics. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree. This course may be repeated once for a maximum of 8.0 credits. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 520 or BIOL 540 or BIOL 547 or BIOL 570.

BIOL587: Selected Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide advanced biology and molecular biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in molecular biology. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree and the molecular biology masters degree. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547.

BIOL588: Selected Advanced Topics in Physiology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide advanced biology and molecular biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in physiology. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree and the molecular biology masters degree. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 520 or BIOL 540.

BIOL589: Selected Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course is designed to provide advanced biology and molecular biology graduate students with a literature intensive exploration of current developments and specialized content in the biological sciences. Topics will cover specific research areas in ecology. This course is designed to fulfill elective requirements of the biology masters degree and the molecular biology masters degree. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 570.

BIOL593: Molecular Ecology (3 hours lecture)

Detailed survey of the application of molecular methods to address ecological, behavioral, and conservation questions. Topics to be covered include the principles of most common molecular techniques used in molecular ecology, and application of those molecular techniques to phylogeography, behavioral ecology, population genetics, conservation genetics, and adaptive variation. Students will develop and present independent research proposal. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or instructor's permission.

BIOL594: Signal Transduction (3 hours lecture)

This course will cover various aspects of cellular signaling from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Topics will include specific signal transduction systems, methods for studying these systems and the results of these signaling events on cell division, cell differentiation and cell function. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or permission of instructor.

BIOL595: Conservation Biology: The Preservation of Biological Diversity (3 hours lecture)

This course addresses concerns about the loss of biological diversity and genetic resources through species extinctions. Students will learn about the importance of maintaining biological diversity, the problems involved in monitoring and protecting sensitive and crucial habitat, the impact of human societies on biodiversity, the alternatives to the destruction of habitat/species, the prospects of restoration, and the policies needed to prevent the loss of biological diversity. Students will also learn about population processes that are directly related to species survival. This course is cross listed with CNFS 595. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

ECEL691: Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

The culminating experience for the BA/MAT Dual Certification programs, this course focuses on policies, issues, and trends related to the education of students in inclusive settings. Relevant sociological and cultural perspectives focused on the social construction of dis/ability are examined as well as their implications for the schools. Students synthesize, analyze, and evaluate issues of relevance to inclusive education that will impact their professional careers as teachers in inclusive environments and the future of inclusive education. Students also conduct an empirical research project on inclusion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 graduate credits in the program.

GRADCMP: Comprehensive Examination

This course is a placeholder for matriculated master's students planning to take the departmental Comprehensive Examination. Successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination will result in a grade of P, unsuccessful students will receive a grade of NC. Students who do not successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination will be required to register for this placeholder course in each term for which they plan to take the examination (limited to three). 0 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Master's degree program required.

SASE520: Inclusive iSTEM for the Adolescent Learner I (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an introduction to integrative STEM education (e.g., Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) as a tool to advance student learning in the STEM content areas, creativity, and innovation. Teachers today have a strong commitment to teaching the subject matter as listed in their content-area standards. However, given the changing trends in education and the push for technology integration, teachers and students are facing rapid change. This course addresses the essential question, "How do you inspire learning and creativity in all students according to the standards while maintaining balance in your core curriculum?" Through exploration of "big ideas" in invention and innovation, teacher candidates will begin to answer this question. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579 and SPED 568.

SASE521: Inclusive iSTeM for the Adolescent Learner II (3 hours lecture)

This course examines research and pedagogy for integrative STEM teaching and learning. In this course, teacher candidates learn to systematically apply design-based inquiry and project-based learning, and national STEM (e.g., Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) standards and integrative curricula. The setting for the study of inclusive iSTeM and design-based inquiry will focus on initiating iSteM teaching and learning in inclusive middle/secondary math and science classrooms, with particular attention to improving access to the general education STEM curriculum for students with disabilities and English language learners. Students will demonstrate their learning through design and inquiry projects, field-based, universally-designed instructional planning and implementation, class discussions, and writing assignments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579 and SPED 568 and SASE 522.

SASE526: Teaching for Learning I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence (SASE 526, SASE 543). This course focuses on developing classroom practices necessary for student teaching and the beginning of a professional career in teaching, building from the knowledge and skills developed in previous courses in the professional sequence. In conjunction with SASE 527-Fieldwork, students have the opportunity to observe in classrooms and to do individual, small group, and whole class teaching. Students investigate democratic classroom practice by focusing on curriculum development; creating a positive, well-structured climate for learning in their classrooms; learning and practicing techniques for effective classroom management; and choosing appropriate teaching strategies and assessments to create successful learning experiences for their students. Previous course CURR 526 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 505 or EDFD 505; SASE 509 or EDFD 509; SASE 516 or EDFD 516; SASE 517; SASE 518; READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SASE527: Fieldwork (3 hours lecture)

Students spend 60 hours, or approximately one day per week, in a selected public school. Activities include, but are not limited to, observing classroom teachers, facilitating small group and individual instruction, participating in after-school activities, tutoring, attending department meetings, shadowing and interviewing students and teachers, lesson planning and teaching, and assessing student work. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Previous course CURR 527 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 505 or EDFD 505; and SASE 509 or EDFD 509; and SASE 516 or EDFD 516; and SASE 517; and SASE 518; and EDFD 519 or SASE 519; and READ 501. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SASE529: Student Teaching (6 hours lab)

Full time student teaching in the public schools of New Jersey for the duration of a semester is required of all students who complete the regular program of certification requirements. 6 hour lab requirements. May be repeated once for a maximum of 12.0 credits. Previous course CURR 529 effective through Spring 2014. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 505 or EDFD 505; and SASE 509 or EDFD 509; and SASE 516 or EDFD 516; and SASE 517; and SASE 518; and SASE 519 or EDFD 519; and SASE 526; and SASE 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SASE543: Teaching for Learning II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence (SASE 526, SASE 543). This course focuses on putting into practice all the knowledge and skills students have developed throughout their professional sequence in their full-time, supervised student teaching experience. A primary focus is on planning and implementing curriculum. In addition to curriculum planning and using appropriate instructional and assessment strategies, students learn about the impact of the school and classroom culture and climate on student learning and on relationships between and among students, teachers, and other professionals in school. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. Previous course CURR 543 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SASE 505 or EDFD 505; and SASE 509 or EDFD 509; and SASE 516 or EDFD 516; and SASE 517; and SASE 518; and SASE 526; and SASE 527; and READ 501; and content area methods course(s). Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED584: Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom

This course is designed to be an introduction for pre-service teachers in the field of Special Education assessment and accountability. The course will introduce students to elements of traditional assessment, including record keeping, grading, objective and essay testing, theories of validity as well as authentic, performance, and portfolio assessment. The keeping of anecdotal records, inclusion, heterogeneous groups, and accommodations will also be components of this course. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED586: Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on a Research-Based and Teacher-Tested Support Model for planning and implementing transition services for students with disabilities. Successful transition services will allow students to build the bridges toward becoming independent self advocates with the insights, skills, knowledge, and learning techniques for successful transition from school to adult life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED691: Issues, Policies and Trends in Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

The culminating experience for the BA/MAT Dual Certification programs, this course focuses on policies, issues, and trends related to the education of students in inclusive settings. Relevant sociological and cultural persepectives focused on the social construction of disability are examined as well as their implications for the schools. Students synthesize, analyze, andevaluate issues of relevance to inclusive education that will impact their professional careers as teachers in inclusive environments and the future of inclusive education. Students also conduct an empirical research project on inclusion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 Graduate credits in the program. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).