Teaching, with Teacher Certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6 (M.A.T.) - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog

Coordinator: Dr. Susan Wray
Office: University Hall, Room 3187
Phone: (973) 655-4243
Email: wrays@mail.montclair.edu

Montclair State University’s Teacher Education Program is one of the most highly-regarded teacher preparation programs in the country. It has been consistently recognized both nationally and regionally for its unique features, including its structure, partnerships, and curricular emphases. The program is considered a model for other colleges and universities and has continuously been accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954.

The Teacher Education Program’s professional course sequence and field experiences emphasize teaching for critical thinking and culturally responsive teaching. The professional component for both graduate students addresses four broad areas: 1) student development and learning, 2) the classroom and the school, 3) the curriculum, and 4) effective teaching skills. erience with groups of children.


TEACHING (ELEMENTARY EDUCATION K-6)

Complete the following 2 requirements for a total of 42 semester hours:

  1. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STATE CERT

    1. Complete or graduate level equivalent with written approval.

      FCST 512 Child Development I: Theories of Child Development (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. SPEECH

      Complete or complete by examination.

      CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. PHYSIOLOGY & HYGIENE

      Pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the COP or have UG equivalent course approved by advisor.

  2. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 36 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

    1. CORE COURSES

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

        ECEL 501 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Diverse Society (3 hours lecture) 3
        EDFD 503 Methods of Research (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 500 Literacy Foundations (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course from the following list.

        ECEL 518 Families, Communities, and Schools: Diversity, Culture and Democracy (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 508 Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. Complete 1 course from the following list.

        READ 503 Literature for Adolescents (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 507 Understanding Reading Comprehension (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 519 Language and Early Literacy Development (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 522 History of Literacy and Media (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 524 Teaching Multiethnic Literature in P-8 Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 525 Literacies, Digital Technology and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 600 Workshop in Contemporary Issues in Reading 1-3
    2. CONTENT/METHODS

      Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

      ECEL 516 Social Studies and the Arts: Understanding Democracy in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 517 Integrating Science and Technology in Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 577 Mathematics Education in the Elementary School (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. Complete 3 courses for 6 semester hours:

        ECEL 502 Seminar I: Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
        ECEL 510 Clinical Experience I in Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings 2
        ECEL 522 Curriculum Development and Assessment in Diverse Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete for 1 semester hours.

        ECEL 504 Seminar II: Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
      3. Complete 1 course for 5 semester hours from the following list (ECEL 514 is for students in full-time teaching positions)

        ECEL 511 Clinical Experience II in Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings 5
        ECEL 514 In-Service Supervised Graduate Student Teaching 5
    4. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

      In the term that you will sit for exam, register for - which matches your major & advisor. Successfully pass exam.

      GRAD CMP Comprehensive Examination 0

Course Descriptions:

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL501: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Diverse Society (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children, families, and society. They examine ways our education system reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society with particular emphasis on inclusive education, culturally responsive teaching, and democratic practice. Required field work component. 3 sh.

ECEL502: Seminar I: Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Accompanies ECEL 510, Clinical Experience I in Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings, and offers students a forum for discussion, reflection, and critical thinking with regard to clinical work in inclusive elementary classrooms. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to M.A.T. in Early Childhood or Elementary Education or Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Early Childhood or Elementary Education.

ECEL504: Seminar II: Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

This course provides students with a forum to discuss the role of the teacher as teacher candidates take on full-time classroom responsibilities. Discussions focus on identifying and involving oneself in the professional field of early childhood/elementary/middle school education, upholding and advocating for ethical standards, engaging in continuous and collaborative learning, and taking a critical stance to inform practice. Teacher candidates demonstrate that they can make and justify decisions based on their knowledge of central issues such as developmentally appropriate practice, culturally responsive learning and teaching, and the context of children's lives. 1 sh.

ECEL510: Clinical Experience I in Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings

Provides clinical experiences in an early childhood or elementary setting to foster the skills and dispositions necessary to become effective and nurturing teachers. Students provide learning opportunities that support children's intellectual, social, and emotional development; design environments that support culturally responsive teaching; and plan and assess high quality curriculum. Students develop skills as reflective and questioning practitioners, promote democratic values and communication in the classroom, and build relationships with school colleagues, families, and agencies in the larger community. 2 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to M.A.T. in Early Childhood or Elementary Education or Post-Baccalaureate Program in Early Childhood or Elementary Education.

ECEL511: Clinical Experience II in Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings

Students demonstrate their knowledge of child development and the significant role of families and communities with regard to children's learning by planning and implementing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an inclusive early childhood/elementary classroom. Focusing on the diverse needs of individual children, students develop, implement, and assess an integrated curriculum unit that incorporates the Core Curriculum Content Standards and emphasizes literacy across the curriculum. As reflective practitioners, students utilize multiple strategies to assess children's learning, classroom climate, and effective classroom management. Students are responsible for the full range of teacher activities in the classroom and are expected to seek out the resources of parents, administrators, and school colleagues. Students are to demonstrate their strengths as a teacher. 5 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 510.

ECEL514: In-Service Supervised Graduate Student Teaching

Replaces student teaching for students who are employed as full-time teachers with primary responsibility for a classroom. Students are supervised by university faculty during one semester. Students must obtain permission of the school district and department and complete a COP application. Specific qualifications are required. 5 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 522 or ECEL 528.

ECEL516: Social Studies and the Arts: Understanding Democracy in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

By integrating the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-students consider the knowledge, skills and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national and global contexts in the 21st Century. Working independently and in groups, students use technology to enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning. Course activities enable students to discover methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. Students learn how four strands frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, Human Right; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. 3 sh.

ECEL517: Integrating Science and Technology in Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Inquiry based science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) experiences for elementary instruction serve as a framework for this course. In this course, students examine the process of discovery through individual and group activities in STEM grounded in critical thinking and problem solving activities, effective pedagogical strategies that engage children in the wonder of STEM, a survey of dominant STEM curricula, and analysis of the impact policy documents have on the work of elementary educators. Opportunities for fieldwork. 3 sh.

ECEL518: Families, Communities, and Schools: Diversity, Culture and Democracy (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students explore how social and cultural influences shape children's development and learning. They examine the relationships among teacher, parent, child, and community as they affect learning and learn about methods for developing school/family partnerships. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity and culturally responsive teaching as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

ECEL522: Curriculum Development and Assessment in Diverse Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to reflective curriculum planning. Students plan a long-term integrated unit that integrates state standards, differentiated instructional strategies, and appropriate adaptations for students with diverse learning styles and interests, students with disabilities, and English Language Learners. They critically examine the issues related to their teaching and learning experiences focusing on inclusion practices, assessment, classroom management, equity and culturally responsive teaching. Students critically examine their teaching beliefs, ethics and teacher professionalism in the field of elementary education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 501.

ECSE508: Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the importance of meaningful family-professional partnerships. Students gain knowledge, skills, and dispositions to work collaboratively with diverse families to support the education of children with disabilities. The influence of historical, social, cultural, and community influences are deeply embedded in course content. Various approaches including family-focused practice and family systems theory are explored. Students draw from course readings, presentations by guest speakers, and personal and professional experiences to participate in class discussions, complete assignments and expand their understanding of issues vital to families of children with disabilities. 3 sh.

EDFD503: Methods of Research (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an overview of key methodological principles and approaches to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research. Research literacy and developing the ability to access, read, and critique professional research literature in education, counseling, and related fields is a central focus on the course. The course also provides an opportunity for students to evaluate current research relevant to their professional interests. Previous course ELRS 503 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

FCST512: Child Development I: Theories of Child Development (3 hours lecture)

In this course students examine and critique the standard theories of so-called "normative" child development along with newer contextual models that consider the role of oppressive structures in the lives of children. 3 sh.

GRADCMP: Comprehensive Examination

This course is a placeholder for matriculated master's students planning to take the departmental Comprehensive Examination. Successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination will result in a grade of P, unsuccessful students will receive a grade of NC. Students who do not successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination will be required to register for this placeholder course in each term for which they plan to take the examination (limited to three). 0 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Master's degree program required.

MATH577: Mathematics Education in the Elementary School (3 hours lecture)

The contemporary mathematics curriculum of the elementary and middle school. The role of behavioral objectives and learning theory in curriculum development/teacher training. Related research findings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.

READ500: Literacy Foundations (3 hours lecture)

Students examine the theoretical and pedagogical foundations of literacy and literacy teaching. This involves learning about reading development, early years and elementary literacy instruction, assessment processes and policies, and practical strategies for ensuring literacy success for all school students. 3 sh.

READ503: Literature for Adolescents (3 hours lecture)

Offers background for the development of recreational reading programs in middle schools and high schools. Literature written for students, as well as literature intended to be read widely by adolescents, criteria for book selection, censorship, role of mass media, minority group identification through books, bibliotherapy, bibliographic tools, and the importance of the librarian. 3 sh.

READ507: Understanding Reading Comprehension (3 hours lecture)

Pre-service and in-service teachers examine the concept of reading comprehension. Students make the link between influential theories of reading comprehension, specific elements of reading as a practice, and real-world reading and teaching situations. Over the course of the semester, students articulate and reflect upon their own concepts of reading comprehension, and identify useful approaches for working with a range of school students and types of readers. 3 sh.

READ519: Language and Early Literacy Development (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the nature of language, communication, and literacy development in children of diverse backgrounds and abilities during the foundational early childhood period from birth through age five. Students explore how children acquire language in social context and the impact of biological, psycholinguistic, and sociocultural factors on language development in both typically and atypically developing children. Students examine the relationships between language skills and emergent literacy, and the role of parents, teachers and other caregivers in helping prepare children to successfully acquire school-based Literacies. Students explore state and national policies that seek to improve preschool supports for language and early literacy development and the impact of increasing linguistic and cultural diversity on early childhood language arts/literacy education. 3 sh.

READ522: History of Literacy and Media (3 hours lecture)

Students learn about the history of literacy and media from early sign-making systems, to the printing press, to broadcast media and education, to the internet, and across ancient, modern and post-modern eras. Students also learn the history of a range of literacy educational initiatives from Dame Schools and tutor systems, to literacy "readers" in schools, to national policies that shape education, and more. In learning about the history of literacy and media, students engage with issues concerning dominant literacy discourses in education and wider society, children's and youths' literacy practices and the extent to which these are built upon in schools, and the relationship between literacy policies and classroom practices over time. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 500 or READ 501 or instructor's permission.

READ524: Teaching Multiethnic Literature in P-8 Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Students examine multiethnic children's literature as aesthetic forms and pedagogical tools. Students analyze the social, political, and education implications of this literature and its use in P-8 classrooms. Students are encouraged to introduce powerful, well-written and illustrated, and engaging literature into their classroom teaching across a range of subject areas as they explore important topics, such as race, ethnicity, and democracy; processes such as critical thinking and critical media analysis; and issues of power and privilege. Students learn to use this literature effectively and confidently within a range of curriculum and assessment structures. 3 sh.

READ525: Literacies, Digital Technology and Learning (3 hours lecture)

Within this course, students examine a range of theoretical, methodological and practical approaches to identifying and understanding new literacies. In particular, students engage with sociocultural approaches to understanding and exploring new literacies that focus on literacy in connection with social practices. Students also evaluate popular literacy and technology uses in classrooms, and develop their own strategies for bringing together literacy learning and digital technologies in well informed and forward-looking ways in schools. 3 sh.

READ600: Workshop in Contemporary Issues in Reading

Students have the opportunity to learn about current literacy-related issues, developments, pedagogies, policies, and so on within this course. Each workshop is topic-specific and designed by faculty on a course-by-course basis. Students within the program are encouraged to request that this course be offered to target a specific topic they themselves find timely or pressing. 1 - 3 sh.