Public Health, Community Health Education Concentration (M.P.H.) - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog

Graduate Program Coordinator: Dr. Lisa Lieberman
Department Administrator: Ann Schurmann
Phone Number: (973) 655-7681
Email: mph@mail.montclair.edu

Click here for detailed information and for answers to frequently-asked questions!

The mission of the Master of Public Health program is to prepare culturally and professionally competent leaders in community health education by providing an interdisciplinary academic and experiential program with a focus on social justice. Through this program, students will master public health knowledge and skills while developing professional values and dispositions. Graduates of the program will be prepared for careers as public health leaders in local and state health departments, public and private health agencies, voluntary organizations focused on specific health issues (e.g. cancer or heart health), schools, health care settings, community based organizations, policy and advocacy organizations, and other settings in which health monitoring and health education initiatives are implemented. The core of the proposed program comprises the five core disciplines of public health: biostatistics, environmental health sciences, epidemiology, health policy and management, and social and behavioral sciences. Community Health Education is a concentration that aims to prepare public health professionals to protect and enhance the health and well-being of populations through health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. Communities may be large or small geographic areas, institutions such as schools or workplaces, groups affiliated by common characteristics (race or ethnicity, religious practices, sexual behaviors, common experiences, etc.), or other groups of people.

Program Objectives:

The Master of Public Health program has the following objectives:

  • To prepare public health practitioners with strong skills in performing community health need assessments
  • To prepare public health practitioners with strong skills in planning, implementing, evaluating, and sustaining community health education initiatives.
  • To prepare public health practitioners who are committed to social justice and the elimination of health disparities and who actively and continually examine their discipline using critical thinking.
  • To collaborate with field-based professionals - based on parity, trust, and mutual interests - to improve the public's health and advance the standing of the profession.

PUBLIC HEALTH w/CONC:Community Health Ed

Complete 42 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. CORE COURSES

    Complete 2 requirements for 18 semester hours:

    1. Complete 5 courses:

      HLTH 501 Public Health Seminar: Foundations, Ethics, and Cultural Competency (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 502 Determinants of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 504 Behavioral and Social Science in Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 565 Foundations of Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 580 Health Policy and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      FCST 506 Introductory Statistical Methods in Family and Child Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 500 Biostatistical Methods for Research Workers I (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete 2 requirements for 12 semester hours:

    1. Complete 3 courses:

      HLTH 528 Program Planning and Evaluation (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 529 Applied Topics in Program Planning and Evaluation (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 555 Health Disparities and Social Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      EDFD 503 Methods of Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 503 Research Methods in Health (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. ELECTIVES

    Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

    CHAD 501 Introduction to Applied Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
    CHAD 503 Current Social Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 510 Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
    EVAL 505 Applied Data Collection Techniques and Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
    EVAL 520 Theory-Driven Evaluation. Starting Winter 2016: Advanced Approaches to Evaluation (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 512 Child Development I: Theories of Child Development (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 515 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 516 Human Development (3 hours lecture) 3
    FCST 544 Intercultural Study of Family (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 511 Biomedical and Psychosocial Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 520 Foundations and Methods in Health Education (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 525 Grant Writing (3 lecture hours) 3
    HLTH 533 Behavioral Aspects of Diet, Activity and Health (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 560 Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 575 The Teaching of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 577 Selected Topics in Health (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 592 Controversies in Sexuality Education (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 605 Community Project 3
    ICMH 501 Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 557 Food Safety (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 577 Social Marketing in Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 580 Current Applications in Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 581 Nutrition Education (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 585 Food and Nutrition Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
    NUFD 590 Nutrition Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 551 Latina/o Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 552 General Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. FIELDWORK/CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Complete 2 requirements for 9 semester hours:

    1. Complete for 6 semester hours

      HLTH 604 Internship and Professional Seminar 3-6
    2. Complete for 3 semester hours.

      HLTH 606 Culminating Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3

Course Descriptions:

CHAD501: Introduction to Applied Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the maltreatment of children from both a historical and contemporary perspective. It will discuss the three major reform movements of the Progressive Era that shaped the field of child advocacy. Students will also explore recent trends in legislation that affect abused and neglected children. Emphasis will be on the historical and current role of the child advocate. Empirical and applied research will be reviewed. 3 sh.

CHAD503: Current Social Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on current social issues in the field of child advocacy. Poverty, drug abuse, illnesses and violence will be explored. Strategies for social change will be highlighted and discussed. 3 sh.

EAES510: Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

Provides graduate students who have finished any introductory GIS courses or equivalents an opportunity to advance both the practical skills and theoretical understanding of GIS. The course will focus on application of GIS to urban planning, locational analysis, public health, crime analysis, resource and land use management, transportation planning, environmental management etc. In the meantime, specific topics such as geovisualization, geographic database design, GIS modeling and management will be treated as an integrated part during the applications. Previous course EUGS 570 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES 210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 310.

EDFD503: Methods of Research (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an overview of key methodological principles and approaches to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research. Research literacy and developing the ability to access, read, and critique professional research literature in education, counseling, and related fields is a central focus on the course. The course also provides an opportunity for students to evaluate current research relevant to their professional interests. Previous course ELRS 503 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

EVAL505: Applied Data Collection Techniques and Analysis (3 hours lecture)

In this course students survey the different techniques through which applied researchers and program evaluators in education, human services and public health collect, manage, and analyze primary and secondary data. Students evaluate the different forms that primary and secondary data can take and the strengths and limitations of both forms. Students critically examine a range of strategies to collect these data, including administrative record data, public-use micro data, surveys, focus groups, interviews, observations, among others. Students learn how to transform and manage these data prior to analysis. An array of different analytic techniques including basic descriptive statistics, coding, and content. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EVAL 501 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EVAL520: Theory-Driven Evaluation. Starting Winter 2016: Advanced Approaches to Evaluation (3 hours lecture)

The course provides students with cutting-edge knowledge and tools associated with the framework of theory-driven evaluation to assess and improve intervention programs in areas of education, human services and public health. Students apply program theory and pertinent research methods to design an implementation and/or outcome evaluation. In addition, students propose a theory-driven evaluation that considers stakeholders' perspectives, formulate an evaluation design, collect and analyze data, and draft reports that explain how to use the results of theory-driven evaluation to drive program improvement. Starting Winter 2016: This course provides students with cutting-edge knowledge and tools associated with the framework of theory-driven evaluation and other advanced approaches to assess and improve intervention programs in areas of education, human services and public health. Students apply program theory and other pertinent research methods and approaches to design an implementation and/or outcome evaluation. In addition, students propose an evaluation that considers stakeholders' perspectives, formulate an evaluation design, collect and analyze data, and draft reports that explain how to use the results of the evaluation to drive program improvement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: EVAL 505 and EVAL 501.

FCST506: Introductory Statistical Methods in Family and Child Studies (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an overview of basic statistics used in family and child studies taking an applied approach. Students develop a conceptual understanding of the methods used in data analysis. They learn about descriptive statistics, normal distributions, confidence intervals, significance tests, correlation, simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Students are also introduced to several advanced statistical methods such as factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. 3 sh.

FCST512: Child Development I: Theories of Child Development (3 hours lecture)

In this course students examine and critique the standard theories of so-called "normative" child development along with newer contextual models that consider the role of oppressive structures in the lives of children. 3 sh.

FCST515: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

Students utilize developmental and ecological approaches to study physical, cognitive, and social development of adolescents (11-18 years) in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Students also examine how family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural factors, and politics can have an influence on adolescents. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status in adolescent development are likewise examined. Students also engage in out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as develop an APA style research literature review or proposal paper. 3 sh.

FCST516: Human Development (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students learn about theories and current knowledge of human development throughout the lifespan (from conception through death). Drawing on lifespan and life course perspectives, students critically examine various issues and topics related to social, emotional, cognitive, psychological, and biological change with an emphasis on the diversity of humans. The role of cultural context in shaping the course of human development is emphasized. Students explore topics related to both typical and atypical development, as well as research methods for assessing developmental change. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

FCST544: Intercultural Study of Family (3 hours lecture)

In this course students perform an analytical study of cross cultural regularities and differentials in family structures, while examining functions and impact of social change on family values and patterns. Students utilize a variety of conceptual approaches to the study of families as well as gain a broad acquaintance with empirical studies and research. 3 sh.

HLTH501: Public Health Seminar: Foundations, Ethics, and Cultural Competency (3 hours lecture)

In this course, to be taken in the first semester in the program, students learn about the role of the core areas of public health (epidemiology and biostatistics, health policy, environmental health, behavioral and social aspects of health) in public health practice. Students also learn about the basis of public health ethics by examining the history and codes of ethics for both community-based and research-based public health work. Finally, students explore issues of cultural competency by examining an array of cultures and beginning to develop the skills needed to develop culturally competent interventions. Students apply their knowledge, practice skills, enhance their understanding of culture and ethics, and improve their oral and written communication skills. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH majors only.

HLTH502: Determinants of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture)

Advanced study of health and safety aspects of the environment: air, water, industrial pollution and the impact of expanding population on health problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Environmental Studies w/ conc: Environmental Science (ESES) MA majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH503: Research Methods in Health (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical and practical experiences in methods of inquiry, designing of research studies, utilization of various tools for gathering data, statistical analysis of data, and writing of research proposals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, Health Education (HLPE) MA, and Nutrition and Food Science (NUFS) MA majors only.

HLTH504: Behavioral and Social Science in Health (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students develop knowledge and skills needed to understand community, individual, and organizational behaviors and change processes in cross-cultural settings as a foundation for planning culturally appropriate public health education programs. Students learn about social theories of health behaviors, and behavioral and social interventions that can promote healthy behaviors and therefore decrease morbidity and premature mortality; and develop skills for planning and evaluating health education and health promotion programs. Students apply knowledge, practice skills, enhance computer literacy, and improve oral and written communication skills. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH majors only.

HLTH511: Biomedical and Psychosocial Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Examines the complex biomedical and psychosocial dimensions of contemporary drug use, emphasizing consideration of a broad spectrum of physiological responses to and health consequences of involvement. Provides a comprehensive view of the historical and social aspects of drug use, and an analysis of selected major issues presented by our current problems with drugs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Health Education, Counseling w/conc in Addictions Counseling and Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education majors only.

HLTH520: Foundations and Methods in Health Education (3 hours lecture)

Study of the scientific historical foundations and the instructional methodologies in health education and health promotion with opportunity for practical application of various methodologies for the achievement of specific objectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH525: Grant Writing (3 lecture hours)

This course prepares students to develop proposals to secure grants from various types of funding agencies, including government, foundation, corporate and individual sources. Students develop skills to identify promising funding sources and write effective grant proposals that address important public health needs, are theoretically sound, empirically supported, feasible, and appropriate given the state of the science and practice. Students develop needs assessments that incorporate relevant data, program goals and objectives, clear program plans, evaluation plans, and budgets. By writing a grant proposal over the course of the semester and incorporating feedback, students develop strong grant writing skills through experiential learning. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH528: Program Planning and Evaluation (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the principles and methods of program planning and evaluation for health education and health promotion activities. Students develop an understanding of theoretical and applied issues in planning, implementing and evaluating health programs. They critically examine ethical and political dimensions of program planning and evaluation and consider how these affect current practices and future directions. Course sessions and assignments are designed to engage students in developing applied skills in program planning and evaluation as well as critiquing programs and evaluations. It is recommended that students take a basic course in statistics before taking this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Basic course in Statistics Recommended. Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH529: Applied Topics in Program Planning and Evaluation (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students apply the principles and methods of program planning and evaluation through a variety of hands-on learning activities. Drawing from the program planning and evaluation theories and principles learned in HLTH 528, students practice and refine skills in: setting program goals and objectives; designing surveys and other measurement instruments (both quantitative and qualitative); collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data; and using data to modify and improve health promotion programs. Students explore issues of program implementation and fidelity, working within local contexts and cultures, and program sustainability. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 528.

HLTH533: Behavioral Aspects of Diet, Activity and Health (3 hours lecture)

The combination of poor diet and lack of physical activity has been identified as the second leading preventable cause of death in the United States, second only to tobacco. Therefore, understanding and positively changing these behaviors is of paramount importance for the field of public health. This course examines the epidemiology of population-based dietary and physical activity behaviors, the social and behavioral contexts and meanings of diet and physical activity, their relationships to chronic diseases, and public health intervention approaches. Students use the principle of energy balance -the balance between energy intake (through food and drink) and energy expenditure (primarily through physical activity) - as a framework for studying and intervening in diet and activity behaviors. Students examine issues including overweight and obesity, poverty and food insufficiency, sedentary leisure habits, and the roles of individuals, government, and industry. Students critically analyze current initiatives in the United States and other industrialized nations. Emphasis is placed on theoretically sound intervention approaches and primary prevention through the cultivation of habits that promote health and prevent disease. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH555: Health Disparities and Social Justice (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for students interested in working with underserved populations in the United States and internationally. The course helps prepare students to become leaders in US and international health by developing their ability to research, analyze, and compare information from multiple sources, and guides them in their efforts to improve the health conditions of those overburdened by poverty, marginalization and social injustice. Students examine the ways in which multiple forms of discrimination as well as neighborhood and community factors and inequalities in socioeconomic status interact to influence health behaviors. They explore the impact of access to health care services on health outcomes. Instruction is case-based and focuses on a set of medical problems of relevance to people living at the margins of society. Students work individually and in teams to develop interventions and solutions to the problems addressed in class. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH560: Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Presents a contemporary view of the major infectious and chronic/degenerative diseases with an emphasis on the principles of causation, process, diagnosis, prevention, and management. Important past and present medical developments are discussed in the context of continuing change, methods and inferences of epidemiologic investigation are studied and the implications of ongoing research are considered. Concludes with an instructional component which addresses methodology and disease specific information resources. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A basic course in biology. Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH565: Foundations of Epidemiology (3 hours lecture)

Provides an understanding of the epidemiologic method of identifying disease-causing agents. Emphasizes the generation of hypotheses based on descriptive epidemiologic data, the testing of hypotheses by analytical epidemiologic research design, the determination of causality and value of epidemiologic research in developing disease prevention programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, Health Education (HLPE) MA & CER and Nutrition and Food Science (NUFS) MS majors only.

HLTH575: The Teaching of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of instructional methodologies and resource materials pertaining to human sexuality education. Emphasizes curriculum development, teaching plans, resource selection and the role of the teacher in school and community setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 290. Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH577: Selected Topics in Health (3 hours lecture)

Course provides students with the opportunity to expand their professional preparation and expertise about selected topics in health not covered in other graduate health courses. The selected topics will be based on significant, emerging health problems and issues and new scientific developments and discoveries. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Human Sexuality Education (HSED) CER majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH580: Health Policy and Politics (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of politics of health care, health policy issues and the health care delivery system. Special emphasis is placed on health policy as it has evolved in response to sociopolitical and economic factors and expected future trends. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH592: Controversies in Sexuality Education (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates current controversies in the field of sexuality education and how they are played out at various levels including within the classroom. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to MA in Health Education and Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education and Human Sexuality Education majors only.

HLTH604: Internship and Professional Seminar

Students work with an advisor to identify a suitable placement site engaged in health education/public health activities- providing students real-world work experience and opportunity to complete projects that meet the needs of the community agency. Students must complete 6 credits, and can do so in one semester for 6 credits, or two semesters for 3 credits each. Students must attend a course seminar held monthly throughout the semester (or both, if the student elects to complete the course in two semesters). Seminar activities assist them in measuring specific competencies they have selected, problem-solving in the field, developing presentation skills, completing their projects, and presenting their work. The course instructor and on-site preceptor provide supervision. For each 3-credit block, students must complete 180 hours (360 for the total 6 credits). Both on and offsite hours are counted, with specific activities or projects mutually determined by the student and preceptor. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: 18 credit hours completed in the MPH program.

HLTH605: Community Project

In this course, students continue to enhance their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of public health professional and increase their competency as community health educators. Following completion of 6 credits of HLTH 604, students may elect to complete an additional 3 credit fieldwork experience, carefully selected to provide experiences that reflect the mission of the MPH in Community Health Education program and meet the individual learning and career needs of students, while responding to the real public health issues in the community. Students are linked with community groups that are either planning, want to plan, or have an identified need for a community health education activity. Students may be involved in a variety of projects, including performing community health assessments, producing health education materials, and serving as health educators. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Must have completed all six credits of HLTH 604.

HLTH606: Culminating Seminar (3 hours seminar)

This capstone course integrates learning from the MPH program by requiring students to develop a final ePortfolio that demonstrates mastery of program competencies, as well as their leadership skills, professionalism, and a commitment to social justice. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 604; Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits before enrolling in this course.

ICMH501: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the main issues in the field of Infant Mental Health - an interdisciplinary field concerned with the optimal development of the infant and young child within the context of his/her primary relationships. Students survey the theoretical origins of the field as well as contributions made by various allied disciplines to our understanding of human development. They review historical and contemporary perspectives on the developmental progress of infants, toddlers and young children, and methods by which assessment and intervention occur. Students examine the remarkable competencies of the newborn and infant, the field of interpersonal neurobiology, the nature of human attachment, the psychological dimensions of pregnancy and parenting, including the critical ways in which the infant's arrival alters the family system, and the interpersonal nature of human development. They also understand disruptions and disorders of attachment and the impact on relational development over the lifespan. 3 sh.

NUFD557: Food Safety (3 hours lecture)

This course is offered for those who must understand food sanitation and safety for effective food management and production. The course emphasizes the understanding of food safety and food sanitation risk management and microbial food contaminants as it encompasses changing federal and state compliance regulations including Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), good manufacturing practices and Safe, Sanitary Operational Procedures (SSOP). 3 sh.

NUFD577: Social Marketing in Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

Social Marketing in Nutrition course entails a comprehensive view of the applications of social marketing in the design, implementation, and evaluation of nutrition education programs. Social marketing is an audience-centered approach that focuses on multiple, reinforcing channels of communication along with environmental changes to influence behavior. Highlights of social marketing will be presented in light of its usefulness and applicability to nutrition education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Basic nutrition course or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 501 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD580: Current Applications in Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course enables students to develop detailed and in-depth knowledge of recent findings in human nutrition and to apply this knowledge by learning how to write a grant application for funding. Emphasis is placed on the critical review and analysis of recent developments in nutrition research and developing a successful proposal. 3 sh.

NUFD581: Nutrition Education (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide students with skills for developing, implementing, evaluating and funding nutrition education programs for populations with various demographic characteristics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 182 or 192, and BIOL 243 or equivalent. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 501 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD585: Food and Nutrition Issues (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of current issues in food and nutrition with an emphasis on consumer, food industry, government and professional perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: NUFD 382. Starting Winter 2016: NUFD 501 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

NUFD590: Nutrition Policy (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to theories, models, and analytic frameworks for understanding the dynamics of policy making and evaluation processes that address nutrition policy problems. Students develop a project for evaluating policy decision-making, outcomes and impacts. Case studies are used as a teaching tool to underscore policy lessons, facilitate small group discussion, and introduce students to several policy initiatives (i.e., School Meal Programs, Food stamps, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

PSYC551: Latina/o Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the personal, familial, social, cultural and institutional forces that affect the psychology of Latina/os and explore how these factors impact assessment and treatment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/Conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), and School Psychologist (SPSY) programs.

PSYC552: General Social Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys and analyzes the theoretical and empirical literature of modern social psychology. Among topics dealt with are the social psychology of the psychology experiment, attitude development and change, group processes and conflict, role theory, ecological psychology, socialization, organizations and work places, and a number of other themes and issues focused on the individual's relationship to the larger social structure. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate work in psychology or sociology.

STAT500: Biostatistical Methods for Research Workers I (3 hours lecture)

Planning effective observational and experimental research, data collection and summarization, significance testing and p-values, t-test, chi-square, regression and correlation, use of statistical software, reading statistical results in the literature. Required course for the MPH degree. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate program coordinator.