Anthropology Major with Teacher Certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6 (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

Students who wish to pursue K-6 teacher certification in Elementary Education must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. Please visit the Teacher Education Program Web site for the required professional sequence of courses and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.


ANTHROPOLOGY MAJOR

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 40 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete the following 22 semester hours:

      ANTH 100 Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      ANTH 102 Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 201 Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 301 Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 401 Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar) 3
    2. ELECTIVES

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. CROSS CULTURAL

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        ANTH 105 Introduction to Disability Studies, Rights, and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 110 Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 115 Cultures of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 120 Native North Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 125 Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 130 Cultures of South Asia (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 135 Anthropology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 140 Non-Western Contributions to the Western World (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 150 Cultures of Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 160 The Anthropology of Race (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 180 Health and Healing in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 190 Historical Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. THEORY & METHODS

        Complete 15 semester hours from the following:

        1. 0 semester hours - 3 semester hours from the following list

          ANTH 145 Human Variation 3
        2. 12 semester hours - 15 semester hours from the following list

          ANTH 310 Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 320 Caribbean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 330 The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 340 The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 350 Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 370 Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 380 Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 410 Archaeology in Montclair (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 414 Selected Issues in Anthropology 3-6
          ANTH 421 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
          ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
          ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
          ANTH 425 Anthropology of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
          ANTH 430 Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 440 Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 460 Field Methods: Visual Anthropology 3
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (K-6)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL CORE

        Complete for 15 semester hours

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT

        Complete the following 2 courses:

        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. ELEMENTARY ED PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete for 18 semester hours

      ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. CLINICAL SEQUENCE/STUDENT TEACHING

      Complete the following 2 requirements for 15 semester hours:

      1. Complete the following for 7 semester hours:

        1. Complete 3 courses for 5 semester hours:

          ECEL 412 Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 421 Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 422 Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 2 semester hours.

          ECEL 410 Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms 1-3
      2. Complete for 8 semester hours.

        ECEL 414 Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms 8

Course Descriptions:

ANTH100: Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the basic concepts, goals, and research strategies of anthropology, the nature of culture, its role in human experience, and its universality. Presentation of cross-cultural examples and conceptual frameworks for understanding and explaining cultural diversity. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH101: Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course will introduce you to several important areas within physical anthropology including the genetic basis of human evolution, how evolution works as a process, modern human variation, race, bioarchaeology and forensics, primate ecology and behavior, and the human fossil record. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

ANTH102: Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Different linguistic systems will be analyzed through the use of informants (speakers) of non-Indo-European languages, and through published data from a variety of Amerindian and African languages. The relationship of linguistic structure and theory to cultural systems will be emphasized in individual student field experience and in readings and lectures. 3 sh.

ANTH103: Introduction to Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

Archaeology is a fascinating and important way to understand the lives of people from the past. But how does archaeology actually work? Much more than just digging things up, archaeology uses a wide range of scientific techniques and anthropological insights to recover and reconstruct what happened in the past. This course offers a survey of archaeological methods and case studies to show how archaeologists allow us to engage with people who are no longer here. Meets Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH105: Introduction to Disability Studies, Rights, and Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed as an introduction to the emerging, multidisciplinary field of disability studies. Historically, the concept of disability has been interpreted through the medical sciences as an individual-based sickness, pathology, or problem. More recently, however, the growing field of disability studies has challenged that perspective. This course will introduce students to various frameworks that have shaped an understanding of disability (from medical & charity models to a civil rights based approach), and promote the understanding of disability as a cultural construction. It will examine the disability rights movement and contemporary "disability culture" within the broader context of a multicultural United States (e.g., on par with race, class, and gender), as well as from an international, cross-cultural perspective. Lastly, students will examine how these different notions are linked to specific social welfare and educational policies related to the delivery of services and supports for people with disabilities. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH110: Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of the diversity of racial, ethnic, religious, occupational, and other subcultures and subgroups within the U.S. Emphasis on the character of American culture. Subpopulations are examined in relationship to each other and to the mainstream culture. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH115: Cultures of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

The Middle East culture area in anthropological perspective. Emphasis is placed on the nature of different interlocking cultural systems which are adaptations to environmental stresses in the Middle East. The concepts of culture and society will be explored in the context of course materials. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH120: Native North Americans (3 hours lecture)

Amerindian cultures north of Mexico; representative tribes, their world views, and their adaptations to the environment, each other and European contact. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH125: Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture)

Cross-cultural perspectives on the rapid social and cultural changes spawned by globalization. The implications and consequences of globalization on society. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH130: Cultures of South Asia (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a broad overview of society, culture, and history of South Asia. The goal is to convey the tremendous diversity of cultural expression and social plurality found in the region by focusing on specific events and concepts at scales varying from local to national, such as the emergence of nationalism, formation of nation states, and caste. The course will introduce students to an important region, home to one-fifth of the population of the world, and also help them understand contemporary political, economic, and environmental change in the subcontinent. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH135: Anthropology of Conflict and Violence (3 hours lecture)

Types of conflict and violence including war, crime, family and sexual violence, class and ethnic violence, and genocide; biological determinist and cultural explanations of violence; theories of nonviolent social change. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH140: Non-Western Contributions to the Western World (3 hours lecture)

A survey of scientific, medical, artistic, and other contributions from cultures outside the mainstream of European, North American, and Judeo-Christian history that influence our lives in the West today. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH145: Human Variation

The study of the origins, adaptations and evolution of races from a physical anthropology perspective. Misconceptions about race, intelligence and racism as well as theories and explanations of human variations will be covered. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

ANTH150: Cultures of Latin America (3 hours lecture)

Study of indigenous peoples of Latin America. Surveys earliest evidence of human occupation of Middle and South America and the Caribbean; diverse origins of food production; intellectual achievements; political organization; material contributions to world culture; and aspects of early European contact and conquest. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH155: Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to a broad, cross-cultural, evolutionary perspective on urban settlements. The goal is to provide students with a framework of theoretical models and concepts for analyzing and understanding the learned behavior of people in cities. Most of the course examines contemporary North American cities with additional data from African, South American, and European cities. Topics covered include the archaeology of cities, world systems theory, transnational corporations, the community study model, urban fieldwork, migration, class, poverty, gentrification, homelessness and hip-hop. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Social Science - Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH160: The Anthropology of Race (3 hours lecture)

This course is an examination of the scientific study of the origin and nature of race in light of human physical and cultural difference from an anthropological perspective. Cross-cultural data are used to explore the concept of race, the history and impact of race thinking, and patterns of culture contact and ethnic relations. Special attention is paid to historical and ethnographic analysis, understanding, and critique of race as a distinctive cultural practice that underwrites and legitimizes social inequalities. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH180: Health and Healing in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a variety of medical and healing traditions. It will address the connections between medicine and culture, and relate the medical practices to the cultures that produced them. The course will cover non-western healing systems, such as Traditional Chinese medicine (including herbs & acupuncture), Ayurvedic medicine from India, and Native American shamanism, as well as western biomedicine as a cultural system (or "ethnomedicine"). This course will examine how these different healing systems reflect and are reflections of the social, economic, and political history of a given society and region. Students will apply knowledge of these systems to contemporary social and individual contexts. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH190: Historical Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the archaeology and material culture of historically documented people and cultures over the last 500 years. The course considers and compares both American and global case studies of the development of cultures that arose with colonialism, capitalism, slavery, industrialization, and modernity. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the methods and theory of historical archaeology and illustrate how the archaeologists shed light on hidden, forgotten, and undocumented aspects of modern life. Students will learn how to see everyday objects as resources for historical analysis including maps, wills, houses, streets, gravestones, ceramics, bottles, food, and clothing. The course examines research in diverse settings including colonial outposts, small settlements and farms, large cities, plantations, prisons, and company towns. Students will explore the history and archaeology of diverse peoples including West and South Africans, African Americans, Native Americans and other indigenous people, and various European peoples at home and abroad. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH201: Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The course emphasizes the uses of anthropology in contemporary societies by stressing the skills and knowledge needed for the development of practical solutions to current problems. Special attention is placed on: policy decision-making, community development, cultural resource management, advocacy and social impact assessment. This is a service-learning course. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Anthropology and is designed to pay close attention to and support for the enhancement of writing in the discipline of anthropology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 120 or ANTH 130 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 170 or ANTH 180 or ANTH 195 or departmental approval.

ANTH301: Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture)

An overview of nonstatistical research methods commonly used in anthropology, including participant observation, interviewing, questionnaire design, cultural domain analysis, ethnographic decision tree analysis, and network analysis. Emphasis on practical experience in applying these methods to research and applied problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH310: Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture)

This course will describe and analyze immigration from an anthropological perspective over time and space. Particular attention will be devoted to recent migration to the United States and how this movement is similar to and different from other migrations. We will examine how globalization has influenced contemporary migration by broadening who migrates and where migrants go, the role of social networks and cultural capital in facilitating migration, and the factors that affect reception, settlement, incorporation, and return. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH320: Caribbean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates the full range of human occupations in the Caribbean, through and including the arrival of European colonizers. Topics and themes to be addressed include multiple colonization events throughout pre-Columbian and into colonial times; shifting survival strategies; varying scales of interactions networks; and changes in political, social, and economic organization through time. Particular attention will be paid to debates and competing hypotheses accounting for data in the archaeological, historical, and ethnohistoric records. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 and ANTH 103; or departmental approval.

ANTH330: The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

Cultural effects on diet, nutritional status, disease, and ecology; anthropological contributions to the study of food and food habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH340: The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of human work across cultural space and historical time. Various subsistence strategies (e.g. foraging, pastoralism, agriculture and industrial) are covered. Connections among forms of work, the social relations of work, the meanings of work, and social stratification (e.g. class, gender, race/ethnicity, age) are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH350: Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the influences of cultural systems on the processes of aging. Special emphasis is placed on the behaviors and meanings attached to the stages of growing older in a variety of cultural systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH360: Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The relationships between culture and the bio-physical environment, as well as the cultural environment. The emphasis will be on primitive and non-Western cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH370: Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course will cover the manufacture, use, preservation, analysis, and cataloging of prehistoric artifacts made of stone, bone and wood. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH380: Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

What do "sex," "sexuality" and "gender" mean, and how have anthropologists dealt with these concepts? Using an anthropological perspective stressing an "emic" or insider view and structural constrains of class, gender, race, and nation, we will describe and analyze how genders are constructed, negotiated, and maintained throughout the world. We will examine ethnographic material from a variety of cultural settings to understand how cross-cultural studies of gender and sexuality have contributed to more complex understandings of human experience and how gender/sexual identities are constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH401: Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar)

The development of anthropological theory during the past 100 years. Various subdisciplines of cultural and social anthropology are explored and applied to similar bodies of data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH410: Archaeology in Montclair (3 hours lecture)

Archaeology in Montclair is a practical course in historical archaeology focusing on archaeological field research opportunities available in and around Montclair, New Jersey. Students will join MSU faculty and staff on an archaeological excavation and participate in archival research, research design, archaeological survey, fieldwork and documentation, laboratory processing of artifacts, and the writing of a professional report. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH414: Selected Issues in Anthropology

Identification and analysis of contemporary issues and problems in anthropology - e.g., models of society; new directions in anthropological inquiry and methodology; etc. May be repeated twice, if the topics are different, for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH421: Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture)

Case studies of community, conflict and decay, conflicts over immigration, problems of racial and cultural diversity, multiculturism and cultural misunderstandings, role of education and the local school system, urban infrastructure and community decline, sprawl versus community, introduction to basics of program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH422: Environment and Community (3 hours lecture)

The overall goal of this course is to examine the relationship between the structure, composition, formation and evolution of communities and their environment. The course has three major and interrelated objectives: one, to provide an overview of the major theoretical frameworks that have been utilized to conceptualize community-environment interactions; two, using case studies, demonstrate the use of anthropological methods and perspectives in resolving environment problems affecting communities, in diverse socio-cultural contexts; three, provide examples of the contributions of anthropology to environmental policy making. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH423: Community and Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 312 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380.

ANTH425: Anthropology of Religion (3 hours lecture)

Patterns of religious beliefs and behaviors which relate to sacred, supernatural entities. Origin theories, divination, witchcraft, mythology and the relationship of religious movements to other aspects of culture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH429: Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture)

Selected case studies of community development programs nationally and internationally and their implications for community development in New Jersey, importance of citizen participation, inclusion of people with disabilities, aging in place, localization theory, smart growth, ecovillages, cohousing, permaculture, community supported agriculture, community land trusts, community development banks and corporations, program evaluation skills. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH430: Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on the development of the student's skill in gathering and analyzing linguistic data. Complements the more theoretically oriented courses in linguistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 102.

ANTH440: Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Examination of cross-cultural concepts of illness, health and medical care. Ecological and historical aspects of diseases in human evolution are also studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH460: Field Methods: Visual Anthropology

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore potential uses of photography in anthropological research and practice. Each student is guided in the development of a project which demonstrates the significance of recording and interpreting visual data in the study of selected aspects of culture, social interaction patterns, and/or individual behavior. As the focus of this experience is on the collection and interpretation of visual data, not the technical aspects of photography, only basic skills and knowledge about effective camera usage are required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL410: Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms

This course introduces students to the dynamics of inclusive elementary and early childhood classrooms, schools, and communities. Through required fieldwork in elementary and early childhood settings, observations, interviews, and data collection, students discuss the role of the teacher(s), documentation and assessment techniques, variables of the classroom environment, school climate, and the wider community. Students implement lesson plans and use a range of observation and documentation strategies including running records, environmental rating scales, anecdotal records, checklists, rating scales, and examination of children's work. Students learn to link community resources to school and classroom needs, collect data to inform instructional practice and culturally responsive teaching and learning, and evaluate the progress and needs of children in inclusive elementary and early childhood settings. Fieldwork is required. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and READ 399.

ECEL412: Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Accompanies ECEL 410, Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms, and offers students a forum for discussion, reflection, and critical thinking with regard to clinical work in inclusive elementary classrooms. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

ECEL414: Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms

Students demonstrate their knowledge of child and early adolescent development and the significant role of families and communities with regard to children's learning by planning and implementing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an inclusive elementary classroom. Focusing on the diverse needs of individual children, students develop, implement, and assess an integrated curriculum unit that incorporates the Core Curriculum Content Standards and emphasizes literacy across the curriculum. As reflective practitioners, students utilize multiple strategies to assess children's learning, classroom climate, and effective classroom management. Students are responsible for the full range of teacher activities in the classroom and are expected to seek out parents, administrators, and school colleagues as resources. Students are required to assemble an exhibition portfolio and participate in a mock interview in order to demonstrate their strengths as a teacher. 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 410.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL421: Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Provides students with a forum to discuss the role of the teacher as teacher candidates take on full-time classroom responsibilities. Discussions focus on identifying and involving oneself in the professional field of elementary and middle school education, upholding and advocating for ethical standards, engaging in continuous and collaborative learning, and taking a critical stance to inform practice. Teacher candidates demonstrate that they can make and justify decisions based on their knowledge of central issues such as developmentally appropriate practice, culturally responsive learning and teaching, and the context of children's lives. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 412 or ECEL 413.

ECEL422: Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students engage in reflective curriculum planning. They develop an integrated unit that incorporates state standards, differentiated instructional strategies, and appropriate adaptations for students with diverse learning styles and interests, students with disabilities, and English Language Learners. Students investigate and discuss issues related to their teaching and learning experiences focusing on inclusion practices, assessment, classroom management, and culturally responsive teaching. Students critically reflect on their teaching beliefs and explore teacher professionalism in the field of elementary education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.