Anthropology Major, Community Development Concentration (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CONCENTRATION

Complete 40 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. ANTHROPOLOGY MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete the following 22 semester hours:

    ANTH 100 Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    ANTH 102 Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 201 Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 301 Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 401 Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar) 3
  2. CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete 1 course from the following:

      ANTH 110 Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 125 Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES

      Complete 15 semester hours from the following:

      1. 6 semester hours from:

        ANTH 310 Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 360 Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 410 Archaeology in Montclair (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 421 Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3-4
        ANTH 422 Environment and Community (3 hours lecture) 3-4
        ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
        ANTH 429 Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture) 3-4
      2. 3 semester hours-9 semester hours from the following list

        ANTH 330 The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 340 The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 350 Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 380 Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 414 Selected Issues in Anthropology 3-6
        ANTH 430 Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
        ANTH 440 Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. 0 semester hours-6 semester hours of may be taken.

        ANTH 490 Internship in Anthropology 3-6

Course Descriptions:

ANTH100: Cultural Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the basic concepts, goals, and research strategies of anthropology, the nature of culture, its role in human experience, and its universality. Presentation of cross-cultural examples and conceptual frameworks for understanding and explaining cultural diversity. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH101: Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course will introduce you to several important areas within physical anthropology including the genetic basis of human evolution, how evolution works as a process, modern human variation, race, bioarchaeology and forensics, primate ecology and behavior, and the human fossil record. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

ANTH102: Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Different linguistic systems will be analyzed through the use of informants (speakers) of non-Indo-European languages, and through published data from a variety of Amerindian and African languages. The relationship of linguistic structure and theory to cultural systems will be emphasized in individual student field experience and in readings and lectures. 3 sh.

ANTH103: Introduction to Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

Archaeology is a fascinating and important way to understand the lives of people from the past. But how does archaeology actually work? Much more than just digging things up, archaeology uses a wide range of scientific techniques and anthropological insights to recover and reconstruct what happened in the past. This course offers a survey of archaeological methods and case studies to show how archaeologists allow us to engage with people who are no longer here. Meets Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH110: Anthropology of Multicultural America (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of the diversity of racial, ethnic, religious, occupational, and other subcultures and subgroups within the U.S. Emphasis on the character of American culture. Subpopulations are examined in relationship to each other and to the mainstream culture. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH125: Anthropology of Globalization (3 hours lecture)

Cross-cultural perspectives on the rapid social and cultural changes spawned by globalization. The implications and consequences of globalization on society. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH155: Urban Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to a broad, cross-cultural, evolutionary perspective on urban settlements. The goal is to provide students with a framework of theoretical models and concepts for analyzing and understanding the learned behavior of people in cities. Most of the course examines contemporary North American cities with additional data from African, South American, and European cities. Topics covered include the archaeology of cities, world systems theory, transnational corporations, the community study model, urban fieldwork, migration, class, poverty, gentrification, homelessness and hip-hop. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Social Science - Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ANTH201: Applied Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The course emphasizes the uses of anthropology in contemporary societies by stressing the skills and knowledge needed for the development of practical solutions to current problems. Special attention is placed on: policy decision-making, community development, cultural resource management, advocacy and social impact assessment. This is a service-learning course. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Anthropology and is designed to pay close attention to and support for the enhancement of writing in the discipline of anthropology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 120 or ANTH 130 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 170 or ANTH 180 or ANTH 195 or departmental approval.

ANTH301: Methods in Anthropological Research and Practice (3 hours lecture)

An overview of nonstatistical research methods commonly used in anthropology, including participant observation, interviewing, questionnaire design, cultural domain analysis, ethnographic decision tree analysis, and network analysis. Emphasis on practical experience in applying these methods to research and applied problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH310: Immigration: An Anthropological Perspective (3 hours lecture)

This course will describe and analyze immigration from an anthropological perspective over time and space. Particular attention will be devoted to recent migration to the United States and how this movement is similar to and different from other migrations. We will examine how globalization has influenced contemporary migration by broadening who migrates and where migrants go, the role of social networks and cultural capital in facilitating migration, and the factors that affect reception, settlement, incorporation, and return. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH330: The Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

Cultural effects on diet, nutritional status, disease, and ecology; anthropological contributions to the study of food and food habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH340: The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of human work across cultural space and historical time. Various subsistence strategies (e.g. foraging, pastoralism, agriculture and industrial) are covered. Connections among forms of work, the social relations of work, the meanings of work, and social stratification (e.g. class, gender, race/ethnicity, age) are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH350: Anthropology of Aging and the Aged (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of the influences of cultural systems on the processes of aging. Special emphasis is placed on the behaviors and meanings attached to the stages of growing older in a variety of cultural systems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH360: Environmental Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

The relationships between culture and the bio-physical environment, as well as the cultural environment. The emphasis will be on primitive and non-Western cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 125 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH380: Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

What do "sex," "sexuality" and "gender" mean, and how have anthropologists dealt with these concepts? Using an anthropological perspective stressing an "emic" or insider view and structural constrains of class, gender, race, and nation, we will describe and analyze how genders are constructed, negotiated, and maintained throughout the world. We will examine ethnographic material from a variety of cultural settings to understand how cross-cultural studies of gender and sexuality have contributed to more complex understandings of human experience and how gender/sexual identities are constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH401: Seminar in Anthropological Theory (3 hours seminar)

The development of anthropological theory during the past 100 years. Various subdisciplines of cultural and social anthropology are explored and applied to similar bodies of data. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH410: Archaeology in Montclair (3 hours lecture)

Archaeology in Montclair is a practical course in historical archaeology focusing on archaeological field research opportunities available in and around Montclair, New Jersey. Students will join MSU faculty and staff on an archaeological excavation and participate in archival research, research design, archaeological survey, fieldwork and documentation, laboratory processing of artifacts, and the writing of a professional report. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH414: Selected Issues in Anthropology

Identification and analysis of contemporary issues and problems in anthropology - e.g., models of society; new directions in anthropological inquiry and methodology; etc. May be repeated twice, if the topics are different, for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH421: Communities in Transition (3 hours lecture)

Case studies of community, conflict and decay, conflicts over immigration, problems of racial and cultural diversity, multiculturism and cultural misunderstandings, role of education and the local school system, urban infrastructure and community decline, sprawl versus community, introduction to basics of program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH422: Environment and Community (3 hours lecture)

The overall goal of this course is to examine the relationship between the structure, composition, formation and evolution of communities and their environment. The course has three major and interrelated objectives: one, to provide an overview of the major theoretical frameworks that have been utilized to conceptualize community-environment interactions; two, using case studies, demonstrate the use of anthropological methods and perspectives in resolving environment problems affecting communities, in diverse socio-cultural contexts; three, provide examples of the contributions of anthropology to environmental policy making. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH423: Community and Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 312 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380.

ANTH429: Building Sustainable Communities (3 hours lecture)

Selected case studies of community development programs nationally and internationally and their implications for community development in New Jersey, importance of citizen participation, inclusion of people with disabilities, aging in place, localization theory, smart growth, ecovillages, cohousing, permaculture, community supported agriculture, community land trusts, community development banks and corporations, program evaluation skills. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH430: Field Methods: Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on the development of the student's skill in gathering and analyzing linguistic data. Complements the more theoretically oriented courses in linguistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 102.

ANTH440: Medical Anthropology (3 hours lecture)

Examination of cross-cultural concepts of illness, health and medical care. Ecological and historical aspects of diseases in human evolution are also studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH490: Internship in Anthropology

According to interest and preparation, students are placed in cooperating agencies in order to provide an opportunity to test their acquired theoretical knowledge and to gain disciplined practice in their profession. Under faculty guidance and agency supervision, students are to engage in anthropological fieldwork by conducting research and/or special projects. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.