Archaeology Minor - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

Coordinator: Timothy Renner

Jointly sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Classics and General Humanities, and Art and Design, together with support from the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies, this minor offers an interdisciplinary program in the study of ancient and other past cultures through investigation of their material remains. Coursework includes overviews of ancient Old World and New World cultures and the study of archaeological method and theory. Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the extensive coursework offered by the University in modern and ancient languages and in the natural and social sciences. The overall course of study in Archaeology helps lead to a sophisticated understanding of material remains in the larger context of human society. It also shows how material evidence can compare with and supplement the evidence of written texts that are available for historical cultures (e.g., those of the Romans of the Imperial age or European settlers in 18th century North America).

Through programs run directly by the University's Center for Heritage and Archaeological Studies in northern New Jersey (for prehistoric and historical North American archaeology), as well as through faculty-conducted projects in other regions (e.g., the Caribbean or Mediterranean), students have excellent opportunities to participate in fieldwork as part of their curriculum and/or preprofessional experience in archaeology. Here they are able to develop basic fieldwork skills in surveying, excavating, mapping, and artifact analysis. In addition, training in geoarchaeology is available from Montclair State's Earth and Environmental Studies faculty.

The Archaeology minor makes a good complement to any liberal arts or professional studies major. In general archaeology has recently become a subject of great interest to many parts of our society. Students who pursue careers in the media, the travel industry, and international business (to name  a few) profit from this interdisciplinary study. Moreover, historic preservation  legislation has resulted in important employment opportunities in the private (applied archaeology) and public (government agencies, state museums) sectors, especially for students who major in Anthropology. Government funded or permitted development projects frequently require environmental impact studies, including archaeological and heritage investigations; these kinds of studies are typically carried out by heritage preservation or large environmental engineering firms. Finally, students who wish to pursue master's or doctoral level studies in preparation for a career in teaching, research, or museum work will find the Archaeology minor to be excellent background, especially when combined with a major such as Anthropology, Art History, Classics, or Earth and Environmental Studies.

ARCHAEOLOGY MINOR

Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. Complete 2 requirement(s) for a total of 9 semester hours:

    1. Complete 2 courses: .

      ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 181 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      1. .

        ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. One course from the following may also be taken: .

        ARHT 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. ELECTIVE COURSES FOR MINOR

    Complete 9 semester hours from:.

    ANTH 190 Historical Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 270 Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 320 Caribbean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 370 Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 410 Archaeology in Montclair (3 hours lecture) 3
    ANTH 470 Archaeological Field Methods 1-6
    EAES 210 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
    EAES 341 Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
    EAES 343 Geoarchaeology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
    GNHU 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 351 The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 355 Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 357 The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 358 Cleopatra (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 359 Rome in the Age of Augustus (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 360 The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 361 Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 362 Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology 3-6

Course Descriptions:

ANTH103: Introduction to Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

Archaeology is a fascinating and important way to understand the lives of people from the past. But how does archaeology actually work? Much more than just digging things up, archaeology uses a wide range of scientific techniques and anthropological insights to recover and reconstruct what happened in the past. This course offers a survey of archaeological methods and case studies to show how archaeologists allow us to engage with people who are no longer here. Meets Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

ANTH190: Historical Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the archaeology and material culture of historically documented people and cultures over the last 500 years. The course considers and compares both American and global case studies of the development of cultures that arose with colonialism, capitalism, slavery, industrialization, and modernity. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the methods and theory of historical archaeology and illustrate how the archaeologists shed light on hidden, forgotten, and undocumented aspects of modern life. Students will learn how to see everyday objects as resources for historical analysis including maps, wills, houses, streets, gravestones, ceramics, bottles, food, and clothing. The course examines research in diverse settings including colonial outposts, small settlements and farms, large cities, plantations, prisons, and company towns. Students will explore the history and archaeology of diverse peoples including West and South Africans, African Americans, Native Americans and other indigenous people, and various European peoples at home and abroad. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

ANTH270: Archaeology of Ancient Middle America (3 hours lecture)

The archaeology of ancient cultures of Middle America. Consists of two major units (1) Northern Mesoamerica, the Gulf Coast, Oaxaco and Central Mexican Aztecs (2) Ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 110 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 120 or ANTH 130 or ANTH 140 or ANTH 150 or ANTH 170 or ANTH 180 or ANTH 195 or departmental approval.

ANTH320: Caribbean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates the full range of human occupations in the Caribbean, through and including the arrival of European colonizers. Topics and themes to be addressed include multiple colonization events throughout pre-Columbian and into colonial times; shifting survival strategies; varying scales of interactions networks; and changes in political, social, and economic organization through time. Particular attention will be paid to debates and competing hypotheses accounting for data in the archaeological, historical, and ethnohistoric records. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 and ANTH 103; or departmental approval.

ANTH370: Experimental Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course will cover the manufacture, use, preservation, analysis, and cataloging of prehistoric artifacts made of stone, bone and wood. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH410: Archaeology in Montclair (3 hours lecture)

Archaeology in Montclair is a practical course in historical archaeology focusing on archaeological field research opportunities available in and around Montclair, New Jersey. Students will join MSU faculty and staff on an archaeological excavation and participate in archival research, research design, archaeological survey, fieldwork and documentation, laboratory processing of artifacts, and the writing of a professional report. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ANTH470: Archaeological Field Methods

Provides practical field experience in the various aspects of survey and excavation techniques. A specific area will be surveyed and a site will be excavated. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. 1 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380 or departmental approval.

ARHT313: Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the art and architecture of the Aegean region in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE with special attention to archaeological perspectives. Specifically, this includes the material culture of the Early Cyclades, Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The two primary methodological approaches will be art historical and archaeological. The core material of the course will be chronologically presented; however, substantial time will also be devoted to specific problems or themes in the field. Cross-listed with the Classics and General Humanities department, GNHU 313. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208, GNED 201, GNED 202, GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 290, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, ARPH 201, MUGN 241, RELG 221 or departmental approval.

ARHT314: Greek Art (3 hours lecture)

Greek art and material culture including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 328 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT315: Roman Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 485 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

EAES210: Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduces the basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing. Focus on digital cartographic science, graphic design, spatial data and image portrayal and inquiry, map overlays, and applications. Previous course EUGS 270 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CSIT 111, EAES 100, EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107, EAES 160, EAES 161 or EAES 170.

EAES341: Principles of Soil Science (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Origin, composition, properties and classification of soils. Additional topics include water in soils and human impact on soil resources. Laboratory covers the measurement of soil properties and principles of soil mapping and soil resource assessment. Field trips are required. Previous course GEOS 450 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 270, ANTH 360, ANTH 370, BIOL 213, CHEM 230, EAES 200, EAES 220, EAES 230 or EAES 240.

EAES343: Geoarchaeology (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course explores the use of geological concepts and methods toward the solution of archaeological problems. Discusses earth materials and processes relevant to archaeology; evidence and timing of environmental change; human environmental impacts; field, lab, and spatial analytical techniques. Field trips expected. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 103 or GNHU 181 or EAES 100 or EAES 101 or EAES 105 or EAES 107, plus one of any of the following: EAES 200, EAES 220, EAES 240, EAES 340, EAES 341, ANTH 270, ANTH 370, GNHU 351, GNHU 361, GNHU 362, or departmental approval.

GNHU181: Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The science of evaluating Greco-Roman and closely related cultures through observation and analysis of their physical remains. Problems and methods of dating artifacts and sites. Building materials, types, and decorations. Field trip in addition to illustrated lectures and discussions. 3 sh.

GNHU281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman conquest as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Classics. Cross listed with History, HIST 281. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Cross listed with History, HIST 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: Not for History Majors/Minors. GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU313: Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the art and architecture of the Aegean region in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE with special attention to archaeological perspectives. Specifically, this includes the material culture of the Early Cyclades, Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The two primary methodological approaches will be art historical and archaeological. The core material of the course will be chronologically presented; however, substantial time will also be devoted to specific problems or themes in the field. Cross-listed with the Fine Art and Design department, ARHT 313. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208, GNED 201, GNED 202, GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 290, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, ARPH 201, MUGN 241, RELG 221 or departmental approval.

GNHU351: The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Cities and city-based culture in the Greek and Roman world seen through the evidence of archaeology, literary sources, and contemporary documents such as inscriptions. Town planning, economic life, social groups, and population patterns in selected ancient cities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or GNHU 283 or GNHU 285 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU355: Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture)

Dying undefeated at the age of 32, Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) had conquered the vast Persian Empire stretching from the Mediterranean sea to the borders of present-day Pakistan, ensuring the spread of Greek culture throughout the known world. This course studies Alexander's life, accomplishments, and geo-historical impact, as well as his transformation into a quasi-mythical figure in literature and art throughout the east and west from antiquity to today. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU357: The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture)

From a small town barely dominant over one region of Italy, Rome grew, between the traditional founding of the Republic in 509 and the collapse of the Republican government in the mid-first century BCE, to be a wealthy and sophisticated center of culture and a Mediterranean "world" power backed by a major military machine and accustomed to frequent victory in war. This course examines that process, with special emphasis on the role of the Senate in motivating foreign policy, the role of patronage and self-advertisement, and the massive influx of new cultural characteristics, from large-scale slavery to the creation of a literature and a taste for things Greek that took place during the last two centuries BCE. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU358: Cleopatra (3 hours lecture)

This course examines Cleopatra VII both as she appears in the historical record and as later authors and artists have shaped her image. Issues considered include female power, east vs. west, and politics and propaganda. Beyond Cleopatra herself, the course considers the Hellenistic period, the origins of the Roman Empire, the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria, and women's roles in ancient society. In addition, the course offers an introduction to the study of reception, the recreation and re-interpretation of history, art, and literature in subsequent ages. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU359: Rome in the Age of Augustus (3 hours lecture)

Roman culture and society experienced a radical transformation during the lifetime of Rome's first emperor, Augustus (63 BC - 14 AD). This course focuses on the interplay between a new set of political realities and developments in literature, the visual arts, and the organization of private and social life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU360: The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture)

Among empires ancient and modern, that of the Romans is especially noteworthy for its geographical extent, cultural richness and diversity, duration, and status as a model or anti-model for more recent polities. This course centers around the three and a half centuries from the establishment by Augustus of the regime known as the Principate to the period of Diocletian and Constantine in the fourth century CE, when changing conditions and new political forces began to alter its nature significantly. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing primary sources of information and on understanding the development of Rome from an outside power ruling a diverse collection of regions to an entity incorporating increasingly shared ideologies and other cultural habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU361: Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of in-depth study of the archaeological evidence for a selected period, region, or other thematic topic within the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined. Special attention will be given to the role which archaeology plays in reconstructing the history of past cultures and to the Mediterranean archaeologist's frequent need to reconcile ancient written evidence with archaeologically obtained data. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, GNHU 282, HIST 282, GNHU 285 or GNHU 181. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or HIST 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or GNHU 285.

GNHU362: Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is a practical introduction to how archaeology is conducted in the field at an ancient site in the Mediterranean world. Students learn basic techniques of surveying, digging, artifact removal and processing, and on-site record keeping as well as the overall organization of an archaeological project in the field. The course is given on-site at an appropriate excavation location. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: One of the following: A previous course in some aspect of Mediterranean archaeology; previous archaeological fieldwork experience; or permission of the instructor.