Classics Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.

CLASSICS MAJOR

Complete 33 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. CLASSICS MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours:

    GNHU 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. CLASSICS ELECTIVE COURSES

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. LANGUAGE COURSES

      Complete 5 courses from the following:

      1. Complete 1 course from: .

        GREK 301 Greek New Testament (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 302 Greek Epic Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 351 Attic Orators (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 352 Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 361 Greek Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 371 Greek Philosophers (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 372 Greek Lyric Poets (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 374 Hesoid (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 390 Selected Readings in Ancient Greek (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 410 Greek Composition (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 301 Latin Literature of the Republic (3 hour lecture) 3
        LATN 302 Latin Literature of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 303 Latin Literature of the Silver Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 304 Latin Literature of the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 401 Latin Composition (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 410 Advanced Latin Grammar (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 411 Roman Letter Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 412 Roman Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 414 Roman Lyric Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 415 Roman Biography (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 419 Methods of Teaching Latin (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 445 Linguistic History of the Latin Language (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 451 Roman Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 453 The Epic and Vergil (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 454 Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 455 Ovid (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 461 Caesar: End of the Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 462 Roman Satire (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 464 The Elegy (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 470 Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
        LATN 475 Study Abroad (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 478 Advanced Latin Readings: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 484 Cicero: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 4 courses from: .

        GREK 101 Beginning Greek I (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 102 Beginning Greek II (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 201 Intermediate Greek I (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 202 Intermediate Greek II (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 301 Greek New Testament (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 302 Greek Epic Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 351 Attic Orators (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 352 Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 361 Greek Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 371 Greek Philosophers (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 372 Greek Lyric Poets (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 374 Hesoid (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 390 Selected Readings in Ancient Greek (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 410 Greek Composition (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 101 Beginning Latin I (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 102 Beginning Latin II (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 150 Intensive Beginning Latin (6 hours lecture) 6
        LATN 205 Intermediate Latin I (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 206 Intermediate Latin II (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 301 Latin Literature of the Republic (3 hour lecture) 3
        LATN 302 Latin Literature of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 303 Latin Literature of the Silver Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 304 Latin Literature of the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 401 Latin Composition (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 410 Advanced Latin Grammar (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 411 Roman Letter Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 412 Roman Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 414 Roman Lyric Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 415 Roman Biography (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 419 Methods of Teaching Latin (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 445 Linguistic History of the Latin Language (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 451 Roman Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 453 The Epic and Vergil (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 454 Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 455 Ovid (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 461 Caesar: End of the Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 462 Roman Satire (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 464 The Elegy (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 470 Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
        LATN 475 Study Abroad (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 478 Advanced Latin Readings: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 484 Cicero: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. ELECTIVES

      Complete 12 semester hours from the following (courses in Greek & Latin beyond those taken as Language Electives may be used here):

      1. Complete at least 6 semester hours from the following:

        ARHT 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 321 Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 211 Classicism and American Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 351 The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 361 Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 362 Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology 3-6
        GNHU 384 Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        PHIL 331 History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 0 semester hours - 6 semester hours from:

        ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 321 Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 115 Troy and the Trojan War (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 181 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 182 English Vocabulary: Classical Roots (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 201 General Humanities I (to 1400) (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 211 Classicism and American Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 283 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 285 Mythology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 288 Mythic Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 290 Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 310 History of Criticism (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 320 Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 332 Selected Topics in Ancient History (Greece, Rome, W. Asia, N. Africa, Europe) (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 351 The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 355 Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 357 The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 358 Cleopatra (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 359 Rome in the Age of Augustus (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 360 The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 361 Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 362 Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology 3-6
        GNHU 381 Africa in Classical Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 383 Women in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 384 Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 385 Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 454 Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 470 Seminar in Classical Humanities (3 hours seminar) 3
        GNHU 490 Principles of Mythic Symbolism (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 101 Beginning Greek I (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 102 Beginning Greek II (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 201 Intermediate Greek I (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 202 Intermediate Greek II (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 301 Greek New Testament (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 302 Greek Epic Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 351 Attic Orators (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 352 Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 361 Greek Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 371 Greek Philosophers (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 372 Greek Lyric Poets (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 374 Hesoid (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 390 Selected Readings in Ancient Greek (3 hours lecture) 3
        GREK 410 Greek Composition (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 101 Beginning Latin I (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 102 Beginning Latin II (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 150 Intensive Beginning Latin (6 hours lecture) 6
        LATN 205 Intermediate Latin I (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 206 Intermediate Latin II (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 301 Latin Literature of the Republic (3 hour lecture) 3
        LATN 302 Latin Literature of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 303 Latin Literature of the Silver Age (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 304 Latin Literature of the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 401 Latin Composition (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 410 Advanced Latin Grammar (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 411 Roman Letter Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 412 Roman Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 414 Roman Lyric Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 415 Roman Biography (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 419 Methods of Teaching Latin (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 445 Linguistic History of the Latin Language (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 451 Roman Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 453 The Epic and Vergil (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 454 Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 455 Ovid (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 461 Caesar: End of the Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 462 Roman Satire (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 464 The Elegy (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 470 Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
        LATN 475 Study Abroad (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 478 Advanced Latin Readings: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
        LATN 484 Cicero: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
        PHIL 331 History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. 1 course from the following may be taken:

        GNHU 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. 1 course from the following may be taken:

        ARHT 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

ARHT313: Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the art and architecture of the Aegean region in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE with special attention to archaeological perspectives. Specifically, this includes the material culture of the Early Cyclades, Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The two primary methodological approaches will be art historical and archaeological. The core material of the course will be chronologically presented; however, substantial time will also be devoted to specific problems or themes in the field. Cross-listed with the Classics and General Humanities department, GNHU 313. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208, GNED 201, GNED 202, GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 290, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, ARPH 201, MUGN 241, RELG 221 or departmental approval.

ARHT314: Greek Art (3 hours lecture)

Greek art and material culture including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 328 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT315: Roman Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 485 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT321: Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The emergence and development of early Christian, Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art from Late Antiquity through Iconoclasm and the early Middle Ages. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 322 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

GNHU115: Troy and the Trojan War (3 hours lecture)

For more than 3,000 years the story of the Trojan War has fascinated and attracted people throughout the world. Is the war completely "mythical?" How can different disciplines such as archaeology, linguistics, and literature be combined to shed light on the historical reality that may lie behind the story as it first appears in Homer? How have the art and literature of other cultures, such as the Romans, the European Middle Ages, or the modern culture of television and movies interpreted and reused the story of Troy, and what can this adaptation tell us about these cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. 3 sh.

GNHU181: Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The science of evaluating Greco-Roman and closely related cultures through observation and analysis of their physical remains. Problems and methods of dating artifacts and sites. Building materials, types, and decorations. Field trip in addition to illustrated lectures and discussions. 3 sh.

GNHU182: English Vocabulary: Classical Roots (3 hours lecture)

Systematic development of the student's knowledge of English vocabulary through study of the most important Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, suffixes, and other elements and the ways in which they are used to form words in English. 3 sh.

GNHU201: General Humanities I (to 1400) (3 hours lecture)

A broadly historical introduction to important themes and topics in the humanities as seen through literature, philosophy, and the arts from the ancient world to the Middle Ages. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in General Humanities. 3 sh.

GNHU209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with RELG 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU211: Classicism and American Culture (3 hours lecture)

Through the critical analysis of texts ranging from translations of Greco-Roman authors to works on the nature of Western and non-Western culture, the course examines how politicians, novelists, critics, and educators from the 17th century to the present have interpreted the classical past and have viewed it as reflecting their own values or ideals. The course considers classicism both as it has been appropriated and elaborated by Americans specifically and as a phenomenon common to many cultures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman conquest as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Classics. Cross listed with History, HIST 281. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Cross listed with History, HIST 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: Not for History Majors/Minors. GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU283: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture)

This course uses women, gender, and sexuality to model a broad, cross-disciplinary, and issue-oriented approach to ancient societies. Students will examine cultural and historical objects, such as historical and philosophical works, inscriptions, and graffiti. They will view monuments and artifacts. They will learn how to approach complex cultural objects and understand how social constructions of gender affected and reflected the lives of women and men in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU285: Mythology (3 hours lecture)

The nature and interpretation of mythology, primarily as seen through the myths of Greece and Rome. Selected comparative study of myths of the Near East, Iran, India and other cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU288: Mythic Traditions (3 hours lecture)

A survey of Greco-Roman myths and their recurrence in and influence on later literature, art, music, and film, and how they contribute to the ongoing development of culture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU290: Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine topics that involve the interrelationships between the literature and the culture of Greece and Rome, including that of the Roman Empire broadly understood. It will focus on how literary texts arise from, interact with, explain and critique their cultures and the productions of those cultures, such as art, architecture, rhetoric, sports, politics. This course may be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU310: History of Criticism (3 hours lecture)

This course provides introduction to the major figures in literary criticism, proceeding historically from classical to modern times. Particular emphasis is given to Classical Greek and Latin criticism as the foundational texts for all later criticism of any of the arts, and of those who interpreted and elaborated these classical works in the Renaissance and Neo-classical periods, as well as on the innovations of the Romantics and of the modern period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285.

GNHU313: Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the art and architecture of the Aegean region in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE with special attention to archaeological perspectives. Specifically, this includes the material culture of the Early Cyclades, Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The two primary methodological approaches will be art historical and archaeological. The core material of the course will be chronologically presented; however, substantial time will also be devoted to specific problems or themes in the field. Cross-listed with the Fine Art and Design department, ARHT 313. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208, GNED 201, GNED 202, GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 290, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, ARPH 201, MUGN 241, RELG 221 or departmental approval.

GNHU320: Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a topic or issue utilizing the content and approaches of two or more fields of Humanitites (broadly defined, including Art History, Theater, Dance and the Fine Arts) to consider some particular issue or topic relevant to the Humanities. May be repeated twice for a total of up to 9 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285.

GNHU332: Selected Topics in Ancient History (Greece, Rome, W. Asia, N. Africa, Europe) (3 hours lecture)

Courses offered under this selected topics rubric examine specific periods and issues concerning Mediterranean, Western Asian, and European political, cultural, social and economic history from the Bronze Age to the late Antique. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 OR HIST/GNHU 281 or HIST/GNHU 282.

GNHU351: The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Cities and city-based culture in the Greek and Roman world seen through the evidence of archaeology, literary sources, and contemporary documents such as inscriptions. Town planning, economic life, social groups, and population patterns in selected ancient cities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or GNHU 283 or GNHU 285 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU355: Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture)

Dying undefeated at the age of 32, Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) had conquered the vast Persian Empire stretching from the Mediterranean sea to the borders of present-day Pakistan, ensuring the spread of Greek culture throughout the known world. This course studies Alexander's life, accomplishments, and geo-historical impact, as well as his transformation into a quasi-mythical figure in literature and art throughout the east and west from antiquity to today. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU357: The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture)

From a small town barely dominant over one region of Italy, Rome grew, between the traditional founding of the Republic in 509 and the collapse of the Republican government in the mid-first century BCE, to be a wealthy and sophisticated center of culture and a Mediterranean "world" power backed by a major military machine and accustomed to frequent victory in war. This course examines that process, with special emphasis on the role of the Senate in motivating foreign policy, the role of patronage and self-advertisement, and the massive influx of new cultural characteristics, from large-scale slavery to the creation of a literature and a taste for things Greek that took place during the last two centuries BCE. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU358: Cleopatra (3 hours lecture)

This course examines Cleopatra VII both as she appears in the historical record and as later authors and artists have shaped her image. Issues considered include female power, east vs. west, and politics and propaganda. Beyond Cleopatra herself, the course considers the Hellenistic period, the origins of the Roman Empire, the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria, and women's roles in ancient society. In addition, the course offers an introduction to the study of reception, the recreation and re-interpretation of history, art, and literature in subsequent ages. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU359: Rome in the Age of Augustus (3 hours lecture)

Roman culture and society experienced a radical transformation during the lifetime of Rome's first emperor, Augustus (63 BC - 14 AD). This course focuses on the interplay between a new set of political realities and developments in literature, the visual arts, and the organization of private and social life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU360: The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture)

Among empires ancient and modern, that of the Romans is especially noteworthy for its geographical extent, cultural richness and diversity, duration, and status as a model or anti-model for more recent polities. This course centers around the three and a half centuries from the establishment by Augustus of the regime known as the Principate to the period of Diocletian and Constantine in the fourth century CE, when changing conditions and new political forces began to alter its nature significantly. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing primary sources of information and on understanding the development of Rome from an outside power ruling a diverse collection of regions to an entity incorporating increasingly shared ideologies and other cultural habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU361: Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of in-depth study of the archaeological evidence for a selected period, region, or other thematic topic within the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined. Special attention will be given to the role which archaeology plays in reconstructing the history of past cultures and to the Mediterranean archaeologist's frequent need to reconcile ancient written evidence with archaeologically obtained data. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, GNHU 282, HIST 282, GNHU 285 or GNHU 181. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or HIST 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or GNHU 285.

GNHU362: Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is a practical introduction to how archaeology is conducted in the field at an ancient site in the Mediterranean world. Students learn basic techniques of surveying, digging, artifact removal and processing, and on-site record keeping as well as the overall organization of an archaeological project in the field. The course is given on-site at an appropriate excavation location. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: One of the following: A previous course in some aspect of Mediterranean archaeology; previous archaeological fieldwork experience; or permission of the instructor.

GNHU381: Africa in Classical Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

The importance of Africa in the Greco-Roman world: economic, intellectual, political, and artistic contributions; Blacks and ancient institutions: army, theater, sport, government, slavery; ancient attitudes toward race; famous Africans of antiquity. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or HIST 281 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU383: Women in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Women in the ancient world and their contributions to history, literature, philosophy and the arts. Emphasis on Greco-Roman civilization, with comparative study of other ancient cultures. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 and GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285 or WMGS 201 or departmental approval.

GNHU384: Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture)

The role of law in Roman history and society. Social structure and family law. The law and slavery. Property, contracts, and delicts. Legal forms, legal fictions, and the response of law to new conditions. Roman law in the Medieval and Modern periods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200.

GNHU385: Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture)

Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides read in English translation; origins of Greek drama, religion and myth in tragedy, the tragic hero, stage production, influence on modern literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 285 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 281 or GNHU 285 or HIST 281.

GNHU454: Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture)

Reading of De Rerum Natura with study and discussion of the relation of science and philosophy in antiquity; Greek schools of thought and Roman interpretation of Hellenistic ideas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or HIST 281 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 310 or GNHU 313 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 351 or GNHU 355 or GNHU 357 or GNHU 358 or GNHU 359 or GNHU 360 or GNHU 361 or GNHU 362 or GNHU 370 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 382 or GNHU 383 or GNHU 384 or GNHU 385 or GNHU 396.

GNHU470: Seminar in Classical Humanities (3 hours seminar)

Topic to be selected according to faculty and student interest and developed through an interdisciplinary approach. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 310 or GNHU 313 or GNHU 320 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 345 or GNHU 351 or GNHU 355 or GNHU 357 or GNHU 358 or GNHU 359 or GNHU 360 or GNHU 361 or GNHU 362 or GNHU 370 or GNHU 380 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 382 or GNHU 383 or GNHU 384 or GNHU 385 or GNHU 396.

GNHU490: Principles of Mythic Symbolism (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the origins and patterns of mythic symbolism as discussed by various theorists of myth in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the study of myth, the course examines theories derived from various disciplines, including literature, religion, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, women's studies and others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 310 or GNHU 320 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 351 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 383 or GNHU 385 or departmental approval.

GREK101: Beginning Greek I (3 hours lecture)

The fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar. Reading of simple texts. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

GREK102: Beginning Greek II (3 hours lecture)

The continuation of Beginning Greek I. The fundamentals of grammar and reading of selected texts. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 101 or departmental approval.

GREK201: Intermediate Greek I (3 hours lecture)

Review of grammar. Selected readings from Greek prose and poetry. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 102 or departmental approval.

GREK202: Intermediate Greek II (3 hours lecture)

Review of grammar. Selected readings from Greek prose and poetry. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 201 or departmental approval.

GREK301: Greek New Testament (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings from the New Testament with attention to historical context and to the nature and development of Koine Greek. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 202 or departmental approval.

GREK302: Greek Epic Poetry (3 hours lecture)

Representative selections from the Iliad and Odyssey. Homer as an oral poet. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 202 or departmental approval.

GREK351: Attic Orators (3 hours lecture)

Representative works of Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and others. The orators as stylists and as a source for political and social history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 102 or departmental approval.

GREK352: Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture)

Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. The metrics, style, themes, and structure of Attic tragedy. The influence of the Greeks on Western drama. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 102 or departmental approval.

GREK361: Greek Historians (3 hours lecture)

Readings from Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. The development of Greek historiography as a literary genre and as a medium for reporting events. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 102 or departmental approval.

GREK371: Greek Philosophers (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings, especially from Plato's Dialogues concerning the trial and death of Socrates. The Greek philosophical tradition and its development in the archaic and classical periods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 202 or departmental approval.

GREK372: Greek Lyric Poets (3 hours lecture)

Readings from the principal lyric, iambic, and elegiac poets, primarily those of the archaic period. The development of theme, structure, and metre. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 202 or departmental approval.

GREK374: Hesoid (3 hours lecture)

Readings from the Theogony and the Works and Days. Study of the archaic period of Greek civilization. The structure and meaning of the Hesiodic literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 202 or departmental approval.

GREK390: Selected Readings in Ancient Greek (3 hours lecture)

Intensive reading and critical study of one or more selected authors, genres, texts or periods of ancient Greek that is not covered by a regular course. With different topics may be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 102 or departmental approval.

GREK410: Greek Composition (3 hours lecture)

The finer points of style and grammar and an ability to handle the Greek idiom, as much as possible, in a non-translation situation; readings of selected Greek literary and non-literary models. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Any 300-level GREK course or departmental approval.

LATN101: Beginning Latin I (3 hours lecture)

The fundamentals of classical Latin grammar. Reading of simple Latin texts. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

LATN102: Beginning Latin II (3 hours lecture)

The continuation of Beginning Latin I. Fundamentals of Latin grammar and reading of selected texts. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 101 or departmental approval.

LATN150: Intensive Beginning Latin (6 hours lecture)

The equivalent of Beginning Latin I and II. Fundamentals of classical Latin grammar and reading of selected Latin texts. 6 sh.

LATN205: Intermediate Latin I (3 hours lecture)

Review of grammar. Selected readings from Latin prose and poetry. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 102 or departmental approval.

LATN206: Intermediate Latin II (3 hours lecture)

Review of grammar. Selected readings from Latin prose and poetry. Meets World Languages Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN301: Latin Literature of the Republic (3 hour lecture)

A historical survey of the highlights of Latin literature from its beginnings to the death of Cicero. Selections from prose and poetry will be read with attention to style, form, outlook, and cultural context. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Latin. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 206 or department approval.

LATN302: Latin Literature of the Golden Age (3 hours lecture)

A historical survey of the highlights of Latin literature from the second triumvirate through the early Julio-Claudian period. Selections from prose and poetry will be read with attention to style, form, outlook, and cultural context. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Latin. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 206 or departmental approval.

LATN303: Latin Literature of the Silver Age (3 hours lecture)

A historical survey of the highlights of Latin literature from the Neronian period through the second century of the Christian era. Selections from prose and poetry will be read with attention to style, form, outlook, and cultural context. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Latin. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 206 or departmental approval.

LATN304: Latin Literature of the Middle Ages (3 hours lecture)

The highlights of Latin literature from the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the West to the beginning of the Renaissance. Selections from poetry, history, philosophy, theology, and popular literature will be read with attention to style, development of the language, and historical context. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Latin. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 206 or departmental approval.

LATN401: Latin Composition (3 hours lecture)

Practice in writing Latin prose in conjunction with review of grammar. Readings in selected Latin authors with a view toward acquiring familiarity with different prose styles. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN410: Advanced Latin Grammar (3 hours lecture)

Linguistic analysis of Latin grammar based on examples from classical authors. Practice in writing Latin prose. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN411: Roman Letter Writing (3 hours lecture)

The public figure and the private citizen seen through the letters of Cicero and Pliny. The letters as evidence for Roman political and social history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN412: Roman Drama (3 hours lecture)

Selected comedies of Plautus and Terence with attention to style, form, dramatic technique, and literary ancestry. The influence of Roman comedy on subsequent European drama. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN414: Roman Lyric Poetry (3 hours lecture)

Readings from the lyrics of Catullus and Horace, with particular emphasis on style, themes, and metrics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN415: Roman Biography (3 hours lecture)

The biography as a genre: selected passages from Sallust, Tacitus, Suetonius; contrasting these works with autobiographical evidence from the letters and excerpts of other Latin authors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN419: Methods of Teaching Latin (3 hours lecture)

The history of methodology together with new approaches and techniques. The development of a Latin curriculum, including evaluation of textbooks and construction of lesson plans, reviews, and tests. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN445: Linguistic History of the Latin Language (3 hours lecture)

Latin and its position in the Indo-European family; the evolution from the spoken to the literary, to the vulgar, to the Christian; characteristics of the periods exemplified in the language; transitional features in the phonology, morphology, and syntax. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN451: Roman Historians (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings from Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus. The development of Roman historiography in the context of Roman history and the Greek historiographical background. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN453: The Epic and Vergil (3 hours lecture)

Readings primarily from the Aeneid but including selections from the Georgics and Eclogues. Vergil as a literary artist and his role in the development of the epic in Western literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN454: Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture)

Reading of De Rerum Natura with study and discussion of the relation of science and philosophy in antiquity; Greek schools of thought and Roman interpretation of Hellenistic ideas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN455: Ovid (3 hours lecture)

Selections from Ovid's works, principally the Metamorphoses, Ars Amatoria, Amores, and Heroides. Ovidian style, humor, and use of literary myth. Ovid's influence on literature and the arts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN461: Caesar: End of the Republic (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings from the De Bello Gallico and De Bello Civili. Caesar as a politician, general, man of letters, and historical source on his own conquests. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN462: Roman Satire (3 hours lecture)

Readings from Horace, Juvenal, Petronius, and others. Different forms and definitions of satire. The Latin contribution to satire in Western literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN464: The Elegy (3 hours lecture)

The Roman elegiac poets, Tibullus and Propertius; the elegy as a form of poetic expression. Comparison of the elegy in Latin and English literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN470: Senior Seminar (3 hours seminar)

Independent study pursued on a theme in depth by contractual arrangement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN475: Study Abroad (3 hours lecture)

Approved study-travel program at selected universities, classical sites, museums. Credit by evaluation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN478: Advanced Latin Readings: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Intensive reading and critical study of a selected author, genre, period, or theme in Latin literature. Topic to be announced each semester. May be repeated for twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 205 or departmental approval.

LATN484: Cicero: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

Cicero's philosophical essays with special attention to his role as a transmitter of Greek philosophy to the Roman and later Western world. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

PHIL331: History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophical systems and movements from the pre-Socratics to Plotinus with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

RELG209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with GNHU 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.