Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations Minor - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog


ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CIVILIZATIONS REQ

Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 3 requirements:

  1. INTRODUCTORY COURSES

    Complete 2 courses from the following:

    ARHT 105 Art in Western Civilization: Ancient Through Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 181 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 201 General Humanities I (to 1400) (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. ART HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY

    Complete 1 course from the following:

    ARHT 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
    ARHT 321 Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 313 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 351 The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 361 Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 362 Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology 3-6
    GNHU 370 Reading Seminar in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours seminar) 3
  3. Complete 3 courses from the following:

    GNHU 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 283 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 320 Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 332 Selected Topics in Ancient History (Greece, Rome, W. Asia, N. Africa, Europe) (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 355 Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 357 The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 358 Cleopatra (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 359 Rome in the Age of Augustus (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 360 The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 381 Africa in Classical Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
    GNHU 384 Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture) 3
    GREK 301 Greek New Testament (3 hours lecture) 3
    GREK 361 Greek Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
    LATN 415 Roman Biography (3 hours lecture) 3
    LATN 451 Roman Historians (3 hours lecture) 3
    LATN 461 Caesar: End of the Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
    PHIL 331 History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
    POLS 333 Topics in Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
    RELG 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

ARHT105: Art in Western Civilization: Ancient Through Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The history of Western art, architecture, and material culture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages: Paleolithic and Neolithic art; ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art; Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic art. Museum visits and extensive reading. Required for Fine Arts majors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Animation and Illustration, Fine Arts, and Graphic Design. Previous course ARHS 105 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT313: Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the art and architecture of the Aegean region in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE with special attention to archaeological perspectives. Specifically, this includes the material culture of the Early Cyclades, Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The two primary methodological approaches will be art historical and archaeological. The core material of the course will be chronologically presented; however, substantial time will also be devoted to specific problems or themes in the field. Cross-listed with the Classics and General Humanities department, GNHU 313. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208, GNED 201, GNED 202, GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 290, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, ARPH 201, MUGN 241, RELG 221 or departmental approval.

ARHT314: Greek Art (3 hours lecture)

Greek art and material culture including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 328 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT315: Roman Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 485 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT321: Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The emergence and development of early Christian, Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art from Late Antiquity through Iconoclasm and the early Middle Ages. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 322 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

GNHU181: Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The science of evaluating Greco-Roman and closely related cultures through observation and analysis of their physical remains. Problems and methods of dating artifacts and sites. Building materials, types, and decorations. Field trip in addition to illustrated lectures and discussions. 3 sh.

GNHU201: General Humanities I (to 1400) (3 hours lecture)

A broadly historical introduction to important themes and topics in the humanities as seen through literature, philosophy, and the arts from the ancient world to the Middle Ages. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in General Humanities. 3 sh.

GNHU209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with RELG 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman conquest as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Classics. Cross listed with History, HIST 281. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Cross listed with History, HIST 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: Not for History Majors/Minors. GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU283: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture)

This course uses women, gender, and sexuality to model a broad, cross-disciplinary, and issue-oriented approach to ancient societies. Students will examine cultural and historical objects, such as historical and philosophical works, inscriptions, and graffiti. They will view monuments and artifacts. They will learn how to approach complex cultural objects and understand how social constructions of gender affected and reflected the lives of women and men in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU313: Aegean Art and Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the art and architecture of the Aegean region in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE with special attention to archaeological perspectives. Specifically, this includes the material culture of the Early Cyclades, Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The two primary methodological approaches will be art historical and archaeological. The core material of the course will be chronologically presented; however, substantial time will also be devoted to specific problems or themes in the field. Cross-listed with the Fine Art and Design department, ARHT 313. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208, GNED 201, GNED 202, GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 290, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, ARPH 201, MUGN 241, RELG 221 or departmental approval.

GNHU320: Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a topic or issue utilizing the content and approaches of two or more fields of Humanitites (broadly defined, including Art History, Theater, Dance and the Fine Arts) to consider some particular issue or topic relevant to the Humanities. May be repeated twice for a total of up to 9 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285.

GNHU332: Selected Topics in Ancient History (Greece, Rome, W. Asia, N. Africa, Europe) (3 hours lecture)

Courses offered under this selected topics rubric examine specific periods and issues concerning Mediterranean, Western Asian, and European political, cultural, social and economic history from the Bronze Age to the late Antique. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 OR HIST/GNHU 281 or HIST/GNHU 282.

GNHU351: The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Cities and city-based culture in the Greek and Roman world seen through the evidence of archaeology, literary sources, and contemporary documents such as inscriptions. Town planning, economic life, social groups, and population patterns in selected ancient cities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or GNHU 283 or GNHU 285 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU355: Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture)

Dying undefeated at the age of 32, Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) had conquered the vast Persian Empire stretching from the Mediterranean sea to the borders of present-day Pakistan, ensuring the spread of Greek culture throughout the known world. This course studies Alexander's life, accomplishments, and geo-historical impact, as well as his transformation into a quasi-mythical figure in literature and art throughout the east and west from antiquity to today. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU357: The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture)

From a small town barely dominant over one region of Italy, Rome grew, between the traditional founding of the Republic in 509 and the collapse of the Republican government in the mid-first century BCE, to be a wealthy and sophisticated center of culture and a Mediterranean "world" power backed by a major military machine and accustomed to frequent victory in war. This course examines that process, with special emphasis on the role of the Senate in motivating foreign policy, the role of patronage and self-advertisement, and the massive influx of new cultural characteristics, from large-scale slavery to the creation of a literature and a taste for things Greek that took place during the last two centuries BCE. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU358: Cleopatra (3 hours lecture)

This course examines Cleopatra VII both as she appears in the historical record and as later authors and artists have shaped her image. Issues considered include female power, east vs. west, and politics and propaganda. Beyond Cleopatra herself, the course considers the Hellenistic period, the origins of the Roman Empire, the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria, and women's roles in ancient society. In addition, the course offers an introduction to the study of reception, the recreation and re-interpretation of history, art, and literature in subsequent ages. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU359: Rome in the Age of Augustus (3 hours lecture)

Roman culture and society experienced a radical transformation during the lifetime of Rome's first emperor, Augustus (63 BC - 14 AD). This course focuses on the interplay between a new set of political realities and developments in literature, the visual arts, and the organization of private and social life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU360: The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture)

Among empires ancient and modern, that of the Romans is especially noteworthy for its geographical extent, cultural richness and diversity, duration, and status as a model or anti-model for more recent polities. This course centers around the three and a half centuries from the establishment by Augustus of the regime known as the Principate to the period of Diocletian and Constantine in the fourth century CE, when changing conditions and new political forces began to alter its nature significantly. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing primary sources of information and on understanding the development of Rome from an outside power ruling a diverse collection of regions to an entity incorporating increasingly shared ideologies and other cultural habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU361: Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of in-depth study of the archaeological evidence for a selected period, region, or other thematic topic within the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined. Special attention will be given to the role which archaeology plays in reconstructing the history of past cultures and to the Mediterranean archaeologist's frequent need to reconcile ancient written evidence with archaeologically obtained data. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, GNHU 282, HIST 282, GNHU 285 or GNHU 181. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or HIST 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or GNHU 285.

GNHU362: Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is a practical introduction to how archaeology is conducted in the field at an ancient site in the Mediterranean world. Students learn basic techniques of surveying, digging, artifact removal and processing, and on-site record keeping as well as the overall organization of an archaeological project in the field. The course is given on-site at an appropriate excavation location. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: One of the following: A previous course in some aspect of Mediterranean archaeology; previous archaeological fieldwork experience; or permission of the instructor.

GNHU370: Reading Seminar in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours seminar)

Directed study based on intensive reading of current literature focused on a region, a problem, or a theoretical issue in Mediterranean archaeology. Students are normally expected to have a background which includes at least one archaeology course. With department approval, may be repeated once for credit. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

GNHU381: Africa in Classical Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

The importance of Africa in the Greco-Roman world: economic, intellectual, political, and artistic contributions; Blacks and ancient institutions: army, theater, sport, government, slavery; ancient attitudes toward race; famous Africans of antiquity. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or HIST 281 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU384: Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture)

The role of law in Roman history and society. Social structure and family law. The law and slavery. Property, contracts, and delicts. Legal forms, legal fictions, and the response of law to new conditions. Roman law in the Medieval and Modern periods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200.

GREK301: Greek New Testament (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings from the New Testament with attention to historical context and to the nature and development of Koine Greek. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 202 or departmental approval.

GREK361: Greek Historians (3 hours lecture)

Readings from Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. The development of Greek historiography as a literary genre and as a medium for reporting events. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GREK 102 or departmental approval.

LATN415: Roman Biography (3 hours lecture)

The biography as a genre: selected passages from Sallust, Tacitus, Suetonius; contrasting these works with autobiographical evidence from the letters and excerpts of other Latin authors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN451: Roman Historians (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings from Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus. The development of Roman historiography in the context of Roman history and the Greek historiographical background. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

LATN461: Caesar: End of the Republic (3 hours lecture)

Selected readings from the De Bello Gallico and De Bello Civili. Caesar as a politician, general, man of letters, and historical source on his own conquests. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LATN 301, LATN 302, LATN 303, LATN 304 or departmental approval.

PHIL331: History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophical systems and movements from the pre-Socratics to Plotinus with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

POLS333: Topics in Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course allows instructors to develop a new course not regularly offered in the area of political thought. Texts and topics will vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit up to four times as long as the titles differ. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300.

RELG209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with GNHU 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.