History (M.A.) - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog

The Master of Arts in History provides a perspective on past societies and cultures. As such, the program furnishes a range of approaches -- political, social, economic, cultural, et al. -- that explore the past on its own terms. Students typically receive exposure to the United States and Europe, our two strongest fields of study, with an opportunity to examine Latin America, Africa and Asia if they so desire. Students do not have to major in history as undergraduates in order to be admitted into the program; nevertheless, they are expected to have some background in the appropriate social sciences. Any questions about the program can be directed to the Graduate Program Coordinator.

ADMISSIONS

In addition to the general requirements for admission to the graduate program at Montclair State, candidates must present an undergraduate record showing a total of at least 30 semester hours in the social sciences and/or history. For candidates with weak undergraduate preparation in the field of concentration, prerequisite courses, not for graduate credit, may be required.

 


HISTORY

Complete 32 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete 1 course from the following for 3 semester hours:

    HIST 501 New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 502 History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete 18 semester hours from the following list

    HIST 501 New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 511 Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar) 3
    HIST 512 American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 513 Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 514 The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 515 Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 517 Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 518 Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 519 America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 521 Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 522 Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 523 History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 524 History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 525 History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 526 The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 529 Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 532 Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 533 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 535 Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 536 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 537 Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 540 Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 541 Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 550 African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture) 3
    HIST 570 Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar) 3
  3. FREE ELECTIVES

    Complete 9 semester hours of free electives with Graduate Program Coordinator approval.

  4. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Complete 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete for 2 semester hours.

      HIST 603 Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar) 2
    2. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

      In the term that you will sit for exam, register for - which matches your major & advisor. Successfully pass exam.

      GRAD CMP Comprehensive Examination 0

Course Descriptions:

GRADCMP: Comprehensive Examination

This course is a placeholder for matriculated master's students planning to take the departmental Comprehensive Examination. Successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination will result in a grade of P, unsuccessful students will receive a grade of NC. Students who do not successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination will be required to register for this placeholder course in each term for which they plan to take the examination (limited to three). 0 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Master's degree program required.

HIST501: New Interpretations in History (3 hours lecture)

Designed to help students keep up to date in the fields of American, European and Non-Western history. Major trends and developments in the study of history in the light of recent representative examples of historical research and interpretation. 3 sh.

HIST502: History and New Social Studies (3 hours lecture)

Designed to assist teachers, administrators and supervisors in acquiring a comprehensive view of modern materials, methods and curricula in history and the social sciences. 3 sh.

HIST511: Seminar in American Colonial History (3 hours seminar)

This course will examine the forces and conditions of the colonial period which contributed to the shaping of the characteristics of American political and economic institutions, social practices and ideas, intellectual outlooks, and attitudes. 3 sh.

HIST512: American Revolution 1763-1787 (3 hours lecture)

The causes and course of the American revolution from both British and American viewpoints, including analysis of economic, political, social and intellectual factors. 3 sh.

HIST513: Problems-New Nation 1789-1828 (3 hours lecture)

The growth of political institutions under the Constitution, the gaining of respect as a new country in the family of nations. The establishment of economic credit, and the rise of American nationalism. 3 sh.

HIST514: The Crisis of American Nationalism, 1828-1876 (3 hours lecture)

The crisis in American nationalism from Jackson through Reconstruction as the country's constitution, party system, and social structure contended with the disruptive effects of territorial expansion, the factory system, slavery and the new immigration. 3 sh.

HIST515: Culture and Consciousness: Women in Nineteenth Century America (3 hours lecture)

This course in the history of American women will focus on major themes in nineteenth century women's culture. It will explore the implications of industrialization and modernization for women, the construction of domestic ideology, the development of feminism, and the centrality of gender in nineteenth century life and culture. The emphasis of the course is antebellum, but will consider the implications of this legacy for post Civil War history. Readings will include contemporary scholarship as well as a selection of representative primary texts by and about nineteenth century American women. 3 sh.

HIST517: Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt (3 hours lecture)

An opportunity to study that part of recent American history centering about Franklin Delano Roosevelt. While concentrating on domestic aspects of American life, attention is given also to foreign affairs and their impact on the daily lives of Americans. 3 sh.

HIST518: Urban History: National Trends in New Jersey Cities (3 hours lecture)

An advanced survey of the urban dimension in American history and of urban history as a discipline. Late 19th and 20th century national trends are pinpointed within the development of Paterson, Passaic, Jersey City, Newark and their suburbs. 3 sh.

HIST519: America Since 1945 (3 hours lecture)

This course studies the transformation of the Roosevelt coalition and its liberal policies since 1945 as they faced the challenge of the cold war abroad and growing class and racial upheaval at home. 3 sh.

HIST521: Civil War and Revolution in Chinese History, 1911-1949 (3 hours lecture)

The transformation of China from empire to Peoples Republic. Chinese concepts of revolution and the intellectual, political and social changes which preceded the formation of the Peoples Republic in 1949. 3 sh.

HIST522: Revolutionary Russia 1905-1921 (3 hours lecture)

The historical forces of 19th and 20th century Russia which led to the Bolshevik revolution of November, 1917 and to the consolidation of Soviet power by 1921. 3 sh.

HIST523: History of Soviet Diplomacy (3 hours lecture)

Changes in the ideological determinants of Soviet diplomacy contrasted with fluctuations in internal and external political and economic policies. Contributions of leading Soviet statesmen to diplomatic history. 3 sh.

HIST524: History of American Business Leaders (3 hours lecture)

Designed to familiarize students with major developments in American business history. The mutual impact of business and society is investigated through biographical studies of leading American businessmen. 3 sh.

HIST525: History of American Labor 1870-1970 (3 hours lecture)

Study of the American worker from the period after the Civil War to the present, with concentration on social, political and economic behavior as well as the union movement. 3 sh.

HIST526: The Industrialization of America, 1865-1900 (3 hours lecture)

The causes and nature of the industrialization of the American economy after the Civil War; factors responsible for rapid economic growth; the impact of changing productive techniques on American institutions and human welfare. 3 sh.

HIST529: Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the major states of Western Europe during the interwar period, with emphasis on varieties of fascism. 3 sh.

HIST532: Modernization in Japanese Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

Modernization in East Asia with focus on Japan. Japanese experience in adjusting new world forces of the 19th and 20th centuries considered against the background of her traditional values and institutions. Comparisons with China and Korea. 3 sh.

HIST533: French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours lecture)

The background of the French Revolution, its changing course and cast of characters during 1789-99, and the advent to power and imperial regime of Napoleon, 1799-1814. 3 sh.

HIST535: Castle, Cathedral and Crusade: Europe in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (3 hours lecture)

Guided by the organizing principle that some medieval people themselves used, this course will approach the High Middle Ages through the eyes of those who fought (nobility), worked (peasants), and prayed (clergy). Social, political, economic, religious and cultural aspects of the medieval European experience will be explored through the investigation of topics such as the rise of the nation-state, the expansion of trade, the rise of the university, the launching of the Crusades, the development of Gothic architecture and the intensification of religious belief. A field trip is required as part of the course. 3 sh.

HIST536: Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800 (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the everyday lives and belief systems of early modern Europeans through a survey of developments in French, Italian, English and German popular culture over a period of three centuries from 1500 to 1800. Topics to be covered include Carnival, community policing, ritual behavior, religious beliefs, magic, family life, violence, deviant behavior, and the transmission of culture between groups and across generations. 3 sh.

HIST537: Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History (3 hours lecture)

Romantic, utilitarian, conservative, liberal and early existential streams of thought in 19th century Europe. The impact of these intellectual movements on European society. 3 sh.

HIST540: Europe as a World Civilization (3 hours lecture)

General analysis and reappraisal of the place of Europe in world history. The development, distinctive contributions and future prospects of European civilization examined in the light of contemporary world conditions. 3 sh.

HIST541: Asian Civilization-Comparative Cultural History (3 hours lecture)

Course compares and contrasts central value systems, kinship institutions, social stratification and the exercise of political power in traditional India, China & Japan. These topics are related to differing patterns of nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. 3 sh.

HIST550: African Identities: Gender, Ethnicity, and Nation (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the construction and development of identities in Sub-Saharan Africa. It explores the meanings of concepts such as "tribe," "ethnicity," and "nation"; and it questions the role of history, culture and politics in the formation and evolution of African identities. The course focuses on particular themes such as traditions of origin, cultural nationalism, slavery, etc. These are illustrated by case studies from West, East, Central and Southern Africa, which are organized in a chronological order. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the notion of identity and its importance in the past and present of African societies. 3 sh.

HIST570: Seminar in Non-Western History (3 hours seminar)

Graduate level study in a period, problem, or theme in Non-Western History. Individual seminars will be offered in African History, South Asian History, Latin American History, etc. May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 credits as long as the topic is different. Please see Course Schedule for specific offering each semester. 3 sh.

HIST603: Reading Seminar in History (2 hours seminar)

Required for all master's degree candidates concentrating in history, this seminar entails directed independent study in preparation for a three-hour written comprehensive examination. Candidates should register to take the seminar in the semester preceding the examination date. Take the seminar in the fall if the examination is the following March; take the seminar in the spring if the examination is the following October. 2 sh.