Computational Linguistics Certificate Program - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog

The Graduate Certificate in Computational Linguistics provides students with a basic education in the interdisciplinary field of computational linguistics. Computational linguists develop tools that support the interface of the person with the computer, in applications like blogs and diaries, citizen journalism and social interactions, web search and online booking systems, smart library catalogs, and the learning of foreign languages, spoken language interaction and knowledge discovery.  They do this working for companies like Google, IBM, Yahoo!, MITRE, Microsoft and Amazon as well as for various governmental organizations both military and  civilian.

The program enables students to understand core algorithms and data structures in CL, understand both symbolic and statistical methods and their appropriate use in applications. Applications include automatic text summarization, machine translation, named entity recognition (determining which items in a text map to proper names and what the type of each such name is –person, location, organization, etc.), natural language generation (converting information from computer databases into readable human language), natural language understanding (converting chunks of text into more formal representations that are easier for computer programs to manipulate),  question answering (determining an answer, given a human language question), speech recognition, and text-to-speech synthesis, among many others.

The program is the only one of its kind in the state of New Jersey. It is unusual in that it places equal emphasis on basic computer science skills and on the techniques and methods of linguistics,giving students a solid background for the job market.


COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS CERTIFICATE

Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. CORE COURSES

    Complete the following 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

    APLN 550 Computational Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
    APLN 552 Current Issues in Natural Language Processing (3 hours lecture) 3
    APLN 553 Text Analysis Tools (1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab) 3
  2. ADDITIONAL COURSES

    Based on academic background, complete 1 of the following:

    1. Linguistics Background

      Complete 3 courses for 12 semester hours:

      CSIT 501 Computer Science Foundations I (4 hours lecture) 4
      CSIT 503 Computer Science Foundations III (4 hours lecture) 4
      CSIT 504 Computer Science Foundations IV (4 hours lecture) 4
    2. Computer Science Background

      Complete the following for a total of 9 semester hours:

      1.  

        APLN 500 Language and Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 1 course from the following list.

        APLN 504 Syntax (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 524 Advanced Structure of American English (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. Complete 1 course from the following:

        APLN 502 Sociolinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 504 Syntax (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 505 Semantics and Pragmatics (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 506 Phonetics and Phonology (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 510 Discourse Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 520 Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 560 Translation Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
        APLN 570 The Structure of American Sign Language (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

APLN500: Language and Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

An overview of the study of language and linguistics intended to provide students with a clear understanding of human language and with the conceptual foundations of linguistics. The course will expose students to several major areas within linguistics: language acquisition, phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. It will introduce the major tenets and principles of linguistics without surveying the areas treated in the other graduate courses in the department. It is a prerequisite for all other courses in the M.A. program. 3 sh.

APLN502: Sociolinguistics (3 hours lecture)

The study of language in its social context with a focus on language variation. Topics include language and social class, language and ethnicity, language and gender, and the study of standard versus nonstandard varieties of language. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN504: Syntax (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the findings of theoretical syntax and the valuable insights which these provide for syntactic analysis in language teaching, for language-learning texts, for translation, for work in artificial intelligence, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN505: Semantics and Pragmatics (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the main tenets of contemporary semantics and pragmatics, the areas of linguistics that examine various aspects of meaning. The course investigates the boundaries between semantics and pragmatics by studying utterance meaning as well as lexical and sentence meaning. Students will learn about the applications of semantics and pragmatics to a variety of areas of applied linguistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN506: Phonetics and Phonology (3 hours lecture)

The study of the basic principles of phonetics and phonology, and the relevance of these principles to a variety of applications, including foreign-language teaching, speech pathology, and the analysis and synthesis of speech by computer. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN510: Discourse Analysis (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the techniques used in discourse analysis, the branch of linguistics which studies how to analyze naturally occurring connected speech. Discourse analysis is the study of the organization of language above the sentence level including the structure of conversations. It considers language in a social context, in particular the language used in verbal interactions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN520: Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth analysis of the processes of child and adult second language acquisition (SLA) and how it differs from first language acquisition and the implications of these theories for the teaching and learning of second languages. The application of sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics to language teaching. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN524: Advanced Structure of American English (3 hours lecture)

A detailed analysis of the phonological and grammatical structures of American English; advanced study of the social and stylistic varieties of American English; various theories of English grammar are studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN550: Computational Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the field of existing computer systems for analyzing natural language. The following areas are covered: parsing, semantic analysis and discourse analysis. Students will be required to analyze human language using a specific programming language such as PROLOG, LISP, or Pascal. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN552: Current Issues in Natural Language Processing (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the two methodologies that dominate speech and natural language processing: rule-based and probabilistic system design. The two methodologies will be compared in light of their suitability for language processing applications in syntactic and morphological analysis, speech synthesis and recognition, and text classification and information retrieval. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ALPN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN553: Text Analysis Tools (1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

An introduction to the computer analysis of text for use in research and teaching. Students learn to develop software to search and manipulate written text and transcribed speech. Applications in computer assisted language learning, corpus linguistics, lexicography, and translation are considered. 3 sh.

APLN560: Translation Theory (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the principles involved in providing semantic "equivalents" between two languages, emphasizing the problems of translating a variety of different types of texts which reflect major cross-cultural differences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN570: The Structure of American Sign Language (3 hours lecture)

The study of American sign language, or ASL, the manual language of many deaf Americans. This course approaches ASL from a linguistic perspective, examining its semantics, grammar, and "phonology", and comparing ASL with English and other spoken languages. ASL is also compared with other manual languages used in America, including signed English and "total communication". The educational implications of ASL and other manual languages are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

CSIT501: Computer Science Foundations I (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to programming using a structured high level language, design of algorithms, character strings, recursion, data structures, numerical computing. May not be used for credit by Mathematics or Computer Science majors. Previous course CMPT 505 effective through Spring 2015. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate coordinator's permission.

CSIT503: Computer Science Foundations III (4 hours lecture)

A continuation of CSIT 501. Design and analysis of data structures, pointers, linked representations, linear lists, trees, storage systems and structures, database design. Previous course CMPT 507 effective through Spring 2015. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CSIT 501 and CSIT 504 and permission of graduate coordinator.

CSIT504: Computer Science Foundations IV (4 hours lecture)

Sets, relations, functions, graphs, trees, propositional calculus, induction and recursion, applications to computer science. May not be used for credit by Mathematics or Computer Science majors. Previous course MATH 501 effective through Spring 2015. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Graduate program coordinator's permission.