Linguistics Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate (Combined B.A./M.A.T. with Teacher Certification in English as a Second Language (Preschool-Grade 12) and Teacher of Students with Disabilities) - 2015 University Catalog

The Dual Degree Dual Certification program is a 5-year program that leads to teacher certification in English as a Second Language (grades P-12), teacher certification in Teacher of Students with Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one-year master’s portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education Program website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.


LINGUISTICS MAJOR

Complete 45 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. Complete the following 7 courses:

      LNGN 210 Introduction to General Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 220 Structure of American English (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 230 Language in Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 245 Language and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 300 Syntax (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 331 Phonetics (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 332 Phonology (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      LNGN 301 Semantics (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 302 Pragmatics (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES

    Complete 4 courses from the following:

    1. (LNGN 450, 478, and 479 may also be used with written department approval)

      LNGN 110 Language of Food (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 250 Language of Propaganda (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 260 Dialectology (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 280 Bilingualism (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 284 History of the English Language (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 325 Principles of Second Language Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 384 The Grammars of English (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 420 Language and the Mind (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. From the following, the course not used in Major Requirements Group B, may be used as an elective:.

      LNGN 301 Semantics (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 302 Pragmatics (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. GRADUATE COURSES

    Complete 2 requirement(s). These courses will also count toward the MAT portion of this program.

    1. Complete 2 courses:

      SPED 584 Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom 2-3
      SPED 585 Technology for Inclusive Classrooms 2-3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following with advisor approval:

      APLN 500 Language and Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 502 Sociolinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 504 Syntax (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 505 Semantics and Pragmatics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 506 Phonetics and Phonology (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 508 Research Design in Applied Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 510 Discourse Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 512 Cross-Cultural Discourse Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 518 Forensic Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 520 Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 522 Sociocultural Theory and Second Language Acquisition/Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 524 Advanced Structure of American English (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 525 Methodology of Teaching ESL (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 526 Computer-Assisted Language Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 528 Language Testing and Assessment (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 529 TESL Practicum (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 530 Language Policy and Language Planning (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 532 Language and Culture in Minority Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 534 Languages in Contact (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 535 Language Policy in Nations in Transition (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 536 Languages of the USA (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 538 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Language Socialization (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 540 Literacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 542 Cross-cultural Perspectives on Literacy (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 544 Linguistics and Reading (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 550 Computational Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 552 Current Issues in Natural Language Processing (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 553 Text Analysis Tools (1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab) 3
      APLN 560 Translation Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 565 Lexicography (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 570 The Structure of American Sign Language (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 580 Corpus Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 582 Language and Mobile Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 590 Selected Topics in Applied Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 591 Topics in Cognitive Linguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      APLN 594 Independent Study 1-3
      APLN 596 Independent Study 1-3
      APLN 605 Research Questions in Applied Linguistics 1
      APLN 610 Seminar for Thesis Students in Applied Linguistics (3 hours seminar) 3

Course Descriptions:

APLN500: Language and Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

An overview of the study of language and linguistics intended to provide students with a clear understanding of human language and with the conceptual foundations of linguistics. The course will expose students to several major areas within linguistics: language acquisition, phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. It will introduce the major tenets and principles of linguistics without surveying the areas treated in the other graduate courses in the department. It is a prerequisite for all other courses in the M.A. program. 3 sh.

APLN502: Sociolinguistics (3 hours lecture)

The study of language in its social context with a focus on language variation. Topics include language and social class, language and ethnicity, language and gender, and the study of standard versus nonstandard varieties of language. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN504: Syntax (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the findings of theoretical syntax and the valuable insights which these provide for syntactic analysis in language teaching, for language-learning texts, for translation, for work in artificial intelligence, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN505: Semantics and Pragmatics (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the main tenets of contemporary semantics and pragmatics, the areas of linguistics that examine various aspects of meaning. The course investigates the boundaries between semantics and pragmatics by studying utterance meaning as well as lexical and sentence meaning. Students will learn about the applications of semantics and pragmatics to a variety of areas of applied linguistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN506: Phonetics and Phonology (3 hours lecture)

The study of the basic principles of phonetics and phonology, and the relevance of these principles to a variety of applications, including foreign-language teaching, speech pathology, and the analysis and synthesis of speech by computer. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN508: Research Design in Applied Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

A course to train students in research design, methodology and data collection procedures. Students learn basic skills which prepare them for administrative and research positions in fields such as language planning, ESL curriculum evaluation and language learning measurement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN510: Discourse Analysis (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the techniques used in discourse analysis, the branch of linguistics which studies how to analyze naturally occurring connected speech. Discourse analysis is the study of the organization of language above the sentence level including the structure of conversations. It considers language in a social context, in particular the language used in verbal interactions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN512: Cross-Cultural Discourse Analysis (3 hours lecture)

A discourse analytic examination and comparison of the verbal practices and communicative strategies of different linguistic, social, and cultural groups. Students will broaden their understanding of discourse analysis by investigating verbal interactions that take place in different languages and within a variety of cultural contexts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 510. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN518: Forensic Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

The study of the role of the linguist in the field of law. The course analyzes the difference between "truth" as defined by science and by the law. It describes how linguists can serve as "expert witnesses" in civil cases and in a wide range of criminal investigations. It also explores how dialect study, discourse analysis, lexical analysis, phonetics, pragmatics, etc. can provide linguistic evidence crucial to litigation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN520: Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth analysis of the processes of child and adult second language acquisition (SLA) and how it differs from first language acquisition and the implications of these theories for the teaching and learning of second languages. The application of sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics to language teaching. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN522: Sociocultural Theory and Second Language Acquisition/Learning (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the basic tenets of sociocultural theory of mind and their application to various aspects of second language acquisition/learning. The results of recent studies present evidence that collaborative mental activity carried out through linguistic means promotes second language learning. At the core of this theory is the principle of linguistically mediated cognition; that is, growth in mental abilities is mediated through language working in collaboration with others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN524: Advanced Structure of American English (3 hours lecture)

A detailed analysis of the phonological and grammatical structures of American English; advanced study of the social and stylistic varieties of American English; various theories of English grammar are studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN525: Methodology of Teaching ESL (3 hours lecture)

The study of current issues in the teaching of English as a Second Language. Issues may include innovative teaching methodologies, the application of language learning theories to classroom teaching and the adaptation and development of instructional materials. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 520.

APLN526: Computer-Assisted Language Instruction (3 hours lecture)

Designed for prospective and experienced foreign language and ESL teachers who are interested in exploring the following areas: the use of network-based computer instruction; authentic interactive language instruction via the World Wide Web; and the use and evaluation of currently available software and CD Roms for teaching second and foreign languages. This course is intended to introduce students to the use of computer-mediated language instruction and to the evaluation and selection of software for language learning. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN528: Language Testing and Assessment (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of testing: reliability, validity, correlation, etc. Statistical concepts: correlation coefficient, standard deviation, etc. Testing individual language skills: listening, reading, writing and oral proficiency. Testing communicative competence. Measuring language dominance in bilingualism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 520 and 525.

APLN529: TESL Practicum (3 hours lecture)

To provide students who are seeking certification in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) as a second teaching field, with an opportunity to teach ESL in a formal classroom setting. Arrangements will be made on an individual basis for each student. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 525 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. Completion of other required courses for TESL certification.

APLN530: Language Policy and Language Planning (3 hours lecture)

The study of the problems facing multilingual societies. The course explores the function of standard languages and the competition which often exists among different populations and languages. Topics include the role of language in ethnic loyalty, the dynamics of language loss and maintenance and the linguistic, economic, sociological, political and educational aspects of language planning. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN532: Language and Culture in Minority Education (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the intimate connection between language, culture, and ethnic pride and identity. Study of the communication problems faced by bilingual children due to differences in verbal and non-verbal patterns of communication; survey of various instructional methods and models employed in teaching children from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds; study of the correlation between language and various socio-cultural factors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN534: Languages in Contact (3 hours lecture)

A study of the effects of bilingualism and multilingualism on society and on the languages involved. By examining a variety of examples, students become familiar with the possible outcomes of language contact and with the factors that play a role in language-policy decisions in multilingual societies. Pidgins and creoles are also studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN535: Language Policy in Nations in Transition (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the language policy issues that arise in nations in transitions, the ways in which such countries have dealt with or are dealing with these issues, and the outcomes of their actions. The general approach will be to examine a variety of contemporary and historical case studies--i.e. cases of language policy formation in developing countries around the world. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN536: Languages of the USA (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the indigenous, colonial, and immigrant languages of the U.S. and how they are used in education and general communication. Also studied are factors affecting the maintenance or loss of languages and the shift from native languages to English with discussion of the mutual effects of language contact. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN538: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Language Socialization (3 hours lecture)

A cross-cultural analysis of how children are socialized to use language and how children are socialized through the use of language. Investigates how children learn about their culture through learning their language. Connects the phenomenon of language acquisition to the belief-system and family structure within a society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN540: Literacy (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the nature of written language and its role in cognition and in social and intellectual life. The linguistic, psychological, and functional differences between speaking, writing, and reading are studied. Literate and nonliterate societies are examined. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN542: Cross-cultural Perspectives on Literacy (3 hours lecture)

An overview of how reading and writing are acquired among various societies throughout the world and what educational implications this knowledge has in applied contexts, such as in the teaching of English as a Second Language. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN544: Linguistics and Reading (3 hours lecture)

A study of the insights into the reading process provided by the linguist's description of what the speaker knows about language; an analysis of what the process of language acquisition tells us about the process by which children learn to read; an investigation of the connection between dialect differences and reading difficulties and an exploration of the contribution that linguistics makes for teaching second language learners to read English. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN550: Computational Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the field of existing computer systems for analyzing natural language. The following areas are covered: parsing, semantic analysis and discourse analysis. Students will be required to analyze human language using a specific programming language such as PROLOG, LISP, or Pascal. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN552: Current Issues in Natural Language Processing (3 hours lecture)

An investigation of the two methodologies that dominate speech and natural language processing: rule-based and probabilistic system design. The two methodologies will be compared in light of their suitability for language processing applications in syntactic and morphological analysis, speech synthesis and recognition, and text classification and information retrieval. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ALPN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN553: Text Analysis Tools (1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

An introduction to the computer analysis of text for use in research and teaching. Students learn to develop software to search and manipulate written text and transcribed speech. Applications in computer assisted language learning, corpus linguistics, lexicography, and translation are considered. 3 sh.

APLN560: Translation Theory (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the principles involved in providing semantic "equivalents" between two languages, emphasizing the problems of translating a variety of different types of texts which reflect major cross-cultural differences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN565: Lexicography (3 hours lecture)

The study of the principles of compiling dictionaries. Topics include: the collection and evaluation of citations, semantic fields, defining, recording pronunciations, and determining usage. Attention will be paid to the differences among different types of dictionaries. Sample dictionaries are examined and students carry out their own lexicographic project. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN570: The Structure of American Sign Language (3 hours lecture)

The study of American sign language, or ASL, the manual language of many deaf Americans. This course approaches ASL from a linguistic perspective, examining its semantics, grammar, and "phonology", and comparing ASL with English and other spoken languages. ASL is also compared with other manual languages used in America, including signed English and "total communication". The educational implications of ASL and other manual languages are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN580: Corpus Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

Corpus Linguistics investigates how linguistic phenomena can be studied using large collections of language data that are available as machine-readable texts (corpora). This course introduces students to some of the commonly used methods and techniques for working with these large quantities of spoken and written language corpora. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN582: Language and Mobile Communication (3 hours lecture)

This course investigates linguistic aspects of mobile and computer-mediated communication in a variety of contexts and within specific social networks. Using publicly available corpora and a corpus of SMS text messages, students investigate various aspects of language on the go. These include linguistic simplifications, the structure of messages, stylistic variation, linguistic creativity, and the construction of personalized telephony-based networks. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN590: Selected Topics in Applied Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

An intensive study in a particular area of applied linguistics to address topics not covered in other courses. Topics reflect current issues in applied linguistics. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN591: Topics in Cognitive Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores language as a cognitive function and examines the functioning of the mind through the study of language. It examines how cognitive mechanisms like memory, categorization, attention, and imagery are used during language behavior, and how psychologically viable models of language cover broad ranges of linguistic phenomena. It surveys the theoretical foundations of Cognitive Linguistics and the empirical evidence and arguments for it. Overall, the course considers the relationship between language and cognitive processing in the human brain, explains the conceptual structures and cognitive processes governing linguistic representation and behavior, and studies cognitive approaches to linguistic analysis, lexical semantics, and closely related frameworks of cognitive grammar and construction grammar. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: APLN 500.

APLN594: Independent Study

This course allows MA students to explore areas in Applied Linguistics that are not covered in the normal course offerings. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN596: Independent Study

This course allows MA students to explore areas in Applied Linguistics that are not covered in the normal course offerings. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN605: Research Questions in Applied Linguistics

Research on an approved topic or on an approved reading list in Applied Linguistics. For this requirement, students write a paper based on a research topic that they choose or write a response to a research topic provided to them based on readings that they choose. The papers and/or responses will be read and approved by three faculty members. For this final research requirement, students give an oral presentation at a Linguistics Department colloquium. A grade of In Progress (IP) will be used until the research is completed; may be repeated two times. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: All other required courses for the MA degree in Applied Linguistics. Restricted to MA students in Applied Linguistics (APLN) only.

APLN610: Seminar for Thesis Students in Applied Linguistics (3 hours seminar)

A seminar for the M.A. student who is completing a thesis. This seminar is designed to facilitate the writing of the thesis by providing students with an opportunity to discuss their work with a faculty facilitator and other M.A. students. This course will be taken after the other core courses have been completed and a thesis topic has been approved. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

LNGN110: Language of Food (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the intersection of language and food (or speaking and eating) by investigating what we can learn about language by studying "the language of food." The course introduces fundamental aspects of language and linguistics through an exploration of topics related to food: food terms, food metaphors, the language and structure of menus and recipes, the language of wine, the language of food advertising and labeling, and language practices related to food and eating (e.g., saying grace, making toasts, sharing recipes, etc.). The course examines how people talk about food, how people use food to talk about themselves and about others, and how "food talk" conveys a range of social and cultural meanings. Cognitive aspects of the language of food and taste as well as cross-linguistic similarities and differences will be considered. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

LNGN210: Introduction to General Linguistics (3 hours lecture)

The nature and structure of language; the basic techniques for analyzing linguistic structures; phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic structure of languages, language and dialects; language change; the comparative method in linguistics; human and animal communication; differences between first and second language learning. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LNGN220: Structure of American English (3 hours lecture)

The phonology, morphology, syntax of American English, geographical and social dialects; traditional, structural and transformational approaches to grammar. 3 sh.

LNGN230: Language in Society (3 hours lecture)

Correlations between language varieties, their functions in particular settings, and the characteristics of their speakers. Black English. The role of second languages within a society: Pidgin, Creole, Lingua Franca, Diglossia, etc. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LNGN245: Language and Culture (3 hours lecture)

A study of language in its cultural context. Relationship of linguistic to non-linguistic variables: ethnosemantics, linguistic relativity principle, componential analysis. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LNGN250: Language of Propaganda (3 hours lecture)

This course is a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the use of language to manipulate and influence opinions via advertising, innuendo, jargon, emotive language, etc. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LNGN260: Dialectology (3 hours lecture)

Principles of dialect study; application to American dialects. The origin and development of American dialects in historical, literary, regional, social and urban perspectives. 3 sh.

LNGN280: Bilingualism (3 hours lecture)

Compound and coordinate bilingualism; attitudes, motivation, etc.; functions of languages in multilingual settings; problems of newly-independent, multilingual nations in establishing national and standardized languages; analysis of bilingual speech; problems of educating minority groups in this country whose native language is not English. 3 sh.

LNGN284: History of the English Language (3 hours lecture)

English from its Indo-European origins up to and including the eighteenth-century grammarians. The Germanic strains; old, middle and modern English. 3 sh.

LNGN300: Syntax (3 hours lecture)

The study of sentence structure and the theories designed to describe it. Emphasis on structural grammar, the development of Generative Grammar and contemporary theoretical methods for describing sentence structure. Data will be taken from a number of different languages. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Linguistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval.

LNGN301: Semantics (3 hours lecture)

The systematic and objective study of meaning in language. Topics include: referential meaning, semantic fields, componential analysis, synonymy, polysemy, hyponymy, and sequential meaning. Data will be taken from a number of different languages. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300.

LNGN302: Pragmatics (3 hours lecture)

The study of pragmatics, an area of linguistics that examines language as situated speech and studies how context affects the interpretation of meaning. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300.

LNGN325: Principles of Second Language Learning (3 hours lecture)

Theories of second language acquisition; error analysis; individual learner differences; the roles of input, interaction, and formal instruction in language acquisition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210. Open to Linguistics majors or admission into Teacher Education program.

LNGN331: Phonetics (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive introduction to phonetics, the study of the production of speech sounds and their acoustic characteristics. Students will learn to identify, classify, and transcribe sounds from a variety of languages. While intended primarily for Linguistics majors, this course will also be of interest to prospective language teachers and to majors in Speech, in Psychology, and in Communication Sciences and Disorders. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or departmental approval (for Cognitive Science majors).

LNGN332: Phonology (3 hours lecture)

Phonology studies how languages make use of a particular subset of all the possible speech sounds in a systematic way to produce meaningful units like words and sentences. The objectives of this course will be to give students experience in analyzing phonological data from a wide variety of languages and to survey current theories of phonology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 331 or departmental approval.

LNGN384: The Grammars of English (3 hours lecture)

A critical overview of traditional, structural, and transformational-generative approaches to the problems of analyzing the grammar of the English language; practical applications for teaching English and for understanding grammatical principles as a means of more effective writing and literary analysis. Cross listed with English, ENGL 384. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or LNGN 210.

LNGN420: Language and the Mind (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the major theoretical and methodological principles of Noam Chomsky's theory of Universal Grammar and what they tell us about structure of the human mind. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 210 or PSYC 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288 or CMPT 288.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture)

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

SPED584: Assessment and Evaluation in the Inclusive Classroom

This course is designed to be an introduction for pre-service teachers in the field of Special Education assessment and accountability. The course will introduce students to elements of traditional assessment, including record keeping, grading, objective and essay testing, theories of validity as well as authentic, performance, and portfolio assessment. The keeping of anecdotal records, inclusion, heterogeneous groups, and accommodations will also be components of this course. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).

SPED585: Technology for Inclusive Classrooms

The course is designed to provide educators with an understanding of how to use technology as a seamless part of the teaching and learning experience for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Two main purposes for students with disabilities will be emphasized. Teachers will learn how to provide access to the curriculum for students with disabilities by using the principles of Universal Design for Learning as a framework for curriculum design. They will learn how to utilize technology to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities in order for them to attain maximum independence and participation in all environments. 2 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPED 579. Students must be enrolled in a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Instructional Teaching Certificate (CRI), Educational Services Certificate (CRE) or Master of Education (MED).