Philosophy Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate (Combined B.A./M.A.T. with Teacher Certification in Grades K - 6 and Teacher of Students with Disabilities) - 2015 University Catalog

The Dual Degree Dual Certification program is a 5-year program that leads to teacher certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6, teacher certification in Teacher of Students with Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one-year master’s portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education Program website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.


PHILOSOPHY MAJOR

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. PHILOSOPHY MAJOR

    Complete 36 semester hours including the following 5 requirement(s):

    1. CORE

      Complete 5 courses:

      PHIL 106 Logic (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 310 Knowledge, Belief and Truth (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 312 Existence and Reality (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 331 History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 333 History of Philosophy: Modern Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. VALUE THEORY

      Complete 1 course from the following:

      PHIL 200 History of Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 212 Social and Political Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. TRADITIONS IN CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY

      Complete 1 course from the following:

      PHIL 231 American Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 337 Analytic Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 339 Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
    4. SEMINAR

      Complete for 3 semester hours.

      PHIL 424 Seminar in Philosophy (3 hours seminar) 3
    5. MAJOR ELECTIVES

      Complete 4 courses from the following (only 1 major elective may be at the 100-level):

      PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 102 Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 200 History of Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 202 Ethics and Business (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 204 Philosophical Issues in Biomedical Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 206 Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 208 Ethical Issues in Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 212 Social and Political Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 214 Ethics of Love, Sex and Desire (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 231 American Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 233 Contemporary Philosophers (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 237 Asian Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 239 Existentialism (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 260 Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 262 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 264 Critical Reasoning and Arguments (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 266 Philosophy of Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 270 Philosophy of Mind (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 271 Philosophy of Sport (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 280 Philosophy of Cyberspace (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 290 Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 295 Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 316 Philosophy of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 322 Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 324 Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 330 Philosophy and Death (3 hours seminar) 3
      PHIL 334 Theoretical and Applied Ethics (3 hours seminar) 3
      PHIL 335 Nineteenth Century Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 337 Analytic Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 339 Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 390 Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 395 Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 446 Independent Study in Philosophy 3-12
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (BA/MAT)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS

        Complete the following 6 courses:

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

      1. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE I

        Complete 4 courses:

        1.  

          FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
          MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
          READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 3 semester hours.

          ECEL 279 Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE II

        Complete 3 courses:

        ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 305 Development and Learning in Children With and Without Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE III

        Complete 3 courses:

        ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 439 Pedagogy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. REQUIRED GRADUATE COURSES

      Complete 3 courses (These courses will also count toward the MAT portion of this program):

      ECSE 508 Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECSE 536 Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 515 Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL279: Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the historical and ideological trends that impact the education of children in inclusive settings. Students explore the historical, political and legal foundations of inclusive education; principles of inclusive planning, consultation, and collaboration; resources and services for effective inclusion and inclusive transition programs; characteristics of high and low-incidence disabilities; and implications for students with and without disabilities. This course includes a field experience in which students engage in reflective observation of inclusive classrooms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECSE305: Development and Learning in Children With and Without Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide preservice teacher candidates with a socioculturally based understanding of children's development from birth through middle childhood. By examining theories and current research in child development, they learn that outcomes for children with and without disabilities are situated in multiple contexts, and in the complex interplay between biological and environmental factors. Children's developmental pathways will be understood in relation to their implications for learning in early childhood and elementary education settings. Teacher candidates learn the etiologies, behavioral characteristics and wide range of developmental outcomes associated with various disabilities and childhood disorders. They learn to observe and interpret the physio-motor, cognitive, and social/emotional development of children and provide interventions that promote optimal learning and development among all children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 314; and ECEL 279 or SPED 279.

ECSE439: Pedagogy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture)

Students explore a range of pedagogic principles and practices that enable teachers to create inclusive classroom communities that support the social, behavioral, and academic needs of diverse groups of learners, including disabled learners, across all primary subject areas (reading, writing, math, social studies, science, social and communication skills, and additional content areas). Students critically analyze the challenges that diverse classrooms of learners pose in terms of traditional conceptions of classroom management and teacher-directed pedagogies, actively exploring as alternatives the inclusive pedagogical tools of differentiation, universal design for learning, collaborative teaching, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is placed on developing a conceptualization of inclusive schooling as schooling that is responsive to the needs of all students, and developing an understanding of the ways in which children may be at risk of experiencing marginalization and failure in schooling on the basis of dis/ability, and also on the basis of social class, race, ethnicity, language heritage, and other facets of identity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 305.

ECSE508: Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the importance of meaningful family-professional partnerships. Students gain knowledge, skills, and dispositions to work collaboratively with diverse families to support the education of children with disabilities. The influence of historical, social, cultural, and community influences are deeply embedded in course content. Various approaches including family-focused practice and family systems theory are explored. Students draw from course readings, presentations by guest speakers, and personal and professional experiences to participate in class discussions, complete assignments and expand their understanding of issues vital to families of children with disabilities. 3 sh.

ECSE536: Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

Students actively engage in observation and assessment of elementary age children with disabilities, with particular emphasis on using assessment processes to inform teachers' pedagogy and support children's active involvement in the general education curriculum. Students plan, implement, and critically interpret the results of a wide range of types of both formal and informal assessments (e.g., standardized assessments, curriculum-based assessments, norm- and criteria-referenced assessments, performance-based and portfolio assessments, etc.) across all skill and subject areas. Throughout the course, specific attention is given to students' critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of assessment processes and of the culture, class, language, and gender implications of using assessment practices in schools. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 502 and ECSE 505.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PHIL100: Introduction to Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The nature, scope, methods, basic problems and major types of philosophy. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

PHIL102: Ethics (3 hours lecture)

The nature of ethical judgments, the meaning of moral concepts, the conditions of moral responsibility and the methodological presuppositions of ethical theories in philosophy and religion. Meets the 2002 General Education Requirement - Humanities, Philolosphy/Religion. 3 sh.

PHIL106: Logic (3 hours lecture)

The forms of deductive and inductive argument in traditional logic, the fundamentals of modern formal logic. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

PHIL200: History of Ethics (3 hours lecture)

A historical survey of major ethical theories in the Western philosophical tradition, from ancient times to the present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL202: Ethics and Business (3 hours lecture)

A study of the meaning of morality in the modern world of business. Course contains balance of theory and practice as it examines behavior of business against background of conflicting ethical theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL204: Philosophical Issues in Biomedical Ethics (3 hours lecture)

A study of moral decision making in regard to specific moral problems arising in such areas of contemporary medical research and practice as experimentation on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, information rights of patients, and eugenic sterilization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL206: Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice (3 hours lecture)

An examination of philosophical approaches to current issues related to law and justice. Close attention will be paid to one or more of the following specific issues: freedom of religion, freedom of expression, gay rights, reproductive rights, or civil disobedience and political protest. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL208: Ethical Issues in Education (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on current ethical issues in education, such as academic integrity, censorship, speech and dress codes, racial and gender equity, same-sex education, religious expression, and school violence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL212: Social and Political Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The nature of society and the state, their relation to each other and to the individual, and an evaluation of some main political and social ideals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL214: Ethics of Love, Sex and Desire (3 hours lecture)

An exploration of the ethical issues related to human sexuality and/or intimate relationships. The focus in this course is on conflicts and/or problem areas related to love, sex and desire and the ways ethicists address them. Ethical issues to be discussed include: monogamy, promiscuity, gay marriage, abstinence education, transgender identity, pornography, prostitution, and sexual abuse. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL231: American Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major American philosophers and philosophical movements with emphasis on Peirce, James, Royce, and Dewey. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL233: Contemporary Philosophers (3 hours lecture)

The major movements in contemporary philosophy, studied through writings of leading exponents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL237: Asian Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the major movements and thinkers in Asian philosophy. It acquaints students with Asian philosophical interpretations of experience and reality found in both classical and contemporary Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism in Eastern cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Offered as PHIL 137 through Winter 2013. To become PHIL 237 effective Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL239: Existentialism (3 hours lecture)

The major themes and concepts of existentialism in selected writings of the existentialist philosophers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL260: Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophies of art in the history of Western thought. The conceptual network of ideas of the thinker in question will be delineated, and connections shown between the thinker and the philosophical and artistic themes of that period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL262: Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture)

The nature and shape of religious experience, criteria for meaning within religious thought and language; metaphysical and epistemological implications of such questions as the nature and existence of god, and the possibility of life after death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL264: Critical Reasoning and Arguments (3 hours lecture)

An intermediary level course concentrating upon argumentation and rhetorical devices as they actually function in everyday conversation, philosophical discussion, forensic debate, etc. Arguments will be examined with an eye to penetrating purely formal structure and discovering the underlying dynamics which contribute to cogency in a given context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL266: Philosophy of Science (3 hours lecture)

The epistemological character of scientific thought and the relevance of scientific findings for the clarification and eventual resolution of traditional philosophical issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL270: Philosophy of Mind (3 hours lecture)

Philosophical issues arising from the study of mental processes including the relation of a person to the body, life after death, and the possible reduction of consciousness to a brain process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL271: Philosophy of Sport (3 hours lecture)

Survey of the philosophical aspects of sport along with development of philosophical ideas about sport from the origins of competitive sport to the present. Special attention will be paid to such classic issues as the ontological status of games, sport as moral education, and athletics as substitutes for war. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL280: Philosophy of Cyberspace (3 hours lecture)

Contemporary and classical philosophical and ethical issues as applied to computer-mediated communication. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288, Psychology PSYC 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CMPT 183 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

PHIL290: Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Philosophy of science, philosophy of history, philosophy of law. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

PHIL295: Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL310: Knowledge, Belief and Truth (3 hours lecture)

The major issues and theories concerning the relationship between knowledge, experience and reality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL312: Existence and Reality (3 hours lecture)

An examination of major philosophical theories concerning the nature of reality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL316: Philosophy of Law (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the philosophical issues of jurisprudence. Close attention is given to the status and nature of law, the concept of equality and the limits of law. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL322: Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the pacifist tradition in philosophy and religion, from its origins as a set of religious and philosophical ideals, to its current multifaith, secular, and political forms. Students will examine and evaluate both pacifist thought and peace activism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL324: Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations for developing models and methods of addressing legal problems. Principles of legal reasoning and argument in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Models of legal reasoning and methodology for resolving legal problems as developed within evolving social and philosophical notions of justice and fairness. Pre-law Minor. Cross listed with Political Science and Law, JURI 324. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or PHIL 206 or PHIL 212.

PHIL330: Philosophy and Death (3 hours seminar)

Seminar devoted to philosophical, mainly ethical and metaphysical, questions about death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL331: History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophical systems and movements from the pre-Socratics to Plotinus with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL333: History of Philosophy: Modern Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophical systems and movements from the Renaissance to Kant. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL334: Theoretical and Applied Ethics (3 hours seminar)

Advanced seminar covering ethical theory and its application to post-modernism and other forms of relativism, the meaning of moral language and the possibility of religious and secular ethical foundations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL335: Nineteenth Century Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the major philosophical figures and movements of the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on Hegel and the Hegelian tradition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL337: Analytic Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The development of the analytic tradition in twentieth century philosophy; the logical and linguistic techniques employed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL339: Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys the four main movements of the continental (European) philosophical tradition: (1) 19th century German philosophy, (2) Marxism/critical theory, (3) phenomenology/existentialism, and (4) post-structuralism/postmodernism. This philosophical tradition runs from the 19th Century to the present day. Continental philosophy stands in contrast to the dominant, Anglo-American, "analytic" philosophical tradition. This course gives students the opportunity to examine the ways in which continental philosophers approach issues in the core subfields of philosophy, such as epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will also have the opportunity to explore similarities to and differences from the analytic philosophical tradition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 202 or PHIL 208 or PHIL 231 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 264 or PHIL 266 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 271 or PHIL 280 or PHIL 288 or PHIL 290 or PHIL 295 or GLQS 201 or WMGS 301.

PHIL376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with JURI 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

PHIL390: Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL395: Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL424: Seminar in Philosophy (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, philosophers or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395.

PHIL446: Independent Study in Philosophy

Directed independent study and research in philosophy. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of philosophy. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 - 12 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.

READ515: Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture)

Students develop a) an understanding of literacy as a multiple, complex set of practices including issues of identity, context, definition and assumption, and b) a repertoire of pedagogic strategies for supporting the literacy development of diverse groups of learners in inclusive classrooms. Particular attention is paid to structurally differentiating workshop models of literacy instruction for diverse learners, incorporating assessment and intervention initiatives such as Response to Intervention (RTI), and integrating new literacies and multimedia, along with assistive technologies (AT) (including the role of augmentative/alternative communication systems [AACS]), in literacy instruction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 502 and ECSE 505.