Religious Studies Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate (Combined B.A./M.A.T. with Teacher Certification in Grades K - 6 and Teacher of Students with Disabilities) - 2015 University Catalog

The Dual Degree Dual Certification program is a 5-year program that leads to teacher certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6, teacher certification in Teacher of Students with Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one-year master’s portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education Program website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.


RELIGIOUS STUDIES MAJOR

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 42 semester hours including the following 6 requirement(s):

    1. TEXTS

      Complete 2 courses from the following:

      RELG 200 Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 202 Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 204 New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 206 New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 214 Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 300 Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 352 Selected Study in Religious Texts (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. ISSUES

      Complete 2 courses from the following:

      RELG 205 Religion and Ethical Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 218 Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 225 Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 273 The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 304 Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 322 Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 332 Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 357 Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. APPROACHES

      Complete 2 courses from the following:

      RELG 101 Introduction to Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 221 Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 262 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 263 Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 267 Women and Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 320 Religious Ethical Thinkers (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 326 Theology (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 355 Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
    4. GLOBAL RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. Complete .

        RELG 100 Religions of the World (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. Complete 3 courses from the following:

        RELG 213 Buddhism (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 215 Hinduism (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 217 Taoism (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 223 Religion in North America (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 240 Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 246 Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 250 African Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 252 African-American Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 254 Native American Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 256 Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 301 Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 350 Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
    5. SEMINAR

      Complete 1 course from the following:

      RELG 460 Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 462 Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 465 Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar) 3
      RELG 467 Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar) 3
    6. REQUIRED GRADUATE COURSES

      Complete 3 courses (These courses will also count toward the MAT portion of this program):

      ECSE 508 Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECSE 536 Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 515 Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (BA/MAT)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS

        Complete the following 6 courses:

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

      1. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE I

        Complete 4 courses:

        1.  

          FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
          MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
          READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 3 semester hours.

          ECEL 279 Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE II

        Complete 3 courses:

        ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 305 Development and Learning in Children With and Without Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE III

        Complete 3 courses:

        ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 439 Pedagogy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. REQUIRED GRADUATE COURSES

      Complete 3 courses (These courses will also count toward the MAT portion of this program):

      ECSE 508 Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECSE 536 Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 515 Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL279: Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the historical and ideological trends that impact the education of children in inclusive settings. Students explore the historical, political and legal foundations of inclusive education; principles of inclusive planning, consultation, and collaboration; resources and services for effective inclusion and inclusive transition programs; characteristics of high and low-incidence disabilities; and implications for students with and without disabilities. This course includes a field experience in which students engage in reflective observation of inclusive classrooms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECSE305: Development and Learning in Children With and Without Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide preservice teacher candidates with a socioculturally based understanding of children's development from birth through middle childhood. By examining theories and current research in child development, they learn that outcomes for children with and without disabilities are situated in multiple contexts, and in the complex interplay between biological and environmental factors. Children's developmental pathways will be understood in relation to their implications for learning in early childhood and elementary education settings. Teacher candidates learn the etiologies, behavioral characteristics and wide range of developmental outcomes associated with various disabilities and childhood disorders. They learn to observe and interpret the physio-motor, cognitive, and social/emotional development of children and provide interventions that promote optimal learning and development among all children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 314; and ECEL 279 or SPED 279.

ECSE439: Pedagogy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture)

Students explore a range of pedagogic principles and practices that enable teachers to create inclusive classroom communities that support the social, behavioral, and academic needs of diverse groups of learners, including disabled learners, across all primary subject areas (reading, writing, math, social studies, science, social and communication skills, and additional content areas). Students critically analyze the challenges that diverse classrooms of learners pose in terms of traditional conceptions of classroom management and teacher-directed pedagogies, actively exploring as alternatives the inclusive pedagogical tools of differentiation, universal design for learning, collaborative teaching, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is placed on developing a conceptualization of inclusive schooling as schooling that is responsive to the needs of all students, and developing an understanding of the ways in which children may be at risk of experiencing marginalization and failure in schooling on the basis of dis/ability, and also on the basis of social class, race, ethnicity, language heritage, and other facets of identity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 305.

ECSE508: Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the importance of meaningful family-professional partnerships. Students gain knowledge, skills, and dispositions to work collaboratively with diverse families to support the education of children with disabilities. The influence of historical, social, cultural, and community influences are deeply embedded in course content. Various approaches including family-focused practice and family systems theory are explored. Students draw from course readings, presentations by guest speakers, and personal and professional experiences to participate in class discussions, complete assignments and expand their understanding of issues vital to families of children with disabilities. 3 sh.

ECSE536: Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

Students actively engage in observation and assessment of elementary age children with disabilities, with particular emphasis on using assessment processes to inform teachers' pedagogy and support children's active involvement in the general education curriculum. Students plan, implement, and critically interpret the results of a wide range of types of both formal and informal assessments (e.g., standardized assessments, curriculum-based assessments, norm- and criteria-referenced assessments, performance-based and portfolio assessments, etc.) across all skill and subject areas. Throughout the course, specific attention is given to students' critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of assessment processes and of the culture, class, language, and gender implications of using assessment practices in schools. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 502 and ECSE 505.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.

READ515: Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture)

Students develop a) an understanding of literacy as a multiple, complex set of practices including issues of identity, context, definition and assumption, and b) a repertoire of pedagogic strategies for supporting the literacy development of diverse groups of learners in inclusive classrooms. Particular attention is paid to structurally differentiating workshop models of literacy instruction for diverse learners, incorporating assessment and intervention initiatives such as Response to Intervention (RTI), and integrating new literacies and multimedia, along with assistive technologies (AT) (including the role of augmentative/alternative communication systems [AACS]), in literacy instruction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 502 and ECSE 505.

RELG100: Religions of the World (3 hours lecture)

The major religious traditions, with emphasis on basic beliefs and on the nature and diversity of religious awareness. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

RELG101: Introduction to Religion (3 hours lecture)

An inquiry into man's religious questions and expressions, their implications, and their critical appreciation and assessment. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

RELG200: Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture)

The evolution of the ancient Hebrew world view as developed in the biblical books covering the early period of Israelite history. The course includes a close reading of the books of Genesis, Exodus and numbers, comparison with contemporary Middle Eastern religious texts and study of the biblical story from the creation through the career of Moses (circa 1250 B.C.E.). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG202: Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture)

The history and theology of Israelite religion as seen in the biblical books covering the middle and late periods (1150-165 B.C.E.). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG204: New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture)

The story of Jesus of Nazareth as told in the gospels of Mark and Matthew. The course explores Old Testament backgrounds, Jesus' place in the Jewish religious context of first century Israel, the question of the historical Jesus and the origins of and relationships between the various gospel traditions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG205: Religion and Ethical Issues (3 hours lecture)

An examination of religious perspectives on classic and contemporary ethical issues. Topics addressed include violence and war, biomedical issues, environmental issues, education, censorship, and marriage/family issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG206: New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture)

A close study of Luke-Acts, John, selected letters of Paul and other later epistles. The course explores the development of the theology and institutions of the early church as revealed in New Testament documents of the first and early second centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG213: Buddhism (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of Buddhist teachings, practices, history, and religious art in various Asian countries, notably India, Southeast Asia, Japan, and Tibet (may vary). No prerequisites, but RELG 100, Religions of the World, is suggested. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG214: Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture)

This course emphasizes critical analysis and interpretation of primary textual sources. Students will read and examine primary documents from each of the Asian religions, their traditional interpretations and recent understandings and applications of these texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG215: Hinduism (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to Hindu religious traditions, including philosophy, yoga practice, ritual workshop, and sacred art. No prerequisites, but RELG 100 Religions of the World is suggested. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG217: Taoism (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to Taoist religious texts and traditions, including Tao Te Ching and Chuang Tzu; Taoist connections with traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts; Taoist ritual traditions; and sacred art. No prerequisites, but RELG 100 Religions of the World is recommended. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG218: Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to study cross-cultural religious practices and attitudes toward death, dying and the afterlife. The course will cover the grieving process, rituals of death, and various cultural attitudes toward death, including symbolic "deaths" (initiations), and belief in limbo states, soul-survival, ghosts, heaven, hell, and karma and reincarnation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG221: Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The interrelation of religion and culture in the formulation of human values and views, life-styles and institutions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG223: Religion in North America (3 hours lecture)

The growth and development of various religious movements-- Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and sectarian minorities-- from colonial times to the present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG225: Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture)

The impact of economic, social and political movements on religious belief and the ways in which religion has both furthered and impeded social development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG240: Asian Religions (3 hours lecture)

The cultural and theological bases for the faith and practice of major Eastern religions--Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Taoism. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Previous course RELG 212 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG246: Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture)

The course will start by examining the rise of Islam through the eyes of two fundamental Islamic texts, the Qur'an and the biography of Prophet Muhammad. It will then explore the history of Islam's formative and classical periods (632-1258 CE) in terms of theology, philosophy, jurisprudence, and mysticism, while emphasizing diversity of perspectives. The heart of Islam will be approached through the teachings of the Qur'an, hadith and the Islamic intellectual tradition. The encounter between Islam and other religious traditions will also be traced briefly. Major trends in contemporary Islam (traditionalism, liberalism, revivalism, etc.) will be identified and discussed through the writings of their major proponents. Meets General Education 2002, K2 NonWestern requirement. Previous course RELG 116 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG250: African Religions (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the indigenous cosmological concepts, ritual practices, and value systems of the peoples of sub-Sahara Africa. Variations on African religious beliefs and practices in the West Indies, such as Voodoo in Haiti, Santeria in Cuba, and Candomble in Brazil will also be examined. Meets Gen Ed 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course RELG 106 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG252: African-American Religion (3 hours lecture)

The course will aim at engaging students in an active examination of the role of religion in the life of African-Americans from the period of slavery to the present. Students will be expected to read extensively from a list of the recommended texts and to write critical analyses on assigned topics. The style of instruction will combine lecture with discussion, thereby encouraging students to develop skills in critical thinking as well as the art of verbal expression. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course RELG 108 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG254: Native American Religion (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the religious traditions and spirituality of the Native American peoples. The course recognizes the value of oral tradition and ritual practices in Native American religions and cultures as well as the variety that exists within this set of traditions. Meets Gen Ed 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course RELG 110 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG256: Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the ways religion, both indigenous and Western, has interacted with culture and society in Latin America. Particular emphasis is given to the diversity of religious expressions, including indigenous religions (Mayan, Aztec, and Quechua), syncretistic religions (i.e., Voodoo and Santeria), alternative and evangelical forms of Christianity, contemporary popular religious expression, and liberation theology. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Requirements - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG262: Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture)

A philosophical examination of religion. It includes the nature and shape of religious experience: criteria for meaning within religious thought and language, metaphysical and epistemological implications of such questions as the nature and existence of God, and the possibility of life after death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG263: Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The views of faith and the religious person reached by such major psychological approaches as the Freudian, neo-Freudian, analytic-ego, existential and Jungian. The implications of such psychology for Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant believers and religious thinkers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG267: Women and Religion (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on women's own experience in religions and the various perspectives of women held by both Eastern and Western religious traditions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women, patriarchy and religion, and roles of women in religions. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Religious Studies. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG273: The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture)

A study of Nazi extermination of 6,000,000 Jews during World War II and the moral and religious issues raised by this event. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG300: Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture)

Selected works of significant theologians of the Western tradition on issues such as the nature of God, christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, theodicy, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG301: Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture)

The writings of Rosenzweig, Buber, Heschel, Rubenstein, Fackenheim, Plaskow, Wyschogrod and others will be examined in detail. They will be studied in the context of the religious crisis of modern society which has generated Existentialism, Death of God Theology and radical shifts in Jewish life (the Holocaust and the rebirth of Israel). Students will be introduced to popular Jewish religious practice in America and elsewhere as well as to the most complex Jewish Theological speculation of this century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG304: Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture)

This course examines primary religious documents, their traditional interpretations, and recent feminist interpretations of these documents. It considers feminist criticisms of traditional Western religious thought as it relates to women. It also explores recent developments in feminist theology, such as female-centered religious ritual and practice and eco-feminist/creation spirituality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG320: Religious Ethical Thinkers (3 hours lecture)

An examination of selected ethical thinkers in the world's religious traditions. Students read the works of specific thinker/s in depth and explore their significance. Students are encouraged to consider the ways in which the ideas and/or practices of the thinker/s can be applied to contemporary ethical problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG322: Ideals of Peace (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the pacifist tradition in philosophy and religion, from its origins as a set of religious and philosophical ideals, to its current multifaith, secular, and political forms. Students will examine and evaluate both pacifist thought and peace activism. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG326: Theology (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the theological efforts of Jews, Christians, and Muslims to wrestle out "the meaning of" their communal faith in rational, speculative, critical, and creative ways. Includes study of how the most influential Jewish and Christian theologians shaped Western culture, and of how recent and contemporary criticism challenges theological approaches. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG332: Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture)

Selected psychological investigations and/or theories of religious phenomena; the implications for constructive theology and positive religious response. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG350: Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG352: Selected Study in Religious Texts (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG355: Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG357: Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG460: Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RELG462: Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminar in major movements, problems, theologians. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RELG465: Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RELG467: Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.