Jurisprudence, Law and Society Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

Coordinator: Dr. Marilyn Tayler

The Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence, Law and Society provides a solid foundation for students aspiring to law school and other graduate study, as well as for work in many other careers that require analytic, conceptual, and communications skills. It provides an opportunity for the interdisciplinary study of law in the liberal arts. The major in Jurisprudence represents the confluence of law, theories of justice, humanistic studies and social issues.

Through this major, undergraduate students at Montclair State University have the opportunity to acquire the fundamental knowledge essential to understanding legal institutions and processes. Students in the major develop intellectual skills necessary to evaluate policies, practices, and philosophies within the context of nation and legal systems.

The major draws its essence from a core of Jurisprudence courses, while at the same time building upon the liberal arts focus of discipline-based courses at the university. The capstone experience of the major is a rigorous Senior Research Seminar. This two part, year-long course involves intensive research and writing in a seminar setting. Students prepare a scholarly interdisciplinary, law related, research paper, developed in consultation with a faculty advisor and designed to enhance the student's understanding of the field. Many law schools find the Senior Seminar particularly advantageous in student preparation.

Program objectives include:

  1. To sharpen skills as readers and thinkers, as interpreters of culture, and as citizens.
  2. To advance the ability to test ethical arguments and textual understandings in contexts where decisions must be made.
  3. To understand legal materials, by further developing students interpretive and analytical skills.
  4. To study the role of law in the liberal arts by inviting an examination of a wide range of critical questions about people and the ways they live together, to raise issues traditionally linked to liberal inquiry.
  5. To participate in a rigorous two-semester Capstone Research Seminar which encompasses intellectual preparation for thinking processes, expands the knowledge base and enhances preparation for law-related study.

In addition to the general criteria for admission to Montclair State University, all students must apply to and be admitted into Jurisprudence, Law and Society major. For entry into the program students must meet one of the following criteria:

  1. Top twenty percent of high school graduating class.
  2. An overall minimum GPA of 3.0 at the completion of a minimum of 24 credits at Montclair State University or transfer institution.
  3. An overall minimum GPA of 3.0 in the student's first three courses in the Jurisprudence major.

JURISPRUDENCE, LAW AND SOCIETY MAJOR

Complete 33 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. Complete 1 course from the following:

      JURI 210 Perspectives on Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 200 Introduction to Law (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete the following 4 courses:

      JURI 300 Essentials of Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      JURI 495 Senior Research and Writing Seminar in Jurisprudence I (3 hours lecture) 3
      JURI 496 Senior Research and Writing Seminar in Jurisprudence II (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 302 Legal Research (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. Complete 1 course from the following:

      JURI 324 Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 324 Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete 6 semester hours from the following:

    1.  

      JURI 316 Theories of Conflict (3 hours lecture) 3
      JURI 418 Seminar in Comparative Legal Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
      JURI 474 Human Rights Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 362 Legal Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 388 Advocacy and Persuasion (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 101 American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 320 Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 322 American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 323 American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 331 Animal Rights: Law, Politics and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 332 U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 351 Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 363 Politics and Morality of War (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 430 International Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 431 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. The following may be taken twice for credit:

      JURI 499 Selected Topics in Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. One of the following may also be taken:

      JURI 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. OTHER MAJOR ELECTIVES

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. Complete 1 course from the following:

      PHIL 102 Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 106 Logic (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 206 Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 264 Critical Reasoning and Arguments (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 316 Philosophy of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 1 course from the following:

      1.  

        ENWR 204 Writing for Clarity and Style (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENWR 205 Creative Nonfiction (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 182 English Vocabulary: Classical Roots (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 202 General Humanities II (from 1400) (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        LAWS 473 Seminar in Law and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        LNGN 250 Language of Propaganda (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. One course from the following may also be taken:

        LAWS 290 Language of the Law 3
        LNGN 290 Language of the Law (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. Complete 1 course from the following:

      CHAD 300 Forensic Interviewing of Children (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 212 Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 218 Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 411 Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 497 Pre-Law Internship 3
      POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 317 The American Congress (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 324 American Public Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 330 Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 420 Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

CHAD300: Forensic Interviewing of Children (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an investigation and analysis of the process and nature of different forms of interviewing techniques. It explores intra-personal and inter-personal aspects of the communication process. A framework for interviewing individuals of diverse backgrounds is examined. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: CHAD 200 or CHAD 202 or CHAD 210 or CHAD 212.

ENWR204: Writing for Clarity and Style (3 hours lecture)

This course is dedicated to intensive, advanced work on academic, professional, and public writing. Students will develop their skills as writers through drafting and revision, peer review, and exposure to research on language practices and the writing process. Students will have the opportunity to analyze their strengths and weaknesses as writers, to develop strategies for editing and polishing, and to enhance their ability to analyze and construct arguments. The course will also provide sustained attention to achieving clarity of prose, with particular emphasis on editing, style, grammar, syntax, and mechanics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENWR205: Creative Nonfiction (3 hours lecture)

Advanced writing skills with stress on developing a personal writing style, adapting writing style to various subjects and audiences and experimenting with different modes of exposition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

GNHU182: English Vocabulary: Classical Roots (3 hours lecture)

Systematic development of the student's knowledge of English vocabulary through study of the most important Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, suffixes, and other elements and the ways in which they are used to form words in English. 3 sh.

GNHU202: General Humanities II (from 1400) (3 hours lecture)

A broadly historical introduction to important themes and topics in the humanities as seen through literature, philosophy, and the arts from Renaissance to the present. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in General Humanities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Cross listed with History, HIST 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: Not for History Majors/Minors. GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

HIST212: Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Social and cultural aspects of American history: population movements, rural and urban problems, status of women, utopian ventures, mass media, recreation, human rights. 3 sh.

HIST218: Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

The historical development of American political institutions from the early 1700s to the present. Focus upon the evolution of constitutional and legal structures, the party system and pressure groups, the role of bureaucracies, and the impact of political leaders. 3 sh.

HIST411: Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Development and contributions of the thought of individuals and groups, dominant and minority, and their effect on the American mind, traditions and practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

JURI210: Perspectives on Law (3 hours lecture)

This course provides the theoretical foundations and practical applications of legislative and judicial areas in United States legal systems. Integrating readings from theorists, scholars and jurists, the course introduces students to methodologies for resolving legal problems within the evolving United States system of law. Students may take LAWS 200 or JURI 210 but not both courses. Students in the Jurisprudence and/or Political Science majors should take JURI 210, not LAWS 200. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

JURI300: Essentials of Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

This core course within the Jurisprudence major provides a fundamental understanding of the principles, ideologies, and political movements that have shaped American law and procedure. It explores the evolution of the theory and scholarship of American law from its inception to the present. Through historical and contemporary readings and classroom discussion, students will consider the origin of law, the nature of social and political rights as well as the reciprocal effects of law and social institutions upon one another. Students will analyze legal opinions, statutes, treaties conventions, regulations and essays in the context of issues such as capital punishment, euthanasia, abortion and civil rights. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or departmental approval.

JURI316: Theories of Conflict (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with central theories of conflict that have been used to analyze various types of conflict, to evaluate the usefulness of these theories by applying them to specific case studies, and to encourage and assist students to develop their own perspectives and to construct useful theories for conflict analysis from interpersonal to international. The role of environment, culture and group dynamics on conflict will be studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or LAWS 220 or departmental approval.

JURI324: Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations for developing models and methods of addressing legal problems. Principles of legal reasoning and argument in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Models of legal reasoning and methodology for resolving legal problems as developed within evolving social and philosophical notions of justice and fairness. Cross listed with Philosophy and Religion, PHIL 324. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or PHIL 206 or PHIL 212 or departmental approval.

JURI376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

JURI418: Seminar in Comparative Legal Systems (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the comparative approach to a study of legal systems through an understanding of cultural considerations, historical backgrounds, sources of law, and legal institutions. The course emphasized common law and civil law traditions, particularly as contrasted with Asian, African, and post-Soviet legal systems. The role of religious law in the development of distinctive legal traditions is also explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or departmental approval.

JURI474: Human Rights Law (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introductory study of the basic principles shaping Human Rights Law. Students will be required to analyze various legal opinions, statutes, treaties, conventions, and regulations in the context of real-world and hypothetical human rights issues. Traditional notions of Human Rights Law will be compared and contrasted with recent developments. In addition to the traditional methods of assessment, students will be responsible for preparing position papers in each phase of the class examining the jurisprudential issues related to this area of law. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or departmental approval.

JURI495: Senior Research and Writing Seminar in Jurisprudence I (3 hours lecture)

This is the first semester of a year-long capstone Senior Research and Writing Seminar. During this semester students are prepared to carry out a major research project on a Jurisprudence-related topic that is completed during the second semester of this course. This course familiarizes students with the methods used in contemporary research in the humanities and social sciences. It complements the student's prior exposure to legal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200; JURI 300; LAWS 302; and 3 additional courses in the major.

JURI496: Senior Research and Writing Seminar in Jurisprudence II (3 hours lecture)

This is the second semester of the year-long capstone Senior Research and Writing Seminar during which each student completes a major research project on a Jurisprudence-related topic and presents the project to the class. The work of this semester builds upon the preparatory study of research methodologies, topic selection, and literature review carried out in the first part of the year-long course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200; JURI 300; JURI 495; LAWS 302; and 3 additional courses in the major.

JURI499: Selected Topics in Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

This course will explore aspects of Jurisprudence not covered in the curriculum or which deserve more in-depth treatment than that in an existing course. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated once for a total of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or departmental approval.

LAWS200: Introduction to Law (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the meaning and functions of law, the powers and the jurisdiction of the courts. An exploration of traditional and evolving areas of law. A survey of the different professions and career options within the legal field. An assessment of the roles and importance of law in the lives of students and the public. Students may take LAWS 200 or JURI 210 but not both courses. Students in the Jurisprudence major should take JURI 210. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LAWS290: Language of the Law

This course explores the interface between language and our legal system. Students study the history of legal language up to the present day. Topics to be covered include, among others, the impact of (il)literacy on the law, the linguistic ramifications of governing bilingual societies, the functions of written laws and legal language, and the social psychological impact of language use in modern-day litigation. Cross-listed with Linguistics LNGN290. 3 sh.

LAWS302: Legal Research (3 hours lecture)

Study of principles and methods of research as applied to law and government. Exploration of the sources of law including case law, legislative process and intent, statutory law and public administration. Contrastive applications of law library research and computer-assisted legal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or POLS 101 or departmental approval.

LAWS362: Legal Writing (3 hours lecture)

Application of legal research, method, and analysis to legal writing. Students are required to perform various kinds of legal writing assignments and to demonstrate ability to identify legal problems, analyze them based upon the related law and theory, and solve problems with resulting written work product. Utilization of computer-assisted legal research. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 302.

LAWS388: Advocacy and Persuasion (3 hours lecture)

The focus of this class involves the study of substantive and procedural legal issues with the added dimension of combining the arts of persuasion and advocacy and their application to trial strategies. Students learn techniques of communicating evidence, both oral and demonstrative, to advocate effectively a client's case and persuade a jury. Students are exposed to the rules of evidence and trial procedure culminating in putting theory into practice by applying classroom study to a legal problem in the format of a mock trial including witness and attorney roles. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or POLS 320.

LAWS473: Seminar in Law and Literature (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the "Law and Literature" movement, an area of study developed within the legal field over the past several decades. The course is devoted to a thematic exploration and examination of the application of the concepts of law and literature and underscores areas of mutual illumination of the two vast bodies of text: legal opinions and works of literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or departmental approval.

LAWS497: Pre-Law Internship

Field work experience in the legal setting to provide pre-law students who have acquired basic skills through introductory courses with the opportunity to utilize those skills and further explore the field of law. Required classroom seminar supplements experiential component and includes discussion of field work experience and ethical considerations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LAWS 302 with a grade of "B" or better; and LAWS 200 or JURI 210; and open only to juniors and seniors.

LNGN250: Language of Propaganda (3 hours lecture)

This course is a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the use of language to manipulate and influence opinions via advertising, innuendo, jargon, emotive language, etc. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

LNGN290: Language of the Law (3 hours lecture)

The course explores the interface between language and our legal system. Students study the legal language up to the present day. Topics to be covered include, among others, the impact of (il)literacy on the law, the linguistic ramifications of governing bilingual societies, the functions of written laws and legal language, and the social psychological impact of language use in modern-day litigation. Cross listed with Political Science and Law, LAWS290. 3 sh.

PHIL102: Ethics (3 hours lecture)

The nature of ethical judgments, the meaning of moral concepts, the conditions of moral responsibility and the methodological presuppositions of ethical theories in philosophy and religion. Meets the 2002 General Education Requirement - Humanities, Philolosphy/Religion. 3 sh.

PHIL106: Logic (3 hours lecture)

The forms of deductive and inductive argument in traditional logic, the fundamentals of modern formal logic. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

PHIL206: Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice (3 hours lecture)

An examination of philosophical approaches to current issues related to law and justice. Close attention will be paid to one or more of the following specific issues: freedom of religion, freedom of expression, gay rights, reproductive rights, or civil disobedience and political protest. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL264: Critical Reasoning and Arguments (3 hours lecture)

An intermediary level course concentrating upon argumentation and rhetorical devices as they actually function in everyday conversation, philosophical discussion, forensic debate, etc. Arguments will be examined with an eye to penetrating purely formal structure and discovering the underlying dynamics which contribute to cogency in a given context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL316: Philosophy of Law (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the philosophical issues of jurisprudence. Close attention is given to the status and nature of law, the concept of equality and the limits of law. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL324: Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations for developing models and methods of addressing legal problems. Principles of legal reasoning and argument in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Models of legal reasoning and methodology for resolving legal problems as developed within evolving social and philosophical notions of justice and fairness. Pre-law Minor. Cross listed with Political Science and Law, JURI 324. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or PHIL 206 or PHIL 212.

PHIL376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with JURI 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

POLS101: American Government and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce students to the basic institutions and processes of American politics, and will do so, in part, through a focus on current policy issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

POLS307: American Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introduction to the main strands of American political thought from the founding of the American colonies to the present day. Our goal will be to come to grips with the major questions that have driven our politics throughout the nation's history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or JURI 300.

POLS317: The American Congress (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the United States Congress. It will allow students to explore in depth one of the key American political institutions introduced to them in POLS 101, American Government and Politics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS320: Law in Society: Civil Law (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the American civil legal system as it affects a variety of our social institutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS322: American Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of supreme court decisions in the areas of the distribution of power within the national government and between the national government and the states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101.

POLS323: American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture)

The development of the constitution and the Supreme Court of the United States illustrated through reference to court opinions in civil rights and liberties. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS324: American Public Policy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the methods used to analyze public policy and an examination of current public policy issues. Special attention is given to the use of comparative analysis in analyzing American public policies. This course deals with issues such as crime, punishment, social welfare, drug abuse, child abuse, equality, health, education and the environment. It focuses on public policy responses to these issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS331: Animal Rights: Law, Politics and Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course seeks to provide students with an understanding of how human-animal relations have been affected by politics and the rule of law. It will generate debate about the treatment of animals in a multitude of contexts, including agricultural food production, product development, wild fauna, and domestic pets. Students will develop an understanding of the political nature of human-animal relations. Students will analyze the individual and group efforts to exercise power over and on behalf of animals. Also, students will analyze the efforts to grant political power to animals themselves. Students will seek to understand the values and interests that vie for control of collective decision-making, institutions, and public policy regarding animals. Students will analyze the interests for and against animal protection laws and the nature of such laws. Throughout the course, students will develop their critical reading, writing, and analytical reasoning abilities. Also, students will increase their knowledge of human-animal relations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201, POLS 202, POLS 203, POLS 204, POLS 205, POLS 206, POLS 207, POLS 214, POLS 215, POLS 216 or JURI 210.

POLS332: U.S. Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the interrelationships among the legal, political and societal factors in major legislative enactments of U.S. immigration and nationality law as they relate to government institutions and affected populations. The course examines the law and politics of restrictive immigration since the founding of our nation, including exclusion laws of the nineteenth century, quota systems of the twentieth century, and key legislative acts of the later 20th and early 21st centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS351: Comparative Legal Perspectives: Israel and the United States (3 hours lecture)

This seminar explores the legal and political traditions giving rise to contemporary Israeli and American legal systems. This encompasses such aspects as democratic process with its origins and influences, governmental institutions within each legal system, the role of religion and the protection of minority rights. Comparative perspectives provide an understanding of each legal system within its national context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or POLS 202 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or JAST 201 or permission of department.

POLS363: Politics and Morality of War (3 hours lecture)

This course aims at giving students an understanding of how thinkers and practitioners try to limit the violence of armed conflict. To accomplish this, the class will engage with the major elements of the just war tradition and its realist, militarists, and pacifist critics. The course ends with an intensive examination of the moral issues presented by recent conflicts such as assassination, terrorism, counterinsurgency, occupation, and nation-building. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 and POLS 300.

POLS430: International Law (3 hours lecture)

The nature, place, evolution, subjects, sources, principles, role and substance of international law in the international system of nation-states. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or POLS 203 or departmental approval.

POLS431: Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture)

After reviewing debates on globalization, this course covers its impact on global security through an examination of key issues such as crime, terrorism, migration, environment, and health, and a detailed case study of the Bosnian War. The course includes evaluation of the role of the international community and civil society in addressing these new security challenges. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 202 or permission of instructor.

PSYC330: Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the interaction between psychology and the legal system. Emphasis placed on the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathic behavior, court-mandated evaluations and the role of the psychologist as expert witness. The application of psychological knowledge within the criminal justice context. Ethical guidelines in forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or JUST 300 or LAWS 302.

SOCI420: Sociology of Law (3 hours lecture)

The impact of the social usages of law on all levels of operation as an instrument of social policy, social control and social regulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

WMGS376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and JURI 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.