Law and Governance, Intellectual Property Concentration (M.A.) - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog

Graduate Director and Contact Person: Dr. Daniel Herman

The Master of Arts in Law and Governance offers a program of study for students seeking advanced preparation in this field. It provides academic opportunities leading to career enhancement for legal professionals. The degree offerings are on the cutting edge of specialty areas such as conflict management, human resource management, private sector compliance, law office management, legal information management, trademark law, ethics, and professional responsibility.

Law and Governance provides graduate instruction through a broad range of topics which develop the student's critical understanding of law. Graduate offerings are designed:

  • To enhance professional development in law-related fields.
  • To advance the study of law within the context of an interdisciplinary liberal arts education.
  • To provide a more advanced level of legal knowledge in areas such as governance, compliance and human resources.
  • To prepare for the technologically sophisticated legal environment of the twenty-first century.
  • To develop theoretical and practical knowledge of advocacy and dispute resolution.
  • To develop advanced research and writing abilities.
  • To enhance analytical and critical thinking skills essential to the legal field.

THE MA PROGRAM IS NOT APPROVED BY THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF PARALEGALS OR LEGAL ASSISTANTS. THOSE INTERESTED IN PARALEGAL STUDIES, LEGAL ASSISTANT STUDIES AND PARALEGAL CERTIFICATION SHOULD CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE STUDIES FOR INFORMATION.

Students may choose the general program without a concentration or they may choose from four available concentrations:

  • Conflict Management and Peace Studies
  • Governance, Compliance and Regulation
  • Intellectual Property
  • Legal Management

In the general program, students have the opportunity to enroll in courses from all four concentrations.

The programs of the Master of Arts in Law and Governance incorporate education in the liberal arts with sound preparation for law-related professions. Many career alternatives are possible for graduates in government, the corporate sector and private arenas. Graduate course work in Law and Governance serves the needs of a broad range of professionals including:

Human resources personnel; supervisors; claims managers; compliance officers; affirmativeaction officers; contract managers; government administrators and officials atthe federal, state, county and local levels; public and nonprofitadministrators; investigators; criminal justice professionals; legaladvocates for victims of domestic violence, the disadvantagedand the physically and mentally challenged; primary and secondary school teachers desiring education inlaw or conflict resolution/peer mediation; consultants; newspaperreporters; practitioners in the field of conflict management;and professionals who utilize dispute resolution in various forums,such as labor, insurance and financial markets.

ADMISSION

Candidates for admission must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and meet the university's minimum requirements for the Graduate Records Examination. In addition, candidates for admission to the M.A. in Law and Governance must meet the following university and department requirements: minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 for their undergraduate work.

Candidates with marginal credentials may be accorded deferred matriculation status and permitted to enroll in a maximum of two graduate courses in the program. If they attain a combined minimum grade point average of 3.0 in two Law and Governance graduate courses and meet the other matriculation requirements, they may apply for full matriculation status in the program.


LAW AND GOVRNCE w/CONC:IntellecProperty

Complete 36 semester hours including the following 3 requirement(s):

  1. REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours: (LAWS 500 may be substituted with an approved elective by the Graduate Advisor).

    LAWS 500 United States Legal System (3 hours lecture) 3
    LAWS 503 Research Methods and Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
    LAWS 513 Ethical and Professional Issues in the Legal Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. CONCENTRATION COURSES

    Complete 2 requirement(s) for 18 semester hours:

    1. Complete 4 courses for 12 semester hours: .

      LAWS 545 Cyberlaw (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 547 Intellectual Property: Copyright, Licensing, and Advertising (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 553 Arbitration and Other Alternative Adjudicative Processes (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 572 Legal Information Management (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Complete 2 courses for 6 semester hours from the following list.

      LAWS 531 Administrative Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 537 Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 538 Trademark Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 577 International Law and Transnational Legal Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. ELECTIVES & CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Complete the following 2 requirement(s) for a total of 9 semester hours:

    1. DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES

      Complete 6 semester hours-9 semester hours from the following list.

      LAWS 512 Statutory and Regulatory Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 520 Private Civil Responsibility: Contracts and Torts (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 525 Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 531 Administrative Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 537 Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 538 Trademark Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 551 Negotiation Theory and Practice (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      LAWS 552 Mediation Theory and Practice (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 3
      LAWS 554 Conflict Management and Peer Mediation in Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 555 Family Mediation (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 556 Dispute Resolution in the Workplace (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 558 Cross-Cultural Conflict Resolution (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 559 Advanced Conflict Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 560 Bullying Prevention (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 573 Seminar in Law and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 574 Human Rights Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 577 International Law and Transnational Legal Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 578 Legal Aspects of Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 579 Private Sector Compliance With Public Regulations (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 580 Field Experience in Law and Governance 3
      LAWS 581 Cooperative Education in Law and Governance 4
      LAWS 588 Independent Study in Law and Governance 1-4
      LAWS 590 Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 599 Selected Topics in Law and Governance (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 524 The Third World in the International System (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 525 International Relations (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 526 The International Political Economy (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 531 Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 532 U.S.Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 560 Politics of Terrorism (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

      After completing 27 graduate credits and with approval, complete 1 of the following options for 0 semester hours-3 semester hours.

      1. THESIS OPTION

        Complete for 3 semester hours. Submit completed Thesis original & 1 copy to Graduate Office. See Thesis Guidelines for details.

        LAWS 698 Master's Thesis 3
      2. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

        In the term that you will sit for exam, register for - which matches your major & advisor. Successfully pass exam.

        GRAD CMP Comprehensive Examination 0

Course Descriptions:

GRADCMP: Comprehensive Examination

This course is a placeholder for matriculated master's students planning to take the departmental Comprehensive Examination. Successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination will result in a grade of P, unsuccessful students will receive a grade of NC. Students who do not successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination will be required to register for this placeholder course in each term for which they plan to take the examination (limited to three). 0 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Master's degree program required.

LAWS500: United States Legal System (3 hours lecture)

This course provides the theoretical basis and appropriate applications of law within the United States legal system in the context of its foundations, processes and norms. Integrating readings from legal theorists, scholars and jurists, the course presents the full range of legal perspectives and processes in order to understand methodologies for resolving legal problems within the evolving United States system of law. 3 sh.

LAWS503: Research Methods and Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Presentation of theory and methods of intellectual inquiry and research. Advanced study of legal research methodology and legal analysis which includes preparation of scholarly legal research papers. 3 sh.

LAWS512: Statutory and Regulatory Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Study of legislative and administrative processes including the creation, application and interpretation of statutory and administrative law. Required research includes use of primary and secondary legislative and administrative law materials as well as legislative history. 3 sh.

LAWS513: Ethical and Professional Issues in the Legal Environment (3 hours lecture)

Examination of ethical and professional issues as they relate to the legal environment. Exploration of different viewpoints and conflicting views. Interrelationships with rules of professional responsibility analyzed and discussed through hypothetical and real ethical dilemmas. 3 sh.

LAWS520: Private Civil Responsibility: Contracts and Torts (3 hours lecture)

Study of aspects of contract and tort law and their interaction in contemporary business practices, examined in the context of an ever-changing society. Application of common law principles and contract and tort as well as the Uniform Commercial Code. Judicial and legislative roles and reactions to change in the context of the public good and business interests. 3 sh.

LAWS525: Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

To acquaint students with procedural and substantive principles of Jurisprudence as it is developed in American Law. The course will chart the development of basic legal and philosophical principles governing the theory of law through its cultural and constitutional roots through the early 21st century. Special attention will be given to analysis of legal realism and feminist jurisprudence. 3 sh.

LAWS531: Administrative Law (3 hours lecture)

A critical analysis of the body of law which regulates government agencies and their relations with the public. Examination of federal and state administrative law, regulations, rules and procedures. 3 sh.

LAWS537: Entertainment Law (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with theoretical foundations and practical applications of entertainment law. The course utilizes a model and method approach, which presents theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course acquaints students with various traditional legal theories and compares and contrasts them with law as it has evolved to meet new changes in society. Areas to be covered include representing minors, contract preparation, copyright infringement, publishing, the record industry, film, and television. 3 sh.

LAWS538: Trademark Law (3 hours lecture)

Comprehensive study of procedural and substantive aspects of trademark selection, registration, use, and protection within the context of intellectual property. 3 sh.

LAWS545: Cyberlaw (3 hours lecture)

To acquaint students with procedural and substantive principles of Internet technology and legal principles which are at the nexus of modern legal practice. To become versed in the theory and practice of intellectual property, criminal law, jurisdictional issues and choice of law relating to commerce, law enforcement, and legal procedure. To teach students to analyze and synthesize legal principles which are at the core of changing World Wide Web technology. 3 sh.

LAWS547: Intellectual Property: Copyright, Licensing, and Advertising (3 hours lecture)

To acquaint students with procedural and substantive principles of Intellectual Property Law as it is developed and is practiced in the entertainment field. The course will chart the development of intellectual property in American law from its constitutional roots through the early 21st century. Special attention will be given to analysis of issues in entertainment law involving copyright, licensing, and advertising. 3 sh.

LAWS551: Negotiation Theory and Practice (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

In-depth study of negotiation theories and practical applications. Includes an examination and comparison of various negotiation theories and critical skills needed to be an effective negotiator. Extensive role plays. Study of ethical and policy issues. 3 sh.

LAWS552: Mediation Theory and Practice (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

In-depth examination of the theory and practical applications of mediation. Integration of ethical and policy issues and applications through role plays. Study of how the various applications affect the mediation process and the court's role in the development of mediation. 3 sh.

LAWS553: Arbitration and Other Alternative Adjudicative Processes (3 hours lecture)

In-depth examination of the theory and applications of arbitration and other adjudicative processes. Utilization of role plays to expand student knowledge and ability to understand increasingly complex issues. Examination of policy and ethical issues and exploration of case law research. 3 sh.

LAWS554: Conflict Management and Peer Mediation in Schools (3 hours lecture)

Comprehensive study of the theory and application of interpersonal conflict management theories and processes between and among individuals, students, organizations, and groups of similar status in a variety of governmental, domestic, and international settings. 3 sh.

LAWS555: Family Mediation (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical and practical aspects of mediation in the family law context. An overview of the laws which govern and affect the formation, maintenance and dissolution of the family unit. Study of the increasingly important role of family mediation both privately and within the judicial structure. Integration of ethical and practical considerations and enhancement of student understanding through role plays and independent research. LAWS 552 is recommended as a prerequisite. 3 sh.

LAWS556: Dispute Resolution in the Workplace (3 hours lecture)

Critical study of procedural and substantive legal principles of dispute resolution in the workplace. Exploration of procedures such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration, fact finding, and grievance resolution through collective bargaining which is the core of dispute resolution in both private and public sector employment. LAWS 551 is recommended as a prerequisite. 3 sh.

LAWS558: Cross-Cultural Conflict Resolution (3 hours lecture)

Intensive study and application of theories and techniques of cross-cultural conflict resolution. Examination of issues of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexual preference within the context of dominant Western Culture. LAWS 552 is recommended as a prerequisite. 3 sh.

LAWS559: Advanced Conflict Management (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with the theoretical foundations and applications of five areas from the Conflict Management field: Diversity; Prevention of Sexual Harassment; Support of Gender Equity; Teaching Character Education; and Organizational Mechanisms. These interconnected areas are being implemented in various settings in order to create a safe environment, avoid legal liability, and increase organizational efficiency. 3 sh.

LAWS560: Bullying Prevention (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide students with the theory of bullying prevention in various settings. Students will critically analyze situations targeted to support bullying prevention, study state laws regarding bullying prevention and harassment, and enhance the connections with conflict management and related fields. 3 sh.

LAWS572: Legal Information Management (3 hours lecture)

Study of theoretical aspects of information theory in the legal environment with application to the problem method of analysis. This course will examine the compilation and analysis of legal information from automated litigation support through computer-assisted legal research. 3 sh.

LAWS573: Seminar in Law and Literature (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the "Law and Literature" movement, an area of study developed within the legal field over the past several decades. The course is devoted to a thematic exploration and examination of the application of the concepts of law and literature and underscores areas of mutual illumination of the two vast bodies of text: legal opinions and works of literature. 3 sh.

LAWS574: Human Rights Law (3 hours lecture)

To acquaint students with procedural and substantive principles of Human Rights Law in the international arena. The course will chart the development of Human Rights Law in various cultures from the Judaic and Greek eras through the enlightenment to the 20th century. Special attention will be given to analysis of disputes involving native populations and minority rights as they are affected by the United Nations Charter, Treaties, and Conventions. Issues of criminal, commercial and individual rights will be considered. 3 sh.

LAWS577: International Law and Transnational Legal Issues (3 hours lecture)

To acquaint students with procedural and substantive principles of International Law as it has developed and is practiced under the United Nations Charter, Conventions, Accords, Protocols, and Agreements. The course will chart the development of International Law from its roots in early legal and cultural traditions through the early 21st century. Special attention will be given to analysis of issues of international compliance and regulatory issues. 3 sh.

LAWS578: Legal Aspects of Human Resource Management (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of procedural and substantive legal principles of human resource management. Exploration of the various procedures which can and should shape the work environment in both private and public employment. 3 sh.

LAWS579: Private Sector Compliance With Public Regulations (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of federal and state requirements of compliance with public regulations in the areas of labor, employment, employee benefits, affirmative action, equal pay, and other federal and state mandated policies. Exploration of the interplay of various statutory and common law requirements governing private organizations which function in the United States. 3 sh.

LAWS580: Field Experience in Law and Governance

Application of academic theories to field experience of 120 hours over a semester in a legal environment reflective of the student's course of study. Research of issues related to placement and/or ethical issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of LAWS 500 and LAWS 503, and 18 additional credits toward the M.A.

LAWS581: Cooperative Education in Law and Governance

Application of academic theories to compensated field experience of 20 hours per week in a legal environment reflective of the student's course of study. Research of issues related to placement and/or ethical issues. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of LAWS 500 and LAWS 503, and 18 additional credits toward the M.A. degree, and departmental approval.

LAWS588: Independent Study in Law and Governance

To allow students and faculty to create courses of study within the discipline which more precisely reflect students' needs and to supplement concentration courses with other courses which more fully educate students to their specific educational needs. 1 - 4 sh.

LAWS590: Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications of Environmental Law. The course will utilize a model and method approach, which will present theory and procedure in a case problem context. The course will acquaint students with various traditional legal theories and compare and contrast them with law as it has evolved to meet new changes in society. 3 sh.

LAWS599: Selected Topics in Law and Governance (3 hours lecture)

Examination of a current topic in the legal environment that is of significance. Analysis of theoretical foundations and practical applications in the area studied. Development of the ability to critically analyze, observe, and research the topic under examination, as well as prepare a research paper. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

LAWS698: Master's Thesis

Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take LAWS 699 if they don't complete LAWS 698 within the semester. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

POLS524: The Third World in the International System (3 hours lecture)

The position and role of African and Asian nation-states in contemporary international relations, mutual relations; their encounters with the major powers; involvement in general international organizational and diplomatic activity and domestic political and economic factors that affect or underlie their international interactions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: A course in Government and Politics of Africa, or Government and Politics of South Asia, or departmental approval.

POLS525: International Relations (3 hours lecture)

A study of the nation-state system and those forces affecting its interactions. Special attention is given to the recent theories and approaches in the study and understanding of international politics today. 3 sh.

POLS526: The International Political Economy (3 hours lecture)

The concern of the course is to review the various theoretical explanations of the relationship between politics and economics: to depict the political forces that underpin the international economic system and its institutions and generally to shed light on the salient issues of the global political economy. 3 sh.

POLS531: Globalization and Security (3 hours lecture)

After reviewing debates on globalization, this course studies its impact on global security through an examination of key issues such as crime, terrorism, migration, environment, health, and a detailed case study of the Bosnian War. We will evaluate the role of the international community and civil society in addressing these new security challenges. 3 sh.

POLS532: U.S.Immigration: Law and Politics (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the interrelationships among the legal, political and societal factors in major legislative enactments of US immigration and nationality law as they relate to government institutions and affected populations. The course examines the law and politics of restrictive immigration since the founding of our nation, including exclusion laws of the nineteenth century, quota systems of the twentieth century, and key legislative acts of the latter 20th and early 21st centuries. 3 sh.

POLS560: Politics of Terrorism (3 hours lecture)

This course explores international and domestic terrorism from a broad perspective consistent with contemporary scholarship in a global context. The course will examine transnational security as it is manifest is the United States criminal, environmental, public health, terrorism and migratory policies in the broader context of evolving geopolitical realities. Special attention will be given to the post-cold war era and Bosnia. 3 sh.