Psychology Major (B.A.) - Undergraduate (Combined B.A./M.A.T. with Teacher Certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K - 6 and Teacher of Students with Disabilities - 2015 University Catalog

The Dual Degree Dual Certification program is a 5-year program that leads to teacher certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6, teacher certification in Teacher of Students with Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one-year master’s portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education Program website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines, and procedures. Students also are strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 2.0 overall GPA, and a minimum 2.0 major GPA. However, more than 120 semester hours may be required depending upon the major field of study. In addition to the major requirement outlined below, all university students must fulfill the set of General Education requirements applicable to their degree.

Psychology majors must earn a grade of C- or above in all Psychology courses. Psychology course in which grades of less than C- are earned must be repeated and brought up to a minimum grade of C- or they will not count toward the major.


PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 38 semester hours with minimum grades of C- in the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED COURSES

      Complete the following 14 semester hours:

      PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 203 Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 220 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture) 4
      PSYC 301 Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
    2. ELECTIVES

      Complete 24 semester hours from the following:

      1. BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR ELECTIVE

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        PSYC 305 Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 308 Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 353 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 355 Motivation (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. COGNITION ELECTIVE

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        PSYC 313 Cognition (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 340 Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 358 Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. PERSONALITY ELECTIVE

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        PSYC 320 Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 332 Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 365 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. SOCIAL/APPLIED ELECTIVE

        Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

        PSYC 302 Health Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 304 Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 306 Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 307 Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 354 Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      5. ADVANCED AND 200 LEVEL ELECTIVES

        Complete 12 semester hours from the following:

        1. ADVANCED ELECTIVES

          Complete from 6 semester hours to 12 semester hours from the following:

          1.  

            PCOM 385 Advanced Community Psychology: Externship 3
            PCOM 387 Methods in Evaluation Research (4 hours lecture) 4
            PSYC 300 The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 310 Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 314 Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 324 Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 330 Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 360 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 366 Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 375 Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 402 Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 488 Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar) 3
            PSYC 496 Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture) 4
          2. If not already used in categories 1-4, the following may also be taken:

            PSYC 302 Health Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 304 Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 305 Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 306 Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 307 Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 308 Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 313 Cognition (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 320 Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 332 Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 340 Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 348 Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 353 Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 354 Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 355 Motivation (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 358 Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 365 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. 200 LEVEL AND OTHER MAJOR ELECTIVES

          Complete 0 semester hours to 6 semester hours from the following:

          1.  

            PCOM 245 Introduction to Community Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PCOM 391 Cooperative Education in Psychology 4-9
            PSYC 201 Child Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 202 Adolescent Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 224 Children's Rights and Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 225 Psychology of Adjustment (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 227 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 230 Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 231 Psychology of Aggression (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 235 Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 245 Hispanic/Latino Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 246 Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 248 Psychology and Law (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 265 Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 268 Psychological Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 294 Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 420 Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology (1 hour lecture) 1
            PSYC 459 Special Topics in Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 491 Independent Study I: Research 1-3
            PSYC 492 Independent Study II: Research 1-3
            PSYC 495 Psychology Honors I (4 hours lecture) 4
          2. One of the following may also be used:

            CMPT 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
            LNGN 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
            PSYC 288 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (BA/MAT)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS

        Complete the following 6 courses:

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

      1. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE I

        Complete 4 courses:

        1.  

          FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
          MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
          READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 3 semester hours.

          ECEL 279 Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE II

        Complete 3 courses:

        ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 305 Development and Learning in Children With and Without Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE III

        Complete 3 courses:

        ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
        ECSE 439 Pedagogy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3
        READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. REQUIRED GRADUATE COURSES

      Complete 3 courses (These courses will also count toward the MAT portion of this program):

      ECSE 508 Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECSE 536 Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 515 Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CMPT288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Linguistics LNGN 288, Philosophy and Religion PHIL 288, and Psychology PSYC 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CMPT 183 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL279: Foundation and Philosophy of Inclusive Education (3 hours lecture)

This course provides an overview of the historical and ideological trends that impact the education of children in inclusive settings. Students explore the historical, political and legal foundations of inclusive education; principles of inclusive planning, consultation, and collaboration; resources and services for effective inclusion and inclusive transition programs; characteristics of high and low-incidence disabilities; and implications for students with and without disabilities. This course includes a field experience in which students engage in reflective observation of inclusive classrooms. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECSE305: Development and Learning in Children With and Without Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide preservice teacher candidates with a socioculturally based understanding of children's development from birth through middle childhood. By examining theories and current research in child development, they learn that outcomes for children with and without disabilities are situated in multiple contexts, and in the complex interplay between biological and environmental factors. Children's developmental pathways will be understood in relation to their implications for learning in early childhood and elementary education settings. Teacher candidates learn the etiologies, behavioral characteristics and wide range of developmental outcomes associated with various disabilities and childhood disorders. They learn to observe and interpret the physio-motor, cognitive, and social/emotional development of children and provide interventions that promote optimal learning and development among all children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 314; and ECEL 279 or SPED 279.

ECSE439: Pedagogy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture)

Students explore a range of pedagogic principles and practices that enable teachers to create inclusive classroom communities that support the social, behavioral, and academic needs of diverse groups of learners, including disabled learners, across all primary subject areas (reading, writing, math, social studies, science, social and communication skills, and additional content areas). Students critically analyze the challenges that diverse classrooms of learners pose in terms of traditional conceptions of classroom management and teacher-directed pedagogies, actively exploring as alternatives the inclusive pedagogical tools of differentiation, universal design for learning, collaborative teaching, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is placed on developing a conceptualization of inclusive schooling as schooling that is responsive to the needs of all students, and developing an understanding of the ways in which children may be at risk of experiencing marginalization and failure in schooling on the basis of dis/ability, and also on the basis of social class, race, ethnicity, language heritage, and other facets of identity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 305.

ECSE508: Strengthening Partnerships with Families of Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the importance of meaningful family-professional partnerships. Students gain knowledge, skills, and dispositions to work collaboratively with diverse families to support the education of children with disabilities. The influence of historical, social, cultural, and community influences are deeply embedded in course content. Various approaches including family-focused practice and family systems theory are explored. Students draw from course readings, presentations by guest speakers, and personal and professional experiences to participate in class discussions, complete assignments and expand their understanding of issues vital to families of children with disabilities. 3 sh.

ECSE536: Observation and Assessment of Elementary Age Children with Disabilities (3 hours lecture)

Students actively engage in observation and assessment of elementary age children with disabilities, with particular emphasis on using assessment processes to inform teachers' pedagogy and support children's active involvement in the general education curriculum. Students plan, implement, and critically interpret the results of a wide range of types of both formal and informal assessments (e.g., standardized assessments, curriculum-based assessments, norm- and criteria-referenced assessments, performance-based and portfolio assessments, etc.) across all skill and subject areas. Throughout the course, specific attention is given to students' critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of assessment processes and of the culture, class, language, and gender implications of using assessment practices in schools. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 502 and ECSE 505.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

LNGN288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Philosophy and Religion PHIL 288, and Psychology PSYC 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CSIT 111 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PCOM245: Introduction to Community Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Integration of social psychology with mental health in the resolution of problems in the community. Social psychological theories and empirical strategies are used to study the dynamics of power, membership, change and deviance. Accent is also on comprehensive mental health center and roles of community psychologist. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PCOM385: Advanced Community Psychology: Externship

Supervision is provided in a variety of community action programs which have preventive as well as treatment goals. Day and hour assignments can usually be arranged, but effective study participation will require a 3 hour block of time in order to serve directly in a community setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PCOM 245.

PCOM387: Methods in Evaluation Research (4 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the application of psychological research methods and knowledge to the evaluation of the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of community programs. Emphasis will be on techniques for program planning and for constructive innovations in community settings. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PCOM 385.

PCOM391: Cooperative Education in Psychology

The cooperative education option integrates academic study with a supervised employment experience outside the formal classroom environment. The co-op term is a semester off-campus, during which a student is supervised by a faculty coordinator and the Office of Cooperative Education, and is responsible for completing the terms of a learning contract. Contact Office of Cooperative Education. 4 - 9 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PHIL288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288, Psychology PSYC 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CMPT 183 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

PSYC201: Child Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers growth, development and behavior of children. Physical, intellectual, social and emotional development and their interaction. Scientific method exemplified through the literature and intensive study of individual children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC202: Adolescent Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers biological, psychological and social factors that shape the transition from childhood to adulthood: Normal and deviant patterns of development in morals, intellect, emotions and judgment; problems of adolescents with practical application to oneself and others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC203: Introduction to Psychological Research (3 hours lecture)

The course will introduce students to different methods of psychological research including survey, correlational and experimental methods. Introductory descriptive statistics and correlational analysis will be covered. Basic aspects of sound scientific writing, including conducting a literature search and writing a scientific manuscript following American Psychological Association guidelines, will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC220: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology (4 hours lecture)

An introduction to basic statistical methods in the behavioral sciences. The course begins with a review of descriptive statistics. The main course emphasis will be on probability theory and inferential statistics and their application to psychological research. This includes such methods as z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and nonparametric statistics. Laboratory sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply concepts from class using computers, particularly statistical software packages. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC224: Children's Rights and Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

Explores the review and evaluation of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of young citizens (preschool through adolescence); the process and goals of advocacy; the community services available to and lacking for the optimum development to maturity of young citizens. Psychology, education, sociology, mental health, law enforcement, medicine are domains of study and investigation. 3 sh.

PSYC225: Psychology of Adjustment (3 hours lecture)

Discusses individual and social adjustment; typical varieties of adjustive behavior illustrated by practical examples; factors which facilitate or impede people's adaptation to life situations such as work, marriage, disability, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC227: Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Topics include: Behavior and attitudes influenced by basic sexuality; widening perspectives to aid in decision-making; developmental periods and sexual relationships; connections between psychological theory and sexual mores; genetic understandings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC230: Environmental Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Covers the influence of the physical environment on the behavior of organisms: population growth and regulation; crowding; sensory experience, enrichment and deprivation; motivational force of environmental stimulation; adaptation to environment as a function of prolonged exposure; salutary effects of aesthetically pleasing stimulation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC231: Psychology of Aggression (3 hours lecture)

The root causes of violence in America will be examined through case studies, (the protest-movement of the 1960's, sexual and physical abuse, violent-criminal activity, etc.) and familiarization with biochemical, psychological and socio-cultural research into causes and effects of aggression and violence. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC235: Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth (3 hours lecture)

Surveys, current practices and problems of exceptional children and youth. Explores the unique needs of individuals with handicaps that involve intellectual, sensory, motor, neurological, social and emotional origins. Utilizes analysis of case materials for theoretical and practical applications to the psychology of exceptionality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC245: Hispanic/Latino Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on the personal, social, institutional and cultural forces that affect the psychology of Hispanic/Latino Americans. The course will cover issues such as the measurement of psychological functions, bilingualism, personal values and belief systems, the dynamics of the family and acculturation. A midterm and a final exam as well as a research paper will be required from students. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC246: Psychology of the Black Experience (3 hours lecture)

Covers the historical impact of scientific and institutional racism on the psychological study of blacks. Survey and critical analysis of traditional European approaches with non-traditional methods for comparison. Future development and advancement of a black psychology considered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC248: Psychology and Law (3 hours lecture)

Law and psychology share a common focus: the understanding, prediction and regulation of human behavior. Despite this commonality of interest, different emphasis on these elements and a different mandate have frequently hindered active communication and collaboration between the disciplines. The purpose of this course is to present the common ground of law and psychology, and show how they contribute to each other. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC265: Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture)

The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC268: Psychological Aspects of Aging (3 hours lecture)

Overview of later maturity and aging. Emphasis on psychological, physiological and sociological aspects. Aging and the cognitive process. Mental health, death, adjustment problems, needs, issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC288: Introduction to Cognitive Science (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288 and Philosophy and Religion PHIL 288. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or CSIT 111 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101.

PSYC294: Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture)

This is a service learning course that allows students to develop a sophisticated understanding of leadership from both a theoretical and practical point of view. Students receive in depth information on historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership. They participate in assessments of their own leadership competencies and capabilities based on theory and research. They then learn to apply, assess, compare, and critically evaluate theory, research, and assessment tools through a multi-week project with a community partner in which they have a chance to observe and practice leadership. Students combine theory and practice through a series of critical reflections that result in students articulating their learnings about leadership, the practice of leadership in the civic environment, and themselves as leaders. This course is not recommended for students who successfully completed PSYC 120. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or CMST 101 or HONP 100.

PSYC300: The Teaching of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Students in this course will simultaneously learn concepts in teaching psychology, and work with a Psychology professor who will mentor them as the student acts as a teacher's assistant. Students will engage in a critical examination of the teaching of psychology. The course will run as a seminar where issues of curriculum development, teaching techniques, and ethical aspects will be discussed based on journal articles. The work as an assistant includes anonymous record keeping, leading study groups and providing a brief lecture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; Psychology majors only; departmental permission.

PSYC301: Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Introduction to laboratory methods of research in areas such as motivation, perception and learning. Emphasis is on design and execution of exploratory investigations. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 and PSYC 220;or PSYC 220 and PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288.

PSYC302: Health Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The theoretical, empirical and clinical aspects of health psychology will be presented. The relation of health psychology with other areas of psychology and other scientific disciplines will be discussed. The historical developments of the field, its research methodologies, theoretical models and exemplary interventions will be described. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC304: Social Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on social behavior of the individual and the group, social perception, motivation, and learning; attitudes and values; development and dynamics of social groups; inter-group tension and prejudice; mass phenomena; psychological approaches to social issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC305: Physiological Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Anatomical, neural and biochemical bases of behavior are studied. Topics include localization of function, neuro-hormonal interaction, sensory and motor functioning, emotions, the relationship of neurophysiological processes and personality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC306: Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will address psychological issues involved in personnel decision making (e.g., job interviewing decisions, hiring decisions). Students will learn about aligning organizational and human resource strategy, and learn about tools and techniques in personnel psychology including job analysis, equal employment opportunity law, performance management, employee selection, and organizational training and development. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about important personnel functions and then apply the knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will learn about measurement and assessment of job applicant and how this assessment must be conducted to be fair and successful. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC307: Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will address individual, social and group interactions in work organizations. Students will learn about how social factors such as roles, norms, groups, stereotypes, and culture, influence individual and organizational behavior. Students will study theories and practices in organizations to assess and improve job attitudes, work stress, work motivation, leadership, and organizational functioning. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about the different social factors that influence organizational function, and then apply this knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will gain a better understanding of their own work experiences as a result of this course. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC308: Perception (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the theory and procedure of perceptual research. Theoretical approaches; modern psychophysical and perceptual research; traditional problems of perception, constancies of size and color brightness. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC310: Introduction to Psychological Testing (3 hours lecture)

Tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement and personality; principles of psychological testing; approaches to test construction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC313: Cognition (3 hours lecture)

The study of the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge, utilizing behavioral, observational, and computer modeling methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC314: Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours lecture)

This course examines how human beings make decisions and judgments. It reviews how personal values, uncertainty and cognitive, social, and neurological processes affect decision making. This course draws upon a wide range of examples from many fields including psychology, economics, criminology, and medicine. Students will also learn strategies and techniques to enhance judgment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC320: Developmental Psychology I (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys human psychological development from the prenatal period to adolescence. The interacting forces of heredity, environment and physical, cognitive, emotional and socio-cultural factors are reviewed in the light of current research and theory in these areas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC324: Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth study of current topics in the field of child advocacy. The impact of Megan's Law, advocacy for adopted children, child right-to-life movement, and repressed memory syndrome are among the possible issues to be explored. A multi-disciplinary focus will be used to enhance student understanding and learning. Previous course PSYC 430 effective through Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior Psychology or Justice Studies majors only.

PSYC330: Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the interaction between psychology and the legal system. Emphasis placed on the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathic behavior, court-mandated evaluations and the role of the psychologist as expert witness. The application of psychological knowledge within the criminal justice context. Ethical guidelines in forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203 or JUST 300 or LAWS 302.

PSYC332: Psychological Foundations of Personality (3 hours lecture)

Explores current approaches and theories of personality development and organization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC340: Human Learning and Memory (3 hours lecture)

Covers research, language and methods of learning theory. Classical and operant conditioning, complex habits, remembering and forgetting, transfer of training, cognition and behavior modification. Review of animal research but primary emphasis is on people. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC348: Psycholinguistics (3 hours lecture)

Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC353: Comparative Animal Behavior (3 hours lecture)

The student will explore experimental and field studies of behavior in a few selected animal species with particular reference to the behavior of vertebrates. The course will involve detailed study of instinctive behavior and imprinting, respondent and operant behavior with emphasis upon the procedures and variables concerned with the acquisition of new forms of behavior. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC354: Clinical Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an understanding of the basic tenets of the field of clinical psychology. The relation of clinical psychology with other areas of psychology and other disciplines will be discussed. The course will cover clinical psychology's past and present, assessment and intervention, approaches to practicing clinical psychology, multicultural issues in clinical psychology, and the future of the field. Fulfills Category "4 Social/Applied" in Advanced Elective list. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC355: Motivation (3 hours lecture)

The concepts of instincts, homeostasis, drive, reinforcement, arousal and inception are analyzed with reference to data drawn from many areas of experimentation. The primary emphasis is on the experimental, rather than the theoretical literature: motivational concepts relevant to human and animal research. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC358: Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning (3 hours lecture)

Major theoretical problems and theories of learning are considered. Includes experimental analysis of basic phenomena of conditioning and learning, studied primarily through experimental studies of infra-human organisms. Students may study selected topics more extensively. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC360: History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Discusses the historical development of psychology, comparative analysis of the major schools of contemporary psychology, and new trends and movements in psychological theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC365: Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Topics include an overview of psychopathological processes: neuroses, psychoses, and characterological disorders; feeling, thinking and behavioral aspects during the life span; diagnostic and treatment procedures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC366: Health Psychology: Applications to the Community (3 hours lecture)

The course will present psychological contributions to interventions designed to promote health, prevent illness and avert further disability. Appropriate techniques to assess, plan, and implement programs at the community level will be discussed. The multidisciplinary, multilevel nature of community programs will be emphasized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC375: Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines behavior from a Darwinian perspective attempting to understand how our behaviors have evolved throughout time. By examining behavior in terms of natural selection, this course provides a new and insightful perspective to all areas of psychology, including cognitive, social, developmental, and neuropsychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 203.

PSYC402: Systems of Psychotherapy (3 hours lecture)

An overview of classical and contemporary systems of psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on understanding each system in terms of its underlying theory of personality, psychopathology and therapeutic impact. Studies of therapeutic efficacy are also covered. Other issues include such topics as the training of psychotherapists and the ethical issues involved in psychotherapy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 354 or PSYC 365 or departmental approval.

PSYC420: Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology (1 hour lecture)

A detailed review on the use of a computer package for the purpose of doing statistical analyses of psychological data. The instructor will select one such package for presentation and choose among SSPS, EcStatic, BMD, SAS, and others. Instruction will be provided on coding, data entry, menu selection, score transformation, and exporting. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC459: Special Topics in Psychology (3 hours lecture)

An in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in a specific area of psychology. The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor. The course permits the instructor and students to examine psychological issues which are either not covered in the curriculum or which deserve more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as part of major degree requirements in psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301.

PSYC488: Seminar in Cognitive Science (3 hours seminar)

Seminar discussion of foundation works and contemporary research articles in Cognitive Science. With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of Cognitive Science for comprehensive in-depth review of research and write a literature review. Professional issues in Cognitive Science are discussed. Cross listed with Linguistics LNGN 488. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: LNGN 300 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288 or PSYC 288.

PSYC491: Independent Study I: Research

Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC492: Independent Study II: Research

Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC495: Psychology Honors I (4 hours lecture)

With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of psychology for a comprehensive, in-depth review of research; generate research questions and hypotheses; delineate appropriate design, methodology and statistical analyses to answer these questions and test these hypotheses; collect and analyze preliminary data; and write an Honors Thesis Proposal. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 301; departmental approval; overall GPA of 3.5.

PSYC496: Psychology Honors II (4 hours lecture)

This course constitutes the second semester of Psychology Honors. Students are expected to gather, analyze and interpret the data for their honors project, write the analysis and discussion chapters, and submit their completed honors thesis. Students who successfully complete this course will graduate with honors in psychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 495 with a grade of A or A-.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.

READ515: Literacy Strategies for the Inclusive Elementary Classroom (3 hours lecture)

Students develop a) an understanding of literacy as a multiple, complex set of practices including issues of identity, context, definition and assumption, and b) a repertoire of pedagogic strategies for supporting the literacy development of diverse groups of learners in inclusive classrooms. Particular attention is paid to structurally differentiating workshop models of literacy instruction for diverse learners, incorporating assessment and intervention initiatives such as Response to Intervention (RTI), and integrating new literacies and multimedia, along with assistive technologies (AT) (including the role of augmentative/alternative communication systems [AACS]), in literacy instruction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECSE 502 and ECSE 505.