Psychology (M.A.) - Graduate (Combined B.A./M.A.) - 2015 University Catalog


PSYCHOLOGY (Combined BA/MA)

Complete 38 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s): (3 courses for 9 hrs will be transferred from the UG program).

  1. REQUIRED CORE COURSES

    Complete 4 courses for 13 semester hours:

    PSYC 510 Research Methods in Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 520 Human Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
    PSYC 550 Quantitative and Statistical Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 578 Psychological Tests and Measurements (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. SPECIALIZATION COURSES

    Complete 12 semester hours from the following:

    1. Learning & Cognition

      PSYC 504 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 563 Theories of Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. Social

      PSYC 552 General Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. Biological Basis of Behavior

      1 course from the following may be taken:

      PSYC 573 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 583 Sensation and Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
    4. Individual Differences

      1 course from the following may be taken:

      PSYC 551 Latina/o Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 561 Developmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 667 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
  3. ADVANCED ELECTIVES

    1. Complete for 3 semester hours.

      PSYC 659 Special Topics Seminar in Psychology (3 hours seminar) 3
    2. Complete 3 semester hours from the following list. (An out-of-department elective may be used with written permission of graduate advisor).

      PSYC 504 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 552 General Social Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 561 Developmental Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 563 Theories of Learning (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 565 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 571 Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 573 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 583 Sensation and Perception (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 592 Graduate Seminar in Health Psychology (3 hours seminar) 3
      PSYC 602 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 613 Research Methods in Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 620 Forensic Psychology in Criminal Proceedings (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 622 Forensic Psychology in Family Proceedings (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 626 Expert Testimony (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 659 Special Topics Seminar in Psychology (3 hours seminar) 3
      PSYC 663 Independent Study 1-3
      PSYC 667 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 679 Family Systems and Childhood Disorders: A Multicultural Approach (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. THESIS

    1. Complete for 4 semester hours.

      PSYC 698 Master's Thesis 4
    2. Submit the completed Thesis original and one copy to the Graduate Office. See Thesis Guidelines for details.


Course Descriptions:

PSYC504: Cognitive Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with in-depth exposure to classic and contemporary theories and research in cognition. The specific topics to be covered include neuroscience, attention, perception, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning & decision-making, and natural and artificial intelligence. 3 sh.

PSYC510: Research Methods in Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course provides the essentials needed to read, understand and critically evaluate research reports. Students will also learn how to carry out the entire research process, starting with identifying the research problem and ending with a thesis or research report. Factorial analysis of variance and the major multiple correlational designs are explained. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate laboratory course in experimental psychology.

PSYC520: Human Experimental Psychology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Students survey methods and topics in human experimental psychology by conducting, analyzing, and reporting on experiments on topics to be drawn from cognition, memory, language, perception, learning, sensation, and neuropsychology. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 510.

PSYC550: Quantitative and Statistical Methods (3 hours lecture)

This course presents the theory and use of simple and factorial anova, regression, and covariance to analyze representative psychological data. The use of computer packages for analysis is included. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Psychology (PSYC and PYBM), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), Industrial Organizational Psychology (IOPS), or School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC551: Latina/o Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine the personal, familial, social, cultural and institutional forces that affect the psychology of Latina/os and explore how these factors impact assessment and treatment. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/Conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), and School Psychologist (SPSY) programs.

PSYC552: General Social Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys and analyzes the theoretical and empirical literature of modern social psychology. Among topics dealt with are the social psychology of the psychology experiment, attitude development and change, group processes and conflict, role theory, ecological psychology, socialization, organizations and work places, and a number of other themes and issues focused on the individual's relationship to the larger social structure. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate work in psychology or sociology.

PSYC561: Developmental Psychology (3 hours lecture)

Philosophical, conceptual, theoretical and research issues pertinent to human development from prenatal life to adulthood are presented. The core conceptual issues of development, such as the nature-nurture controversy, the continuity-discontinuity issue, and the issue of stability-instability, are discussed, and their relationships to the major theories in developmental psychology are examined. 3 sh.

PSYC563: Theories of Learning (3 hours lecture)

The aim of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of modern learning theory, its historical context, theoretical ideas, research, and applications. To this end, the theoretical ideas of the major schools of learning--behaviorism, gestalt, cognitivism, and information-processing--are reviewed. 3 sh.

PSYC565: Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3 hours lecture)

This course emphasizes the diagnosis of psychological disorders usually first evident in infancy, childhood or adolescence. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorders, substance abuse, sexuality/gender identity disorders, pervasive developmental disorder and behavioral aspects of developmental disabilities. Students will be expected to understand DSM-IV categories. Each student is expected to be familiar with developmental psychology and personality development. Issues associated with evaluation, classification and diagnosis will be discussed extensively. Guidelines for appropriate interventions will be provided. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Psychology (PSYC and PYBM), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), or School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC571: Organizational Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the psychological aspects of organizational behavior. Emphasis on the organization effected by individual psychological processes and behavior. Areas covered include social norms, group and team processes, leadership and power, motivation, job attitudes and satisfaction, and organizational change. 3 sh.

PSYC573: Behavioral Neuroscience (3 hours lecture)

The physiological bases of normal and abnormal behavior with emphasis on the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the human nervous system are discussed. Starting with the nerve cell, the course progresses through the receptors, spinal cord, cortical and subcortical structures, psychosurgery, biofeedback, and other topics. 3 sh.

PSYC578: Psychological Tests and Measurements (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys the theory, construction and application of psychological tests. Topics include the statistical concepts underlying measurement; reliability and validity; critical analyses of selected intelligence, ability and personality tests; evaluation and interpretation of test data in practical situations; and the role of testing in clinical, educational and remedial settings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Psychology (PSYC and PYBM), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), Industrial Organizational Psychology (IOPS), or School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC583: Sensation and Perception (3 hours lecture)

The full range of visual processing phenomena, from sensory processing to memory and thinking, is presented in this course. Topics covered include psychophysics. The physiological bases of vision, involvement of cognitive processes in perception, perceptual development, and psychoaesthetics. The course also examines hearing, the skin senses, smell and taste. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval, and an undergraduate experimental psychology course.

PSYC592: Graduate Seminar in Health Psychology (3 hours seminar)

The theoretical, empirical, and clinical aspects of Health Psychology will be explored and discussed. The relation of Health Psychology with other areas of Psychology and various scientific disciplines will be discussed. The historical development of the field, its research methodologies, theoretical models and exemplary interventions will be described. A specific emphasis will be placed on applications in regards to education, industry and other organizations as they relate to the various masters programs offered by the department of Psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/Conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), and School Psychologist (SPSY), Psychology Degree Program (IOPS), Psychology (PSYC & PYBM) programs only.

PSYC602: Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The objective of this course is to broadly expose students to the discipline of forensic psychology and provide an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the psychologist working within the justice system. This course introduces students to major topics and issues in forensic psychology and is divided into two sections. The first section examines forensic psychology as it relates to clinical prediction, assessment, and treatment in the civil and criminal justice systems. The second section focuses on experimental forensic psychology, orienting students to non-clinical issues faced by psychologists operating in these arenas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC613: Research Methods in Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to methods and techniques used to generate empirical research within the discipline of forensic psychology. Emphasis is placed on experimental, quasi-experimental, and case study designs. Students will be introduced to the major data analytic strategies found in forensic research, as well as the ethical and legal challenges faced by forensic researchers. This course will equip students to be educated consumers of the forensic psychological literature, and will enable students to evaluate the merits of such research for its integration into forensic practice. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC620: Forensic Psychology in Criminal Proceedings (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the substantive criminal law in America stressing analysis of the justification of punishment, the definition of offenses, the Constitutional limits, the significance of resulting harm, group criminality, and methods of exculpation or defense that impact the practice of clinical forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC622: Forensic Psychology in Family Proceedings (3 hours lecture)

Children in the last few decades have been given special recognition and increased protection under state, federal and international law. But doctrines and beliefs developed in periods when the social value of children was low and the legal duties of parents and the state was minimal, continue to influence the way the law views children. This course will survey various areas of the law concerning children and examine their sources and influences. Topics to be covered are: (1) the responsibilities of the state and family in the care of the child, including education; (2) the legal treatment of abused and neglected children; (3) rules concerning the medical treatment of children; (4) adoption, surrogacy and parentage; (5) the treatment of children accused of crimes in the juvenile justice system; (6) children's disabilities; and (7) government entitlement programs for children. The course will also examine the International Convention on the Rights of the Child, a treaty that seeks to render universal certain rules respecting the treatment of children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC626: Expert Testimony (3 hours lecture)

A study of the law and rules (with particular attention given to the Federal Rules of Evidence) governing the proof of disputed issues of fact in criminal and civil trials, including the functions of judge and jury; relevancy; real and demonstrative evidence; authentication and production of writings; the examination, competency, and privileges of witnesses; hearsay; impeachment; and burden of proof, presumptions, and judicial notice in the practice of clinical forensic psychology. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC659: Special Topics Seminar in Psychology (3 hours seminar)

This course provides an in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in various areas of psychology. It is designed to permit faculty with particular interests and expertise to provide students with a comprehensive analysis of a selected contemporary issue (or issues) in psychology. May be repeated two times for a maximum of 9 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Psychology (PSYC and PYBM), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), Industrial Organizational Psychology (IOPS), or School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC663: Independent Study

The student conducts an individual project under the supervision of a professor in the department. May be taken only once for a maximum of 3.0 credits. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC667: Abnormal Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on theoretical models and selected research in psychopathology. Topics include contemporary nosology, diagnostic problems, schizophrenia, anxiety and affective disorders, social deviance, somatoform and psychophysiological syndromes, and therapeutic intervention. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 561. For Psychology (PSYC and PYBM), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/CONC:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), Industrial Organizational (IOPS), or School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC679: Family Systems and Childhood Disorders: A Multicultural Approach (3 hours lecture)

This course will use a multicultural lens to examine the various family therapy approaches such as Structural, Bowenian, Behavioral, Strategic and Paradoxical approaches and their corresponding techniques. Special emphasis will be placed on applying these approaches to the prevailing childhood DSM diagnoses (e.g., Childhood Depression and Anxiety, Substance Abuse, Eating Disorders, ADHD, Developmental Disorders, Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder). A segment of the course will focus on special topics and their relevance to family functioning (e.g., trauma, incest/sexual abuse, domestic violence, illness/death, poverty and parental psychopathology). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 565 or PSYC 667. For Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Latina/oPsyc, and School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC698: Master's Thesis

Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take PSYC 699 if they don't complete PSYC 698 within the semester. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.